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IN THIS ISSUEGo Off the Basel Path p. 72 See all the best art shows p. 74 December 2012 www.BiscayneTimes.com Volume 10 Issue 10 Drawing on the FutureWhen will Miamis art scene grow up? Give it a few more years Perhaps quite a few pg. 34CALL 305-756-6200 FOR INFORMATION ABOUT THIS ADVERTISING SPACE

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KNIGHT CONCERT HALL K C Z CARNIVAL STUDIO THEATERZIFF BALLET OPERA HOUSE P PARKER AND VANN THOMSON PLAZA rfntbn ntn rfntb Z Z rf ntbt rf rrrntbrnnrrf ntbt ttrr b tnr t rrbrrnrrf ntbt tfr nt tnt r tfrttrfrf ntbt rfrtb rttnttn trf rrrntbrnnrtt rf rf ntbt rtrt rntrf ntbt tt rf rf ntbt rtrtr rrn rrtrf rrr rbrtrfrf ntbt n nbrrr rt trrrttt rrttrrbrf trrffnttrf ntbt rrr rr frtbfn ttbrt bfbrfrf ntbt t nrt nbr Ct bt rf ntbt rf ntbt rtrr brr trrrtrr ftrr brtrf Zrf ntbt br tr tbf Z Crf ntbt br ftr trtr trtbnrtbnt Zrf ntbt nrrf frr t rr rf ntbt rf ntbt rf ntbt n t br tn rtbtrtrr rtrt Z C Ctt rf rfrr fttn rf rfntbt rf ntbt t C C C Z C Z C K K C rf ntbt t t C Z rf rf ntbt C C Z C C C C Z K C Z C C C Z Z Z C Z Z Z K rf rf rfnt r nr f

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COVER STORY 34 Drawing on the Future: Miamis Art Scene COMMENTARY 12 Feedback: Letters 18 Gaspars Cult Following 22 Jack King: Co medy, Drama, and Chaos 26 Christian Cipriani: The Art of Dec, a Novel OUR SPONSORS 30 BizBuzz: December 2012 COMMUNITY NEWS 52 A Tale of Two Banks 52 Tase the Season: A Cautionary Yarn 53 Historic Monument or Monumentally Ugly NEIGHBORHOOD CORRESPONDENTS 62 Jay Examines a Very Disturbing Lawsuit 64 Wendy Bids Farewell to a Loving Friend 66 Craig Says Small Things Make a Big City 68 Mark on the Museum of Contemporary Art 70 Frank Bemoans Flori-duh Once Again ART & CULTURE 72 Melissa Wallen Goes Off the Basel Path 74 Melissas Galleries + Museum s: Basel Edition 82 Events Calendar POLICE REPORTS 84 Derek McCanns Biscayne Crime Beat PARK PATROL 86 Jim W. Harper: Getting Green in Sunny Isles COLUMNISTS 83 Picture Story: Miami Before Tuttle and Flagler 88 Pawsitively Pets: Weekend Get aways with Fido 90 Going Green: Saving Nemo and the Reefs 91 Kids and the City: Home for the Holidays 92 Your Garden: The Root of the Problem 93 Vino: Bubbly That Wont Bust Your Budget 94 Dish: So Long, Red Light, He llo Everyone Else! DINING GUIDE 95 Restaurant Listings: 308 Biscayne Corridor Restaurants PUBLISHER & EDITOR r CONTRIBUTORS fntrnSenior Writer nrnr bArts Editor r tnrt t tr rr n nnrr rnrn BUSINESS M anagerANAGER rrr rrrr ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES r r tr rr A rtRT directorDIRECTOR rn r A dvertisingDVERTISING designDESIGN rrr CIRCULATION rr r PRINTING rCONTENTSPO Box 370566, Miami, FL 33137 www.biscaynetimes.com rfnftbfrfft nbb F orOR A dvertisingDVERTISING informationINFORMATION callCALL 305-756-6200 26 53 74Serving communities along the Biscayne Corridor: Arch Creek East, Aventura, Bay Point, Bayside, Biscayne Park, Belle Meade, Buena Vista, Coventry, Design District, Downtown, Eastern Shores, Edgewater, El Portal, Enchanted Lake, Hibiscus Island, Highland Lakes, Keystone Point, Miami Shores, Morningside, North Greynolds, North Bay Island, North Miami, North Miami Beach, Oak Forest, Oakland Grove, Palm Grove, Palm Island, Sans Souci, Shorecrest, Sky Lake, Sparling Lake, Star Island, Wynwood, and Venetian Islands

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As Long as Politicians Can Keep Pulling in Cash from Casino Interests, Dont Expect Any Votes Anytime SoonIn his story about the future of gambling in Miami and elsewhere in Florida (You Can Bet on It, November 2012), Erik Bojnansky notes that the Genting Group is making plans to do an end run around our state legislators and go straight to the people with a referendum on legalizing casino-style games of chance. A big reason Genting is probably going to do that was illustrated in the two informational boxes accompanying the story. They showed the millions of dollars the company has been funneling to political groups and individual politicians. The numbers are staggering. As long as Gentings top brass are will ing to throw that kind of money at politi cians all over the state, why should the pols ever resolve the gambling question? If they can string along Genting for another few years without actually doing anything, its just that much more cash in their pockets. It looks like Genting, in poker terms Im sure they understand well, is preparing to call the politicians bluff. I like that, because I dislike our politicians even more than I dislike gambling. Jonathan Harbrough Miami Editors note: For more on the Genting Group and its proposed Resorts World Miami, see Historic Monument or Monumentally Ugly, page 53.If the Future of Voting Is Snail Mail, Wont We Need a Postal Service That Actually Works?Obviously Jack King wrote his column Voter Fraud That Works (November 2012) before election day, but it was a portent of the voting debacle that un folded: Excessively long wait times in line caused by an enormously long ballot with multiple amendments, initiatives, straw ballots, and printing in three languages. This was on top of the normal glitches in ballot printing, machinery, and human failures that always haunt Florida voting. I am a core member of the MoveOn. org Miami Council. I would like to know if Biscayne Times and its readers would participate in initiating a proposed Florida constitutional amendment to switch all state voting to 100 percent by mail, which, as reported in Jack Kings piece, has been successfully working in Oregon and Washington State for years. ciency, the money savings, and the elimination of travel to and wait time at polling places. In addition, I am sure that the per centage response of registered voters would be increased substantially. With the money saved, the counties could even offer a small cash rebate to all who returned their ballot, just like the Nielsen television balloting. The goal should be 100 percent participation, not the 25 percent we see in most elections. Printing all ballots in three languages is also in need of adjustment. All ballots should of course be printed in English, with an additional printing in one other language, as a selected option recorded on your voter registration card. There is absolutely no reason to print all ballots in three languages. We at MoveOn would probably initiate it with a petition at Signon.org, funneled through the MoveOn state network, followed by letters to the editor at various state newspapers. We would love for Biscayne Times to be involved at the start. What do you think? Alfred Sasiadek MoveOn.org Miami CouncilPolitical Hit Squads of Miami Shores: They Never Saw an Obama Sign They Wouldnt StealIf Jack King thinks the only problems with last months election occurred at polling places and with absentee ballots, he doesnt know Miami Shores very well. Now that the election is over, for better or worse, its time for someone to take a look at the undercur rent of political warfare in the Shores. The most recent terrorist attacks on Democrats was just business as usual in Pleasantville. Obama-Biden yard signs went up in the vicinity of 96th Street and NE 6th Avenue, all were stolen. This is the same location where, in our local election two years ago, a candidates sign was defaced with the word FAGGOT scrawled across it. The Shores police department, when contacted immediately after the incident, as sured the homeowner: Well write a report. To add insult to injury, our code en forcement professionals followed up after the stolen signs on 96th Street were re not merely requested to be removed, and to date no one knows their whereabouts. Code enforcement removed more than a dozen Obama-Biden signs in Commentary: LETTERS Continued on page 14

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Miami Shores, supposedly because they were in violation of the code. More than 24 Obama-Biden signs were stolen from the yards of Miami Shores residents. This was not coincidental mischief. All Obama yard signs on 96th Street and all signs on NE 6th Avenue, plus signs on NE 2nd Avenue, NE 101st Street, and NE 5th Avenue were removed in a sweep on October 13, the morning of the Miami Shores street fair. This, the third wave of yard-sign theft, kept the buzz going at the street fair. Rumors abounded that a resident or residents were paying a bounty for Obama signs. We have no idea as yet if that was a fact, but the political hit squad exists. We in the peaceful village of Miami Shores seem to have a piece of our demo cratic fabric shot full of holes each election season. In the world of trend-watching, this trend is decidedly not our friend. I know of no one in the Shores Pine apple Republic ruling elite who will stand up on this issue. Perhaps its time to assidu ously ask that question of our leaders. Bob Domlesky Miami ShoresFrom One Wino to Another: Well Drink to That!I just wanted to write a quick note and let you know how much I enjoy and appreci ate your regularly published wine columns by Bill Citara (Vino: Red, white, and you agreeable wine for $12 or less). As someone in the industry working as a wine steward, wine reviewer, and blogger I look forward to every issue. I am always excited to see what new topic or wine Bill is helping me to discover, agree with, or even at times disagree on. Please keep them coming. Salud! Ernest M. Gonzalez Whine and Cheers for Wine www.WhineAndCheersForWine.com Cop, Biker, Hippie, Womanizer, Intelligent Businessman? That Could Only Be NeilWhen I read Erik Bojnanskys story about Tobacco Roads 100th anniversary (Soul Survivor, November 2012), I was reminded of the old saying: History is written by the winners. In this case, by the last man standing. I think my old friend Neil Katzman was given short shrift. Neil was a cop, biker, hippie, womanizer (but werent we all), and a very intelligent businessman. When he bought Tobacco Road in 1977, it was just barely surviving. He saw the potential of the Brickell area not unlike those who saw the potential of South Beach. Neil worked hard to keep the bar going, and by the time he sold it after the police raid in 1981, it was a successful enterprise. Neil lived life to its fullest. His house was a hangout for a variety of characters, both men and women. There seemed to always be a party there, and his gyneco logical examining chair was a big hit. So wherever Neil is, whether living on a boat in the Grove, in Mexico, or Tahiti, Im sure its party time. Alfred McKnight El PortalHey, Commish, Fix This Before Trying ThatIn response to Jay Beskins Neighborhood Correspondents column Other Side of the Tracks (November 2012), I ask the former Aventura commissioner this: Instead of thinking about Aventuras future expansion into western terand Miami Gardens? Fixing it now It gets worse by the minute! problem at said intersection, maybe we should take advantage of it and have railroad crossings. Cmon. commish. Fix one before you start another! Jorge Fregonese Formerly Aventura, now North Miami Beach More Memories, More Tales, More BreweCrystal Brewes articles make you not only think about the way you are parenting, she always tends to brings in wonderful, nostalgic memories in her column, ones that jolt my own (Kids and the City). Her writing speaks to you, asks you to learn and feel good about your parenting skills, regardless of the subject matter. They are as well very interesting and great summations. She needs to write more articles and perhaps have a second column in Biscayne Times Her skills and voice are an asset to the BT without a shadow of a doubt. Debra Savittieri Scottsdale, ArizonaCommentary: LETTERS LettersContinued from page 12 4th Annual Reindeer Races December 15th, 11am At the Fountain Meet Santa Claus and get a Free Family Photograph!Shops at Midtown Miami 3401 N Miami Ave. Miami, FL 33127 305.573.3371 shopmidtownmiami.com Enjoy Arts and Crafts, Bounce Houses, Facepainters, Treats, Fun Prizes and Lots More!! shopmid Race your Rubber Duck Reindeer through Midtowns iconic FountainFree Fun for the Whole Family! Fr ee F u the W Fa m

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Commentary: CULT FOLLOWINGFish FlopThe Miami Marlins trade away a truckload of players and everyone is shocked. Really?By Gaspar Gonzlez BT ContributorWho knew there would be a Miami Marlins column in December? After a season in which the hometown team lost a disap sion, the general consensus was, the less said about the Fish, the better. Best to look to the future. Well, the future has arrived early, and it isnt what most fans expected. In mid-December, Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria signed off on a deal to the Toronto Blue Jays: pitchers Mark Emilio Bonifacio, catcher John Buck, and shortstop Jos Reyes. This deal followed two mid-season trades in which the Fish sent pitcher Anibal Sanchez and second baseman Omar Infante to the Detroit Tigers and shortstopturned-third baseman Hanley Ramirez to the Los Angeles Dodgers and an October trade that delivered reliever Heath Bell to the Arizona Diamondbacks. In return for all this, the Marlins got an assortment of young prospects. But they mostly got to dump salary. A lot of it. The teams payroll in 2012 was around $118 million; as of this writing, theyre committed to spending only $16 million in 2013, pending additional player signto be in the $40-$50 million range.) As a result, Marlins fans are probably looking at several more losing seasons. The hand-wringing and moans were instantaneous. At the center of it all, of course, was the roughly $485 million local taxpayers contributed to the Marlins Park project. Loria has a moral obliga tion to the county, city, and taxpayers who substantially built the stadium for him Cote in the Herald. Not to be outdone, his colleague Dan Le Batard went homo phonic: It feels today like our poor city helped build a bejeweled cathedral for Its enough to give one a case of the vapors. Its also a crock, this idea that weve somehow been betrayed by Loria and the Marlins. Loria is a businessman. His goal, as a team owner, is to make money. There are essentially two ways to do that: 1) Spend a lot on high-priced talent, quickly mold a with increased attendance, TV revenue, and merchandising, or 2) Spend modestly on unproven players, commit/resign yourself to a long potentially endless rebuilding process, and bank all the money you can from stadium income and Major League Baseballs revenue-sharing plan. Loria claimed that, once he had his strategy and, for one season, he did; hes now opting to do the latter. Is that immoral? No more than capitalism is. Businesses change their approach all the time, based on what they perceive to be in their long-term interests. No, the problem isnt with Loria. Its with the staggeringly bad deal we, collectively, made. We built Loria a ballpark, increasing the value of his private business to approximately $450 million (according to Forbes ). We did so on the premise shown by sports economists to be largely unsupported that a basefor its host neighborhood. In exchange, we had Loria doubleteam. Not that we could do anything about it if he didnt, except stay away from games and deny him a few bucks in ticket sales a pittance compared to what wed already bestowed upon him. None of that makes Loria a false prophet. If you think about it, he and Marlins president David Samson have been startlingly honest. Remember last spring, when Samson reportedly told a gathering of business types that Miami residents were not that smart? He later said he had been misquoted, but I prefer to think that was just damage control. Because he was right: Were not that smart. People who are dont write blank checks to millionaires expecting much in return. As for this recent rash of deals, Loria says hes basically just blowing up a team that wasnt very good. And you know what? Despite the initial optimism that surrounded this squad, hes not lying about that, either. Coming into 2012, Ramirez already had a reputation for playing hard only when it suited him; after the Reyes signing moved him from shortstop to third base, he seemed to quit trying altogether. Buck was one of the worst hitters in baseball but not as inept as Bell was at saving games. And the pitching staff, for all the buzz surrounding it, didnt have a single starter who could be considered a legitimate ace. (Johnson? Perhaps if baseball games then there was manager Ozzie Guillen Loria inaugurated his new ballpark with an ill-assembled, overhyped team, and hes admitted it. Hes being straight with us. Going forward, the least we can do is be straight with ourselves. About everything. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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22 Commentary: MIAMIS KING By Jack King BT Contributor The 2012 election cycle is over, at least in most places. It took nutcase Allen West two weeks to concede, but Right up to election day it seemed close, thanks to wild variations in national polls that kept people guessing. Pollsters like Gallup and Rasmussen played weird games with the numbers. Gallup just seemed to be lost and tried to make it look like both sides were winning. Rasmussen was more direct: Romney was going to win. Rasmussen is looking more like a wing of the Republican Party than a legitimate polling operation. But the most inspired predictions came from political hacks Dick Morris and Karl Rove. Morris, who is obviously better at procuring hookers than calling elections, said that Romney would win in a landslide. When that didnt happen, he tried to cover his rear by proclaiming he was just saying that to make the Romney camp feel good in the last days of the campaign, because it didnt look good for them. The best was saved for election night when Fox News called Ohio for Obama. Rove went crashing across the set to their election central, throwing a temper tantrum like someone had stolen his favorite teddy bear. Im still laughing. One thing Romney did win: Presidency of the old Confederacy. He carried every state but Florida and Virginia. Closer to home and in spite of a large number of election glitches, 70 percent of Floridians voted. Much of that very respectable turnout can be attributed to early and absentee voting, even though state Republicans shortened the early voting time and severely restricted the number of polling places. Back when we had a single day of voting on a Tuesday and limited polling places, we barely got to 50 percent. People had to take time off from work and stand in long lines, sometimes in the heat and rain. The new voting procedures show that people do want to vote and that we should make it as easy as possible. As Ive said before, I think the answer to this problem is voting by mail, but if nothing else, we should increase the early voting time to include at least two weekends. That, along with easier registration procedures, could get us to 90 percent of the electorate voting, and that would be more in the American way. Florida voters shot down eight of the eleven state constitutional amend all had gone down. None of them was worthwhile. I hope Gov. Rick Scott and the Republican legislature ponder the fact that a ton of their crap on the ballot ate remembers this stuff in the 2014 election cycle. Thankfully we had at least one situation where money did not buy the election. That was with the retention of three Florida Supreme Court justices. The Koch brothers, who want to buy everything in sight, tried their best to get rid of the justices, but even spending more than a million dollars, they just couldnt do it. Thats great for Florida and bad for billionaires. Keep it up, Florida! One last thing on the political front: U.S. Rep. David Rivera was soundly defeated by Joe Garcia. Lets hope this is the last time we mention Rivera in the same breath that we dis Rivera was a crony of Marco Rubio in the Florida legislature, when they ran roughshod over both the people of Im glad Rivera is gone. Hes been an embarrassment to South Florida for years and he deserves to be gone. Now what do we do about Rubio? On a slightly different note, our $600 million (eventually $2.4 billion ) investment in the Miami Marlins seems to be going south even more rapidly than we expected. Last season they had a huge payroll with name players, yet ended in last place with a miserable 69 wins and 93 losses. So how do the Marlins respond? They trade all the bigname players and save more than $160 million in salary commitments. A weird coalition of local politicians, including Miami Mayor Manny Diaz and county Mayor Carlos Alvarez, plus most of the Miami Herald staff, convinced everyone this stadium was good deal. It was not and never will be, and well be decades to come. I think the only way we citizens can stop such insanity is to change the county and city charters so a voter referendum is required for any bond measure worth, say, $50 million or more. Speaking of Manny Diaz, Im dying to read his new book about his time as mayor: Miami Transformed: Rebuilding America One Neighborhood, One City at a Time Transformed is the word. The city has gone from pathetic to pauper. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Comedy, Drama, and ChaosJust another election cycle spinning itself dizzy

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26 Commentary: URBANIA By Christian Cipriani BT ContributorLove Miami. Hate Miami. Love to hate Miami. I wrestle with myself over this city on an almost daily basis. It keeps me in shape. But the fact is that Im endlessly captivated by our town, its history, and its bizarre inhabitants. So is the author J.J. Colagrande. Colagrande moved here from New York when he was 18, but hes become a Miamian in the truest sense of the word a man whose heart and soul seem staked here. As he puts it: I love Miami very much and Im committed to bringing a deeper, richer, more intellectual evolution to our city. I dont like our citys image, still leftover from the 80s a place of vice and shallow debauchery. Id like to stay here the rest of my life and contribute with my voice. Hes a writing professor at both MiamiDade College (Wolfson campus) and Barry University; hes written countless articles for New Times among others; and in his independently published sophomore novel, Dec Colagrande stirs together everything to love and loathe about South Florida in an abuelas cauldron, then kicks it over on its ear. No sacred cow goes unslaughtered in this swirling, fast-paced satire on modern Miami. Dec follows its eponymous main character, an overeducated yet shallow and self-absorbed wannabe writer who talks a lot about hard work without ever doing any. Hes credit card rich. He dates a supermodel named Chichi (shee-shee), whose exotic heritage includes Australian Shepherd (yeah, the dog). He lives a twodimensional life without substance, where appearances are everything. Decs perfectly fake world crumbles when the adjustable-rate mortgage on his unit at The Stupendously Luxurious jumps from 3.2 percent to 17.9. He goes broke and loses his electro-hybridturbo convertible. His part-dog supermodel girlfriend exits the picture. The velvet ropes close on him, and hes relegated to a humiliating new existence in Wynwood, where extremely judgmental hipsters twirl their mustaches, pretend to be open-minded, worship their own creativity, and form ultra-secret societies that schmooze for corporate grants. Anything to avoid real work. When he falls to the pavement during a Critical Mass bike ride, Dec blacks out about three minutes into the plummeted by every conscientious bike rider in the city. of the tracks, in Allapattah, where Dec begins stumbling naively through a rollicking kaleidoscope of Miami neighborhoods, cultures, and characters on an unlikely journey of self-discovery. Colagrande says he was inspired after teaching Voltaires classic 18th-century satire Candide several times to his stu dents. Like Candide Dec is 30 spritely, episodic chapters, 30,000 words, and takes aim at the modern Zeitgeist with scathing enthusiasm. The more you know about and appreciate Miami, the funnier and more rewarding it is to read. A revolving cast of archetypes instantly recognizable to any Miamian come in and out of the story. No character is especially deep. And thats sort of the point. Dec isnt concerned with the interior life of its inhabitants. Its a book about their society written in prose that relishes the ridiculous and bounces along with plenty of wordplay and inexplicable events that invite you to keep reading: Dec thinks he impregnates the Queen of Allapattah by leaning on her shoulder, so he goes to work earning money for their baby by helping her cousin Lazaro move Coke Coca-Cola, as he believes. He ends up at Ultra Festival but doesnt know who Molly is and why ev an old friend demoralized; shes reduced to prying money from slick Brickell bank ers in unspeakable ways. Once in a while she woofs. For much of the book, lessons are utterly lost on our confused hero. At Dec s heart is an earnest exploration of the tension between American exceptionalism and American entitlement. As Colagrande sees it, what most Miamians (and Americans) no longer wish to believe is that to truly succeed, you have to be both exceptional and relentless. We think that if we just get our foot in the door, it will naturally open to a room full of rewards and riches. Americans today feel we deserve a good-paying job, an inside advantage, and we want to take the easy way out, he says. Our pop culture, sports, and fashion are superior; our defense spending is massive. This gives us a superiority complex. The characters in the book evolve from a celebrity-obsessed, drugdealing lifestyle into a more traditional view of working hard for success. And thats what eventually happens to our dear Dec, but the real reward is the journey. If youre ready to take it, or if you just want a great holiday gift for the Miami-lover in your life, grab a copy for $12.95 at DecoTheNovel.com. There online. Paperback and Kindle versions are available at Amazon.com. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com The Art of DecA new novel turns Miami on its head and no, its not by Tom Wolfe

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Our Sponsors: D ecemberECEMB ER 201 2By Pamela Robin Brandt BT ContributorIts here. The time to deck the halls with, well, whatever is appropriate for the holidays you celebrate this time of year. But whether you favor Christmas or Hanukkah or Kwanza or the Winter Solstice or New Years Eve, theres plenty of preparing to do: gifts to buy, reservations to make, getting your home and yourself ready for all Decembers parties and other festivities. No worries. Our sponsors have you covered. The folks at CleanStart Total Body Cleansing (6901 Biscayne Blvd., 305-603-8540) suggests that a great way to begin December would be to rid your bod of Novembers Thanksgiving excesses with detox massages, colon hydrotherapy, and natural herbal cleansing. And theyre also making it easy for you to enable friends to start the new year renewed, with discounted holiday gift cards. BT readers get 10% off. Go to CleanStartMiami.com to see their full range of services and products. If looking good is what gets you feeling good, visit returning advertiser Anastasia Molchanov Salon (7242 7755). This month the salon has some specials thatll make you shine at any holiday event or at least your hair will. Express blowouts are only $35, deep conditioning is $20, and you can add gloss for $40. Little can make you feel worse about how you look than acne. But new advertiser Horwitz Dermatology (2999 NE 191st St., PH1), a medical and cosmetic ad. People ages 18-40 with moderate to severe facial acne may qualify for clinical studies of investigational medications and be compensated for their time and transportation. Call 305-933-1151 for more info. Several new advertisers this month are Realtors, suggesting that many people feel the best way to get a fresh start in the new year is in a new home. Welcome to new advertisers Judy Luck Jordan and Lisa Mula of Prudential Florida Realty (19056 NE 29th Ave., 305-934-6373), multimilliondollar agents who sell properties all over South Florida and whose very your new dream abode, whether youre looking to buy or rent. Broker Robbie Bell (901 S. Miami Ave. #215, 305-528-8557), a new adver tiser, is an urban lifestyle specialist homes for folks who want to live, work, and play in the same neighborhood. That has actually become possible in the past few years in Miami, with downtown/ Brickell becoming a 24/7 urban center. So contact her: Robbie@gotorobbiebell.info. At new advertiser Sydney Server Real Estate (also at 901 S. Miami Ave. #215, 305-562-7363) an international in Spanish and English but French, Italian, Russian, Portuguese, and Mandarin Chinese sells hip luxe real estate using the latest technology and socialmedia marketing. Call/text 305-562-7363 and visit SidneyServerRealEstate.com for the latest news. Theres big real estate news at Midtown Miami : Less than two months after launching sales of 304 condo units in the high-rise, mixed use tower 4 Midtown, 113 residences have been sold $40 million worth of condos! Though with amenities like a gym, hot tub, sauna, steam room, concierge, valet, garage parking, 24-hour security, and ground-level retail (including cool restaurants that deliver hot food), its not surprising that units are being snapped up so speedily. See this issues ad on page 3 for more details about condo life in Midtowns residential towers, and about remaining units, from owner Gold Krown Financial. For elderly people in need of assistance with their living activities, one of the greatest gifts is simply to be able to remain in their own homes rather than to be placed in a nursing facility. Contact new advertiser Visiting Angels (11601 Biscayne Blvd. #302, 305-505-2294). This bonded, licensed, and insured long-term non-medical home care for senior citizens: meal prep, housekeeping, errands, hygiene/dressing assistance, companionship, and more. To spruce up your present home, drop by Modern Home 2 Go (270-286 NE 39th St., 305-572-1222), where a rfnfrf rfntbrfntbr frrnt brrtr rtinfo@fumcmiami.com .rffntbb bbCelebrate Advent rfn tffbtbnrfb nfbn Our Daily Advent Devotions are available online brr rffn Continued on page 32BizBuzzSales, special events, and more from the people who make Biscayne Times possible

