Group Title: La linguistique comparee creole francais
Title: Syllabus
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Title: Syllabus
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Haitian Creole (Kréole; Kreyòl ayisyen)
Creator: Hebblethwaite, Benjamin
Publisher: Benjamin Hebblethwaite
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
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Bibliographic ID: UF00100077
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Syllabus for Introduction to Haitian Creole Linguistics,
HAT 3700
Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures
University of Florida, Gainesville

Assistant Professor: Benjamin Hebblethwaite
Office location: 363 Dauer Hall
Office hours: T.B.A.
Contact information: hebble@ufl.edu
Tel: 392-2016 ext. 243
Class website: http://web.clas.ufl.edu/users/hebble/

Class objectives:

The objective of this class is to help develop the student's understanding of
Haitian Creole linguistics. In the class we apply linguistic science to the Haitian Creole
language. Students are introduced to the major disciplines of linguistics including syntax,
morphology, phonology, semantics and lexicon. Other equally important areas of
linguistics which are essential for understanding Haitian Creole include sociolinguistics,
dialectology, language planning, bilingualism and multilingualism, language contact and
code-switching. Haitian Creole linguistics includes discussion about West African,
European and Native American languages. The class uses qualitative and quantitative
empirical methods and theories in order to understand fundamental and cutting-edge
issues in Haitian Creole linguistics.
The class format involves lectures, slide-presentations, audio and film segments,
student presentations, and classroom discussions. The class will have no more than 6
pop-quizzes, one midterm, one final, and a 7 page final paper. The essay topic is due one
month before the end of the semester; the final draft is due on the last day of class. In the
case of Gordon Rule students, the essay topic is due 7 weeks before the end of the
semester and paper is due 4 weeks before the end of the semester.
A packet of articles provides the background knowledge needed to follow lectures,
participate in discussions, and to prepare for and perform well on the presentations,
quizzes, examinations and the paper.
Students are advised to read the assigned articles carefully while noting key ideas,
events and individuals. Also, the assigned readings are your primary sources for your
final essay and they must be cited in your paper and included in your bibliography.

General Education Requirements Satisfied by Introduction to Haitian Creole
Linguistics

1. (H) This class satisfies the description of the Humanities (H) classification by
providing a foundation in the theory, methods and history used in the discipline of
linguistics. The class reviews the key themes, principles and terminology of
generative linguistics.









2. (N) This class satisfies the description of the International (N) classification
because it focuses on the language of a country that is outside the United States.
The class will help students understand how historical, geographic and
socioeconomic issues impact the formation of Haitian Creole.

3. (D) This class satisfies the description of the Diversity (D) classification by
examining linguistic issues that relate to the North American Haitian Diaspora.
About 14 of the class deals with linguistic values, attitudes and norms among
Haitian immigrants in the United States (see the Zephir and Hebblethwaite
readings). The social roles and status of Haitian immigrants in the U.S. and how
they impact language use are examined. This is especially related to language
contact and code-switching. This class helps students understand the linguistic
constraints faced by Haitians-Americans.

Grade distribution. You are responsible for maintaining your own records.

(1) 10 % = 2 Class presentations

10 minutes long. Graded for clarity; organization; preparation;
effectiveness of your communication (are you connecting with us? are we
convinced?); insight of your critique.

(2) 25 % = 1 paper (essay topic and paper). 4/8 sources must be from the class
bibliography.

Due on the last day of class. See grading criteria below.
For Gordon Rule students, paper is due 1 month before the end of the
semester.

(3) 10 % = No more than 6 quizzes (most are pop-quizzes).

(4) 10% = 5 Homework (HMWK).

Write a short review about the reading for the day the paper is due (1 page
maximum). You are graded on your insight into the ideas found in the
reading, your unique interpretations and your ability to discuss the content
with an objective, critical and scholarly voice. I will also grade you on
your writing style and your use of grammar, spelling and vocabulary.

(5) 15 % = Participation; attendance; punctuality, courtesy, attentiveness; respect
for the learning environment; etiquette; insights (please, no phones, text-
messaging, ipods, newspapers and inappropriate work, etc.).

(6) 30 % = 2 Exams (15% each).