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WWW.LAPLAYA-PROPERTIES.COM FOR SALE $209,000La Playa Properties Group, Inc. 2275 Biscayne Blvd. Ste 1, Miami, FL 33137 LaPlaya@LaPlaya-Properties.comNow Recruiting Real Estate Professionals305-672-0773LaPlayaMiami La Playa Properties Group @LaPlayaMiami FOR SALE $299,900 500 BRICKELL55 SE 6 St # 2100, BRICKELLSpacious 1 bed 1 /.5 bath in Arlen House West. Enjoy spectacular views to the bay and intercoastal views. Building services include pool, gym, child play area, beauty salon, marketplace and more!!!ARLEN HOUSE WEST500 BAYVIEW DRIVE #1119, SUNNY ISLES PH: 305.672.0773 FOR SALE $359,000Amazing 1 bed / 1 bath + DEN. Largest 1bedroom unit in the building! quartz / granite counter tops, stainless steel appliances and very spacious layout with den. Building includes: pool, gym and much more.WIND BY NEO350 S MIAMI AV #2505, BRICKELLThis spectacular 2 bed / 2 bath with views of the bay, river and downtown skyline. Building features pools, Jacuzzi, spa, indoor racquetball court, fitness center, game room, sports lounge, 2 story party room and walking distance to Mary Brickell Village for shopping and dining. FOR SALE $340,000Great opportunity! Gaze at the spectacular water views from floor to ceiling windows! Unit has 47-foot balcony. Walking distance to the beach, shops & restaurants. Building amenities include exercise room, heated pool, playroom for kids, 24 hr security and more!KING COLE900 BAY DRIVE # 324, MIAMI BEACHLinette GuerraBroker 305-915-0148 FOR SALE $189,900Beautiful 2 bed / 2 bath with brand new kitchen & stainless steel appliances. Washer and dryer in unit. Building amenities include 4 tennis courts, deli-restaurant, beauty salon, exercise room, pool and more. Bulding is going through complete renovation.CHARTER CLUB600 NE 36 ST # 307, ART & DESIGN DISTRICTLinette GuerraBroker 305-915-0148 Jordan LedermanRealtor Associate 248-701-5200 Linette GuerraBroker 305-915-0148 Linette GuerraBroker 305-915-0148 FOR SALE $825,000Spacious 3 bed / 2 bath NE corner unit with spacious living area & wrap around balcony. Direct views of Biscayne Bay, Port of Miami, South Beach, Key Biscayne and Fisher Island. Must see this amazing unit. 50 BISCAYNE50 BISCAYNE BLVD. #2702, DOWNTOWN MIAMIJacob KasselRealtor Associate 561-302-1233 900 BISCAYNE BAY900 BISCAYNE BLVD #4302, DOWNTOWN MIAMILinette GuerraBroker 305-915-0148Luxurious 2 bed + den / 3 bath flow through unit with breathtaking direct bay views and Miami skyline. Italian imported cabinetry and stainless steel appliances. Private elevator leads to private foyer. State of the art fitness center, spa, film theatre and much more.FOR SALE $949,000 FOR SALE $189,900Spectacular 2 bed + den / 2 baths with stunning views of miami beach & skyline. Very nice location, walking distance to the beach. Renovated kitchen & bathrooms. Full service building with doorman, valet, pool & gym. Minutes from South Beach.PARKVIEW POINT 7441 WAYNE AV #3G, MIAMI BEACHLinette GuerraBroker 305-915-0148

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Our Sponsors: D ecemberECEMB ER 201 2super close-out sale is running throughout December owing to the showrooms expansion. Items on sale include Italian leather sectionals, side tables, and lounge chairs, plus high quality, all-weather outdoor dining and lounging sets made from eco-friendly materials. solutions at new advertiser Arravanti Contemporary Interiors (5046 Bis cayne Blvd., 305-576-0620), where the European furniture. In addition to retail sales of furniture and accessories, Arravanti provides custom design services from fabric selection to building wall Gifting your children with high-end fashions is a cinch thanks to new advertiser Inna Gaber Kondrashovas two stores named for her own boy and girl: Gabriel & Ko: A Classy Kids Boutique (located in the Village at Gulfstream Park, 601 Silks Run #1420, Hallandale Beach, 954-404-6342) and newer Sophie Rose Childrens Boutique (35 NE 207th St. #B-8, 305-466-2800). This month take advantage of three deals: an endof-season sale of 30-70% off selected merchandise; a 20% discount on nonsale merchandise with the coupon in this issues ad; and something for you, too: Buy a $100 holiday gift card and get a $20 card for yourself. Sportsters on your holiday list are in luck at new advertiser and venerable business Biscayne Tennis (12733 Biscayne Blvd., 305-891-1728, and new location at 19021 Biscayne Blvd., 305932-0200), which is offering 20% off on all apparel. With this issues ad coupon, youll also get a free can of tennis balls, even without a purchase. For the runners on your list, visit new advertiser 11 Runners (1055 SE 1st Ave., 305-358-0400). Actually, the heck with the runners. Go take a gander at this issues ad. This stores gorgeous athletic shoes would give the gimmes to Need a brief respite from all your shopping-type running around? Take a break with a Philly cheesesteak at new advertiser Woodys Famous Steak Sandwich (13105 Biscayne Blvd., 305891-1451), which has been serving classic road food since 1953. The danger here is that, as well as new menu items, new owner Mike Marano has added a patio serves nine kinds of draft beer. So you may never resume shopping. Just down the Boulevard at Bagels and Company (11064 Biscayne Blvd., 305-892-2435), owner David Cohen is repeating his tempting offer from November: a complete turkey feast for ten at $175. Order early to guarantee youre included. If your friends seem to have everything, and/or you just dont have a clue about what theyd like, theres one thing we can guarantee will be unique: a custom photo-to-canvas print from Canvas Lifestyle (1932 NW Miami Ct., 305-395-7450). Stop by the shop with a favorite photograph, or go to www. canvaslifestyle.com, and a wall-worthy piece of art will be on its way, fast. Theres a gift for BT readers, too: Use promotional code BISCAYNE30 for a hefty 30% discount. Buying the perfect gifts, sadly, isnt the end of it. You also have to get them to your out-of-town friends and family preferably not broken in a zillion pieces. Hey, dont bother Santa; hes a busy guy. Instead go see Barbara and Nancy at Private Postal Systems (12555 Biscayne Blvd., 305-895-6974), which has been in business for an impressive 33 years. (Those ladies do not look or act their age, which we love!) Among their full range of mail services, the grrrls specialize in complete packing and shipping services via UPS, FedEx, DHL, or the post wrapped gifts to go and theyll see that the treasures get there in perfect shape. If youre planning on entertaining at home for the holidays, youll want to check out two exciting new farmers markets just opened by returning advertiser The Market Company (305-531-0038). Owner Claire Tomlin, the force behind many of Miamis pioneer green markets, says that the North Bay Village venture, every Friday from 2:00-7:00 p.m. (in the waterfront parking lot of the Crab House, 1551 79th St. Cswy.) features more than 20 vendors, selling not just fresh produce and herbs, but locally made breads, pastas, cheeses, snack foods, and more. Claires latest Saturday market, from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at Brickells brand-new Flatiron Park (1100 SE 1st Ave.), carries the same variety of products to craft your holiday feasts. As for sweets: With chef Jenny Rissones background as the Eden Rocs executive pastry chef, youd BizBuzzContinued from page 30

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expect her desserts at Pastry Is Art (12591 Biscayne Blvd., 305-640-5045) to impress even the most sophisticated guests. Youd be right. New feature at the bakery: all manner of sugar-free or gluten-free cakes and cookies. Custom cakes, too, with any theme you choose, whatever the holiday or event. To keep the family dogs off the dining table, visit Salon Pooch-ini (1019 Kane Concourse, 305-864-1944). As well as providing grooming services, the salon wants Santas helpers to know that it is also a boutique, providing or ganic treats, plus toys and other stock ing stuffers. Those whod rather eat out during the holidays are often out of luck, since chefs and other restaurant personnel want to celebrate at home. But Kitchen 305 in the Newport Beachside Hotel & Resort (16701 Collins Ave., 305749-2110), is offering a Christmas Eve run from 1:00-6:00 p.m. Theres also a dinner on New Years Eve. Oh, and dont miss the Kitchens Wednesday lobster plus soup or salad and two sides, plus (ready?) ladies drink free from 9:0011:00 p.m. Steady on your feet, girls. Speaking of being steady on your feet, by the way, have you ever wanted to be the belle/beau of the ball and totally blow people away with your dancing, like Fred Astaire always did in the movies? Naturally, who you should call is new advertiser Fred Astaire Dance Studio (18835 Biscayne Blvd., 305-6925800), which teaches almost two dozen different kinds of social dances, ballroom or Latin. They do wedding dance consultations, too, from helping you graphing it, so you start your new life in style. Also offered, for those more into Rather watch pros do the dancing? At the Aventura Arts & Cultural Center (3385 NE 188th St., 877-3117469), Arts Ballet Theatre of Florida presents The Nutcracker December 14-16. Also on Decembers performance ley Locke singing great American diva hits to inaugurate a new Cabaret by the Bay series, December 7-8; Cuban piano virtuoso Jorge Luis Prats on December 9; and continuing the Aventura Foreign Film Series, Poetry (a 2010 Cannes Film Festival winner) on December 11. Our blessed cool weather may not have you thinking about your air conditioning, but One Hour Air Conditioning and Heating says: Think again. Its actually an ideal time to care for that unit, when its not constantly working. Which is why One Hour is offering BT safety and inspection check. Call them at 305-865-1220. Theres some especially fun family entertainment this month, too, including the fourth annual Reindeer Races, presented by the Shops at Midtown (3401 N. Miami Ave., 305-573-3371), on December 15 at 11:00 a.m., at the shops central fountain. Participants actually race rubber duck reindeer (which appear to be either rubber ducks with antlers or rubber reindeer with duck bills) through the massive waterworks. You can also meet Santa and get a free family photo, plus enjoy bounce houses, face painting, and more. Dont forget the spiritual side of the season that, despite the presents and partying, is at the heart of all Decembers holidays. New advertiser First Church of Christ, Scientist (1836 Biscayne Blvd., 305-373-1645) will be bringing it into focus for you with Cuban-born Miamian Lorenzo Rodriguezs free lecture Finding the True Brotherhood of Man, at 2:30 p.m. on December 9. Note: The event is not at the Biscayne BouleHotel (1717 N. Bayshore Dr.). Free valet parking is provided and all are welcome. At First United Methodist Church of Miami (400 Biscayne Blvd., 305-3714706), December 9s 11:00 a.m. service will feature a particularly inspirational speaker, Patrick Knight, who was shot in what 2009 newspapers called the Thanksgiving Day Massacre. After three months in a coma, he went on to a full work and family life, recounted in his new book Blessed to Survive The church will also be offering a Christmas Eve candlelight service on December 24 at 6:00 p.m. We at the BT join all the above advertisers in wishing you a Happy New Years Eve and a Merry Whatever-OtherDecember-Holidays you celebrate before Something special coming up at your busi ness? Send info to bizbuzz@biscaynetimes. com. For BT advertisers only.

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34 Photo by Simon Brooke-Webb

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During this years Art Basel feast of fests, the Miami Art Museum (MAM) will be showcasing a number of local artists in an exhibition called New Work Miami 2013. The New Work series at MAM has been on-going for several years. Back in February 2003, for instance, the museum gave over a room for new work from the Argentine duo Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt, who created their visually stunning House of Cards installation; and in July 2010, the museum presented a New Work Miami exhibit featuring a whopping 35 artists. But this one is different. It is the featured and only new show that MAM will exhibit for Miamis premier art week. This is a departure for Miami museums, as locally createad art often gets lost in the complaint heard far and wide since the ar rival of the massive fair (and fairs) in 2002. As an example, last year MAM featured paintings from the 1960s by Faith Ringgold. This year North Miamis Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) will open a retrospective of the pioneering video artist Bill Viola, who lives and works in the Los Angeles area; while FIU is highlighting the Chilean light sculptor Ivan Navarro; UMs Lowe museum is showing Christo prints; and the Bass Museum, in collaboration with Art Basel Miami Beach, is putting up an expansive international outdoor sculpture show. All of this is good, and underscores how sophisticated our institutions have become, even if that sophistication seems to come at the expense of artists living and working in Miami. MAMs New Work arrives at a time when Miamis art scene appears to Continued on page 36 Drawing on the FutureTalented artists are leaving Miami. Those still here feel isolated. The public doesnt understand contemporary art and is not buying it literally. But there is always tomorrow By Anne TschidaPhotos by Silvia Ros

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be in another transitional period, another phase of its growth perhaps moving from tween years into teenage years, displaying all the energy and anxiety associated with that evolution. Its telling that the emphasis in this exhibition is on collaboration among the artists, and with the space itself. MAM is also in transition; this will be one of the last shows in the old building before the museum moves to its new, Herzog & de Meurondesigned home on Biscayne Bay. This was not trying to be a survey of contemporary art in Miami today, says Tobias Ostrander, the new chief curator at the museum. It is supposed to be works in dialogue with the architecture of Miami. These are different generations [of artists] from different disciplines who were asked to collaborate, to join in the spirit of building. That building is both immediate and broader in the sense of developing a more solid structure for an arts community. Ostrander says the exhibition serves the dual purpose of nurturing a local scene as well as giving exposure to local artists when the eyes of the art world are on us. The ten invited artists work in photography, sculpture, installation, and painting. Some of the names will be familiar to local art followers, such as George Sanchez-Calderon, Consuela Castaeda, and Bhakti Baxter, who have been showing regularly here for a decade or so. Others are less known. While all of them call Miami home, only two were actually born here; others hail from countries such as Croatia, Cuba, Venezuela, and England. That under scores what a migratory center Miami is, art scene. But it also highlights the notion So where do we stand today, in the spectrum of art centers, nationally and internationally, as we enter the 13th year of the 21st Century?I after World War II, when Miamis population burgeoned and absorbed the 1959, the art scene remained tiny. There were a handful a galleries, no contemporary museums, and artists were mostly Drawing on the FutureContinued from page 35 Continued on page 38

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faculty at relatively small art departments in area colleges. In the 1980s and 1990s, that began to change as recently arrived, Cubanborn artists started making a splash, MAM and MOCA were born, the New World School of the Arts graduated its lectors opened up spaces, and galleries dedicated to showing local art began popping up. A batch of youthful, emerging artists garnered attention from galleries, museums, and even some national press; and a native scene sprouted, including a number of artist-run alternative spaces that helped support a lively, if still not huge, community. Then Art Basel arrived at the beginning of the last decade, and changed the equation. Artwork at Basel and the various satellite fairs gave us up-close exposure to the best in contemporary art, and to a lesser extent, exposed our art community to the rest of the world. More recently, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundations funneling of money into the local cultural scene also had a dramatic effect. Then, over the past couple of years, some of the artists who had generated interest and excitement beyond Miami began leaving people like Daniel Arsham, Luis Gispert, and Hernan Bas. Drawing on the FutureContinued from page 36 GET 'LUCKY'! CALL THE We specialize in : r305.934.6373f305.458.5713adiesTeam.com or LUCKY! Continued on page 40Bus Shelter Paintings

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40 Just this year another group took off for Los Angeles, including Bert Ro driguez, Jen Stark, and Friends With You. The departures left many feel ing a little unsettled, prompting some important questions, such as: What is Miami missing? Why cant we both nurture budding artists and keep active artists here? Conversations with people in the arts community from artists both local and recently departed, gallerists, and museum leaders reveal a range of opinions about what it will take to bring Miami to the next level not least of which is simply time. A few months ago the director of MOCA, Bonnie Clearwater, felt a need to address a sense that Miami was losing cohesion. Some of the people who were strong as catalysts moved on, she says, for a variety of reasons, including a dwindling number of affordable studios, which in a weak local art market is critical; and a paucity of gallery and museum shows that combined a mix of artists. Those studios can be lonely, says Clearwater, and I think that artists are not interacting as much as they once were. It was a good moment to try to make some connections between artists and also with the community. She brought back an exhibition a decade ago, in which she selected a group of artists, both accomplished and right out of school. Like the MAM show, they were encouraged to work together, but the work would be in real time. Each serve as a studio for the duration of the exhibit, where they would work on their art and collaborate. Museum visitors could also could watch and interact. We need to create more of a support group out there, says Clearwater, support that will also attract artists from elsewhere, replacing those who have left, an essential part of our eventual growth, she believes. Jacin Giordano has a show for Art Basel week at the noncommercial space Locust Projects. He used to exhibit with Fred Snitzer and in numerous group shows, but he has moved to western Massachusetts, where his wife is going to school. Miami has come a long way since he was a kid, he says: I remember coming back to Miami after graduating college in 2000 and seeing the immediately decided that I could stay in occurred to me that I could make art in Miami and people might pay attention. Drawing on the FutureContinued from page 38 AllisonACADEMYFounded in 1983 Accredited by: AISF, SACS/CASI, AdvancED, MSA NCPSA 305.940.3922 Dr. Allison Celebrates 50 Years in Education! Continued on page 42

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42 So Giordano began layering globs of oil paint, creating art in his signature style, in his hometown. But then, he remembers, after some exciting years, things began to change. Its like at some arbitrary moment in time, people stopped helping one another and instead just got interested in getting ahead and gaining attention, he recalls. This way of thinking led to a certain amount of stagnation in the art scene. There are, Giordano acknowledges, some bright spots: Spaces like [the artist-run alternative] Bas Fisher and Dimensions Variable are good for Miami, and they showcase artists helping artists, which seems incredibly important for the longevity of an art scene. And, of course, Locust Projects, which is consciously Drawing on the FutureContinued from page 40 Continued on page 44 CITY24 | 350 NE 24th Street | MiamiCITY24 is a contemporary, boutique building with just 119 residences. 5 styles of 2 BD / 2 BA units showcased for sale starting at $300,000. Large balconies, oversized lanais and water views available. CITY24 boasts dynamic outdoor spaces with city and water views stretching over beautiful Biscayne Bay. Fantastic pool and gym. LIVE THE CITY LIFE Your ideal city life in vibrant, tropical Miami. Luxury condo and retail spaces for sale and lease. SALES: 2 BEDROOMS STARTING AT $300S NOW LEASING: 2 BD / 2 BA FROM $1,850 TO $2,550 LIVE THE CITY LIFELUXURY DOWNTOWN SPECIALISTDAVID CAROLAN P.A. BROKER ASSOCIATE | DIRECTOR OF SALES CITY24 cell 305 610 3251 | www.city24condo.com Art Basel

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44 juxtaposing local Miami artists and artists from other cities. Giordano has no plans to move back to Miami at anytime soon mostly, he says, because it was simply time for a change.Mariangela Capuzzo is the Miami-based lead curator for ICArt, which develops cor porate art collections, including those for cruise ships. She procured the art for the newest Celebrity Cruise Lines ship, which includes several local artists, along with a handful who are legends. There are a variety of things that could help develop Miamis art world, she the fundamental nature of the place. Its a transitory city, she says, it always has been and always will be, and so will never have that solid foundation some other places have. This is not necessarily bad, she adds, as it means a certain freshness and energy will always be here. Although Miami is home to some of the worlds largest private collections of contemporary art, until a serious group of smaller, local buyers emerges, artists will have a hard time living and making art here, Capuzzo says. The absence of the most common complaints from those in the art world. Miami may now be known for its burgeoning art scene, but many artists and gallerists say the Art Basel-instigated attention has not translated to sustainable sales. Loriel Beltran, a native of Caracas and graduate of the New World School of the Arts, is one of the artists featured in MAMs New Work show. His burntwood sculptures were given a solo outing at the Snitzer gallery last year. Beltran doesnt necessarily want to let even the big collectors off the hook. It would be great, he thinks, if collectors started to believe in at least a small group of artists and start spending some money here rather than only on well-known artists. If you compare the price of a single work by a big artist to our community, it could buy many artists yearly production for the price of a single work from an established artist. This would give the artists time to spend on their work rather than trying to make ends meet, helping not only the production of the artists work, but in creating events, lectures, community programs things central to any artistic community. Thankfully some local institutions are growing up and are becoming central to this development in a different way. Drawing on the FutureContinued from page 42 Continued on page 46

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Capuzzo also believes there has been a tendency to show only a select group of artists in shows around town, an inbroader arts community. That seemed to be particularly true by the end of the last decade, when the same names seemed to appear in every exhibit. That has changed, evidenced by the fact that both MOCA and MAMs latest exhibits include a number of local artists who have rarely been heard from. Aliona Ortega is the director of Waltman Ortega Fine Art, a branch of a Paris gallery that opened in the heart of Wynwood Arts District over a year ago. The reason, according to Ortega: Miami has a huge potential. The local museums and galleries are very dynamic and produce remarkable shows. However, a big number of them take place and go away without any or little attention from the press. Which brings her to a major problem she has had since opening little notice owing to a lack of arts writing and general coverage, and by extension, a limited arts-educated community. Ortega, a native of Russia, thinks that in order for Miamis art scene to grow, it has to gain respectability and more attention from the media, collectors, and curators throughout the world to really become a destina tion, and that requires a dedicated, educated crop of writers who help to educate the public. Ostrander at MAM concurs. We need more criticism, good writing, and critiques, he says. We need to critically connect with the community, and engage more with our universities. Michelle Weinberg is a respected, locally based artist. Her current installation, Shelf Life, is on display at the historic Alfred I. DuPont building downtown, and she has several pieces on the cruise ship But like many artists trying to make a living here, she must show her work elsewhere, and at times actually work elsewhere, to compensate for the limited number of art enthusiasts and collectors here in Miami. How can more folks who have the means to patronize art on a smaller, normal scale not mega collectors who build their own warehouse collection spaces get involved? The more individuals who connect with art, with investing in it, Drawing on the FutureContinued from page 44 Continued on page 48

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enjoying it, the more the citys art scene will thrive. Adds artist Giordano: There is a pretty low ceiling in the Miami art world that requires artists to leave at some point, whether that means your work Bert Rodriguez is one of the more prominent artists who has taken Angeles. He still shows with the Snitzer gallery, and also with his L.A. gallery OHWOW (which will have its own fair here during Art Basel). He too has a piece on the new cruise ship, a giant tree sculpture in the main foyer. Of his recent move, he says, I am extremely happy I did what I did. For him to progress as an artist, he explains, he needed a bigger and more supportive place. I got isolated in Miami, Rodriguez says. There wasnt really any room for growth for me anymore. It would have been irresponsible of me to have stayed. The truth is, at this stage in my career, I probably should have left a long time ago. the same challenges others have brought up, he says theres really nothing that can be done about it. What could Miami do to improve the enviroment for its arts community? Nothing, he replies. Miami only needs time, and thats something nobody can change. Rodriguez also likens Miami to a to move up to the next level, not particularly receptive to the idea that growing up is a long-term process. I was one of those people, he continues, trying so hard to push Miami forward, nudge Miami to someplace it just isnt yet. Miami will get there, but it could 20 years or 50 years who knows? He hasnt abandoned his hometown. Rodriguez still has a studio here, deep family roots, and a Miami gallery to exhibit his work. That gallery, Fredric Snitzer, has announced changes of its own. In its 35th anniversary year, one of the pioneering anchors of the Wynwood district will be leaving its location in March, to a destination unknown. Snitzer says the main reason for his decamping from the art center is economic: He got a good deal on the sale of his centrally located building. But there are other reasons as well. The Second Saturday art walk, he says, became the gallery circus walk, ruining its intention. He also says that Seasons Greetings from All Florida Pool & Spa Center 5 REASONS WE ARE THE BEST CHOICE!*N OT INC LUDI NG REBATES AND IN STORE ONLY.#1 #2 #3 #4 #5MOST EXPERIENCED & K NOWLEDGE ABLE STAFF LOWE ST PRICE G UARANT EE WE MEET OR BEAT ALL LOCAL PRICES*LARGE ST SEL ECT ION O F POOL & SP A PRODUC TS FA MIL Y OW NED & OPERAT ED F OR OVER 40 YEARS W E GUARANT EE T O K EEP YOU HA PPY!! 305-893-4036 Keeping Customers Happy For Over 40 Years S ALT CHLORI NATORS HEATERS YEAR END HOT TUB CLEARANCE SALE!! Perfect Gift For Entire familyRELAX NOW IN A SUNDANCE SPA P erfect GI FT for the CHEF in your family!Plus special discount on all accessories w/ BGE purchaseE xp. 12.31.12 LET US HELP YOU WITH YOUR POOLCOMPUTER WAT ER A N AL YSIS FREE We make it easy! LET US SHOW YOU THE 3 STEP PROGRAM! ON E xp. 12.31.12 SPECI AL PRICI NG P LUS E xp. 12-31-12A WARM POOL FROM ONLY $1.00 A DAY Drawing on the FutureContinued from page 46 Continued on page 50

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at his stage in his career as a gallerist, he doesnt need to be in the thick of things collectors come to him. He rarely even opens his gallery when others do. As rents have soared in Wynwood, there; more likely around the Bacardi buildings on Biscayne Boulevard (now home to the YoungArts Foundation) or even better, he says, back to Bird Road where he started. Snitzer echoes others in addressing what Miami needs: A more discriminating audience. Really, only a handful of people are interested. Until we get that, were not going to grow. Also, he believes, a serious graduate school. We need to attract artists from out of town to come and live and work here. Most everyone, however, feels there is great promise in Miami, which dif ferentiates it from other art centers. Like artist Bert Rodriguez, gallery director Aliona Ortega thinks Miami should be cut some slack for its youth. I think we have to give some time to the art scene to develop and mature in Miami, she says. We live in a very young city with all of the challenges and opportunities that this implies. All of the art institutions are fairly new as well. You can sit here and talk about what is lacking, but weve chosen to see it all as a great opportunity for us to grow with the city. Adds Tobias Ostrander: Theres a lot of space for us to grow. Were a labora tory. As the years go on, the rest of the United States will look more like us, with all the implications of that. As Miami embraces its vibrant diversity and is educated about its own history including art history Ostrander believes it will take its unique place at the art world table. Drawing on the FutureContinued from page 48 Photo courtesy Wet Heat Project

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52 Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDORA Tale of Two BanksOne eagerly anticipated, the other widely despised, both now works in progressBy Erik Bojnansky BT Senior WriterDowntown Miami, Brickell, Midtown Miami, and the Design District continue to dominate business headlines, but theres plenty of real estate news occurring in Biscayne Corridor neighborhoods farther north. Earlier this year, for example, the Adler Group announced plans to build two 20-story rental towers on the Shorecrest site that the Related Group tried to build a condo project three years ago. The water front buildings will rise just north of NE 79th Street where it meets Biscayne Bay. In Aventura, Martin Z. Marguliess residential project to break ground follow ing the real estate crash, is scheduled for nanced the 70-unit luxury tower by putting up 59 pieces from his acclaimed art collec tion as collateral for a construction loan. Miami developer Avra Jain this past June declared her intention to renovate the iconic Vagabond Motel in Miamis MiMo Historic District. Earlier this year, restaurateur Steven Perricone and Milebella, a $1 million, 10,000-squarefoot commercial building also in the MiMo Historic District, at 61st Street and the Boulevard. Several other retail and motel rehab projects are planned throughout the Upper Eastside. But this story is about banks two bank buildings, actually. One is a Chase branch that will soon begin construction after months of delay; the other is a long-vacant, 180,000-square-foot former is being repurposed as an affordablehousing project with an adjacent, new Presidente Supermarket. Well start with the new bank. In November 2011, in an article titled Banking on the Boulevard, the BT reported that the 20-year-old BP gas station at 6800 Biscayne Blvd. was being replaced by a Chase bank. Nine months passed before Boos Development, a Clearwater company that builds banks the land. Alex Lucas, retail manager for Boos Development, blames the delay on Continued on page 58 Continued on page 56By Derek McCann BT ContributorI have been writing Biscayne Crime Beat since the BT s inception nearly ten years ago. Crime Beat is a column I like to write for our faithful readers. This story is different. Its one I do not want to write, but one I feel I need to write. Early in November, I applied online for a Zales store credit card. A message pop-up appeared at the end of the applica tion, advising me to call the company because it needed additional information. (I had forgotten that I placed a precaution ary fraud alert on my Equifax account.) approved me for the card. They then gave me the card number. I asked if I could go to the store and make a purchase without the actual card. They told me all I needed was my drivers license and one more On November 8, at approximately 8:00 p.m., I walked into the Zales store in Aventura Mall. I knew what I wanted, but the effusive salesperson talked me into buying a more expensive item. When it came time to charge my purchase, I explained what the Zales card people had told me, and showed her my card number, which I had written down somewhat sloppily on the back of an enlimit. I provided my drivers license.Tase the SeasonOn the eve of the holidays, a false charge of identity theft leads to a near-stunning confrontation with Aventura policeBT photo by Jacqueline Doulis BT photo by Wendy Doscher-Smith