Bibliography of Required readings in the order read:









1. Valdman, Albert. 1988. Diglossia and language conflict in Haiti. International
Journal of the Sociology of Language 71.67-80.
2. Dejean, Yves. 1993. An overview of the language situation in Haiti. International
Journal of the Sociology of Language 102.73-83.
3. Valdman, Albert. 2007. Preface & Introductory Remarks on Creole. In Haitian
Creole-English BilingualDictionary, i-xxxii (32 pages). Ed. by Valdman, Albert.
Bloomington: Indiana University Creole Institute.
4. Howe, Kate. 1993. Haitian Creole as the official language in education and media.
In Atlantic meets Pacific: A Global View ofPidginization and Creolization, 291-
298. Ed. by Byrne, Francis and John Holm. Amsterdam: Benjamins.
5. DeGraff, Michel. 2003. Against Creole Exceptionalism. In Language, 79.2.391-
410.
6. Hebblethwaite, Benjamin. (Forthcoming, fall, 2009). Scrabble as a Tool for
Haitian Creole Literacy: Sociolinguistic and Orthographic Foundations. Journal
ofPidgin and Creole Languages, p. 1-50.
7. Lefebvre, Claire. 1998. Functional category lexical entries involved in nominal
structure. In Creole Genesis and The Acquisition of Grammar, 78-89. Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press.
8. Degraff, Michel. 2007. Haitian Creole. In Comparative Creole Syntax, 101-126.
Edited by Holm, John and Peter Patrick. Battlebridge Press.
9. Harbour, Daniel. 2008. Klivaj predika, or predicate clefts in Haitian. Lingua,
118.7.July. 853-871.
10. Degraff, Michel. 1997. Verb syntax in, and beyond, creolization. In The New
Comparative Syntax, 64-94. New York: Longman.
11. Johnson, Bruce Lee and Gerard Alphonse-Ferere. 1972. Haitian Creole : Surface
phonology. Gimson, A.C. and J.C. Wells. Journal of the International Phonetic
Association 2.2.35-39.
12. Zephir, Flore. 1997. Haitian Creole Language and Bilingual Education in the
United States: Problem, Right or Resource? Journal of Multilingual and
Multicultural Development 18.3.223-237
13. Degraff, Michel. Is Haitian Creole a Pro-Drop Language? In Atlantic meets
Pacific: A Global View ofPidginization and Creolization, 71-90. Ed. by Byrne,
Francis and John Holm. Amsterdam: Benjamins.
14. Hilton, Dimitri. 2000. Pronominal Clitics in Haitian Creole: Phonological or
Syntactic. In Advances in African Linguistics, 51-59. Ed. by Carstens, Vicki and
Frederick Parkinson. Trenton: Africa World Press.


Class Guidelines

No late or makeup work policy
No late or makeup work accepted unless a valid excuse is presented.

Attendance policy
Students are expected to attend class daily. Students may take 3 unexcused
absences. Athletes must be excused by the athletics department. Unexcused absences









and tardiness result in a lowering of the participation grade. Missing class can seriously
affect a student's ability to perform in other categories of the syllabus (such as missed
quizzes or the no late w.
If a student is absent, he or she is expected to contact the instructor within 24
hours with the reason for his or her absence. Medical treatment or a personal or a family
crisis are grounds for an excused absence, a note including a contact phone number is
required.

Examinations
Class quizzes and exams are based upon readings, lecturers and presentations.
Students are expected to review their notes and readings prior to these evaluations.

Paper (Read carefully!)
Students are expected to write a research paper, 7 pages in length +
bibliography. The paper must use .12 Times New Roman font and be double spaced
with 1 inch columns on all sides.
The 1 page proposal is due 4 weeks before the end of the semester. Include at
least 5 refereed sources (i.e. books or articles; UF online database books and articles
are OK; but NOT the open access WWW). 4 of your 8 sources must also be from the
required readings in this class. The required readings must serve as guidance and form a
foundation for your paper topic.
Citations must be accompanied by appropriate bibliographical references. Your
paper will be graded based on the basis of the originality of the ideas, on the clarity and
concision of the writing and editing and the adherence to the requirements given above
and below in the reference and bibliography guideline. You want to show that you have
carefully read the books and found additional sources, which you have read and
synthesized, and added you own unique interpretation of events, individuals, ideas and
phenomena. Aim to write a scholarly paper where you strive to produce an objective and
accurate analysis of your topic. Avoid advancing personal ideological preferences and try
to take an empirical approach where the facts are considered. Write an outline as you
piece together your research in Haitian Creole linguistics. Organize and link the parts
together.

Reference and Bibliography Guidelines
In the text:

(a) Zephir (1997: 223) advocates the instruction of Haitian Creole in the
United States' secondary education system.

(b) Misclassifying Creole-speakers as African Americans fails to properly
account for linguistic and cultural differences (Zephir 1997: 223).