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Historic Monument or Monumentally UglyIs the effort to save the Miami Herald building genuine, or is it a sly maneuver to squeeze a casino giant?By Erik Bojnansky BT Senior WriterBecky Roper Matkov is on deadline. Besides being CEO of the Dade Heritage Trust, a nonMatkov is editor of Preservation Today Miami Herald winning reporters and photographers, and its enormous 770,000-square-foot headquarters that was built 49 years ago. The purpose of the issue, aside from fundraising, is to demonstrate how important the Herald building has been to Miamis history. It was the biggest building in the state of Florida when it was completed in 1963, Matkov says. Now Matkov is trying to get the 10. On that day, the Dade Heritage Trust will appear before the City of Miamis Historic and Environmental Preservation (HEP) Board for the second time asking that the Herald building be preserved. Opposing that effort is the new owner of the building, the Genting Group, a $45 billion Malaysian corporation that owns half of Norwegian Cruise Lines and including Resorts World New York. Genting purchased the Miami Herald building and adjoining parking lots last year during a $500 million buying spree in the Edgewater/Omni area, where the company plans to build Resorts World Miami, a project that would include hotels, condo towers, restaurants, and perhaps a casino, if the company can ever obtain a gaming license. (See the BT s You Can Bet On It, November 2012.) As part of those plans, Genting intends to demolish the Heralds old headquarters after the newspapers staff moves to Doral in May 2013. But the fate of the Herald building might not be sealed on December 10. If Genting, Dade Heritage Trust, or a city commissioner doesnt like the HEP Boards ruling, theyll have 15 days to appeal to the full Miami City Commission. Gentings representatives didnt return calls for com ment following a meeting of the HEP Board on October 22, when the companys team of architects and plan ners, including former Dade Heritage Trust president Richard Heisenbottle and former Miami-Dade historic preservation director Ivan Herald building was not only too young to be considered historic, but was downright ugly. The HEP Board, by a vote of 6 to 4, decided to continue the process of deter mining whether the building deserves historic designation. Seth Gordon, a Miami publicist and political consul tant not involved with either side, is sure Genting will appeal to the full commis sion if the HEP Board rules for preservation. I cant see how Genting can allow that to happen after investing hundreds of millions of dollars in the property, he says. When you sink that much money into real estate, you dont let people restrict your use of it. Matkov says her group hasnt yet decided what it would do if the HEP Board rules against preservation. That is an interesting question, she says. Well have to ponder that. As for Miamis city commissioners, they arent talking. Id rather not get into that, Commission chairman Francis decision on that basis. Commissioner Marc Sarnoff, whose district includes the Omni/Edgewater area, didnt return phone calls from BT Commissioners Michelle Spence-Jones, Wilfredo Gort, and Frank Carollo also didnt return calls seeking comment. Mayor Tomas Regalado, who has the power to veto commission decisions, was too busy distributing Thanksgiving turkeys to nursing homes to talk about the Herald building, according to an aide. Gordon believes that Genting has enough clout to prevail if the issue comes before the city commission. The companys American subsidiaries have contributed at least $2.6 million to county and state political campaigns, including $10,000 to Future Is Now, a lobbyists who will argue that Resorts World Miami will provide lots of jobs and property taxes for a city still struggling to balance its budget. If the carrot doesnt work (jobs, property taxes), there is always the stick. I think there would be a mammoth Burt J. Harris Act lawsuit that could bankrupt the city, predicts Steve Geller, a lobbyist and former state senator, referring to Floridas property-rights law. Vicky Garcia-Toledo, an attorney and one of Gentings lobbyists, may have already laid the groundwork for such a legal action, or the threat of one. During the Oc tober 22 meeting, she argued that her clients would have never bought the Herald build ing and 14 acres of land from owner Mc Clatchy for $236 million if they thought the structure would ever be declared historic. Gordon doubts that the Dade Heritage Trust will succeed in preserving the build ing, but the group might be able to obtain concessions from Genting if its members ing the property. They [Gentings execu tives] will keep saying no until it makes sense for them to say yes, Gordon says. Continued on page 54BT photo by Silvia Ros BT photo by Silvia Ros

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54 Matkov and other Dade Heritage Trust members insist their only intent is to see the Miami Herald building, or at least some portions of it, preserved. Its a shame that it wasnt designated a long time ago and that we had to wait until there was a crisis, says Nancy Liebman, a Dade Heritage Trust advisor. Its a very important building, period. Its a really big part of the history of Miami. At the least, it helped to shape Miamis waterfront. Prior to its construcwith hotels, warehouses, restaurants, and bait shops, remembers historian Arva Moore Parks, a Dade Heritage Trust advisor and longtime Miami-Dade resident. a shrimping business on the site, prior to moving to Virginia Key, where he later founded Jimbos, a landmark hangout also illegal casino gambling where the Herald building now stands at the Little Palm Club, Moore adds. Ironically, it was the Herald on illicit gambling and orgathe Palm Club and many other underground gambling operations in 1952. Moore remembers seeing giant neon liquor signs when her family drove across the MacAr thur Causeway from Miami Beach to Miami. All that changed when the new Herald building was completed in March 1963. When the Herald was built, it was a major improvement, she says. Gentings consultants, it differently. In a September 4 opinion piece in the Herald they described the area as a vibrant commercial neighborhood before the Herald came along. A examples of Mediterranean Revival and Art Deco architecture, they wrote. The Herald building demonstrated a complete lack of sensitivity to its beautiful scenic vistas and waterfront setting, as well as the scale and character of the surrounding neighborhood at the time. The Herald building was indeed a big 631 feet long, 220 feet wide, and more than 117 feet tall with a heliport large enough to accommodate six helicopters, according to a 47-page report prepared by Dade Heritage Trust and Morris Hylton III, director of the University of Miamis historic preservation program. More than 250,000 pounds of steel and enough concrete to build 2000 homes were used to construct a building strong enough to withstand hurricanes. John and James Knight, two brothers who headed Knight Newspapers, hired a pair of Chicago architects, Sigurd Naess and Charles Murphy, to design the companys new base of operations. (The Herald had outgrown its previous location at 200 S. Miami Ave.) The Trust report notes that it was their work on the Chicago Sun-Times building that particularly impressed the denounced the Herald headquarters as a copy of the Sun-Times building, so hated by Chicago residents that no one protested when it was demolished by Donald Trump in 2004. Continued on page 59 Historic or UglyContinued from page 53

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56 underground contamination, which is still being cleaned up. On behalf of Chase, Boos bought the 30,000-square-foot parcel for nearly $3 million from Carlos Fontecilla, whose company, Victory Petroleum, once owned more than 80 gas stations throughout South Florida. According to Lucas, Chase executives feel the property was well worth the price. Aside from being across neighborhood, the future Chase branch is located in a gap where the nearest bank branches (both Bank of America) are located at 5000 and 8101 Biscayne Blvd. Says Lucas: The marketing study shows theres a clientele in that area thats not being served properly. deal. Chase took control of four former gas stations within the past year. They are just great sites, Lucas explains. Theyre on prime commercial corners, and thats where banks want to be. Joseph Canale, a board member of the nearby Palm Bay Yacht Club Condominium Association, wont miss the 24-hour gas station, calling it a draw for really seedy characters, especially after hours. A bank, on the other hand, will have security cameras and street lights that will dissuade drug dealers and prostitutes from conducting their business at night. Theyll know that there will be a camera on 24/7, he says, and Chase will have the building illuminated. Lyle Chariff, a real estate broker who is partnering with Alex and Rena Karakhanian to renovate the Sunshine Motel at 7350 Biscayne Blvd. and a commercial complex at 6700 Biscayne Blvd., sees the bank branch as a positive sign for the MiMo Historic District, which stretches from 50th Street to 77th Street along the Boulevard. It shows that the area is viable, says Chariff, president of Chariff Realty Group. When you have a Starbucks and a Chase Bank [across the street from each other], that means something. Thats what you call credit tenants. Credit tenants are what were looking for. While the Upper Eastside gains a Chase Bank, Little Haiti will lose a Bank of America. In fact, the bulky structure at the corner of NE 2nd Avenue and NE the Department of Children and Families and South Florida Workforce, has been shuttered since Hurricane Wilma damaged it in October 2005. In spite of a security fence, the 1973 building, a classic example of Brutalist architecture, with its thick concrete walls and narrow windows, was frequented by vagrants, vandals, drug addicts, prostitutes, and pimps. (The BT covered the abandoned structures problems in Eyesore #1: Little Haitis Hulking Behemoth, November 2010.) Tale of Two BanksContinued from page 52 BT photo by Wendy Doscher-Smith Continued on page 61

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58 Wow, you look different without hair, she said, taking my license. My license picture is nine years old; I was about 20 pounds heavier and I had a mop of hair. I currently shave my head. She asked me to sit in a chair. cer came into the store, glared at me, and said, This is the guy. numbers kept growing. Suddenly, apshepherd were surrounding me. I was still sitting in the chair. I murmured a couple of soft questions regarding what this was about. They told me I knew what it was about. Then I saw a stern, stoic face; my defacto judge and jury. The face glared at me and said, You better not move or give me any trouble. He held something in his hand. It had a blinking light. He said, You see this? This is a Taser. Ill tase you right now if you let me. Dont make any moves. You are going to cooperate. We are going to do this the hard way, or the easy way. Ill tase you right now . The light kept blinking. I They pulled my body up out of the chair, told me to place my hands behind me, and clamped handcuffs on me. over my heart, which was racing, and said, Why is your heart beating so fast? You look nervous. Why are you nervous? You know exactly why were here. He my pockets. They accused me of committing identity theft. They talked about the FBI. The Taser was right next to me as they ordered me to back into the chair. I was facing the store entrance and could see a bunch of people watching this spectacle. The sales associate who had so graciously helped me had disappeared behind me, but I couldnt move my head to the side to see what was happening for the Taser (he put it down next to him) towered above my seat, one foot away. He was guarding me. several questions; I answered them. This picture on your drivers license looks nothing like you. I explained why. They eventually removed the handcuffs, but told me to remain seated. My partner, who was heading to the mall to meet me for dinner, called me granted me permission to pick up the phone and speak with him. As things calmed down slightly, I him that was the reason my heart had and said, We can do that. I could point a knife at you if I wanted. I carry a knife with me, and I could point a knife at you. Eventually my partner arrived and witnessed the scene. After a period, they released me without telling me how they had cleared me, and said, Im sorry this happened to you and you were embarrassed. Embarrassed? I thought I was going to be tasered! Being embarrassed was not my concern, but in hindsight, it was embarrassing. They offered this: You better change that drivers license picture or this is going to happen to you again. them laughing in the distance, talking among themselves. The Zales store personnel swore to me they had not called the police; they said they didnt know both extremely apologetic; I believed them. Wanting a return to something like normality, I actually made my purchase. My partner told me I was shaking, and that hed never seen me like this. The following day I made some phone calls and discovered the general consensus was that this sort of reaction to alleged credit card fraud or identity theft is unusual, to put it mildly. I wondered why Id been treated that way. I that had nothing to do with it. They kept saying when I was in handcuffs: This is for your own protection. and a Taser are now needed to detain an individual who is suspected of committing identity theft? Apparently a new task force has been created in partnership with the FBI in an effort to crack down on identity theft. have harassed and threatened me. The prior incident was recounted in the BT six years ago. At the time, I spoke to one Tase the SeasonContinued from page 52 Continued on page 60

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But there are differences between the two buildings, the Trust report asserts. The Herald building had design elements matching the Miami Modern (MiMo) style that dominated the region during the 1950s and 1960s: exposed structural columns, yellow mosaic tiles, angled sun-grilles above the windows, and wrap-around terraces. If Matkov had her way, the HEP Board would be treated to a tour, similar to the one Genting provided Dade Heritage Trust members in February, two months after the group applied for historic designation. The guides hoped they would be able to show the Trust how horrible the building was. They wanted to point out everything that was wrong, Matkov recalls, but the more we saw, the more we liked. She liked it so much, in fact, that Matkov tried to convince their guides that theyd have no problem converting the Herald building for its uses or at least incorporate its faade into its grand plans. Genting, in turn, only offered reasons why they couldnt, Matkov says. Among the reasons, ac cording to Matkov: They wanted to build an underground, 1500-space park ing garage where the building stood, and the Heralds design wasnt compat ible with a world-class, waterfront hotel or a luxury condo. Gentings project would be enhanced by mixing the old with the new: The major impact of respecting a historic landmark like the Herald building is that it gives the project an identity like no other. can qualify for property-tax exemptions from the city and Miami-Dade County. Tax breaks and a unique look, however, arent enough to compensate for the cost of transforming the Herald building into a luxury resort, says Peter Zalewski, a real estate consultant and founder of CondoVultures.com. Besides the extra engineering and contracting costs, Zalewski argues that the Herald building depreciates the value of Gentings project because it hinders the owners ability to build to maximum density. Plus a big chunk of waterfront is now eliminated. Not everyone believes Dade Heritage Trusts assertion that it is only interested in protecting the building. Among the skeptics is Lynn Lewis, a Trust board member. It seems that historic preservation is being misused or in lieu of legislation, she said at the October HEP Board meeting. But since demolition is forever, Lynn asked for a full, long, detailed professional review by the citys historic preservation staff though I will tell you that if I had to decide today, Id be persuaded by the opponent, she warned. Matkov does acknowledge that future development on the site. Part of what we object to is that Genting is saying, Let us tear down the building next May and then put all your faith in 12555 Biscayne Blvd. N. MiamiNancy(305)895-6974Our 33rd Year!Barbara Authorized Shipping Center Preferred Provider Authorized Shipping Outlet HAPPYHOLIDAYSHAPPYHOLIDAYS Historic or UglyContinued from page 54 Continued on page 60 Photo courtesy Knight Foundation

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us that we have a good plan, she says. Thats why its important to designate the building now Then the HEP Board will have some control over what is put in that place. Indeed, Gentings plans have construction of 5200 hotel rooms, more than 1000 condominium units, 50-plus restaurants and bars, 700,000 square feet of convention space, and gambling areas large enough to hold up to 8500 slot machines. But after some neighbors islature declined to pass a resorts casino bill, Resorts World Miami president Christian Goode told the Herald that its project will only have 1500 new hotel rooms, two condo towers, and 100,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space. (Genting has yet to submit these new plans.) Liebman, a former Miami Beach commissioner who lives on Belle Isle at the eastern end of the Venetian Causeway, confesses her unease over the casino resorts potential effect on tion as it is. Yet she stresses that the effort to preserve the Herald building has nothing to do with trying to con trol development. Preventing construction of a casino that could suck money away from South Beach and downtown Miami has been cited as another possible motive behind Dade Heritage Trusts preservation efforts. While Matkov insists Trust members are divided on the issue of gambling, she cant help but mention that the late Alvah Chapman, the former CEO of Knight-Ridder newspapers, was a steadfast opponent of gambling. Local publicist Seth Gordon thinks preservation effort is for the company once again to interact with the public, perhaps even seek input on their plans, and show they can be a good corporate face of Genting to emerge, he says. Meanwhile, Dade Heritage Trust is collecting letters of support from the Urban Environment League, the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation, and local architects. Then there is the letter from Alvah Chapmans widow, Betty. She sees the Herald building as a monument to a medium of communication that is shrinking day by day daily newspapers. It is important for future role newspapers have had in our lifetime, she wrote. We have been almost dependent upon the outpouring of news they gave us whether good or bad. lawyers in South Florida. While under standing my position, he said I didnt have much recourse because one cannot sue over bad behavior by cops. If we could, law enforcement would go broke. He did tell me, though, that almost every police-harassment story he heard from prospective clients began with I was at Aventura Mall and formal complaint with the Aventura Police Department. Using a depart mental picture book, I pointed out the son, who was gracious enough to give me her time. She told me the depart ments internal affairs division would be in touch. Two weeks later, Capt. Michael Bentolila contacted me and informed me he was following up. He was extremely supportive and explained the process to employees from Zales had, in fact, called police that day. So Zales apparently lied to me. No wonder they didnt return my repeated calls. Captain Bentolila hopes to examine the video and interview the Zales empresent. (His investigation was ongoing at press time.) As shoppers take to the malls for the busiest shopping month of the season, they need to be aware of what may await them. Is that drivers license picture too old? Have you changed your hair or gained or lost weight? Do you have one too many tattoos? Be especially careful if youre in Aventura Mall and youre buying diamonds at Zales. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Tase the SeasonContinued from page 58 Historic or UglyContinued from page 59 Continued on page 61

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Recherchons agents immobiliers francophones expriments Now recruiting experienced RealtorsVisit our new Morningside storefront at 5781 Biscayne Boulevard Contemporary waterfront in Gables by the Sea $2,350,000 No expenses spared for this suburbs 2-story villa in prestigious gated community. 5bed/4.5bath, wine cellar, and large covered seating areas. Over 4600 sq ft of the highest craftsmanship iavailable on the market.Marie-Charlotte Piro 305 495 6539Paramount Bay Corner 3 bedroom $1,650,000Breathtaking bay, ocean and city views from this turn-key, fully furnished and highly upgraded SE corner 3be/3ba. 1818 sq ft + 316 wraparound balcony. Signature Steven G. interiors. Shows like a model!William Harbour, Broker 786 247 1185los on the Bay 2be/2ba rental at $2900/monthCutting edge lanai residence in luxury boutique waterfront condo. Private elevator, high ceilings, 2 parking spaces. Huge terrace with direct access to gorgeous bay front pool. William Harbour, Broker 786 247 1185Welcome Art Basel!A fascinating parallel between Contemporary Art prices and Miami Metro area house prices! Both markets have already recuperated respectively 20 and 28%, with stronger and faster recovery for the top 10% of the market. Luxury is always a strong value. Contact us today to secure your property purchase in the fastest recovering, most under-leveraged and most under-valued real estate market on the planet! William Harbour, Broker 786 247 1185 Little Havanna Multifamily $750,000Recently renovated 13-unit building located few blocks from the exclusive Brickell Area, in Little Havana, steps from the new multi-million dollar Marlins Stadium! Cap rate 11.32%Marie-Charlotte Piro 305 495 6539 Now its being ripped apart by construction workers with blowtorches and jackhammers. The entire building, formerly known as the Little River Center, wont be demolished, explains Fausto Al for the buildings new owner. Instead itll serve as the skeleton for a 110-unit affordable housing project. A Presidente Supermarket will be built on an adjoining parking lot just west of the building. The developer for both projects is dente Supermarkets, a chain of 26 South Florida grocery stores aimed at Hispanic shoppers. PAR Family Investments Inc., bought the building and the 2.5-acre parcel for $3 million this past March. The seller was a subsidiary of Sabadell Bank, which foreclosed on the property two years ago. The Sabadell subsidiary million balloon mortgage that PAR Family Investments must pay in full by 2017, according to public records. ing on plans for the affordable-housing venture into that highly regulated and experienced builder of affordable hous ing. We can do this project ourselves, notes, have already been submitted to the City of Miami for approval. If all goes well, the new market will be completed in less than eight months. The Presidente chain is no stranger to this neighborhood. A Presidente market operated for six year just a few says Presidente left that space in March 2011 because the lease expired and the owner of the property wanted too much money for the rent. Sabor Tropical, another locally owned supermarket chain that targets the Hispanic market, took over the space, agreeing not only to sign a ten-year lease but to invest $1 million rehabbing the building. Now both supermarkets will compete for immigrant, workingclass customers living west of Biscayne Boulevard. Sabor Tropicals business, the Presidente store. There are a lot of clients here for everybody, he insists. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Tale of Two BanksContinued from page 56 Matkov admits that Dade Heritage Trust hadnt bothered to protect the Herald building earlier because they assumed it didnt need it. Until Genting announced they were going to demolish the building, it didnt cross our minds, she says. The Herald was such a strong you just assumed it would always be there. Its really a shame that theyve chosen to leave the downtown area. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Historic or UglyContinued from page 60 BT photo by Erik Bojnansky

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62 Neighborhood Correspondents: AVENTUR aA When Oversight Is OverlookedA lawsuit against Aventura and its city manager raises some very disturbing questionsBy Jay Beskin BT ContributorThere is a spring ritual in Aventura, and it is not housecleaning. It is the city commissions annual review of city manager Eric Soroka. This is how it works. At a morning workshop, which almost no residents attend, the city manager asks for an annual raise of $10,000 and a $10,000 lump-sum bonus. Each of the commission ers commends the manager on performing an outstanding job during the previous year, and then they unanimously approve his minutes. Thats it. Nary a critical comment, or even a recommendation for how the man ager might improve his performance. A gambling man might want to bet that this 15-year-old ritual may change next spring. This past November 2, after a monthlong trial, a Miami-Dade jury in state court awarded former Aventura charter school principal Katherine Murphy $155 million in damages against the city and Soroka for, among other things, harassment, slander, and creating a discriminatorily abusive working environment during Murphys tenure at the school, known as Aventura City of Excellence School (ACES). That sum probably exceeds the limits of the citys insurance coverage by 15 times, and is approximately $137 million in excess of Aventuras carefully safeguarded reserve accounts for use in an emergency. Well, this judgment just might be the emergency. Or maybe not. Lest you worry that property taxes order to pay this penalty, just three business days after the jurys decision, Judge Rosa Rodriguez, who presided over the case, tossed out the award. Ben Kuehne, an attorney for Murphy and one of the more esteemed members of the Florida Bar, remarked that to overturn the jurys work so quickly was unprecedented. Kuehne says Murphy will appeal. The city is not yet off the hook. Murphy, who was the schools her case in the federal courts after being terminated in 2006. Both the federal trial court and appeals court found that, even if some of her allegations were true, she had no claims that could be remedied by federal law. However, the federal courts state court. Murphys claims have now been addressed in three judicial forums, and certain allegations continue to be litigated. If any of them are true, they would besmirch the governance of our City of Excellence. Here is a summary of some of the allegations contained in Murphys Photo courtesy Ben Kuehne

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complaint. That a jury apparently found them credible is alarming, and raises very disturbing questions. First, the manager allegedly direct ed vulgarities and obscenities, some containing unwelcome sexual com ments, at Murphy. Soroka also alleg edly threatened her for speaking with commissioners, even under the most innocuous of circumstances. In addi tion, the complaint claims that Soroka ordered Murphy, despite her protest, to turn over certain student records to the city clerk, even though the law says those records cannot leave the custody Has Soroka behaved similarly toward other members of the city staff? Has he created such a hostile work environment in Aventura that city employees are fearful for their jobs if they question him? Can the city attract the best and brightest employees if they know theyll not be free to say what they think? Is the commission failing to receive important information about the city administration because employees are afraid to speak candidly? Second, Murphys complaint states that, although the city commission functions as the ACES board of directors and is obli gated to exercise continuing oversight of the school, nevertheless, Soroka required his name to be listed as the chair of the schools with the Miami-Dade School District, and made all decisions unilaterally and indepen dently of the governing board. Indeed the boards representative to the School Advisory Council is not one of its own, but rather the manager. Kuehne claims that ACES is the only school he knows of that operates under the control of a city manager and not an experienced education professional. Murphys complaint also makes note of a policy that allows nonresident employ ees of ACES to enroll their own children at the school, thereby precluding some number of Aventura children from enroll ing. Did the manager establish that policy? Is the commission even aware of it? How can the commission properly oversee the school if one of its own members does not participate with administrators, teachers, and parents on the School Advisory Council, and if as a result, all information gets bottled up in Third, Florida law requires that all city vendors must go through a neutral bidding process for large contracts. Applicants are scored by a set of criteria, including design. In the contract to build ACES, Soroka allegedly determined that his favored contractor would build the school, even though that contractor failed to present any design plans. Did the city enter into an expensive contract that subverted the legal bidding process? Fourth, the commission exercises direct oversight and control over three municipal positions: the city manager, the city clerk, and the city attorney. None of these positions is answerable to the other. The purpose for this is to ensure there is system of checks and balances in our city, and that accountability rests solely with the commission. Yet the city clerk, who is married to the manager, may have taken direct orders from him with respect to the allegedly illegal custody of school records. Has the clerk in fact improperly taken direction from the manager? Not surprisingly, the managers son is employed by the city attorney, which is the the manager, who is the father of one of its attorneys, or to the city commission? been counseling the commission on how to proceed in the Murphy matter? If they have, wouldnt that represent an inherent sion have considered its strategy outside the presence of the manager? Perhaps none of these allegations, even if true, rises to the level of illegality. But for a city that prides itself on excellence, even the possibility that the managers conduct has included vulgarities and obscenities is shameful. That our residents may not be receiving the best possible government is unacceptable, and that the city may still be liable for $155 million is untenable. Its time for commissioners to exercise their oversight function, and they should hire independent counsel to assist them. Then maybe there will be a true housecleaning next spring. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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64 Neighborhood Correspondents: MIA mM I A T LARGE GG oodbye, AA niseOur correspondents beloved cocker spaniel dies at age 18, leaving her owner with half-a-lifetime of memoriesBy Wendy Doscher-Smith BT Contributor   Ive avoided my laptop for the past week. Not because I didnt have a topic, but because I did. Here I am again in grimly familiar territory: a dog tribute. This time its a memorial to my cocker spaniel, Anise, who was more than a pet. Among other designations, she was a landmark. What else do you call an 18-year-old dog? dogs my children, really die in front of me. Two were ill and had to be put down, and Anise, well, her heart just stopped. None of it gets any easier, and each case offers its own personal bouquet of horrors, snapshots of the end that replay on a loop in ones mind. Eigh teen years is a long time to have a pet or maintain any relationship. Just ask divorce lawyers. Since I had Anise for 18 years, her death conjures up memo ries not just of her, but also of other events. (Ill take that double whammy with cheese, thanks!) Simply put, Anise, as she was known last six, was always here. And now, just like that, she isnt. Anise was given to me as a gift when I was a college senior. Im now 38. Had Anise been human, I might be dropping her off at her college dorm, instead of deciding on the destination of her ashes. You are never prepared to outlive your children, even if they are furry. Yet that is the fate of every responsible dog lover/owner. The irony is, I started worrying about Anise passing a few years ago, when she would sleep so deeply she would awake with a start. But as she trooped on, energetic as ever, I stopped thinking about it. Anise had a spirit that seemed too stubborn to go. (We joked that if she heard us mention her seniorcitizen status, there would be hell to pay.) and on her own terms. Typical Anise! mid-1990s, before cell phones, the Interjob, and marriage. There were landlines. BT photo by Wendy Doscher-Smith 305-538-8835 | www.miamibeachhealth.org | Healthcare made easy.Serving the medical needs of the Miami Beach community for more than 35 yearsMiami Beach Community Health Center North | 11645 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 103-104, Miami, FL, 33181

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Online dating and Facebook did not exist. The Walkman, not the iPod, was the portable music listening device of the day. Print media was a thriving industry, the Twin Towers stood, and eating organic food was considered freakish. When I was sick, it was Anise who gave me the most comfort. When I went on a date, it was Anise who gave her approval, and when my heart was broken, gave me her soft fur to cry into. Anise lived with one parrot, countless cats, and many dogs, but from the start, she was independent-minded, preferring the com pany of people to animals. In her later years (Im talking the last 12), Granny was a feisty curmudgeon who demanded her meals be served on time and her treats to be tasty. There are people who believe dogs do not have souls, that they are meant to live outside, and that the love for an animal is inferior to that which is between humans. I feel sorry for those people, because they have a limited capacity for love. To never know the love of a dog is to miss out on life itself. And if life is a lonely road, grief is that unmarked, unpaved turnoff you see at night from the highway. The one that makes you shudder a bit because you wonder where it leads, at some point, travels down that road, and they do it alone. The difference is how you handle the gravel underfoot. If I drank, I would take my grief neat; no ice diluting my feelings or olive juice tainting my recollections. You cannot heal if you dont face your injuries. Its the rip-the-BandAid-off approach. It hurts a eventually, the sting subsides. Family and friends try to help, but in the end, grief claims the individual. And grief is greedy. Grief steals your joy, your time, and in some cases, your sanity, temporarily or otherwise. But grief is also your friend; without it, you would not be able to continue. In the days after Anise died, I went have multiple dogs.) Twice. I heard footsteps behind me and thought it was her wanting to go out, but it was another of our dogs. I saw a shape in my periphery, and did a double take, but it was a dog bed. Ive been sleeping with her blanket. Crying jags come and go at will. I can still see Anise in the pet store in Gainesville, in that glass enclosure with the For Sale: $300 sign above her small black body and white nose. She was a tiny thing, just three months old, glancing up at me tentatively with big, brown eyes. On the car ride back to my town that small space) and marveled at how own. I decided to name her Anise, after group of schoolchildren would surround us, all petting at once. While a puppy, people often commented on how her nose looked like it was dipped in whipped eyes, and standout white nose, Anise was The bond a person has with his or her dog cannot be matched. Much to their credit, dogs are not people. They are not as evolved, and therefore, para doxically, seem somehow more evolved. Their love is unconditional, and that human. Its simply not in our nature. I think that is why some dog lovers prefer their dogs to their spouses, partners, children, and grandchildren. I hear it constantly: Oh, Id trade my husband (or wife, or child) for my dog any day! they say. Or This is the in the blank once again) doesnt like it, they can leave. But the dog stays! Usually these people claim to be surprised by their admission. Im not. And if they laugh uncomfortably afterward and say, Oh, just kidding, I look at them directly and reply, I know youre not. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com With her long, oppy ears, big eyes, and standout white nose, Anise was the dictionary denition of adorable. The Pleasure Garden Miami Design District rrfnr rtbnr nrr

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66 Neighborhood Correspondents: BRICKELL / DOWNTOWNThe Power of Thinking SmallSidewalks, streetlights, and signs arent sexy, but theyre necessary if we want to create a more vibrant downtownBy Craig Chester BT ContributorThink Big. Its a mantra preached by entrepreneurs, politicians, business people, motivational speakers, and coaches. But is that motto really the key to releasing the potential of downtown Miami? The think big catchphrase has played out quite extravagantly before our eyes in Miami over the past 15 years or so. Grandiose projects like the Adrienne Arsht Center, American Airlines Arena, Marlins Park, and mega-condos galore come to mind. The Miami Art Museum and Miami Science Museum are both under construction, and a downtown resort casino could be on the horizon. These projects represent tremendous investments geared toward turning downtown Miami into a cultural and entertainment hub on a par with those of other leading world cities. When measured individually, the new cultural and entertainment destinations can boast varying degrees of success. But big, expensive projects are not a foolproof formula for urban revitalization. The vitality of a city isnt measured by the annual revenue or number of visitors to a particular attraction. A citys dynamism is greater than the sum of its parts, and urban experience that enhance the quality of a place and foster affection toward it. There are a series of questions we should be asking about life in downtown Miami that are emphatically about the small and simple things: Are the sidewalks clean and inviting, or are they caked with old chewing gum and poorly lit? Are there public maps to guide people around? Is the transit system easily navigable? Are there attractive public spaces with places to congregate? Is bicycle parking readily available? Are there places for children? Pets? Adequate crosswalks and crossing times? Does walking feel safe and inviting? If the answer to some of these ques tions is no, the solutions are usually simple, relatively inexpensive, and can offer a high return on investment. Their importance must not be dismissed, though it some times feels like these basic livability issues are hardly being addressed. I spend a lot of time downtown and often imagine myself in the shoes of a like? One place new visitors frequently wind up is the Metromover, Miamis elevated transit system. For a free service with a seemingly simple route network (three loops, as they are called), the Metromover can be fraught with poten tial misadventures. While the maps on the station platforms identify the three loops using distinct colors (blue, pink, and orange), the maps onboard the actual Saint Martha Yamaha2012-2013 Concert SeriesPaul Posnak, Founding Artistic Director December 15, 2012 at 7:30 p.m. TO PURCHASE TICKETS Visit saintmartha.tix.com or call 1-800-595-4849 or 305-751-0005 or purchase at the church office or at door.For more information please call 305-458-0111, or 305-751-0005. $10 General Admission $20 Blue Circle Meet the artists at our after-concert reception in the Atrium, included with your tickets. St. Martha in the Shores 9301 Biscayne Blvd., Miami ShoresAll programs are subject to change without notice.Artwork by Edward SorelThis Concert sponsored by: The Symphonettes Alfred Allen Lewis and Ralph Lutrin BT photo by Craig Chester

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cars inexplicably abandon those colors, instead using three different shades of bluish-gray to demarcate the same exact routes. Confused yet? As the train approaches, you need to make sure youre boarding the right loop. A digital display on the platform is supposed to tell you this information, but when the screens are frequently unintel ligible or not operational, this poses a real problem. A recurring sight is a confused rider sticking his or her head inside a mo mentarily stopped train to ask other riders which loop the train is on. The typical reaction is a lot of shoulder shrugging. If you are fortunate enough to arrive at your destination without boarding the wrong train, many of the stations lack crosswalks at their exit points to the ing welcome in an unfamiliar place. maddeningly frustrating. Why must it this experience has on visitors must not be underestimated. Presently, popular destinations like the Arsht Center and American Airlines Arena sit on islands lacking any integration with their surroundings. Are people leaving the Arsht Center or the arena likely to visit the restaurants or shops downtown? Will they walk there? The answer is probably not, if the walking conditions are as uninviting as they currently are. opment Authority drafted a master plan for downtown titled, The Epicenter of the Americas. It outlines a number of projects intended to enhance our position as a business and cultural epicenter. many of the smaller details that would enhance the downtown experience: improved pedestrian conditions, public art installations, more ways to get around (like trolleys and pedicabs), and enriched public spaces, among others. While the plan is well intentioned, progress has not exactly been transpiring at warp speed. That is where ordinary citizens like revitalization of downtown by executing low-cost but impactful projects on their own. Their mission statement is powerful: We will be the manifestation of positive force downtown. Using both sanctioned and unsanctioned tactics, we will work to improve the safety, beauty, and prosperity endure and thrive if it is to have a future; we are the agents of that success. Where bureaucracy fails, we will prevail. encourage visitors to the recent Red Bull Flugtag event at Bayfront Park to venture across Biscayne Boulevard and offer. While unsanctioned by any local authorities, the initiative had the blessing of many local business owners. simple walking directions to things like destinations, local businesses, and also people could interact with the project. People tend to overestimate the amount of time it takes to walk someshowed people just how close things actually are. These types of interventions quick, cheap, often temporary projects that aim to make a small part of a city more lively or enjoyable have a new name: tactical urbanism. Guerrilla gardening, convert ing parking lots into temporary parks, pop-up retail shopping, weed bombing (painting brightly colored weeds on forlorn lots) are all examples of tactical urbanism projects that ordinary citizens While its easy to be seduced by the all for absent urban vitality. To truly collectively we need to take a closer look at the human-scale experience how we interact with downtown on a daily, street-level basis and perhaps follow the lead of Enrique Pealosa, the former mayor of Bogota, Colombia, who declared, We invested in high-quality sidewalks, pedestrian streets, parks, bicycle paths, libraries; we got rid of thousands of cluttering commercial signs and planted trees. All our efforts have one objective: happiness. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com classicalsouthorida.orgClassical Music. Its In Our Nature.Just like all of us, classical music lives and breathes. Make it part of your lifestyle. Tune to Classical South Florida on the radio or online. Its in your nature.

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68 Neighborhood Correspondents: NORTH MIAMIHome Is Where the Art Is North Miamis MOCA has garnered international attention, but it could really use some local love and moneyBy Mark Sell BT ContributorAs surely as the sun will rise on Tuesday, December 4, some 4000 souls will descend on 125th Street for the fourth annual Vanity Fair party at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in North Miami. This years international crowd of artists, dealers, curators, investors, media mavens, and celebrities will join North Miami council members, city residents, and art fans from all over South Florida. The peg for this years celebration: the December 5 opening of an exhibition by Bill Viola, whose meditative, BudNew York Times Thats a big deal for this fractious, gritty city of 60,000. While last years party featured a quirky celebrity A-list that included Calvin Klein, Donna Karan, and the mayor of Port-au-Prince (now practically a sister city to North Miami), this years will feature fashion designer and Viola patron Stella McCartney, daughter of Sir Paul. She will likely bring some boldface names with her. And who knows? Perhaps a Kardashian or two will drop in. (Kourtney and Kim are currently ensconced in an 11,000-square-foot Sans series Kourtney and Kim Take Miami .) The real queen bee of the proceedings, of course, will be Bonnie Clearwater, MOCAs founding executive director and curator. She is fresh from a November 14 reception at the White House, where MOCA received the National Medal for Museum and Library Service, the highest honor American museums and libraries can receive for service to their communities. Over the past 16 years, Clearwater has transformed this municipal museum adjoining city hall from a funky outlier into an international force in art and community service; its youth-accented programs serve 20,000 people a year through countywide magnet, after-school, and teen programs, among them Women on the Rise, which takes local artists to juvenile detention centers to help teens express themselves through art. MOCAs very success has strained the museum beyond its capacity, prompting the need for expansion. And yet for all the acclaim and the victories, outreach and pushback collided this year for MOCA and Clearwater, as the museum took its case to the public and came up short. On August 14, North Miami residents nar rowly rejected a 20-year, $15 million bond issue to double the museums size and Photo courtesy MOCA

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triple its exhibition space. The bond issue would have cost city property owners $48 a year per $100,000 in assessed property valuation. It simply proved too big a pill to swallow for the hard-up residents who crowd city hall when water assessments go up three dollars a month, and perhaps too bitter a pill for some of the well-to-do in the eastern neighborhoods, who take a jaded view of the city council, particularly Mayor Andre Pierre. Of course I would have liked to see a positive response, Clearwater says, adding that the city and the MOCA board are discussing the options, and the architects are completing the working drawings and construction documents. Were moving forward with the expansion as envisioned. Prominent opponents of the bond issue, who would not talk on the record for this column, have no harsh words for Clearwater or MOCA, but they believe that private donors, rather than residents, should fund the museums expansion. week summer campaign for the bond issue dishonest in failing to disclose to property owners the real cost of the proposed measure. While that is history now, the answer to the question of how much of the $15 million would be private and how much public or if it will be raised at all is anyones guess. One possible clue may come on December 11, when the North $2.5 million of the $17.5 million bundle the city recently received from Biscayne Landing developer Michael Swerdlow. The agenda item raises the possibility that public money for the museum may be back in the mix. (MOCA was a big factor in the original Swerdlow deal with the city, a subject that has resurfaced since the defeat of the bond issue.) The bond issues failure was a of attachment of some people in the community to MOCAs programs, says Councilman Scott Galvin, arguably the museums most passionate advocate on the council (along with his otherwise frequent adversary, Mayor Pierre). The closeness of the vote tells you that there is certainly a large percentage of residents who support expansion of MOCA at the $15 million level. I think the conversation will veer back in that direction before too long. In its relatively short history, the museums annual budget has increased roughly fourfold, to $4 million, but the tution has grown only modestly, from $1 million to $1.3 million. The other $2.7 million of the museums annual budget tion, supported by private donations. Galvin sees an upside in the bond issues narrow defeat, in that it has refocused the discussion on the museum and its good works, which extend well beyond the city limits. (The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation has taken notice of the museums outreach efforts and in January launched a $100,000a-year challenge grant for community outreach over three years.) We go far beyond what any museum does, Clearwater says, making a case that MOCAs community outreach has our spring campaign alone, we got 2000 households in North Miami as registered members. Conservatively, thats 4000 people and thats just registered people. At Jazz at MOCA on the last Friday of every month, at least a third of the audience is from North Miami. And with our education programs, no one is telling kids they have to be here with the self-esteem, the freedom they feel, the friends they are making, they have a safe place, off the street, where they have fun and meet like-minded people. (Full disclosure: Both my daughters went through the childrens art programs at MOCA. The youngest became a star junior docent, opening gates of contem porary art perception to her sometimes is today a busy intern with her own aspi rations to become an art curator or dealer.) Another art museum director with Clearwaters national reputation might be tempted to make a move to an institution more fully embraced by its community, but Clearwater appears to have no plans to leave, despite this summers setback. I love it, she says of her work. Just look at what weve been able to do. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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70 Neighborhood Correspondents: BELLE MEADEIts Flori-duh, in a LL ands lide No question about it our inability to run an election makes us the most backward state in the unionBy Frank Rollason BT ContributorWhat a debacle. What an embarrassment. What a demonstrative showing of how inept our beautiful state is when it comes to dealing with elections. Once again our state has lived up to its well-earned moniker of Flori-duh From the governor on down to local ofelected and appointed professional posipresidential election and the results of that supposed preparation have made Flori-duh the laughingstock of the rest of the nation. duh still does not have its results forwarded to the rest of the nation. (Florida after the election.) It is unbelievable to up to the challenge. it werent so sad. Then we have the debacle dealing with is alive and well in Flori-duh? And where $3300 Valid with coupon. Not to be combined with other offers. New students only. A New Aveda Concept Salonwww.SevenSeasSpaSalon.com Receive...30 Minute Massage 30 Minute Facial Maninicure and Pedicure Complimentary Valet Complimentary Champagne Access to Tiki Hut on the beachALL forDAY Mon-Thurs 16701 Collins AvenueLocated at the Sunny Isles Beach inside the Newport Beachside Hotel & Resort Photo courtesy ThinkProgress.org

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Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez countermand that operation and order the doors closed, thereby incurring the wrath of the masses demanding their constitutional rights to an absentee ballot or they would Storm the Bastille! About an hour later the mayor came to his senses and reopened the doors, thus defusing another black eye for Flori-duh, or at least recasting the whole thing as a minor glitch. Regardless of how this particular incident materialized, the buck stops with the mayor on this one. On this issue, the mayor and no one else owes the public an apology. Then we have the miscues on Election Day itself. Multiple machines failed to oper ate properly, which is not unexpected for any device that combines mechanics with computers. Keep in mind, however, that Miami-Dade County spent millions of our tax dollars to replace all voting machines in an effort to rectify the hanging-chad syn drome that marked the 2000 election. The votes would not only count but be recorded for the candidates we had selected. Why not bring back the old gray monsters that mechanically registered our vote, kept a paper record of all votes cast, and best of all, gave the voter a sense of mission accomplished when the red handle controlling the curtain was pulled back and you could see all the keys pop back up as each vote selected was registered? Call me a dinosaur, but that was voting. Aside from the mechanical failings, the biggest black eye was the length of lines and the inability of our elections de partment to adequately plan for this. I mean, we were all told weeks ago to expect round-theblock waits because the ballot was so long. So if I were the elections supervisor, I would have gone to my boss and said, Boss, we are facing another embarrassing moment for Miami-Dade County if we are incapable of handling the anticipated voter turnout with an inadequate number of machines and personnel to tackle the work load. I remember as a kid that my dad would instill in me the responsibility to vote. He would tell me that all over the world people stand in the bitter cold all through the night to be able to stuff a rfffntbf bft nnrrrrb nnnbntfrf tLOOKING FOR PEACE & UNITY?The True Brotherhood of Man DoubleTree by Hilton Grand Hotel Valet Parking is Free paper ballot into a box. And today, at the ripe old age of 67, I see my fathers admonitions coming home to roost as many, many voters here stood in lines into the wee hours of the morning to register their vote long after the presidential race had been called, making their vote on that particular race irrelevant. Can you imagine that you have endured all the mudslinging, robocalls, presidential debates, shortened earlyvoting periods, and been jerked around on the process of obtaining and submitting end that you are in line to vote for the President of the United States in the year 2012 and your vote does not make a rats ass bit of difference as to who will occupy the White House for the next four years? Something is wrong, folks, if we, in the most technologically advanced coun try in the world, with all our smartphones, iPads, and the like, have to stand in a line for hours to cast a vote. We have put a man on the moon and a mechanical rover on Mars, and were still standing in line to cast our vote for president. And even that process is being screwed up by those we hire to make it happen. How pathetic. The really sad part is that, now that the election is over, we will all go back to our mundane lives and this, too, shall steps will be taken to assure that this will never happen again and perhaps some underlings will be subjected to disciplin ary action (probably not deserved) and we may even have to spend some more of that this election brought to light. The bottom line, however, is that, regardless of what actions take place post-election, come 2016, we will still be Flori-duh to the rest of the nation. And, my friends, as Lily Tomlins child character used to say, thats the truth! Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Your vote does not make a rats ass bit of difference as to who will occupy the White House for the next four years.

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72 Culture: THE ARTSOff the Basel Path 2012Some recommended stops beyond the main event at the convention center By Melissa Wallen BT ContributorM Plane Text : Plane Text Plane Text by John Baldessari, Mel Bochner, Martin Creed, Jenny Holzer, the Estate of Sol LeWitt, Jack Pierson, Rich ard Prince, Kay Rosen, Alan Ruppersberg, Gary Simmons, Alexis Smith, Hank Willis Thomas, and Lawrence Weiner; December 4 through 9, 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Ragnar Kjartanssons Bliss : Bliss The Marriage of Figaro Bliss, by Ragnar Kjartansson, Decem ber 8, 6:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m., New World Symphony, 500 17th St., Miami Beach, 305-673-3330, free outdoor seating KURT : KURT Bliss Wild Blue Yonder Plane Text

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landmark music video Smells Like Teen Spirit, and music by close friend and Sonic Youth frontman Thurston Moore. All were missing is a seance. KURT by Adarsha Benjamin, Ryan Painters Painting a documentary by Emile de Antonio: While were busy get ting caught up in the glitz, glamour, and commerce of the contemporary art world, we should remember the creative ge niuses behind it all. Filmmaker Emile de Antonios restored documentary, is considered a landmark study enced Abstract Expressionists between the 1940s and 1970s. Artists interviewed include Frank Stella, Willem de Kooning, Jasper Johns, and Barnett Newman. A interest in the history of modern art. Theaster Gatess Soul Manufactur ing Corporation : Inspired by educa tional and entertainment programming brought to illiterate workers in the early industrial era, Theaster Gatess powerful yet simple multi-city projects built into art exhibi tions. By employing the skills of work ers who will create arbitrary things, the artist presents a bold statement on the value of production and process. Yoga instructors, DJs, and readers will entertain and instruct both workers and the audience during the exhibition. Theaster Gates was recently awarded the inaugural Vera List Center Prize for Art and Politics, so be prepared to face some tough questions pertaining to race, labor, and art. Design at Fairchild: Sitting Naturally and Pardo on the Allee: Theres no better time of the year to visit Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden a lush oasis showcas globe than during the mosquito-free winter. Thankfully, the powers-that-be have risen to the challenge of somehow making Fairchild seem even more magical, and have graced the grounds with hun dreds of lamps by Cuban-born artist and designer Jorge Pardo. Pardo on the Allee is the inaugural exhibition in Fairchilds Design at Fairchild Arts Initiative, and was originally shown at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. Also on display are sculp casual passersby can relax while savoring the views throughout the park. Nightlife Highlights: Two hotel installa tions stand proudly on opposite ends of the spectrum of good and bad taste. First, the Delano will re-create Club Silencio, the mysterious cabaret from David Lynchs surrealist nightmare, under the direction of the man himself. Expect lots of pantomiming, exquisite designer furniture, and expensive taste in coffee-table reading material. Meanwhile, the Lords South Beach hotel will be trans formed into an oversize ravenous black dog named Gypsy who will tell your future by barking and discharging smoke, thanks to the s artist of the moment, Desi Santiago. While instalward, theres no denying that its going to be one extremely dark, fun trip. Soul Manufacturing Corporation KURT

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74 Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION 1530 Collins Ave., Miami Beach Aqua Hotel 206-399-5506 www.aquaartmiami.com December 6 through 9 Hours: December 6, noon to 9 p.m. December 7 through 8, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10   919 NW 2nd A ve., Miami www.artafricamiami.com 305-576-7101 December 7 through 9 Hours: December 7 and 8, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Midtown Miami 110 NE 36th St. 212-268-6148 www.artasiafair .com December 5 through 9 Hours: December 5 through 8, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission: $20 Miami Beach Convention Center 1901 Convention Center Dr. www .artbaselmiamibeach.com December 6 through 9 Hours: December 6 through 8, noon to 8 p.m. December 9, noon to 6 p.m. Admission: $24-$90 Midtown Miami 3011 NE 1st Ave. www.artexpo-miami.com December 5 through 9 Hours: December 5, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 6 through 8, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission: $15 Midtown Miami NE 1st A venue at 31st Street 520-529-1108 www.art-miami.com December 4 through 9 Hours: December 5, 6, and 8, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 7, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission: $20 Midtown Miami 3101 NE 1st A ve., Miami 305-515-8573 www.contextartmiami.com December 5 through 9 Hours: December 5, 6, and 8, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 7, 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission: $20-65 Miami Beach Convention Center Meridian A venue and 19th Street 305-572-0866 www.designmiami.com December 5 through 9 Hours: December 5, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. December 6 through 8, noon to 8 p.m. December 9, noon to 6 p.m. Admission: $25 2505 N. Miami A ve., Miami 917-650-3760 www.fountainartfair.com December 7 through 9 Hours: December 7 and 8, noon to 7 p.m. December 9, noon to 5 p.m. Admission: $10-15 1850 Collin s Ave., Miami Beach Suites of Dorchester 212-674-6095 www.inkartfair.com December 5 through 9 Hours: December 5, noon to 5 p.m. December 6 through 8, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 9, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Admission: Free 2136 NW 1st A ve., Miami www.justmadmia.com December 7 through 9 Hours: December 7 and 8, noon to 8 p.m. December 9, noon to 7 p.m. Admission: $15-25 Midtown Miami NE 1st A venue at 30st Street 212-260-8100 www.miami-project.com December 4 through 9 Hours: December 5, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. December 6 and 8, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 7, 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission: $20-35 400 SE 2nd A ve., Miami James L. Knight Center www.miamiriverartfair.com December 5 through 9 Hours: December 5 through 8, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. December 9, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission: $10-30 6701 Collin s Ave., Miami Beach Deauville Beach Resort 212-594-0883 www.newartdealers.org December 6 through 9 Hours: December 6, 2 to 8 p.m. December 7 and 8, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission: Free Midtown Miami Buena Vista Avenue at NW 34th Street 305-318-6554 www.overturemiami.com December 5 through 9 Hours: December 5 through 8, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission: $15 1 100 Biscayne Blvd., Miami Sky House Marquis 212-604-0519 www.poolartfair.com December 7 through 9 Hours: 3 to 10 p.m. 1400 N. Miami A ve., Miami The Ice Palace 212-255-2327 www.pulse-art.com December 6 through 9 Hours: December 6, 1 to 7 p.m. December 7 and 8, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission: $20-25 Midtown Miami 3011 NE 1st Ave., 917-273-8621 www.reddotfair.com December 4 through 9 Hours: December 5 through 9, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 6 through 8, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission: $15 Untitled (Copied II) GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE! rfntbf305.603.8540rrwww.CleanStartMiami.com10% OFFAll ProductsFREEYoga ClassFirst Time Students $16 Value $20 OFFColon HydrotherapyRegular Price $100 By Appointment Only b50% OFFIonic Foot DetoxPull Toxins From Your Body Out Of Your Feet. Regular $25 b$30 OFFSignature Detox Facial With PeelRegular Price $125 b

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Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION Midtown Miami 110 NE 36th St. 212-268-1522 www.scope-art.com December 5 through 9 Hours: December 5 through 8, 1 1 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission: $20 46 NW 36th St., Miami 305-448-2060 www.sculptmiami.com December 3 through 9 Hours: 1 1 a.m. to 8 p.m. Admission: Free 1732 Collin s Ave., Miami Beach Catalina Hotel www.select-fair.com December 6 through 9 Hours: December 6 through 8, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission: Free 2637 N. Miami A ve., Miami 973-452-3283 www.seven-miami.com December 4 through 9 Hours: December 4, 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. December 5 through 8, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission: Free 12th Street and Ocean Drive, Miami Beach www.art-untitled.com December 5 through 9 Hours: December 5 through 8, 1 1 a.m. to 7 p.m. December 9, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission: $20 1001 Collins Ave., Miami Beach Essex House 1020 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach Clevelander Hotel 312-612-2270 www.vergeartfair.com December 7 through 9 Hours: December 7 and 8, noon to 8 p.m. December 9, noon to 6 p.m. Admission: Free 101 NE 40th St., Miami 305-573-2101 www.101exhibit.com December 4 through January 31: Se7n by Chambliss Giobbi 233 NW 36th St., Miami 305-576-4278 Call gallery for exhibition information 4949 NE 2nd Ave., Miami 305-751-8367 www .acnd.net Through January 18: Art from Within with Yunier Cervino Oliver, and Jos Ramirez 2294 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 786-287-7789 www.albertolinerogallery.com Call gallery for exhibition information 2630 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-438-0220 www .alejandravonhartz.net December 3 through January 26: Paper Folding by Odalis Valdivieso Ceremony by Matthew Deleget Painted/Stacked 2012 by Russell Maltz Rio Corrente, Running River by Artur Lescher 2242 NW 1st Pl., Miami 305-576-1150 Through January 20: V idente by Marta Maria Perez Bravo Implications with Veronica Grassi, Paula Herrera, Diana Maguire, Roberto Martinez, and Yanina Monti 1 NE 40th St., Miami 305-573-5730 www.artfusiongallery .com Through December 17: Fusion IX: Seducing the Globe with various artists 348 NW 29th St., Miami 305-573-4661 www .artnouveaugaleria.com Through January 30: Rafael Barrios 171 NW 36th St., Miami 305-573-4009 www.jacques-harvey .com Call gallery for exhibition information 2215 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-237-3559 http://artseenspace.wordpress.com Call gallery for exhibition information 2441 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-571-9410 www.ascasogallery.com Through January 31: Recent Works by Jos Antonio Davila 561 NW 32nd St., Miami 305-576-2828 Through January 18: If a Tree Falls, a Chain Reaction... with various Bakehouse artists, juried by Carol Jazzar, curated by Ananda DeMello Take Me Home with various Bakehouse artists VIP Reception December 8, 7-11 pm Admission: $10 122 NE 11th St., Miami DWNTWN ArtHouse December 3 through January 15: Kosmas), Simon Denny, Yngve Holen, Ilja Karilampi, Nedberg & Kantun, Katja Novitskova, Halvor Rnning, Timur Si-Qin, Spring Break, Anne de Vries, and Phillip Zach December 8: Weird Miami Bus Tours by Spring Break 2248 NW 1st Pl., Miami 786-999-9735 www .blacksquaregallery.com Through January 5: Scribes House by Pablo Lehmann 100 NE 38th St., Miami 305-491-1526 www .borinquenhealth.org Call gallery for exhibition information 12425 NE 13th Ave. #5, North Miami 305-978-4856 www.bridgeredstudios.com Through January 20: The Rule of Law by Joe Nicastri Paint! with George Bethea, Lucas Blanco, Juan Carballo, Shirley Henderson, Mary Malm, Jordan Massengale, Yolanda Sanchez, and Claudia Scalise 180 NE 39th St., Suite 120, Miami Through December 9: Inventory 03: Experience of a City with Rodolfo Agrella, Bell Design Factory, Jacob Brillh art, Chen Chen and Kai Williams, Paul Clemence, Anabella Georgi, Paul Kopkau, LMNOQ, Lemon Yellow, Shawn Maximo, Mr. O, Luis Pons, Michael Whitney, Amore de Madre, Marko Brajovik, Leo Capote, and Guto Requena Through December 10: Inside/OUT by Ray Azcuy December 1 through 28: Years of Artitude: 19132013 Pataphysics for Dummies with various artists, curated by Swampspace Gallery December 5 through 9: Ping Pong with Robert Chambers, Tommerup / Brant, Jacek Kolasinski, Walter Robinson, Avra Jain, Bhakti Baxter and Mei Xian Qiu, Dmitry Kmelnitski, Susan Sironi, York Chang and Sue Irion, Aldo Bonato, Dirk Bonsma, and Street Art Videos with Dare and others, curated by Anthony Thomas and Team Architecture for Dogs with Atelier Bow Wow, Hiroshi Naito, Kazuyo Sejima, Kengo Kuma, Konstantin Grcic, MVRDV, Reiser + Umemoto, Shigeru Ban, Sou Fujimoto, Torafu, and Toyo Ito, curated by Kenya Hara December 5 through 12: Storefront with Kevin Arrow, Loriel Beltran, Christy Gast, Daniel Clapp, Patti Hernandez, Cristina Lei Rodriguez, Nicolas Lobo, Justin H. Long, Robert Lorie, Soul Food Rickshaw for Sitting