In the bibliography:

Zephir, Flore. 1997. Haitian Creole Language and Bilingual Education in the United









States: Problem, Right or Resourse? Article in Journal ofMultilingual andMulticultural
Development, Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 223-37

a. Book:
Author. Year of publication. Title of book. City of publisher: Publisher.

b. Article in journal, magazine, etc.:
Author. Year of publication. Title of article. Article in Name of source,
Volume/number
of issue, page numbers.

See the bibliography for further examples.

Academic Honesty Guidelines
Academic honesty and integrity are fundamental values of the University
community. An academic honesty offense is defined as the act of lying, cheating, or
stealing academic information so that one gains academic advantage. Any individual who
becomes aware of a violation of the Honor Code is bound by honor to take corrective
action.
Violations of the Academic Honesty Guidelines include but are not limited to:
Cheating. The improper taking or tendering of any information or material which
shall be used to determine academic credit. Taking of information includes copying
graded homework assignments from another student; working with another individuals)
on graded assignments or homework; looking or attempting to look at notes, a text, or
another student's paper during an exam.
Plagiarism. The attempt to represent the work of another as the product of one's
own thought, whether the other's work is oral or written (including electronic), published
or unpublished. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to, quoting oral or written
materials without citation on written materials or in oral presentations; submitting work
produced by an on-line translation service or the translation feature of an on-line
dictionary as your own.
Misrepresentation. Any act or omission with intent to deceive a teacher for
academic advantage. Misrepresentation includes lying to a teacher to increase your grade;
lying or misrepresenting facts when confronted with an allegation of academic honesty.
Bribery, Conspiracy, Fabrication. For details see below.

The UF Honor Code states:
"We, the members of the University ofFlorida community, pledge to hold
ourselves andour peers to the highest standards of honesty and integrity."
On all work submitted for credit the following pledge is either required or
implied:
"On my honor I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid in doing this
assignment. "
Violations of this policy will result in disciplinary action according to the judicial
process.
For more details go to: http://www.dso.ufl.edu judicial/academic.htm










Students with disabilities
Students with disabilities must register with the Dean of Students office. Contact
the Assistant Dean of Students/Director of the Disability Resources Program at:
P202 Peabody Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611-5055
Phone (352) 392-1261 (V), 392-3008 (TDD)
For stress, emotional and psychological support, please contact the Counseling Center at:
301 Peabody Hall
Phone (352) 392-1575
Or: www.cousel.ufl.edu
If you need this syllabus in an alternate format, please speak to Ben.










Syllabus for Introduction to Haitian Creole Linguistics
Department of Romance Languages and Literatures
University of Florida, Gainesville
Lecturer: Benjamin Hebblethwaite HMWK = 1 PAGE
COMMENTARY ON THE
READING FOR THE DAY IT IS
DUE.


Friday, August 23
2
Monday, August 27
Wednesday, August 29
Friday, August 31
3
Monday, September 3
Wednesday, September 5
Friday, September 7
4
Monday, September 10
Wednesday, September 12
Friday, September 14
5
Monday, September 17
Wednesday, September 19
Friday, September 21
6
Monday, September 24
Wednesday, September 26
Friday, September 28
7
Monday, October 1
Wednesday, October 3
Friday, October 5
8
Monday, October 8
Wednesday, October 10
Friday, October 12
9
Monday, October 15
Wednesday, October 17
Friday, October 19

10
Monday, October 22
Wednesday, October 24
Friday, October 26


Introductions

Chaudenson and Mufwene Presentations:
Chaudenson and Mufwene
Chaudenson and Mufwene

LABOR DAY NO CLASS
Dejean 1993
Dejean 1993 HMWK.

Degraff 1999
Degraff 1999
Degraff 1999

Johnson & Alphonse-Ferrer
Johnson & Alphonse-Ferere HMWK
Lefebvre 1998

Lefebvre 1998
Lefebvre 1998
Lefebvre 1998

Degraff 1997
Degraff 1997HMWK.
Degraff 1997

Review
Midterm Exam
Degraff 1992, 87-127 17


Degraff 1992, 87-127

Degraff 1992, 87-127


Degraff 1992, 87-127 20
Valdman 1988 GORDON RULE PAPER TOPIC
Valdman 1988 21









11
Monday, October 29
Wednesday, October 31
Friday, November 2
12
Monday, November 5
Wednesday, November 7
Friday, November 9
13
Monday, November 12
Wednesday, November 14
Friday, November 16
14
Monday, November 19
Wednesday, November 21
Friday, November 23

15
Monday, November 26


Wednesday, November 28


Friday, November 30


16
Monday, December 3
Wednesday, December 5


Degraff 1992, 45-56 Essay topic due
Degraff 1992, 45-56 HMWK.
HOMECOMING (NO CLASS)


Hebblethwaite 2007
Hebblethwaite 2007
Hebblethwaite 2007


VETERANS' DAY (NO CLASS)
Zephir 1997 HMWK.
Zephir 1997 GORDON RULE ESSAY DUE

Dejean 2007 25
Dejean 2007
THANKSGIVING NO CLASS


Paper presentations 1
3 ,4


, 5.