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Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION Hugo Montoya, Gean Moreno, Ernesto Oroza, Carlos Rigau, Cesar Trasobares, and Viking Funeral, curated by Ibett Yanez December 7 through 14: Circumferences Reforming: Peel Till They Bloom by Sumakshi Singh 2750 NW 3rd Ave., Suite 6, Miami 305-571-8100 www.buzz-art.net Through December 14: Carlos Alom 8351 NE 8th Ct., Miami 305-754-2093 www.susannacaldwell.com Through June 1: Mahogany Sculptures and Sculptural Of fering Bowls carved from Florida Hardwoods by Susanna Caldwell 158 NW 91st St., Miami Shores 305-490-6906 www.cjazzart.com By appointment: carol@cjazzart.com Through December 9: Byways by Robert Huff 758 NE 125th St., North Miami 786-202-5554 www .caridigallery.com Through December 15: Aguaviva by Cecilia Sanchez Vegas 3800 NE Miami Ct., Miami www.lccollection.cassina.com Through January 12: The Interior of the Cabanon, Le Corbusier 1952, Cassina Reconstruction 2006 by Le Corbusier curated by Jean-Louis Cohen 541 NW 27th St., Miami 305-571-1415 www .visual.org Call gallery for exhibition information 250 NW 23rd St., Miami 305-292-041 1 www.charestweinberg.com Call gallery for exhibition information Shops at Midtown Miami Store # 120 Buena V ista Blvd., Miami 305-576-1977 www.danielazoulaygallery.com Call gallery for exhibition information 2234 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-573-8110 www.davidcastillogallery.com Through December 31: Dark Flow Lurking with Anna Betbeze, Sanford Biggers, Kate Gilmore, Valerie Hegarty, Pepe Mar, Melvin Martinez, Fabian Pena, Gamaliel Rodriguez, Xaviera Simmons, Shinique Smith, Frances Trombly, and Brenna Youngblood 2043 N. Miami Ave., Miami 305-576-1804 December 5 through January 31: Loris Cecchini 3938 N. Miami Ave., Miami 786-536-7801 www.diasporavibe.net Call gallery for exhibition information 100 NE 1 1th St., Miami DWNTWN ArtHouse 305-607-5527 www.dimensionsvariable.net Through January 5: Paper Folding by Odalis Valdivieso 2620 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 786-486-7248 www.dinamitranigallery.com Through January 11: Paris by Willy Ronis 151 NW 24th St., Miami 305-576-1278 www .dorschgallery.com Call gallery for exhibition information 51 NW 36th St., Miami 305-573-9994 Through January 31: leitmotif by Mauro Giaconi, Omar Barquet, Jos Luis Landet, Gonzalo Fuenmayor, Leonel Matheu, Liliane Eberle, Jorge Mio, Leslie Gabaldon, Yanina Szalkowicz, and Hernan Cedola 2145 NW 2nd Ave., Miami www.durbansegnini.com Through February 19: Painting and Architecture by Cesar Paternosto 46 NW 36th St., Miami 754-422-5942 www.elitearteditions.com Call gallery for exhibition information 50 NE 40th St., Miami 305-438-4383 Through December 7: Retrospective by Mario Velez December 8 through January 1 1: Winter Group Show with Rainer Lagemann, Christian Awe, Douglass Freed, Hunt Slonem, and Mario Velez 2247 NW 1st Pl., Miami 305-448-8976 www .snitzer.com December 1 through January 5: th Anniversary Group Show with Alice Aycock, Zack Balber, Hernan Bas, Jos Bedia, Loriel Beltran, Timothy Buwalda, Zhivago Duncan, Naomi Fisher, Mauricio Gonzalez, Ridley Howard, Jessica Laino, Natalya Laskis, Maria Martinez-Caas, Gavin Perry, Jon Pylypchuk, Bert Rodriguez, Cristina Lei Rodriguez, Diego Singh, Michael Vasquez 125 NW 23rd St., Miami 305-582-6067 www.galeriehelenelamarque.com Call gallery for exhibition information 2085 NW 2nd A ve., Miami 786-266-2445 www.galleryschuster.com Call gallery for exhibition information 2407 NW 2nd A ve., Miami 786-431-1957 www.gallery212miami.com Through January 1: Art Basel 2012 with Pedro Zubizarreta, Sergey Ashkeev, Irina Davydova, Agata Agatowska, Florian Fausch, and Maxim Wakultschik 174 NW 23rd St., Miami 305-571-2288 www.gallerydiet.com Through December 31: The W orking Day by Ohad Meromi 62 NE 27th St., Miami 305-576-0256 www.garynader.com Call gallery for exhibition information 769 NE 125th St., North Miami 786-467-0941 www.generalaudiencepresents.com December 4 through February 2: Y awar Mallku: Look For Me In The Whirlwind by William Cordova 3326 N. Miami Ave., Miami 305-576-1645 www.hardcoreartmiami.com December 3 through March 2: Recycle by Consuelo Castaeda 2294 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-989-3359 www.haroldgolengallery.com Bathtub

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Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITIONThrough December 29: Photography by Blake Fisher 2417 N. Miami A ve., Miami 305-576-9878 www.ideobox.com December 3 through February 15: Between Two Continents: Spanish Geometric Abstraction in Latin America with Manolo Calvo, Jesus de la Sota, Jos Maria de Labra, and Jos Duarte, curated by Adolfo Wilson 301 NW 28th St., Miami 786-310-7490 www .juanruizgallery.com Through December 29: One Of Us Can Be Wrong And Other Essays by Ruben Torres Llorca 123 NW 23rd St., Miami 305-573-8142 www .kabecontemporary.com December 3 through February 28: From Color to Motion by Antonio Asis 46 NW 36th St., Miami 305-448-2060 www .kavachnina.com Through January 10: Eclectic Sweetness by Noemi Sanguinetti The Origin of Originality by Jon Davis 50 NE 29th St., Miami 305-447-3888 www .kelleyroygallery.com Call gallery for exhibition information 48 NW 29th St., Miami 305-200-3047 www .kiwiartsgroup.com Ongoing: William John Kennedys Fine Art Photography Collection of Early Pop Artists 2300 N. Miami Ave., Miami 786-431-1506 www.galerieleliamordoch.com Call gallery for exhibition information 3852 N. Miami A ve., Miami 305-576-8570 www.locustprojects.org Through December 12: Soul Manufacturing Corporation by Theaster Gates Wound, Bound, Tied and Knottedem by Jacin Giordano Bus Shelter Project by Nicole Eisenman 3030 NE 2nd Ave., Miami http://maormiami.org Call gallery for exhibition information 114 NE 40th St., Miami 786-362-5546 Through December 28: Exhibition Beginnings & Ends by Marcus December 7 through 9: Maurice Renoma December 15 through 31: Head in the Clouds by Alain Godon 81 NE 40th St., Miami www.mestizocity .com December 6 through 8: Mestizo City by Henry R. Muoz 300 NE 2nd Ave., Miami Bldg. 1, Room 1365 305-237-3696 www.mdc.edu Through December 21: Sweat with various artists Freedom Tower 600 Biscayne Blvd., Miami 305-237-7700 www.mdc.edu Through December 14: CINT AS Foundation Fellows Competition Exhibition with various artists Through February 2: Toledo/Toledo Full Circle by Isabel and Ruben Toledo Where Ideas Are Born: A Jugglers Notebooks by Manuel Estrada December 1 through January 26: Foreverglades with Cracking Art Group and William Sweetlove 11380 NW 27th Ave., Miami 305-237-1532 www.mdc.edu Through January 11: Passages and Other Exploratory Journeys with Victor Gomez and Alena Fresquet 1 110 SW 104th St., Miami 305-237-2322 www.mdc.edu/kendall December 7 through January 28: TBD with Jennifer Basile, Tony Chirinos, Alberto Meza, and Yomarie Silva 20 NE 41st St., Suite 2, Miami 305-760-9030 www .michaeljongallery.com Through December 1: Crocuta Crocuta by Kristen VanDeventer Shops at Midtown Miami Store #120 Buena V ista Blvd., Miami 516-532-3040 www.michaelperez-artist.com Call gallery for exhibition information 177 NW 23rd St., Miami 631-704-3476 www.myragalleries.com Call gallery for exhibition information New W orld School of the Arts 25 NE 2nd St., Miami 305-237-3597 Call gallery for exhibition information 1800 N. Bayshore Dr., Miami 305-395-3599 Through December 22: W orld Tour of Contemporary Art: Miami 2012 with various artists 2561 N. Miami A ve., Miami 305-573-3572 www.norman-liebman-studio.com Call gallery for exhibition information 2600 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-571-9036 www.oascaniogallery.com Call gallery for exhibition information 743 Washington Ave., Miami Beach www.oh-wow.com December 6 through 9: It Aint Fair with various artists 8650 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 21, Miami 305-458-5085 Through December 31: Animals by Hausey Leplat and Julien Garcia 170-C NW 24th St., Miami 786-333-8404 www .oncearts.com Ongoing: Pablo Gentile, Jaime Montana, Jaime Apraez, and Patricia Chaparro 50 NE 29th St., Miami 305-854-7104 www.oxenbergart.com Through January 3: The Paintings of Ashley Collin s by Ashley Collins The Quintet of the Astonished

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Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION 2450 NW 2nd A ve., Miami 305-573-2400 www.panamericanart.com Through January 5: Barroso 2311 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-534-2184 www.miguelparedes.com Ongoing: Elements of an Artist by Miguel Paredes 4141 NE 2nd A ve., Suite 104, Miami www.primaryprojectspace.com December 6 through January 26: RANEYTOWN by Rebeca Raney 1671 Collins Ave., Miami Beach 305-535-8088 www.sagamorehotel.com December 5 through 9: Fundamental 2012: Selections from the Cricket Taplin Collection with various artists 82 NE 29th St., Miami 305-441-2005 www .artnet.com/sammergallery.html Call gallery for exhibition information 2930 NW 7th A ve., Miami 786-271-4223 www.spinelloprojects.com Through January 5: Closer with Abby Double, Agustina Woodgate, Ana Mendez, Antonia Wright, Federico Nessi, Ingrid Lee, Manny Prieres, Naama Tsabar, Reeve Schumacher, Robert Montgomery, Rowan Smith, Ruben Millares, Sinisa Kukec, and TYPOE 162 NE 50th Terr., Miami 305-992-7652 www.stashgallery.com Call gallery for exhibition information 150 NE 42nd St., Miami http://swampspace.blogspot.com/ swampstyle@gmail.com Call gallery for exhibition information 3223 NE 2nd Ave., Miami 786-536-9799 www.tonywynn.com Ongoing: Patriotica by Tony Wynn r rfnt tbnt rrfntb b ttt n Pleat Construction

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Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION 572 NW 23rd St., Miami www.miamithinkers.com December 7 through 9: Miami Independent Thinkers with various artists 1040 NE 82nd St., Miami By appointment: jacqueline.falcone@gmail.com Through December 12: Marriage, Blood, and Adaptation with Dogan Arslanoglu, Kevin Arrow, P. Scott Cunningham, Sinisa Kukec, Ragnar Kjartansson, Kenton Parker 310 NW 24th St., Miami 305-407-8131 www .thelunchboxgallery.com December 6 through February 2: Craters by Michael G. Zimmerer Jos Joaqun Figueroa, and Rodolfo Vanmarcke 2626 NW 2nd A ve., Miami December 3 through January 6: Anne Marie Was Here by RPM Project 12425 NE 13th A ve., North Miami 305-978-4437 Through December 31: Mumbo Jumbo with Fredric Snitzer and Justin Mills, Bill Henry, Karen Rifas, Allen Walter, and New World School of the Arts Faculty 2750 NW 3rd Ave., Suite 4, Miami 305-284-3161 www.as.miami.edu/art Through January 25: Fifth Annual Cane Art Fair with various artists 2219 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-496-0621 Ongoing: Alexis Torres 2233 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-576-5335 www .waltmanortega.com Through December 22: Barcode by Jorge Enrique Closer by Jerome Lagarrigue NW 2nd Avenue between 25th and 26th streets 305-573-0658 www.thewynwoodwalls.com Ongoing: Wynwood Walls with Retna, How & Nosm, Roa, b., The Date Farmers, Saner, Sego, Liqen, Neuzz, Faile, Vhils, Interesni Kazki, Kenny Scharf, Nunca, Shepard Fairey, Aiko, Ryan McGinness, Stelios Faitakis, and avaf 250 NW 23rd St., Unit 306, Miami 954-235-4758 www .yeelenart.com Call gallery for exhibition information 2534 N. Miami Ave., Miami 305-438-3737 www.zadokgallery.com Through December 2: Tapestries? with Chuck Close, William T. Wiley, Hung Liu, Doug Hall, Enrique Chagoya, Deborah Oropallo, Guy Diehl, and Mesami Teraoka December 6 through February 18: Void and Substance by Li Hui 800 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 305-674-8278 www.artcentersf.org December 1 through January 27: The Gift of the Present Moment by Lazaro Amaral and Chloe Firetto-T oomey December 5 through 26: Migrating Inwards with Luis Garcia-Nerey, Wendy Wischer, Antonia Wright, and David Zalben December 15 through February 17: Smoke Signals: Istwa, Paisajes and Allegories with Onyedika Chuke, Yanira Collado, Lourdes CorreaHowardena Pindell, Jerome Reyes, Carlos Sandoval de Leon, Onajide Shabaka, Noelle Theard, Robert Thiele, Anna Tsouhlarakis, and Mary Valverde 2100 Collins A ve., Miami Beach 305-673-7530 www.bassmuseum.org December 6 through March 17: The Endless Renaissance: Six Solo Artist Projects with Eija Liisa Ahtila, Barry X Ball, Walead Beshty, Hans Peter Feldmann, Ged Quinn, and Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook 1018 N. Miami A ve., Miami 305-455-3380 www.cifo.org December 5 through March 3: Unsaid/Unspoken with various artists, curated by Moacir dos Anjos and Jos Roca 3841 NE 2nd A ve., Miami Dacra 305-531-8700 www.dacra.com Ongoing: Richard Tuttle, Marlene Dumas, John rfn tbrfbt rfbt yevgeniya kats, diana garle, and emily batsford in three sIsters/photo by mitchell zachs WERE HIRING! Biscayne Times is looking for a full-time, experienced account executive for display advertising. Small, enthusiastic staff. Loyal readers and advertisers. Tremendous growth potential. Some house accounts available. Base salary plus generous commissions. Serious money to be made. Please send rsum to publisher Jim Mullin at jim.mullin@biscaynetimes.com.

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Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITIONBaldessari, Elizabeth Peyton, and Kai Althoff, curated by Tiffany Chestler 23 NE 41st St., Miami 305-576-6112 www .delacruzcollection.org Ongoing: Works from the Collection of Rosa and Carlos de la Cruz with various artists 10975 SW 17th St., Miami 305-348-2890 Through December 9: Material and Meaning: Earthenware, Stoneware, and Porcelain from The W olfsonianFIU Collection with various artists Fragile Nature: The Florida Artist Series by Mark Messersmith Through January 13: various artists, curated by Annette B. Fromm Financing Available rfntn bn tn nnr Your Neighbors AreCalling One HourGo Green A/C Tune Up*$25-Point Inspection and Safety Check PLUS rf rf ntbfntb fr frtbrfntr tbUSE IT WHEN YOU NEED IT MOST! nnnnbbnnrrn nrnnnnr btffnnnfnfbb nbbbrnr nnrnnbtffnnffff frrntfnnrnnnnrn bn rrnnr nnn nnrrfn Watch me disappear

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Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITIONFluorescent Light Sculptures by Ivan Navarro Through February 24: To Beauty: A Tribute to Mike Kelley with various artists Through May 20: American Sculpture in the Tropics with John Henry, Albert Paley, Dennis Oppenheim, Chakaia Booker, and Verina Baxter 1035 N. Miami A ve., Suite 200, Miami www.legalartmiami.org Call gallery for exhibition information 1301 Stanford Dr., Coral Gables 305-284-3535 www .lowemuseum.org Through January 13: Prints and Objects by Christo and Jeanne-Claude Through February 10: Saintly Blessings: A Gift of Mexican Retablos from Joseph and Janet Shein with various artists Through April 21: Adapting and Adopting: Waves of Change as East Encounters West, Modern and Contemporary Japanese Art with various artists 101 W. Flagler St., Miami 305-375-3000 www .miamiartmuseum.org Ongoing: Between Here and There: Modern and Contemporary Art from the Permanent Collection Through June 2: New Work Miami 2013 with Gideon Barnett, Bhakti Baxter, Loriel Beltran, Consuelo Castaeda, Moira Holohan, Sinisa Kukec, Emmett Moore, George Sanchez-Calderon, Tom Scicluna, Odalis Valdivieso, and SPRING BREAK, curated by Rene Morales and Diana Nawi 770 NE 125th St., North Miami 305-893-6211 www.mocanomi.org December 5 through March 3: Liber Insularum by Bill V iola 591 NW 27th St., Miami 305-576-1051 www.margulieswarehouse.com Through April 28: Anselm Kiefer, Richard Long, William Tucker, Simryn Gill, Doug Aitken, David Ellis, Roberto Lange, Kader Attia, Nathalie Djurberg, Leandro Erlich, Sabelo Mlangeni, Barbara Probst, and Wael Shawky, curated by Katherine Hinds 95 NW 29th St., Miami 305-573-6090 http://rfc.museum December 5 through August 2: Alone Together with various artists 3251 S. Miami A ve., Miami 305-250-9133 www.vizcayamuseum.org Through March 18: The Light Club of Vizcaya: A Womens Picture by Josiah McElheny Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection 170 NW 23rd St., Miami 305-438-9908 www.worldclassboxing.org Through February 28: Raga For Fishwife by Aaron Angell Compiled by Melissa Wallen Send listings, jpeg images, and events information to art@biscaynetimes.com Monsignor Edward Pace High School We are Pace... Partners Academics Catholic Empowerment The Tradition of Excellence Continues! Entrance ExamSaturday, January 26, 2013 at 8:00am www.PaceHS.com to get the enrollment process started.

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82 Not Your Usual NutcrackerThose cute dancing sugarplums and nutcrackers, we know them so well, and, frankly, are a little bored with them. So enter The Nutcracker: A Magical New Play from the innovative House Theatre of Chicago, to change it all up. This is less a dance than a play, and focuses on a story element many may have forgotten namely, that little Clara was really trying to keep a broken home together. This Nutcracker is a tearjerker, involving dialogue, puppetry, music, and a touch of magic. Its made more intimate by being performed in the Carnival Studio of the Arsht Center (1300 Biscayne Blvd.). It runs from the beginning of the month through Sunday, December 30 at various times. Tickets are $45. Go to www. arshtcenter.org.Imagine No LimitsLast winter, Bistoury Physical Theatre delivered the most powerful of locally pro duced performances in a long time, Assas sins For One Night Once again, the group promises something rare and original with IMAGINARIUM Life adult performances at the newly named Miami Theater Center, formerly the Playground Theatre (9806 NE 2nd Ave.). Through a combination of dance, theater, Ruben, who has decided to abandon his tormented real life for a parallel one of the imagination. Performances run from Thursday, December 6, through Satur day, December 22 at 8:00 p.m. Cost is $20. Log onto www.mtcmiami.org.Rocking the RevolutionStretching the limits seems, thankfully, to be a season highlight at our locally run spaces. Take Miami Light Projects latest offering at the Lightbox at Goldman Warehouse (404 NW 26th St.), Dayna Hanson: Glorias Cause Running from Thursday, December 6, through Saturday, December 8 at 8:00 p.m., choreographer and performer Hanson acts out iconic moments from the Revolutionary War and rock musicals yes, you read that right. Its being called one part music, one part history lesson, with lots of social and comedic commentary folded in. Cost is $25. Go to www.miamilightproject.com.Cool BeatsWhats cool about the Chromatics (Italians Do It Better) is how the group sounds. Whats even cooler is that the group will perform at the Olympia Theater at the Gusman Center (174 E. Flagler St.) on Friday, December 7 at 8:00 p.m. Its timed to coincide with Art Basel week, and the funky electronica group will be joined by Prince Rama, once from Florida and now Brooklyn-based. Presented by local Sweat Records (with a sponsor in the Knight Foundation), it all makes for a darkly seductive night. Tickets are $20. Visit www.gusmancenter.org.Havana Meets Vienna Beginning Sunday, December 9 at 5:00 Classical Sundays at Five series at the Aventura Arts and Cultural Center (3385 NE 188th St.). This performance, titled A Voyage from Vienna to Cuba will feature Cuban pianist Jorge Luis Prats playing classics from the European tradition, along with island favorites with his as a soloist with the Royal Philharmonic and the BBC Orchestra of London, and is noted for his interpretations of every thing from Liszt to Lecuona. Tickets cost $30. Details at www.aventuracenter.org.Reeling in MiamiFor the past eight years, the Borscht Film Festival has been commissioning local on to win big awards, including at the Sundance Film Festival. So Borscht 8 which takes place on Saturday, Decem ber 15 at 8:00 p.m. in the Ziff Ballet Opera House at the Arsht Center, will be a chance to catch the latest in local newcomers, and all of them about our strange, smoldering metropolis. Tickets are $25. Go to www.arshtcenter.org.Sounds Like Teen SpiritThose teenage years are the ultimate study in contradiction young bodies and minds so ety; with the desire to shout about everything and also remain sullenly silent. Tigertail Productions has realized that for years now, which is why it produces the Wordspeak project, which lets teens, many from the inner city, express themselves in spokenword poetry. This month Wordspeak, Spoken Word for Teens will include a book launch and poems read by teen contributors at Books and Books (265 Aragon Ave., Coral Gables) on Thursday, December 27 at 8:00 p.m. The event is free. Compiled by BT arts editor Anne Tschida. Please send information and images to calendar@biscaynetimes.com.Culture: EVENTS CALENDAR River StoriesThe Miami River has never looked so good, which is why a nice Miami River Boat Tour courtesy of thing to do this month. See the river reveal stories of our collective past and future as you chug on by historic neighborhoods and new high-rises, catching glimpses of marine life, tugboats, and more. The boat leaves at 9:00 a.m. and returns at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, December 15 Cost is $44 for members; $54 for nonmembers. Call 305-375-1621. Lighting Up for a Good CauseFor the 19th year, those utterly awesome holiday lights that make NE 137th Terrace in North Miami glow electric will be up from Saturday, December 8, through Saturday, January 5 Holiday Lights at Enchanted Place Resource, which heads up myriad community health proHIV/AIDS, which Care Resource asks you to donate to as you drive or walk through the light display. Its a perfect way to bring the holiday cheer to your neighbors. Open every night from 6:00 to 11:30 p.m. Go to www.careresource.org. New Year, New VibeOnce upon a time, going to Bayfront Park to celebrate New Years Eve was considered a somewhat dangerous excursion into an unpopulated, dark downtown Miami. That is no more. These days, downtown is exploding with light and people, and Monday, December 31 in Bayfront Park (301 Biscayne Blvd.) is no longer a lonely outing. At 7:00 p.m., a DJ dance Orange descends down the side of the InterContinental Hotel. All this night. Its free and family-friendly. No bottles, cans, or coolers allowed. Call 305-358-7550.

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Columnists: PICTURE STORYBefore Tuttle, Before Flagler, a Pristine MiamiA view of our past from the archives of HistoryMiamiBy Paul S. George Special to the BTThe Miami River was quiescent, as seen here, in the era prior to the arrival of the Florida East Coast Railway. Interestingly, this photograph of the pristine north bank of the Miami River near the mouth of the stream was taken by Ralph Munroe, a transplanted New Yorker who had earlier squatted in the vicinity of the site shown here, but was, by the 1880s, a leading light in Comiles south of the river. Taken from the south bank of the ishing trading post, this 1890 picture was a seasons greetings card from the Munroe family. Back beyond the spreading coconut palm trees stand two structures representing the old William English Slave Plantation House/Fort Dallas. Built in the 1840s, the taller building was the home of William English, who owned the plantation, while the small building, used as slave quarters, would also host members of the U.S. Army in 1849, and again from 1855-1858. In the year following this photograph, 1891, Julia Tuttle, a widow from Cleveland, Ohio, along with her two children, moved onto the property, and nothing would ever be the same again. In 1895 Tuttle convinced the industrialist Henry M. Flagler to extend his railroad, then terminating in West Palm Beach, to the Miami River. Its arrival in April 1896 transformed a wilderness with few inhabitants into the City of Miami. The rest is, as they say, history. To order a copy of this photo, please contact HistoryMiami archives manager Dawn Hugh at 305-375-1623, dhugh@historymiami.org. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Photo courtesy of HistoryMiami, #1981-172-3

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84 Columnists: POLICE REPORTSBiscayne Crime BeatCompiled by Derek McCannGood Thing They Werent Friends100 Block of NE 82nd Street A dispute occurred between roommates. Victim referred to her male roommate as an acquaintance. The acquaintance was asked to leave the premises, which caused quite a problem. After turning in his key peacefully, he came back to the apartment and kicked down the door, screaming at his former roommate/acquaintance: I am going to kill you! The landlord was also threatened. The man eventually left, but not before throwing a garbage can at a car, causing $1500 in damage. Police tracked down the scumbag, who said he had no idea what they were talking about or how that small baggie of weed got into his pocket.Alibis Are Important100 Block of NE 10th Street A witness saw two men pulling down simply attempted to walk away from was then that the hapless man claimed, I did it for him; he said he was going lars? (Judging from the Crime Beat the man looked at his accomplice and said, Thats him. He must be hiding spontaneous statements from each of the suspects implicating one another. The fence suffered $2500 in damage and these backstabbing accomplices spent the night in jail.Nothing Fare About This Scenario5400 block of N. Miami Avenue An inebriated woman entered a cab and told the driver she had no cash, but that she did have a debit card. She handed him the card and told him her desired destination. After driving several blocks the driver crankily replied, Im not an ATM. He stopped his car and glected to get her debit card back. A few hours later, money went missing from her account, as the cabbie managed to use her debit card at several locations. Victim did manage to obtain video from a gas station where the card was used. No arrest as of yet. Beware: Cabbies beat passengers.We Hope He Left a Big Tip300 Block of NE 79th Street People run a risk when they valet park cidently gave the victims car to someone else. The car had not been returned by press time. Guess it was an upgrade for Specializing in Stress & Anxiety Management, Phobias, Family, Marital & Sexual Therapy, Depression & Bereavement Spiritual Psychics, Tarot Card Readings, Palm Readings, Crystal Rock Readings, Tea Leaf and Crystal Ball Readings Helping you with any and all of Lifes problems. Can suggest which reading best suits your needs....An advisor known for her Honesty and IntegrityBY APPOINTMENT ONLY (786) 284.8203 (917) 804.7784CHAKRA AWARENESS GUIDEUnderstanding & Activating the Bodys Seven Main Energy CentersCrown Chakra Brow Chakra Throat Chakra Heart Chakra Solar Plexus Chakra Navel Chakra Root or Base Chakra

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the person who decided to take it. Crime Beat wonders how this could happen so easily. Miamians: Learn to parallel park.Caffeine Rush Helps Victims Fend Off Purse Snatcher135th Street and Biscayne Boulevard At this Starbucks, where yuppies come to mash on their laptops and look important, a dastardly opportunist hid behind one of the bushes, ready to waylay an innocent victim. Two women were enjoying their time together when they saw hands coming from the bushes, grabbing their purses off a chair. A tug-of-war ensued between victims and criminal. The victims won the battle. (Even the yuppies in North Miami are tough.) The man es caped, only to be tracked down by North Miamis Finest at Highland Village Park.Thief Withdraws Laptop at Bank900 Block of NE 125th Street People who live in North Miami need to be aware that any open door is an invitation for criminal shenanigans even when that door is the trunk of your car. Victim was using the drive-through ATM machine of this bank and had mistakenly left his hatchback trunk open. During his transaction, someone went into the trunk and took a Hewlett Packard laptop. There is surveillance tape of the incident. Please be aware of your surroundings all the time, everywhere. Brand-Conscious Criminal Hits Home600 Block of NE 133rd Street An intruder removed some jalousies those quaint vestiges of a much simpler time, when crooks didnt roam our streets in such huge numbers pushed open the window screen, and unlocked the door to this home. Perpetrator did this while the victim was sleeping. The mystery guest took an Apple laptop, a pair of Air Jordan sneakers, a True Religion shirt, Victorias Secret panties, and $850 in cash. Fortu chance the identity of the culprit will be re vealed and perhaps some of the items will be returned. (Were guessing the victim probably doesnt want the panties back.)How Phony Is This Story in Dog Years?12200 Block of NE 11th Court Woman came home and noticed her door open. When she entered, she saw an unknown man standing in her kitchen. He said he followed her dog to her house because it had bitten a woman, and he wanted to locate the owner. When the victim did not believe the story, the man, who called himself Tavaris, said he and would return. He even left a cell number. He never returned. He neglectfully dropped an ID card outside and the police were called. Victim does not know how he got into the home, and there is no sign of forced entry. Police are now searching for the intruder.Long Workout Leaves Mans Finances Lighter12700 Block of Biscayne Boulevard Victim parked his vehicle in front of U.S. 1 Fitness at approximately 4:00 p.m. After a two-hour workout, he returned to his vehicle and noticed damage to the lock on the drivers-side door. The cars cup holder, which had contained $15 in change, was missing. Underneath that cup holder, the victim had placed $100 in cash, and that was also missing. To make matters worse, his wallet was taken from the center console. The wallet contained eight credit cards, a drivers license, a Social Security card, and $600 in cash. Crime Beat understands not wanting to carry a wallet in your gym clothes, but do it anyway. Tell people its a muscle.Thieves Pop In, Pop Out with TV400 Block of NE 125th Street Victim heard someone knocking on his men entered without an invitation. Civilized people call this the pop-in. While Louie, the victim, and the victims wife engaged in casual conversation in male remained in the living room by himself. Not wanting to be a rude host, the victim went to check on him and saw The man refused to stop despite the victims protestations. Louie and the man then lifted the television onto a waiting people, dont tolerate the pop-in anymore. Not in this city. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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86 Columnists: PARK PATROLGiving Way to GreenTown Center Park in Sunny Isles Beach is a former strip-mall site transformed into an oasis for the citys childrenBy Jim W. Harper BT ContributorThe City of Sunny Isles Beach packs in towering condominiums throughout the thin strip of land it occupies between the Atlantic Ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway. It also seems intent on packing in parks. Before long, Gateway Park at 163rd Street, on the former site of a strip mall will become the citys tenth park, providing a substantial link between the citys historic Newport Pier, currently under reconstruction, and the Intracoastal. Since Gateway is still nothing more than an empty lot surrounded by a turquoise fence, however, well turn our attention a bit farther north to another park adjacent to Collins Avenue: Town Center Park. This park is mostly invisible from visitors encounter is a sign dissuading them from entering: Protected Habitat Beyond Fence: No Trespassing. Fortunately, theres only one part of Town Center Park that you cannot enter, a state-protected wetlands that honors the Original Creator of the Sunny Isles area, Harvey Baker Graves, according to a plaque located in the parks accessible, playground area. This Mangrove Preserve was dedicated in 2007. The preserve is shaped like a golf club, with the rounded head section visible from the playground, but the shaft remains hidden as a long, thin strip of land, about 30 feet wide, that parallels a canal. (The side connected to land is mostly hidden by a long apartment complex, and the fence is formidable. Trespassing simply would not be worth the effort.) This narrow section of protected wetlands is both commendable and lamentable. Commendable because it reminds us of what used to cover the area; lamentable because it is laughably small. Just around the corner is the massive Oleta River State Park and its hundreds of acres of mangroves, so by comparison the approximately two acres here seems like a lost piece of a puzzle. Several invasive plants, such as Brazilian pepper, are visible. Another lamentable attribute is the lack of accessibility: The children playing in the park can only see what appears to be a wall of vegetation being held prisoner behind a black iron fence. Do not waste your time, like I did, trying to walk and drive around the neighborhood to get a closer look at the wetlands. You will get stuck between a private parking lot on one side and the canal on the other. For the average soccer mom and child visiting Town Center Park, the essential park is the half that consists mainly of an rounded by a walking trail and corners of activity. The being that it faces Collins Avenue and that it offers the most centrally located of the six public playgrounds in Sunny Isles Beach. For the more mature crowd, the parks walking path and exercise stations offer a change of pace from the beach across the street not that you can see the beach, as it is obscured by this strips expansive condominiums. On the other hand, the vertical views of the condominiums impress, especially on a clear day. In stark contrast to the towers of white and blue are the two human-scale sculptures along Collins Avenue: One features three tiny tots in bronze playing ring-aroundthe-rosie, while the other, unnamed modern piece is a purple zigzag that creates the optical illusion of three asking, Why not here? Town Center Park opened in 2005, replacing a strip mall (that seems to be a theme in Sunny Isles Beach), and today serves small children best of all. A wide, square lawn is large enough for tossing Frisbees and kicking soccer balls. The main playground near the entrance has a pavilion where parents can rest in the shade while their kids tumble around on the gleaming playground equipment. Yes, children, you are free to squeal. But the biggest draw of all may be the addition in 2011 of a skate park. Tucked away in the main sections northwest corner, the skate park charges an entrance fee. For residents its $2 on weekdays and $5 on weekends; for visitors, $4 and $7, respectively. To a nonskater like myself, it looks cool, but not necessarily intimidating, as the tallest point seems no higher than a few feet. The unmarked concrete structure is somewhat larger than a basketball court, and it has steps, railings, and a BT photos by Jim W. Harper TOWN CENTER PARK17200 Collins Ave. Sunny Isles Beach 305-792-1706 Hours: 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. (Wed. 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.) Picnic tables: No Barbecues: No Picnic pavilions: Yes (but no tables) Tennis courts: No Yes Night lighting: Yes Swimming pool: No YesPark Rating S W 13TH STTOWN CENTER PARKNE 162nd St Collins AveN Bay Rd NE 174th St NE 172nd StNE 170th St

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curved wall in the back with a ramp. Shining in the sun, the smooth concrete wall resembles aluminum. Opening times for the skate park vary (after 3:00 p.m. on school days), and it closes daily at 7:00 p.m. Waivers and helmets are required, and helmets and skateboards can be rented onsite from Sugars Drop Shop. (Note to skate boys and girls: Wheels are not allowed in the rest of the park, so you will have to carry your skateboard until you reach the designated entrance.) Town Center Park has signs at the main entrance explaining its many rules. Park in marked stalls only. No skates. No skateboards. No bicycles. Lightning Warning. No rough or injurious activ shalt not sue. (I made up that last one.) Two conveniences also make this park noteworthy: bathrooms and free parking. Many signs warn visitors by car to visit the park only; if you wander across the street to eat at Epicure or head over to the beach, you are inviting the tow truck. Town Center Park is clean, pleasant, and kid-friendly. There are plenty stations dispense witty advice, such as: A positive attitude may not solve all of your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort. The parks mixture of elements creates a little something for everyone. It seems to be singing, Im a little bit swampy, Im a little bit upper class. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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88 Columnists: PAWSITIVELY PETS WW eekend Getaways for YY ou and YY ou rsFive nearby staycations for people and petsBy Lisa Hartman BT ContributorThe holiday season is upon us, and everyone is busy making their last-minute travel plans, visiting relatives, welcoming relatives, and shopping for holiday gifts. Regardless of your plans or your budget in this stillsluggish economy, you have to take care of Number One. Why not plan a small getaway with the individual who has always stood by you, the one who is the and the one who always is there to give you a kiss when you have a bad day? (Or at least, let you kiss them.) You need not go far. In fact, staying close to home can be very stress-free. No major packing or traveling required. My two dogs and I are no strangers to stayca tions. Sometimes all I have is a day or two free from work, so off we go to a local pet-friendly hotel and pretend were far, far away. Sometimes a change of scenery and free time (and possibly a massage) is all you need. Whats more, many petwelcoming hotels are not just dog friendly, but cat, bird, hamster, and ferret-friendly too! Here are a few weve been to. If youre looking for an affordable getaway with your best friend on South Beach, then check out the Kent Hotel Its a small Art Deco inn with clean rooms and helpful amenities, including free Internet service. No goodie bag for your pup, but as of this writing, no pet fee either! On weekdays, rooms can be had for $99 per night, and sometimes they offer extra nights free. Kent Hotel, 1131 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305604-5068, www.thekenthotel.com. Of course, the alpha dog of South Beach hotels is the Loews Miami Beach Their motto is Loews Loves Pets, Photo courtesy Casa Morada

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and they show your pet the love from the moment you check in. You the pet owner may only get a room key, but your pampered pooch is given a goodie bag (or amenity kit, as its known in the delights and necessities. The last time I was there, the kit featured a doggy bakery item, biscuits, menu from the kitchen. On a beachside corner of the property there is a dog park and toilet area for your pet. The Loews is adjacent to a wide, meandering boardwalk that is dog-friendly for an ocean-view jog or stroll with your pet. Throughout the year, Loews hosts special dog events, including a lavish, dogSociety of Greater Miami. Loews Miami Beach, 1601 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-604-1601, www.loewshotels.com/en/ Miami-Beach-Hotel. If youre looking for a change of scenery, pack up your pet and head across Alligator Alley, then up to the Loews Don Cesar in St. Pete Beach, on the laid-back Gulf Coast. But dont think the Loews is just about dogs. Loews welcomes cats, too. Catnip, scratching posts, and cat beds will make your feline feel right at home. Throughout the year, seasonal packages are offered. Loews hotels are generally known to welcome pets of any size, but of course check with each hotel property directly for any restrictions and to avoid extra fees. A respectable, one-time $25 cleaning fee is all the Loews chain usually charges per stay, and two pets per room is sometimes the max. Loews Don Cesar, 3400 Gulf Blvd., St. Pete Beach, 727360-1881, www.loewshotels.com/en/ Don-Cesar-Beach-Resort. When I want a bit of luxury with a relaxed island feel, Saffy, Jay-J, and I head to Casa Morada in Islamo rada, Florida Keys. A small boutique hotel with a chic, Caribbean feel, Casa Morada welcomes dogs, but not small children. This is a romantic, serene, breezy place with a lavish Continental breakfast on a second-story deck amid the treetops. Bicycles, snorkeling gear, and kayak rentals are included with the price of admission, as are seasonal yoga classes by the pool. Most snacks in your fridge are also complementary. You are more likely to hear a bossa nova beat here than Jimmy Buffett. Ive stayed in three different rooms and all had something special to offer, including terraces, sunken tubs with views, and sitting rooms. Ive not been charged a pet fee, but you should always check before you make reservations. The intimate property includes lovely gardens to walk your dog. Pets are pretty much allowed anywhere except the pool area. Casa Morada, 136 Madeira Rd., Islamorada, 305-664-0044, www.casamorada.com. For a more family-friendly or group-friendly resort in the Keys that still retains some island charm, the Islander Resort is a solid choice. Its a beachfront hotel (Casa Morada is on Morada Bay) also on Islamorada, and has a selection of rooms set aside for pets. A nonrefundable pet fee is charged, and at $75 it is admittedly a bit steep. Continental breakfast and free parking is included. Islander Resort, Mile Marker 82.1, Islamorada, 305-664When Im on staycation with my pets, I do all those things I just never have time for during the daily grind. I tour the local shops, swim in the ocean and pool, and stay in bed a little longer in the morning. Maybe I get a massage or listen to live music. I also get to meet a bunch of interesting people and their pets from near and far. Jay-J, my Dalmatian, loves checking out new places and smells; a vacation for his senses. Little Saffy just likes to know food bowl and where shell be sleeping. Taking a staycation not only rejuve nates you but it helps the local economy as well. Furthermore you will be going green and helping the environment by not traveling by jet to distant locales. Always check to see if there is a special for Florida residents. The Internet is the easiest avenue planning my next nearby getaway tonight. I hope you are too. and behavior specialist. You can reach her at lisa@lisathedogtrainer.com, or

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90 Saving Nemo Preserving our coral reefs should be a much higher priorityBy Jim W. Harper BT Contributor Finding Nemo Finding Nemo Dying Nemo Send your tips and clever ideas to: goinggreen@biscaynetimes.com. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com www.santassingers.comPRESENTSFOR RATES AND AVAILABILITY CALL 305-757-6500 OR EMAIL singers@missjanesmusic.com Santas SingersAN ADULT A CAPPELLA GROUP SINGING TRADITIONAL CAROLS AND POPULAR HOLIDAY SONGSPerfect for ofce parties, private functions

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Columnists: KIDS AND THE CITY HH ome for the HH olida ysJust because the family is staying put in South Florida this season doesnt mean there arent wintry things to doBy Crystal Brewe BT ContributorHoly Holiday Muzak, Batman! Its here! It started earlier this year with e-mails the day after Halloween from Amazon reminding me about Cyber Monday deals and countless Facebook event invitations to holiday events around South Florida. I ignored it all because I had big plans involving snow. Who needs snow? I do! I spent the year campaigning for a trip to Park City, Utah, where the girls would have an introduction to snow and I could revisit my my whole family, including brothers, girlfriends, and cousins, would love this idea. Only Scrooge himself wouldnt ho-ho-ho there, right? Wrong. No one bought into this very expensive plan. So tropical temperatures be damned, South Florida holiday options. Dont get me wrong; who wouldnt want to ride a rollercoaster operated by a Christmas elf? My husband and I have spent nearly 15 years bucking commercial holiday traditions. But for some reason, this year I cant help my attraction to malls that make it snow and zoos with animatronic holiday displays. Lets face it: In the Sunshine State, we may not do holidays like they do up north, but South Florida has its own unique holiday fun that any family can make its own. Fairs, Festivals, and Snow: Your brood will have their mind blown at Miami-Dade Colleges North Campus childrens holiday. Its a diverse wonderland of fun, with exhibits including a holiday vil lage complete with a 12-foot mountain of snow where children slide down in tubes. The event also features live performances on three stages, ranging from childrens chorus to hula. (I told you it was diverse.) Details at www.mdc.edu. Weve all seen the Santas Enchanted Forest advertisements boasting three million holiday lights so bright they can be seen from outer space. Through January 6, this winter carnival includes a 90-foot Christmas tree, a peek inside Santas workshop, 100 rides (only 20 of which are appropriate for children), a petting zoo, pony rides, nine live shows, and of course, funnel cake. Visit www. santasenchantedforest.com. Onstage: Two Nutcrackers are better than one! This year the Adrienne Arsht Center has doubled down when it comes to presenting this classic tale. Miami City Ballet will offer its interpretation on the Ziff Ballet Opera House stage, while a hip, theater-in-the-round version ( not a ballet) family. With a free family fest on December 15, and the classic, larger-than-life Broad way musical Mary Poppins the holidays have more than a spoonful of sugar. See www.arshtcenter.org. Boat Parades: Whats better than holiday-themed and LED-adorned houses? Holidaythemed and LEDadorned boats! On December 15, South Florida has two boat parades to choose from: the Winterfest Parade (www.winter festparade.com) and the Miami Outboard Club Holiday Boat Parade (www.miami outboardclub.com). Showboats, corporate mega-yachts, and even pontoons will feature hundreds of thousands of lights, music, entertainment, and celebrities. Snowfall at Dolphin Mall: I know, I know a mall? During the holidays? If youre anything like us, you get the Santas lap thing out of the way early so as to avoid the dreadful crowds and other peoples crying kids. The thing is, a rare weather occurrence happens at Dolphin Mall through the new year. Magic wands are distributed every night to children under 12 when their parents sign up to receive the Dolphin Mall e-bulletin. (The marketer in me is envious I didnt come up with this.) At 7:00 p.m. the children wave their wands in the air and snow illuminates the sky with a warm holiday glow. Trust me, its well worth the nausea malls normally cause. Lions and Tigers and Lights, Oh My!: What holiday is complete without a drive to see other peoples holiday lights? My family used to crowd into my uncles van for an annual pilgrimage around the neighborhood. The tradition evolved into a contest of who could drag us to the most Happy Birthday, Baby Jesus! messages written in LED on rooftops. While a bit of a drive from Miami proper, the Holiday Fantasy of Lights offers a spectacular drive-through light display described by many as one of the most amazing in South Florida. Its located at Tradewinds Park in Coconut Creek and is open nightly from 6:00 to 10:00 p.m., through January 2. See www. holidaylightsdrivethru.com. closer to home, in North Miami. Its called Holiday Lights at Enchanted Place. For de tails, see our Events Calendar on page 82. Finally, dinner with Mrs. Claus should be on everyones top ten list, right? ZooMiami has that and more, having stepped up their holiday offerings to include a brilliant animal-shaped light display, camel rides, ice-skating, and free 3-D glasses. Check www.miamimetrozoo.com. Whatever your traditions, be it grandmas fruitcake or kayaking through the Everglades, may you enjoy your time with family and friends. Happy holidays! Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Boutique practice in a cozy & warm atmosphereLOCATED IN THE MIAMI DESIGN DISTRICT NEAR MIDTOWNMargaret Okonkwo, MD, FAAP 4112 Northeast 1st Ave, Miami FL 33137 Phone: 305-576-KIDS (5437) Fax: 305-576-5120 www.KidstownPediatrics.com Photo courtesy ZooMiami

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92 The Root of the ProblemNew construction can damage trees, without the homeowner suspecting a thingBy Jeff Shimonski BT ContributorI drive the same roads every day and, jam, I spend the time checking out interesting horticultural features. Trees and new construction always draw my attention, mainly because I want to see how the trees fare over time. Theres one recently constructed house Ive been keeping an eye on. In the front yard is a huge live oak tree. It must have a trunk diameter of at least four feet at chest height. The trees canopy towers over a good portion of this two-story house. I imagine it was a great selling point when potential buyers came to look at the house. Too bad the tree is dying. That happens a lot with pre-existing trees on construction sites: Many die a slow death over a few years owing to the impact of construction, leaving the new homeowners to deal with the resulting issues and costs, even though they probably didnt know the trees were in decline when they moved in. Theyll now have to deal with tree removal reports and permits, overworked city or county inspectors, and the inevitable cost of the removal of the offending tree, plus possible mitigation. The City of Miami, along with every other municipality, has a tree ordinance that includes a section on tree protection quires a protected and fenced-off radius of ten feet around the base of the trees during the course of construction. This is pretty typical of most municipal tree ordinances. for all. It is obviously a compromise and in writing, to make exceptions to this mea surement or propose an alternative tree and root protection method. Regardless of what the code mandates, I constantly see construction sites required tree-protection barriers, or if they have been installed, crushed underneath vehicles or piles of debris. This type of negligence causes soil compaction, which not only damages the roots of the tree directly, but restricts the access of necessary oxygen and water to those impacted tree roots. As trees age, they begin to not only grow slower, but have fewer resources internally to repair or replace damaged roots or branches. This is often when we the tree as spores through damaged roots or large pruning cuts. Once the trees are stressed, they become vulnerable to many different types of pathogens, hastening the death of the tree. I was inspecting a couple of newly built homes recently and was very surmature trees on these sites, the trunks of which were only three or four feet from the foundation of the house. Most of the trees were native and had been onsite years before the structures had been built. Some of these trees I could actually shake by just pushing on them. If these trees dont blow down in a storm, I believe most of them will die a premature death as a result of the trees roots having been cut so close to the trunks. Healthy roots are very important not only to the general health of a tree but are what keep the tree attached to the ground in a storm. It is apparent nitely had not been protected during construction. You could see that large probably from heavy machinery. Also, with the trees being located only a few feet from the walls of these two-story houses, all the branches that had been growing in the direction of the struc tures had been removed. Excessive branch removal from the lower half of a tree can be detrimental to a trees health. Large cuts made on the trunk of a tree allow fungal spores to easily enter and can cause rapid decay of the trunk. I saw evidence of this on the trees I surveyed. Removal of these branches also takes away the trees ability to increase the girth of its trunk. At some point, as the tree grows taller, the trunk cannot keep up structurally and can bend and break under its own weight or in a storm. So is it the fault of the new homethink it is, but they will have to pay the costs for the eventual tree removal. I would like to see municipalities and building departments pay more attention to the trees on their construction sites so homeowners dont have to suffer the consequences of poor planning and inadequate monitoring. BT photo by Jeff Shimonski Ceiba speciosa rf ntbtb rf nrtfb nrt rfnt btb

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By Bill Citara BT ContributorImagine, if you would, the sad state of a world without bubbly. Celebrations would be puny and Champagne would be just another the Marne. Dom Perignon would not be but a weird old guy in a dirty brown ons, rappers with more money than taste, All this is very, very bad. In a world lousy with war, poverty, Honey Boo Boo, we need all the bright, roster of affordable bubbles. If the world grapes grown on the approximately 85,000 ments, too, about varietals, growing, and nately for our budgets), those limitations beyond the borders of Champagne, howminerality of their more expensive and Saint-Reines NV Brut is a stellar example and, at a mere $11.99, an exemfrom this months tasting, it should be the Depreville NV Brut apple fruit, nutty-toasty aromas, and NV Berberana Cava Ros Brut out of the way with aromas of rose petal, red apple, and toast, but on the palate its a mouthful of tart, soapy, sour Rondel NV Cava Brut are its antly nutty, red apple aromas. bitter, but after a few minutes it mellows out and delivers an As for homegrown bubbly, NV Barefoot Bubbly Brut from California, one of two wines in the tasting and then bottled). I dont want to say the Chateau Ste. Michelle NV Brut well as hints of herbs and minerals that Tosca NV Prosecco Brut has the freshness and fruitiness the Bare Its not Dom Perignon, but its better than a world without bubbly. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Bubbly That Wont Bust Your BudgetRed, white, and you: Agreeable wine for $12 or less