9.


,14
,17


,15
,18


Review
FINAL EXAM; Essay Due









CLAS New Course Submission Checklist:
Benjamin Hebblethwaite, Lecturer in Haitian Creole, University of Florida
Department of Romance Languages and Literatures

1. Address and E-mail address

Benjamin Hebblethwaite,
Department of Romance Languages and Literatures
PO Box 117405
Gainesville, FL 32611-7405

E-mail: hebble@ufl.edu

2. Suggested prefix, Course Number and Title...

Prefix: HAT
Course Number 3000
Title: Introduction to Haitian Creole Linguistics

3. Objectives:

The objective of this class is to help develop students' understanding of Haitian
Creole Linguistics. In the class we apply the linguistic sciences to the Haitian Creole
language. Students are introduced to the major disciplines of linguistics including syntax,
morphology, phonology, semantics and lexicon. Other areas of linguistics which are
essential for understanding Haitian Creole include sociolinguistics, dialectology,
language planning, bilingualism and multilingualism, language contact and code-
switching. Haitian Creole linguistics includes discussion about West African, European
and Native American languages. The class uses qualitative and quantitative methods in
order understand fundamental and cutting-edge issues in Haitian Creole linguistics.
The class format involves lectures, slide-presentations, student presentations, and
classroom discussions. The class will have no more than 6 pop-quizzes, one midterm, one
final, and a 7 page final paper (the essay topic is due one month before the end of the
semester; the final draft is due on the last day of class).
A packet of articles provides the background knowledge needed to follow lectures,
participate in discussions, and to prepare for and perform well on the presentations,
quizzes, examinations and the paper.

4. How does the course fit into current course offerings:

Presently there are no course offerings in Haitian Creole Linguistics. The Haitian
program at UF has neither a major nor a minor. There is no co-requisite or pre-requi site.

5. Overlap with any other unit?









This course does not overlap with courses taught in any other unit. I have contacted Dr.
James Essegby (essegby@ufl.edu) in the Linguistics Department about a possible
overlap with the Introduction to Pidgen and Creole Linguistics class that he teaches. He
has replied stating that there is no significant overlapping. Please see his e-mail reply
included here.

6. Grade distribution:

(1) 10 % = Class presentation
(2) 25 % = Paper
(3) 20 % = Quizzes
(4) 15 % = Participation
(5) 30 % = 2 Exams

7. Please justify...variable and repeatable credit...
Not applicable.









Description for the course catalog:


Course description for Introduction to Haitian Creole Linguistics
This class examines the major disciplines of linguistics by means of the Haitian Creole
language. Haitian Creole syntax, morphology, phonology, semantics and lexicon are
introduced in addition to sociolinguistics, dialectology, language planning, bilingualism
and language contact. S, H, I, D.









Benjamin Hebblethwaite December 5 2007
Department of Romance Languages and Literatures
PO Box 117405
Gainesville, FL 32611-7405

E-mail: hebble@ufl.edu

Justifications for the General Education categories being sought:

4. (S) This class satisfies the description of the social and behavioral sciences (S)
classification by using quantitative methods and underlying theories in order to
investigate and explain the linguistic structure and history of Haitian Creole.

2. (H) This class satisfies the description of the Humanities (H) classification by
providing a foundation in the theory, methods and history used in the discipline of
linguistics. The class reviews the key themes, principles and terminology of
generative linguistics.

3. (N) This class satisfies the description of the International (N) classification
because it focuses on the language of a country that is outside the United States.
The class will help students understand how historical, geographic and
socioeconomic issues impact the formation of Haitian Creole.

4. (D) This class satisfies the description of the Diversity (D) classification by
examining linguistic issues that relate to the North American Haitian Diaspora.
About /4 of the class deals with linguistic values, attitudes and norms among
Haitian immigrants in the United States (see the Zephir and Hebblethwaite
readings). The social roles and status of Haitian immigrants in the U.S. and how
they impact language use are examined. This is especially related to language
contact and code-switching. This class helps students understand the linguistic
constraints faced by Haitians-Americans.




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