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94 So Long, Red Light, Hello Everyone Else!Food news we know you can use By Pamela Robin Brandt BT ContributorFeelings of sudden loss, irritability, depression Psychologists predicted all these maladies might torment people affected by superstorm Sandy. Similar symptoms were certainly displayed in the aftermath of last months major disaster in the food world: The announcement of the bankruptcy of Hostess Brands and possible doom for all its iconic snacks. Locally this means that fans of deepfried Twinkies had better run, not walk, to Burger & Beer Joint (900 S. Miami Ave.), or be prepared to console yourselves with their deep-fried Oreos. Another major loss occurred last month for those who eat out in BT terri tory. But a humongous number of restaurant openings provides solace. CLOSING Red Light Little River (7700 Biscayne Blvd.). What was to be a temporary closing of this neighborhood-transforming eatery at Motel Blu (formerly a hooker hangout), to allow chef-owner Kris Wessel to concentrate on opening a new South Beach restaurant, turned permanent when the owners of the space, which changed hands during lease, refused to renew. Fortunately the similarly regional, and much-expanded, menu at Wessels new Florida Cook ery (1545 Collins Ave., Miami Beach; 786-276-0333) features all Red Lights greatest hits, including the BBQ shrimp. OPENINGS Pride & Joy BBQ (2800 N. Miami Ave., 305-456-9548) The outdoor beer garden is the most relaxing place to eat at this instantly popular joint from three-time Memphis BBQ World Championship winner Myron Mixon. From the full range of cue, Id skip the smoked wings (which are mostly deep-fried) for perfect St. Louis-style ribs tender without being falling-off-the-bone overcooked, as well as bigger and enjoyably fattier than baby backs. MC Kitchen (4141 NE 2nd Ave., 305456-9948). In the former Fratelli Lyon space, modern Italian inventions from chef Dena Marino. Expect local ingredi ents utilized in unexpected ways (stone crab with faro, fennel salad, and lemonlime vinaigrette instead of mustard sauce). And a dramatic stone oven is used for beyond-pizza items like Pia-Denas, a like soft tacos, around varied salads. Oak Tavern (35 NE 40th St., 786391-1818). From chef/restaurateur David Bracha of River Oyster Bar, this stylish tavern (which has a large oak tree on the outdoor dining patio, and lamps that look like oaks inside) does offer oysters and other raw-bar items. But most of the menu is modeled after Michaels Genuine down the block, with prepared Snacks, Small Plates, Large Plates, etc. Highlight: arti sanal charcuterie, much of it housemade. OTC (1250 S. Miami Ave., 305374-4612). This newcomer is a civilized gastropub with over-the-counter (get it? OTC!) service that encourages frequent visits. See the Dining Guide (next page), New This Month for more. Bar Louie (3201 N. Miami Ave. #106, 786-879-8260). Cheese/bacon-loaded tater tots; Bavarian pretzel sticks with cinna mon butter, cheese, and honey mustard; burgers like the Fried Louie (bacon, ched dar, and fried egg), triple-deckable with three times the meat for $6 more; smores martinis This branch of a growing chain serves such over-the-top stoner food and drink every day till 2:00 a.m. Toro Toro (100 Chopin Plaza, 305372-4710). Chef/restaurant empire-builder the upscale emirate of Dubai, so its not unexpected that this #2, in downtowns InterContinental Hotel, is ideal for power meals either steakhouse stuff (includ ing a mini rodizio experience), or Porketta (43 NE 3rd Ave., 305-3720034). To paraphrase food critic Homer Simpson: Porchetta Mmmmmmm. [Add drooling.] See the Dining Guides New Additions for more. Reggae Tacos (93 SE 2nd St., 786-425-9558). Think of it as Mexican-Jamaican fusion street/beach food: Taco or burrito shells encase escovitch veggies, and other island dishes that are normally plated entres, transforming them into portable packages. Snacks like festival (cornmeal mini-doughnuts), too. MPP Brickell (14 SW 7th St., 305-400-4610). In the space vacated by elegant Mediterranean eatery Andu, MPP is an elegant Peruvian eatery an outpost of one of Limas most popular restaurants. The menu features both upscaled versions of classic dishes (lomo fare like causa maki rolls. Paladar Latin Kitchen & Rum Bar (801 Silks Run Rd., Hallandale Beach, 954-455-0700). In the Village at Gulfstream Park, this new branch of a small chain serves just what South Florida has been missing: Pan Latin food from Cleveland! Ropa vieja with aji pepper aioli, Cezar salad, more. Too many restaurants, too little room. See this issues BizBuzz for more food news! Please send me tips: restaurants@ biscaynetimes.com. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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MIAMIBrickell / DowntownAijo1331 Brickell Bay Dr., 786-452-1637 Hidden within Jade condo, this sleek Japanese fusion resto lounge (whose name means love) is also a jewel. Food-loving Venezuelan owner Rene Buroz encourages innovation, and his chefs (including four from Zuma) respond with beautifully plated items as fun as they are flavorful. Dont miss the layered croquante (a sort of Asian croqueta: mouthwatering crispy rice, subtly smoked salmon, and creamy crab), Aijo kani (king crab legs with citrus foam clouds and rich emulsified butter dip), or creative cocktails from a mixologist who also juggles and plays with fire. Area 31270 Biscayne Boulevard Way, 305-424-5234Not that the sleek interior of this seafood restaurant (named for fishing area 31, stretching from the Carolinas to South America) isnt a glamorous dining setting. But wed eat outside. From the expansive terrace of the Epic condo and hotel on the Miami River, the views of Brickells high-rises actually make Miami look like a real city. Its hard to decide whether the eats or drinks are the most impressive. The food is impeccably fresh regional fish, prepared in a clean Mediterraneaninfluenced style. The cocktails are genuinely creative. Luckily you dont have to choose one or the other. $$$-$$$$Azul500 Brickell Key Dr., 305-913-8254Floor-to-ceiling windows showcase Biscayne Bay. But diners prefer ogling the raw-bar-fronted open kitchen, where globetrotting chef Joel Huff crafts imaginative, often multi-part dishes -some Asian-inspired (like oysters with fresh wasabi, hibiscus granita, and Asian pear), as one would expect from the Mandarin Orientals top eatery. But most of Huffs dishes are strongly European-influenced, primarily by New Spanish cuisine. Elegant, playfully molecular gastronomy-accented almond gazpacho with foie gras snow, or eggs, bacon & toast (suckling pig, tempura duck egg, truffled potato, and speck air) tell the story. $$$$$Balans901 S. Miami Ave., (Mary Brickell Village), 305-534-9191Open until 4:00 a.m. on weekends, this London import (Miamis second Balans) offers a sleeker setting than its perennially popular Lincoln Road progenitor, but the same simple yet sophisticated global menu. The indoor space can get mighty loud, but lounging on the dog-friendly outdoor terrace, over a rich croque monsieur (which comes with an alluringly sweet/ sour citrus-dressed side salad), a lobster club on onion toast, some surprisingly solid Asian fusion items, and a cocktail is one of Miamis more relaxing experiences. $$-$$$Bali Caf109 NE 2nd Ave., 305-358-5751While Indonesian food isnt easy to find in Miami, downtown has secret stashes small joints catering to cruise-ship and construction workers. This cute, exotically decorated caf has survived and thrived for good reason. The homey cooking is delicious, and the friendly family feel encourages even the timid of palate to try something new. Novices will want Indonesias signature rijsttafel, a mix-and-match collection of small dishes and condiments to be heaped on rice. Note: bring cash. No plastic accepted here. $-$$Banana & Leaf234 NE 3rd St., 786-431-5548Ever get tempted by the convenience of supermarket sushi boxes, but feel uneasy about freshness and disgruntled about sparseness of fillings? In the grab-and-go containers here, raw fish glistens and makis like a plump snow crab roll have a satisfying seafood-to-rice ratio. If youd rather, dishes on the larger custom menu arrive almost as fast. There is also limited, tasty Southeast Asian fare. Most unbelievable: Prices beat supermarket sushi by far. $The Bar at Level 25 (Conrad Hotel) 1395 Brickell Ave., 305-503-6500On the Conrads 25th floor, The Bars picture-windowed space is not just a watering hole with panoramic views. At lunch its an elegant sandwich bar; at night its a raw bar (with pristine coldwater oysters) and (best) a tapas bar serving pintxos. Thats just the Basque word for tapas, but here theres nothing mere about the generously portioned small plates. They range from traditional items like cod fish equixada and saffronsauted Spanish artichokes to inventive inspirations like foie gras and goat cheese-stuffed empanadas. $$$Bento Sushi & Chinese801 Brickell Bay Dr., 305-603-8904Hidden in the Four Ambassadors Towers, this tiny spot (which specializes in sushi plus Japanese small plates, but also serves limited Chinese and Thai-inspired dishes of the mix-and-match, pick-your-protein-then-preparation sort) has been mostly an insiders secret delivery joint for Brickell residents. But its Restaurant ListingsThe Biscayne Corridors most comprehensive restaurant guide. Total this month: 308.rf ntbnfnt tnft ntf f t tf fnf fff Breakfast Lunch Dinner305-705-243417070 West Dixie Hwy North Miami Beach, FL 3316020% OFF Traditional Pizza 20% OFF Traditional PizzaAventura West Caf ExpressItalian Pizzeria NEW THIS MONTH MIAMIBRICKELL/DOWNTOWNMachiya Ramen Noodle House3250 NE 1st Ave. #116, 786-507-5025While this chic-looking Japanese spot has an extensive selection of todays popular izakaya-style Asian fusion small plates (miso-braised short ribs, marinated crudos), the real reason to come is ramen -both hot and cold bowls of appealingly toothsome housemade noodles that bear no resemblance to the packaged corkscrews that got you through college. Admittedly, these bowls arent student-budget ($15-$20), but seafood, meat, and exotic veggie toppings are plentiful, and a $2 kae-dama system supplies an extra serving for your soup. Reasonably priced additional toppings are also available. $$-$$$OTC1250 S. Miami Ave. 305-374-4612Over-the-counter service usually connotes the classic fast food slider experience: both greaseburgers and patrons are in and out quickly. At this casually cool gastropub, the counter ordering system encourages the opposite feel, of comfie congeniality; it invites hanging out, just without the fuss of formal dining out -or the expense. Most plates are $10 or under. Ingredient-driven dishes cover todays favorite food groups (various mac-and-cheeses, variously topped/seasoned fries, and more) with some unusual twists, like a scrumptiously lardon-laden frise/ goat cheese salad brightened by fresh peaches. Even the condiments are housemade. $$Porketta43 NE 3rd Ave., 305-372-0034Warm, juicy, served with succulent pieces of crisp crackling, herb-stuffed Italian porchetta (pronounced porketta) roast, at its best, is hard to find even in much of Italy except during festivals. But every day is a festival here, where the real thing (not the dry deli-style pork roll slices that often pass for porchetta) is featured on a plate with broccoli rabe and cannellinis; in the hefty Bombardino sandwich; or in three mini-sandwiches, convenient for sampling the places three sauces. Several salads and carpaccios placate porkophobes. $-$$The Hoxton1111 SW 1st Ave., 786-691-2730Though inland (and reportedly inspired by old England), this urban beach bar/grill has the relaxing, refinedrustic ambiance of a classic New England hangout, and upscaled down shore food to match: Maine lobster rolls, on brioche rather than hot dog rolls; a luxe take on Qubcoise poutine (from-scratch fries with Vermont cheddar and duck confit gravy); an especially lavish clam bake. Also appealingly different from the Miami norm: frequent live bands of many musical genres in the comfortable lounge area, plus almost spookily competent service. $$$MIDTOWN / WYNWOOD / DESIGN DISTRICTSouth Street Restaurant & Bar4000 NE 2nd Ave., 305-573-5474In the historic Buena Vista post office building, this neosoul food restaurant features family recipes from chef Amaris Jones, a Philly native. Along with tasty traditional favorites like fried chicken or shrimp and cheese grits with low-country gravy, there are lightened classics (green tomatoes that are grilled, not fried, with basil cream aioli), plus a few items whose street cred seems to come from a Soul Train stop at the Bryn Mawr Country Club (surf and turf). Food comes with a soul soundtrack befitting the lounge vibe. $$$ NORTH BAY VILLAGE Sabor Latin Restaurant & Cafe1880 79th St. Cswy., 305-741-2020This family-run restaurant serves big portions of homey traditional food from several Latin American countries, including Cuba (pan con bistec, ropa vieja), Mexico (nachos, tacos, quesadillas), and Peru (lomo saltado). But the specialty is Colombian classics, from snacks like empanadas to a bandeja paisa combo (grilled steak, chorizo, a gargantuan crispy chicharron strip, fried egg, arepa, plantains, beans, rice). Particularly recommended: daily specials including two meal-in-a-bowl chicken soups, ajiaco, and sancocho. If youve wondered about the much-debated difference, heres where to test the taste. $-$$Sports Grill2995 NE 163rd St., 305-944-4552Like the other five locations of this popular local mini chain (which originated more than 20 years ago), NMBs family-friendly sports bar/grill has walls lined with flatscreen TVs and a menu packed with all the classic gamewatching munchies, some with Old South twists, like jalapeo poppers with pepper jelly dipping sauce. Must-haves are the charbroiled special wings, meaty and mild. But for those who prefer more highly spiced wings, there are six additional varieties. Cool down with a craft beer from a list that changes weekly to avoid boredom. $-$$

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actually a pleasant place to relax outside, enjoying a bay view and budget bento box specials that include miso soup, gingerdressed salad, California roll, and fresh orange sections, plus two mini-entres (the nigiri assortment sushi and lacy-battered tempura especially recommended). Bubble tea, too! $$-$$$ Bon Fromage500 Brickell Ave. #106, 786-329-5632Though independently owned instead of a chain cog, this cheese and wine caf/shop is like a pint-size version of Midtown Miamis Cheese Course, right down to being officially self-service. But it is staffed by accommodating employees who, unofficially, do their best to double as servers for eatin diners. The cheese (plus charcuterie) menu of garnished platters, salads, and crusty baguette sandwiches features numerous high-quality, imported favorites, but dont miss more unusual domestic treasures like Wisconsin bread, a cooked cheese that, like halloumi, doesnt melt but tantalizingly softens when heated. $$ Brother Jimmys BBQ900 S. Miami Ave. #135, 786-360-3650The South is supposed to be the source of barbecue. But Bro J evidently didnt hear about that. His signature North Carolina pork cue comes from NYC, where the first Brother Jimmys opened more than 20 years ago. Miamis location is actually the first south of the Mason-Dixon line. But the slow-smoked pulled pork butt tastes righteous -no interfering glop, just hot sauce-spiked vinegar to balance the fab fattiness. Theres other cue, too, including big (not baby back) ribs, and respectable brisket. $$-$$$Bryan in the Kitchen104 NE 2nd Ave., 305-371-7777This quirky caf-markets chef/owner is a former smoothieswilling model who is now into fresh whole foods, and though his eclectic green gourmet menu does uniformly reflect his dedication to ecological consciousness, it otherwise could only be described as intensely personal. Offerings are an odd but appealing saint/sinner mix, ranging from healthy pasta/ grain salads and homemade-from-scratch snacks (beef jerky, granola) to unique cupcakes featuring not-too-sweet adult flavors and irresistible sticky buns. If we had to choose just one category, wed sin. But luckily, you can have it all. $-$$ Caf Bastille248 SE 1st St., 786-425-3575Breakfasting on a ham-egg-cheese crepe at this very Frenchfeeling -and tasting -caf is a most civilized way to start the day. Formerly breakfast and lunch only, the caf is now open for dinner, too. And while the crepes (both savory and sweet) are tempting and varied enough to eat all day, dinner choices like homemade foie gras (with onion jam and Guerande salt), salmon with lentils and fennel salsa, or a very affordable skirt steak au poivre make it possible to resist. $-$$$Caf Sambal500 Brickell Key Dr., 305-913-8358Though the Mandarin Oriental Hotel describes this space as its casual hotel restaurant, many consider it a more spectacular dining setting than the upscale Azul, upstairs, owing to the option of dining outdoors on a covered terrace directly on the waterfront. The food is Asian-inspired, with a few Latin and Mediterranean accents. For the health-conscious, the menu includes low-cal choices. For hedonists theres a big selection of artisan sakes. $$$-$$$$$Cavas Wine Tasting Room900 S. Miami Ave. #180, 305-372-8027Like South Miamis predecessor (now closed), this Cavas is mainly an upscale, high-tech tasting lounge for the winecurious. Patrons buy prepaid cards to sample ounce, half-glass, or full-glass portions from more than 50 self-service dispensing machines. But theres an extensive selection of tapas/pintxos small plates, flatbread pizzas, sandwiches, plus fully garnished charcuterie and cheese platters specially selected to pair well with vino. Additionally, more substantial dishes have been added, including a daily three-course lunch special and some tasty, bargain-priced soups (carrot cream with Gouda particularly recommended). $$-$$$ Chophouse Miami300 S. Biscayne Blvd., 305-938-9000Formerly Mannys Steakhouse, Miamis Chophouse retains basically everything but the famed name (from the original Mannys in Minneapolis), and remains Miamis most intentionally masculine steakhouse. Here, ensconced in your black leather booth, everything is humongous: dry-aged choice-grade steaks like the Bludgeon of Beef (a boldly flavorful 40-ounce bone-in ribeye, described as part meat, part weapon); king crab legs that dwarf the plate; cocktail shrimp that could swallow the Loch Ness monster whole; two-fisted cocktails that would fell a T-Rex. Not for the frail. $$$$$ The Corner1035 N. Miami Ave., 305-961-7887 With a Zuma alum in the kitchen, a Gigi alum crafting classic or creative cocktails, a warm pub feel, and hours extending from lunch to nearly breakfast the next morning, The Corner is transforming a desolate downtown corner into a neighborhood hangout. The nicely priced menu of sandwiches, salads, snacks, and sweets (the latter from Om Nom Noms cookie queen Anthea Ponsetti) ranges from 100-percent homemade ice cream sandwiches to the Crazy Madame, Frances elaborate Croque Madame (a bchamel sauce-topped grilled cheese/ham/fried egg sandwich) plus bacon and caramelized onion. $-$$ Crazy About You1155 Brickell Bay Dr. #101, 305-377-4442The owners, and budget-friendly formula, are the same here as at older Dolores, But You Can Call Me Lolita: Buy an entre (all under $20) from a sizable list of Mediterranean, Latin, American, or Asian-influenced choices (like Thai-marinated churrasco with crispy shoestring fries) and get an appetizer for free, including substantial stuff like a Chihuahua cheese casserole with chorizo and pesto. The difference: This place, housed in the former location of short-lived La Broche, has an even more upscale ambiance than Dolores -including a million-dollar water view. $$$ Cvi.che 105105 NE 3rd Ave., 305-577-3454Fusion food -a modern invention? Not in Peru, where native and Euro-Asian influences have mixed for more than a century. But chef Juan Chipoco gives the ceviches and tiraditos served at this hot spot his own unique spin. Specialties include flashmarinated raw seafood creations, such as tiradito a la crema de rocoto (sliced fish in citrus-spiked chili/cream sauce). But traditional fusion dishes like Chinese-Peruvian Chaufa fried rice (packed with jumbo shrimp, mussels, and calamari) are also fun, as well as surprisingly affordable. $$ db Bistro Moderne345 Avenue of the Americas, 305-421-8800Just two words -- Daniel Boulud -should be enough for foodies craving creative French/American comfort cuisine to run, not walk, to this restaurant. If they can find it. (Hint: The mysterious Avenue of the Americas is really Biscayne Boulevard Way. Dont ask.) Downtowns db is an absentee celeb chef outpost, but on-site kitchen wizard Jarrod Verbiak flawlessly executes dishes ranging from the original NYC db Bistros signature foie gras/short rib/black truffle-stuffed burger to local market-driven dishes like crusted pompano with garlic/parsley veloute. $$$-$$$$ The Democratic Republic of Beer255 NE 14th St., 305-372-4161The food here? Beer is food! The DRB serves 400 beers from 55 countries, ranging from $2 Pabst Blue Ribbon to $40 DeuS (an 11.5% alcohol Belgian mthode Champenoise brew). But for those favoring solid snacks, tasty global smallish plates include fried fresh zucchini with dip (cheese recommended); chorizo with homemade cilantro Mayo; or steak tacos, served Mexican-style with onions, cilantro, and spicy salsa. Sadly for breakfast-brew enthusiasts, the DRB isnt open that early. But it is open late -till 5:00 a.m. $$D-Dog House50 SW 10th St., 305-381-7770While it has become increasingly common to find servers at upscale restaurants utilizing computerized POS (point of service) systems to take orders, this high-tech hole-in-the-wall trumps them by replacing servers -and in-house entertainment, too -with iPads that accept not just food orders and credit cards but music requests. You can web surf or game, too, while waiting for your choice of the house specialty: supersized hot dogs, most overloaded with internationally inspired toppings. To accompany, hand-cut fries are a must. And have a cocktail. Theres a full liquor bar. $-$$ Dolores, But You Can Call Me Lolita1000 S. Miami Ave., 305-403-3103From the stylish setting in Miamis historic Firehouse No. 4, one would expect a mighty pricy meal. But entres, which range from Nuevo Latino-style ginger/orange-glazed pork tenderloin to a platter of Kobe mini-burgers, all cost either $18 or $23. And the price includes an appetizer -no low-rent crapola, either, but treats like Serrano ham croquetas, a spinach/ leek tart with Portobello mushroom sauce, or shrimp-topped eggplant timbales. The best seats are on the glam rooftop patio. $$$Dominique Bistro-Club1451 S. Miami Ave., 305-371-8859At typical restolounges, the resto part often gets the short end of the stick. But not at this chic but friendly spot, where Gerardo Barrera, an alumn of Pariss Le Cordon Bleu, plus his wife Dominque and her brother Jos Sigona, welcome diners with Frances best-known bistro classics: coquilles St. Jacques (tender scallops in mushroom/white wine sauce); a precisioncooked entrecte rib-eye with Bearnaise or complex Caf de Paris butter; crme brle (from scratch) or macaron cookies (from heaven). No velvet ropes, and club music isnt cranked till 11:00 p.m. $$$ Edge, Steak & Bar1435 Brickell Ave., 305-358-3535Replacing the Four Seasons formal fine dining spot Acqua, Edge offers a more kick-back casual welcoming vibe. And in its fare theres a particularly warm welcome for non-carnivores. Chef-driven seafood items (several inventive and unusually subtle ceviches and tartares; a layered construction of corvina encrusted in a jewel-bright green pesto crust, atop red piquillo sauce stripes and salad; lobster corn soup packed with sweet lobster meat; more) and a farm-to-table produce emphasis make this one steakhouse where those who dont eat beef have no beef. $$$$-$$$$$ Elwoods Gastro Pub188 NE 3rd Ave., 305-358-5222Cordial English owners, classic rock music (sometimes live), and updated classic pub fare make this hangout a home. Made from scratch with artisan ingredients, traditional Brit bites like fish and chips cant be beat -thick pieces of crisply beer-battered moist cod, served with hand-cut fries and mushy [mashed] peas, plus housemade tartar sauce and ketchup. All desserts are also made in-house, including a deliriously rich (but worth it) sticky date pudding with toffee sauce. Tie down your dental implants. Theyre in for a wild ride. $$Eos485 Brickell Ave. (Viceroy Hotel), 305-503-0373Originally opened by Michelin-starred New Aegean chef Michael Psilakis, Eos changed upon the chefs departure into a more familiar Mediterranean resort eatery, minus Greekinspired innovations. Now inspiration comes mainly from Spain and Italy, with nods to Morocco and Latin America. Best bets include a tasting platter of Spanish cheeses and cured meats; a pistachio-garnished salad featuring Serrano ham, figs, and arugula; crispy parmesan risotto balls with prosciutto and smoked tomato dip; and olive/smoked paprika-rubbed roast chicken. At lunch burgers and upscale sandwiches are added. $$$-$$$$Eternity Coffee Roasters117 SE 2nd Ave., 305-609-4981Normally we list only full restaurants, but even a (not so) simple cuppa joe from Chris Johnson and Cristina Garcess sleek micro-roastery will convince anyone possessing taste buds that fine coffee can be as complex as fine wine, and as satisfying as solid food. A changing selection of superior single-origin beans (many varieties from the Garces familys Colombian farm; most others from Ethiopia and Kenya), roasted in-house, produces slow-pour regular brews with amazing nuances of fruits, chocolate, and more. The espresso is so smooth sugar isnt necessary. Other treats: flaky chocolate-stuffed cigars and other locally baked pastries. Free parking. $ Fado Irish Pub900 S. Miami Ave. #200, 786-924-0972Unlike most Miami Irish pubs, which serve mostly American bar food, rarely foraying past fish and chips or shepherds pie, Fado (pronounced fdoe) has a menu reflecting the pub grub found today in Ireland, including solid standards. But most intriguing are dishes mixing classic and contemporary influences, particularly those featuring boxty, a grated/mashed potato pancake. Try corned beef rolls (boxty wraps, with creamy mustard sauce and cabbage slaw), or smoked salmon on miniboxty blini, with capers and horseradish sauce. Theres a seasonal menu, too. $$Finnegans River401 SW 3rd Ave., 305-285-3030Pool tables are expected in a sports bar and grill. But an actual pool? And a Jacuzzi? This Miami River hideaway has other surprises, too, on its extensive outdoor deck, including a boat dock and a large array of umbrella tables and lounge chairs where its easy to while away many happy hours. The menu is the same array of bar bites served by South Beachs older Finnegans, but angus burgers are big and tasty, and zingy jalapeo-studded smoked-fish dip is a satisfying table-snack choice. $$ First Hong Kong Caf117 SE 2nd St., 305-808-6665Old Hong Kong saying: If it walks, swims, crawls, or flies, its edible. And nowhere is this truer than in this historically international trade ports cafs -meaning fast-food restaurants. Typical menus present hundreds of items that are local interpretations of dishes from all China, and most other nations. So believe us: At this caf, whose head chef is from HK, the Indian-style curries, sambal-spiked Indonesian chow fun, even the borscht (a tomato/beef, not beet-based version of the Russian soup) are as authentic as the kung pao whatever, and as tasty. $$ Fratelli Milano213 SE 1st St., 305-373-2300Downtown isnt yet a 24/7 urban center, but its experiencing a mini explosion of eateries open at night. That includes this family-owned ristorante, where even newcomers feel at home. At lunch its almost impossible to resist panini, served on foccacia or crunchy ciabatta; even the vegetarian version bursts with complex and complementary flavors. During weekday dinners, try generous plates of risotto with shrimp and grilled asparagus; homemade pastas like seafoodpacked fettuccine al scoglio; or delicate Vitello alla Milanese on arugula. $$-$$$Garcias Seafood Grille and Fish Market398 NW N. River Dr., 305-375-0765Run by a fishing family for a couple of generations, this venerable Florida fish shack is the real thing. No worries about the seafoods freshness; on their way to the dining deck overlooking the Miami River, diners can view the retail fish market. Best preparations are the simplest. When stone crabs are in season, Garcias claws are as good as Joes but considerably cheaper. The local fish sandwich is most popular grouper, yellowtail snapper, or mahi mahi. $-$$Giovana Caffe154 SE 1st Ave.305-374-1024If the menu at this charming downtown hideaway contained only one item -pear and gorgonzola ravioli dressed, not drowned, in sage-spiced cream sauce -wed be happy. But the caf, formerly lunch-only but now serving weekday dinners, is also justly famed for meal-size salads like grilled skirt steak atop sweetly balsamic-dressed spinach (with spinach, tomatoes, bacon, hard-boiled eggs, blue cheese, and almonds), or an especially lavish chicken salad with pine nuts, golden raisins, apples, and basil, an Italian twist. $$Grimpa Steakhouse901 Brickell Plaza, 305-455-4757This expansive indoor/outdoor Brazilian eatery is sleekly contemporary, but no worries. The classic sword-wielding gauchos are here, serving a mind-reeling assortment of skewered beef, chicken, lamb, pork, sausages, and fish. And included in the price (dinner $47, lunch $34) is the traditional belly-busting buffet of hot and cold prepared foods, salad, cold cuts, and cheeses. A pleasant, nontraditional surprise: unusual sauces like sweet/tart passion fruit or mint, tomato-based BBQ, and mango chutney, along with the ubiquitous chimichurri. $$$$-$$$$$Half Moon Empanadas192 SE 1st Ave., 305-379-2525As with South Beachs original Half Moon, you can get wraps or salads. But its this snackerys unique take on Argentinestyle empanadas that makes it seem a natural for national franchising. The soft-crusted, doughy crescents -baked, not fried, so relatively guilt-free -are amply stuffed with fillings both classic (beef and chicken, either mild or spicy) and creative: the bacon cheeseburger, the pancetta/mozzarella/ plum-filled Americana, and several vegetarian options. At just over two bucks apiece, theyre a money-saving moveable feast. $ *Free Medium Pizza*with $25 purchase or more. With this ad.Now open at Noon on Sundays 10% off Catering Menu18228 W Dixie Hwy. N Miami Beach | PH:305.792.9455 1800 Biscayne Blvd, #105 (Located at 1800 Biscayne Plaza) WWW.3CHEFS-MIA.COM Specializing in Chinese & Vietnamese Cuisine

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Business Hours: 12pm-3am Every Day 305-947-00643881 NE 163rd Street, North Miami Beach, Fl(Intracoastal 163rd Street Mall) www.yakko-san.comNot affiliated with Hiros Restaurant on 163rd St. YAKKO-SANAuthentic Japanese Cuisine Specializing in regional Japanese cuisinefocusing on small tapas-like plates you will not find anywhere else.Full Bar -Hiros17040-46 W. Dixie Highway 305-949-0776 or 305-949-4685Mon-Fri 11amam/Sat & Sun 1pm-12amClick your online order & get delivery right to your door www.sushiexpress.com(Also located in South Beach 305-531-6068 and Oakland Park 954-772-0555) DINE-IN TAKE OUT DELIVERY CATERING Sushi Express

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Hawa Jade1331 Brickell Bay Dr., 305-905-5523When thinking fusion cuisines, Japanese and Lebanese dont instantly spring to mind. But taking the medieval Spice Route connection as inspiration, the Hawa family makes the mix work at both its original Coral Gables Hawa and this new location in the Jade Residences. Golden Pockets (tofu crpes encasing macadamias, avocado, and tuna, crab, shrimp, or Kobe-style beef) are musts. Plus there are unique combos containing makis plus substantial salads, like crunchy tuna enoki rolls with falafel salad -not the usual green garnish. Housemade desserts with a French twist are also a pleasant surprise. $$ Hibachi Grill45 NE 3rd Ave., 305-374-2223Imagine a mini-express Benihana. This place specializes in teppanyaki cuisine -minus the thrilling (or terrifying) tableside knife theatrics, true, but the one-plate meals of seasoned steak slices, chicken, shrimp, or salmon plus dipping sauces, fried rice, and an onion/zucchini mix come at bargain prices. There are also hefty soups or Japanese, Thai, and Singaporestyle noodle and rice bowls loaded with veggies and choice of protein (including tofu). The limited sides are Japanese (shumai, plump chicken gyoza) and Chinese (various egg rolls). Fancy? No, but satisfying. $-$$ Il Gabbiano335 S. Biscayne Blvd., 305-373-0063Its location at the mouth of the Miami River makes this ultraupscale Italian spot (especially the outdoor terrace) the perfect power lunch/business dinner alternative to steakhouses. And the culinary experience goes way beyond the typical meat mar ket, thanks in part to the flood of freebies thats a trademark of Manhattans Il Mulino, originally run by Il Gabbianos owners. The rest of the food? Pricy, but portions are mammoth. And the champagne-cream-sauced housemade ravioli with black truffles? Worth every penny. $$$$$Indigo / Table 40100 Chopin Plaza, 305-577-1000Long known for its power-lunch buffet -including hot entres, carving station, custom pastas, packed-to-the-gills salad, sushi, and dessert stations -the InterContinental Hotels Indigo restau rant now has a hip offspring intended for private dining: Table 40. The charming, glassed-in wine cellar (actually in the kitchen) enables 12-14 diners to watch the action in heat-shielded, soundproofed comfort while eating creations by veteran chef Alexander Feher, combining Continental technique with local seasonal ingredients. Highlights: tender house-smoked, stoutbraised short ribs; lavish lobster salad with grilled mango; and a seductive fresh corn gazpacho. $$$-$$$$$ Jackson Soul Food950 NW 3rd Ave., 305-377-6710]With a recently refurbished exterior to match its classy/comfy retro interior, this 65-year-old Overtown soul food breakfast institution now has only one drawback: It closes at 1:00 p.m. Never mind, night owls. If youre a first-timer here, order the astonishingly fluffy pancakes with juicy beef sausage, and youll set multiple alarm clocks to return. Classic drop biscuits (preferably with gravy) are also must-haves. And hearty Southern breakfast staples like smothered chicken wings or fried fish do make breakfast seem like lunch, too. $ Jamn, Jamn, Jamn, 10 SW South River Dr., 305-324-1111From the outside, you know youre walking into the ground floor of a new condo building. But once inside the charmingly rustic room, youd swear youre in Spain. Obviously Spains famous cured hams are a specialty, as are other pork products on the weekly changing menu, from a roast suckling pig entre to a fried chorizo and chickpea tapa. But seafood is also terrific. Dont miss bacalao-filled piquillo peppers, or two of Miamis best rice dishes: seafood paella and arroz negro (with squid and its ink). $$-$$$Kork Wine & Cheese Bar2 S. Miami Ave., 305-377-8899From the owner of Transit Lounge, a hip hangout long before the downtown/Brickell revival, this more upscale-cool venue is worth checking out for its almost medieval dimly lit dcor alone, including a subterranean wine cellar/party room, formerly a WW II-era bomb shelter. Comestibles are limited to wine and cheese plus accompaniments. Both are available to go. Kork is as much market as lounge. But with a stock of roughly 5000 bottles, and a selection of roughly two dozen perfectly ripe artisanal cheeses -curated by a cheese sommelier wholl create perfect pairings -who needs more? $$Largo Bar & Grill401 Biscayne Blvd., 305-374-9706Sure, Bayside Marketplace is touristy. But it can be fun to spend a day playing visitor in your own city. If you do, this waterfront place overlooking Miamarina is a superior food choice. Expect nothing cutting edge, just tasty, familiar favorites solidly prepared. You wont go wrong with stone crab claws and Cajun mustard dip; inauthentic but delicious fish tacos in hard blue corn tortillas with two sauces (cilantro and chipotle), generously portioned fish sandwiches (grouper, mahi, snapper, or daily catch), and festive cocktails. $$-$$$ La Loggia Ristorante and Lounge68 W. Flagler St., 305-373-4800This luxuriantly neo-classical yet warm Italian restaurant was unquestionably a pioneer in revitalizing downtown. With alter natives like amaretto-tinged pumpkin agnolloti in sage butter sauce and cilantro-spiced white bean/vegetable salad dressed with truffle oil, proprietors Jennifer Porciello and Horatio Oliveira continue to draw a lunch crowd that returns for dinner, or perhaps just stays on through the afternoon, fueled by the Lawyers Liquid Lunch, a vodka martini spiked with sweetened espresso. $$$La Moon 144 SW 8th St., 305-860-6209At four in the morning, nothing quells the munchies like a Crazy Burger, a Colombian take on a truckers burger: beef patty, bacon, ham, mozzarella, lettuce, tomato, and a fried egg, with an arepa corn pancake bun. While this tiny places late hours (till 6:00 a.m. Friday and Saturday) are surprising, the daytime menu is more so. In addition to Colombian classics, theres a salad Nicoise with grilled fresh tuna, seared salmon with mango salsa, and other yuppie favorites. $-$$ La Provence1064 Brickell Ave. 786-425-9003Great baguettes in the bread basket, many believe, indicate a great meal to come. But when Miamians encounter such bread -crackling crust outside; moist, aromatic, aerated interior -its likely not from a restaurants own kitchen, but from La Provence. Buttery croissants and party-perfect pastries are legend too. Not so familiar is the bakerys caf component, whose sandwich/salad menu reflects local eclectic tastes. But French items like pan bagnats (essentially salade Nioise on artisan bread) will truly transport diners to co-owner David Thaus Provenal homeland. $$La Sandwicherie34 SW 8th St., 305-374-9852This second location of the open-air diner that is South Beachs favorite aprs-club eatery (since 1988) closes earlier (midnight Sunday-Thursday, 5:00 a.m. Friday and Saturday), but the smoothies, salads, and superb Parisian sandwiches are the same: ultra-crusty baguette stuffed with evocative charcute rie and cheeses (saucisson sec, country pt, camembert, etc.) and choice of salad veggies plus salty/tart cornichons and Sandwicheries incomparable Dijon mustard vinaigrette. Additionally the larger branch has an interior, with a kitchen enabling hot foods (quiches and croques), plus A/C. $-$$Le Boudoir Brickell188 SE 12th Terr., 305-372-233At this French bakery/caf, mornings start seriously, with choices ranging from quality cheese, charcuterie/pt, or smoked salmon platters to chic Continental and complete American breakfasts. At lunch, generously salad-garnished, open-faced tartines are irresistible. But sophisticated salads and homemade soups make the choice tough. And do not skip dessert. Superb sweets include rich almond/fresh raspberry or properly tangy lemon tarts, traditional Madeleines, airy layered mousses, and addictive mini-macaroon sandwich cookies with daily-changing fillings. $-$$Lime Fresh Mexican Grill1 W. Flagler St., Suite 7, 305-789-9929 (See Midtown / Wynwood / Design District listing.)Little Lotus25 N. Miami Ave. #107, 305-533-2700Secreted inside the International Jewelry Exchange, this eatery (owned by stealth super-foodie Sari Maharani -paralegal by day, restaurateur by night) is tough to find but seems destined to become one of our towns toughest tables to book. Two talented chefs, whose credits include Morimoto (NYC) and hometown fave Yakko-san, create Japanese, Indonesian, and fusion small plates that look remarkably artful and taste like theyre about ready to take on Iron Chef Morimoto himself. Saucing, often with multiple but balanced potions, is especially noteworthy. The prices? A steal. $-$$ LouLou Le Petit Bistro638 S. Miami Ave., 305-379-1404When Indochines owner, Jacques Ardisson, closed his Asian spot to open this charming French eatery in the same space, it was a return to his roots. He and his daughter, for whom the place is named, come from Nice. Youll be transported, too, by dishes like lamb shank with flageolets (known as the caviar of beans), duck leg confit on a bed of mouthwatering green lentils from Le Puy, a classic moules/frites, a shared charcuterie platter with a bottle from the savvy wine list, and, of course, salade nioise. $$-$$$Martini 28146 SE 1st Ave., 305-577-4414This stylish little lunch-only spot, a labor of love from a husband-wife chef team, serves what might well be the most impressive meal deal in town. From an ambitious, daily-changing menu of fare thats geographically eclectic but prepared with solid classic technique, diners get a choice of about ten entres (substantial stuff like steak au poivre with Madeira cream sauce and roasted potatoes, or pignolia-crusted salmon with Dijon mustard sauce, potatoes, and veggies), plus soup or salad and housemade dessert. For just $9.99. Told ya. $ Miami Art Caf 364 SE 1st St., 305-374-5117For businessfolk on the go, this breakfast/lunch-only French caf serves up evocative baguette sandwiches (like camembert) loaded, if you like, with greens, olives, and more. For those with time to sit, wed recommend the savory crpes, garnished with perfectly dressed salad, or sweet crpe like the Bonne Maman (whose sugar/salted butter stuffing brings Brittany to downtown). And quiches are nicely custardy. But there are surprises here, too, including just a few full entres, with correctly made traditional sauces one wouldnt expect at a luncheonette -except, perhaps, in Paris. $-$$Miamis Finest Caribbean Restaurant236 NE 1st Ave., 305-381-9254Originally from Jamaica, proprietor Miss Pat has been serving her traditional homemade island specialties to downtown office workers and college students since the early 1990s. Most popular item here might be the weekday lunch special of jerk chicken with festival (sweet-fried cornmeal bread patties), but even vegetarians are well served with dishes like a tofu, carrot, and chayote curry. All entres come with rice and peas, fried plantains, and salad, so no one leaves hungry. $

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Mint Leaf1063 SE 1st Ave., 305-358-5050Part of Londons famous Woodlands Group, this stylish spot, like its Coral Gables parent, serves the sort of upscale Indian food rarely found outside Great Britain or India. More interestingly, the menu includes not just the familiar northern Indian Mughlai fare served in most of Americas Indian restaurants, but refined versions of south Indias scrum ptious street food. Weve happily assembled whole meals of the vegetarian chaat (snacks) alone. And dosai (lacy rice/lentil crepes rolled around fillings ranging from traditional onion/potato to lamb masala or spicy chicken) are so addictive they oughta be illegal. $$$-$$$$Miss Yip Chinese Caf900 Biscayne Blvd., 305-358-0088Fans of the South Beach original will find the dcor different. Most notably, theres an outdoor lounge, and more generally a nightclub atmosphere. But the menu of Hong Kong-style Chinese food, prepared by imported Chinese cooks, is familiar. Simple yet sophisticated Cantonese seafood dishes rock (try the lightly battered salt-and-pepper shrimp), as does orange peel chicken, spicy/tangy rather than overly sweet. And a single two-course Peking duck (skin in crepes, stir-fried meat and veggies with lettuce cups) makes mouthwatering finger food, shared among friends. $-$$$ Naoe661 Brickell Key Dr., 305-947-6263 Chances are youve never had anything like the $85 prixfixe Japanese dinners at chef Kevin Corys tiny but nationally acclaimed oasis, transplanted from its original Sunny Isles space with its supreme serenity intact. By reservation only, in two dinner seatings of just eight people each, and omakase (chefs choice) only, meals include a seasonal soup, a four-course bento box, eight pieces of sushi, and three desserts. Cory personally does everything for you, even applying the perfect amount of housemade artisan soy sauce mix and fresh-grated wasabi to each mindreelingly fresh nigiri. Few eating experiences on earth are more luxuriant. $$$$$ neMesis Urban Bistro1035 N. Miami Ave., 305-415-9911Truly original restaurants are hard to find here, and harder to describe in standard sound bites. But they often are the attention-grabbing people-magnets that spark revivals of iffy neighborhoods. Thats our prediction for this quirkily decorated bistro, where the kitchen is helmed by Top Chef contestant Micah Edelstein. The intensely personal menu of creative dishes inspired by her global travels (plus her fascination with unfamiliar ingredients) changes constantly, but scrumptious signatures include South African smoked veal bobotie, and Peruvian pinoli pancakes with housemade chicken/apple sausage, hibiscus syrup, and maple granules. $$$-$$$$Novecento1414 Brickell Ave., 305-403-0900For those who think Argentine cuisine is a synonym for beef and more beef, this popular eaterys wide range of more cosmopolitan contemporary Argentine fare will be a revelation. Classic parrilla-grilled steaks are here for traditionalists, but the menu is dominated by creative Nuevo Latino items like a new-style ceviche de chernia (lightly lime-marinated grouper with jalapeos, basil, and the refreshing sweet counterpoint of watermelon), or crab ravioli with creamy saffron sauce. Especially notable are the entre salads. $$-$$$Oceanaire Seafood Room900 S. Miami Ave., 305-372-8862With a dozen branches nationwide, Oceanaire May seem more All-American seafood empire than Florida fish shack, but menus vary significantly according to regional tastes and fish. Here in Miami, chef Sean Bernal supplements signature starters like lump crab cakes with his own lightly marinated, Peruvian-style grouper ceviche. The daily-changing, 15-20 specimen seafood selection includes local fish seldom seen on local menus: pompano, parrot fish, amberjack. But even flown-in fish (and the raw bars cold-water oysters) are ultrafresh. $$$$Ozzi Sushi200 SE 1st St., 786-704-8003Since its 1958 invention, conveyor-belt sushi has been the most fun form of Japanese fast food, but problematic. Who knew how long plates had been circulating on the sushi-goround? Happily, this sushi-boat spot avoids sanitation issues with clear plastic covers, and as for freshness, low prices ensure a steady stream of diners grabbing makis, nigiri, and more as they float by. Highlights include glistening ikura (salmon roe) in a thin-sliced cucumber cup, a sweet-sauced mango/ guava/crab roll, and a festively frosted strawberry Nutella dessert maki. $-$$Pashas1414 Brickell Ave., 305-416-5116The original branch on Lincoln Road was instantly popular, and the same healthy Middle Eastern fast food is served at several newer outlets. The prices are low enough that you might suspect Pashas was a tax write-off rather than a Harvard Business School project, which it was by founders Antonio Ellek and Nicolas Cortes. Dishes range from falafel and gyros to more unusual items like muhammara (tangy walnut spread) and silky labneh yogurt cheese. Everything from pitas to lemonade is made fresh, from scratch, daily. $-$$Pega Grill15 E. Flagler St., 305-808-6666From Thanasios Barlos, a Greek native who formerly owned North Beachs Ariston, this small spot is more casually contemporary and less ethnic-kitschy in ambiance, but serves equally authentic, full-flavored Greek food. Mixed lamb/beef gyros (chicken is also an option), topped with tangy yogurt sauce and wrapped, with greens and tomatoes, in fat warm pita bread, are specialties. But even more irresistible is the taramasalata (particularly velvety and light carp roe dip), available alone or on an olive/pita-garnished mixed meze platter. $$ Peoples Bar-B-Que360 NW 8th St., 305-373-8080Oak-smoked, falling-off-the-bone tender barbecued ribs (enhanced with a secret sauce whose recipe goes back several generations) are the main draw at this Overtown institution. But the chicken is also a winner, plus theres a full menu of soul food entres, including what many aficionados consider our towns tastiest souse. And it would be unthinkable to call it quits without homemade sweet potato pie or banana pudding, plus a bracing flop half iced tea, half lemonade. $-$$ Perricones15 SE 10th St., 305-374-9449Housed in a Revolutionary-era barn (moved from Vermont), this market/caf was one of the Brickell areas first gentrified amenities. At lunch chicken salad is a favorite; dinners strong suit is the pasta list, ranging from Grandma Jennies old-fashioned lasagna to chichi fiocchi purses filled with fresh pear and gorgonzola. And Sundays $15.95 brunch buffet ($9.95 for kids) featuring an omelet station, waffles, smoked salmon and bagels, salads, and more remains one of our towns most civilized all-you-can-eat deals. $$Pieducks1451 S. Miami Ave., 305-808-7888If you can overlook a name as unenlightening as most in-jokes (it evidently refers to a favorite character of owner Claudio Nuness kids -we assume the Pokemon Psyduck), youll experience pretty perfect pizza. Sadly, not all brick ovens turn out perfectly char-blistered crusts, crisp outside and airy/chewy inside, but thats what youll consistently find here and a newer take-out/delivery-only Midtown branch. And unlike many artisan pizzerias, Pieducks doesnt get cheesy with cheese quantity (though we like that extra cheese is an option). Elaborate salads complete the menu. $$Pier 9494 SE 1st St., 305-379-5652Tucked into The Village, a collection of courtyard eateries far from any waterfront, this ceviche bar specializes in fresh seafood dishes from chef/owner Alex Del Corrals native Peru, but also features famous Peruvian meat and poultry dishes (including a refined aji de gallina, chicken in aji pepper-spiced cream sauce). Emphasis is particularly strong on Perus penchant for fusion food, including traditional Chifa (Chinese-Peruvian) rice or noodle stir-fries. But the chef also fuses classic and creative influences. Try contemporary causas, combining Perus favorite starch, potatoes, with unique new sauces. $$ Pizzarium69 E. Flagler St., 305-381-6025 Roman-style rectangular pizzas, served in square slices, have been available in the Miami area since the mid-1990s. But the familiar squares and Pizzariums are similar only in shape. Main difference: dough, here allowed to rise for four days. The resulting crusts are astonishingly airy, as authentic Roman slices, intended as light street snacks, should be. Toppings, a rotating selection of nearly 30 combinations, are highlighted by quality imported ingredients -not to mention a healthy imagination, as the zucca gialla attests: pumpkin cream, pancetta, smoked scamorza cheese. $ Pollos & Jarras115 NE 3rd Ave., 786-567-4940From Juan Chipoco, Peruvian chef/co-owner of seafood-centric Cvi.Che 105, this stylish but affordable two-level restaurant is centered around pollo a la brasa, as a huge rotisserie oven attests. Grilled steaks, unique sandwiches, anticuchos, and varied starters and sides are also served, but the must-notmiss is rotisserie chicken, marinated in roughly a dozen-anda-half seasonings before a self-basting spin on the spit cooks it to incomparable juiciness. Its served with crisp fries and a substantial salad. Meals also come with a complimentary cup of aguadito -assertively cilantro-spiked chicken rice soup. $$ PreludeAdrienne Arsht Center 1300 Biscayne Blvd., 305-949-6722Though the opening of Barton G.s elegant performing arts center eatery did feature a live giraffe, the foods actually more grown-up than at his original SoBe spot. The concept is prix fixe: Any three courses on the menu (meaning three entres if you want) for $39. Highlights include silky, tarragon-inflected corn/bacon chowder, beautifully plated beef carpaccio with horseradish/mustard and shallot olive oil dipping sauces; and over-the-top playhouse desserts, one with a luscious crme fraiche ice cream pop. $$$$Rajas Indian Cuisine33 NE 2nd Ave., 305-539-9551Despite its small size and dcor best described as none, this place is an institution thanks to south Indian specialties rarely found in Miamis basically north Indian restaurants. The steamtabled curries are fine (and nicely priced), but be sure to try the custom-made dosai (lacy rice crepes with a variety of savory fillings) and uttapam, thicker pancakes, layered with onions and chilis, both served with sambar and chutney. $$The River Oyster Bar650 S. Miami Ave., 305-530-1915This casually cool jewel is a full-service seafood spot, as evidenced by tempting menu selections like soft-shell crabs with grilled vegetables, corn relish, and remoulade. There are even a few dishes to please meat-and-potatoes diners, like short ribs with macaroni and cheese. But oyster fans will find it difficult to resist stuffing themselves silly on the unusually

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100 large selection, especially since oysters are served both raw and cooked fire-roasted with sofrito butter, chorizo, and manchego. Theres also a thoughtful wine list and numerous artisan beers on tap. $$$Rosa Mexicano900 S. Miami Ave., 786-425-1001This expansive indoor/outdoor space offers a dining experience thats haute in everything but price. Few entres top $20. The dcor is both date-worthy and family-friendly festive but not kitschy. And nonsophisticates neednt fear; though nachos arent available, there is nothing scary about zarape de pato (roast duck between freshly made, soft corn tortillas, topped with yellow-and-habanero-pepper cream sauce), or Rosas signature guacamole en molcajete, made tableside. A few pomegranate margaritas ensure no worries. $$$Scalina315 S. Biscayne Blvd., 305-789-9933Comparisons between this new Tom Billante venture and the other (slightly pricier) Italian eatery in the same building are inevitable, especially considering similarities like key personnel from NYCs Il Mulino, Mulino-style abundant free appetizers, and a power-dining crowd. But why focus on competitive nonsense when you can relax on the river-view terrace enjoying chef Enrico Giraldos specialties, including an elaborate take on Venices famed fegato (calfs liver and onions), upscaled with Lucanica sausage and a balsamic reduction. Or maybe an even more evocative Roman ice cream tartufo? Mangia! $$$$Soi Asian Bistro134 NE 2nd Ave., 305-523-3643From the owners of Calle Ochos hip Mr. Yum and 2B Asian Bistro, Soi sports similar casual-chic ambiance and eclectic Thai/ Japanese cuisine. Traditional Thai curries and familiar sushi rolls are prepared with solid skill and style. But most intriguing are new inventions adding Peruvian fusion flair to the Asian mix, such as a spicy, tangy tangle of crisp-fried yellow noodles with sauted shrimp plus slivered peppers and onions -mod mee krob, with jalea-like tart heat replacing the cloying sweetness. $$ Soya & Pomodoro120 NE 1st St., 305-381-9511Life is complicated. Food should be simple. Thats owner Armando Alfanos philosophy, which is stated above the entry to his atmospheric downtown eatery. And since its also the formula for the truest traditional Italian food (Alfano hails from Pompeii), its fitting that the menu is dominated by authentically straightforward yet sophisticated Italian entres. There are salads and sandwiches, too. The most enjoyable place to dine is the secret, open-air courtyard. Alfano serves dinner on Thursdays only to accompany local musicians and artists. $-$$Sparkys Roadside Restaurant & Bar204 NE 1st St., 305-377-2877This cowboy-cute eaterys chefs/owners (one CIA-trained, both BBQ fanatics nicknamed Sparky) eschew regional purism, instead utilizing a hickory/apple-wood-stoked rotisserie smoker to turn out their personalized style of slow-cooked, complexly dry-rub fusion: ribs, chopped pork, brisket, and chicken. Diners can customize their orders with mix-and-match housemade sauces: sweet/tangy tomato-based, Carolinas-inspired vinegar/ mustard, pan-Asian hoisin with lemongrass and ginger, tropical guava/habanero. Authenticity aside, the quality of the food is as good as much higher-priced barbecue outfits. $-$$ Sushi Maki1000 S. Miami Ave., 305-415-9779Fans of the popular parent Sushi Maki in the Gables will find many familiar favorites on this Brickell branchs menu. But the must-haves are some inventive new dishes introduced to honor the eaterys tenth anniversary and Miami multiculturalism: sushi tacos (fried gyoza skins with fusion fillings like raw salmon, miso, chili-garlic sauce, and sour cream), three tasty flash-marinated Asian/Latin tiraditos; addictive rock shrimp tempura with creamy/spicy dip. Also irresistible: four festive new sake cocktails. $$-$$$ SuViche49 SW 11th St., 305-960-7097 This small Japanese-Peruvian place serves food influenced by each nation distinctly, plus intriguing fusion items with added Caribbean touches. Cooked entres, all Peruvian, include an elegant aji de gallina (walnut-garnished chicken and potatoes in peppery cream sauce). But the emphasis is on contemporary ceviches/tiraditos (those with velvety aji amarillo chili sauce particularly), plus huge exotic sushi rolls, which get pretty wild. When was the last time you encountered a tempurabattered tuna, avocado, and scallion maki topped with Perus traditional potato garnish, huancaina cheese sauce? $$TIKL Raw Bar & Grill1450 Brickell Ave. #110, 305-372-0620From restaurateur Claudio Giordano and chef Simon Stojanovic, the team behind longtime South Beach seafood favorite Altamare, this eatery is similar in food genre (contemporary American), though more global influences, especially from Asia, are evident here. Additionally, rather than serving conventional three-course meals, TIKLs menu focuses on small plates: creative crudos (like hamachi with yuzu, wasabi, and olive oil powder), plus robata-grilled and otherwise cooked items. Standouts: garlic/citrus-spiked local white shrimp with sweet shishito peppers; Thai curried mussels with crisped sushi rice; sinful bacon toast. $$$-$$$$ Tobacco Road626 S. Miami Ave., 305-374-1198Prohibition-era speakeasy (reputedly a fave of Al Capone), gay bar, strip club. Previously all these, this gritty spot has been best known since 1982 as a venue for live music, primarily blues. But it also offers food from lunchtime to late night (on weekends till 4:00 a.m.). The kitchen is especially known for its chili, budget-priced steaks, and burgers. Theres also surprisingly elegant fare, though, like a Norwegian salmon club with lemon aioli. A meat-smoker in back turns out tasty ribs. $$Trapiche Room1109 Brickell Ave., 305-329-3656With multiple Marriott hotels in Brickell and downtown, one of them housing high-profile db Bistro, its not surprising that this small, second-floor restaurant is something of a best kept secret. But it deserves discovery. Chef Maria Tobar hasnt Daniel Bouluds fame, but she does have classic Europeantype technical skills, combined with contemporary creativity that turns even ultimately old-fashioned items, like a pork/ cabbage strudel, into 21st century fine-dining fare. Both dcor and service, similarly, are swelegant, not stuffy, and the rooms intimacy makes it a romantic spot for special occasions. $$$$Tre Italian Bistro270 E. Flagler St., 305-373-3303Bistro actually sounds too Old World for this cool hangout, from the owners of downtown old-timer La Loggia, but resto lounge sounds too glitzy. Think of it as a neighborhood bistro lounge. The food is mostly modernized Italian, with Latin and Asian accents: a prosciutto-and-fig pizza with Brazilian catupiry cheese; gnocchi served either as finger food (fried, with calamata olive/truffle aioli), or plated with orange-ginger sauce. But there are tomato-sauced meatballs with rigawt for Grandpa Vinnie, too. $$-$$$Trulucks Seafood, Steak, and Crabhouse777 Brickell Ave., 305-579-0035Compared to other restaurants with such an upscale powerlunch/dinner setting, most prices are quite affordable here, especially if you stick to the Miami Spice-priced date-dinner menu, or happy hour, when seafood items like crab-cake sliders are half price. Most impressive, though, are seasonal stone crabs (from Trulucks own fisheries, and way less expensive than Joes) and other seafood that, during several visits, never tasted less than impeccably fresh, plus that greatest of Miami restaurant rarities: informed and gracious service. $$$-$$$$Tu yo415 NE 2nd St., 305-237-3200Atop the revolutionary Miami Culinary Institute, this upscale eatery, unlike the caf downstairs, isnt student-run. Rather its designed to showcase school ideals -including sustainability as well as definitive Miami cuisine. The changing menu, from a culinary Dream Team headed by New World Cuisine inventor/MCI instructor Norman Van Aken (plus former prot gs Jeffrey Brana and Travis Starwalt), mixes citrus-inflected creamy conch chowder and other pioneering signatures with new inventions like mind-reelingly multidimensional oyster pan stew, or tartare of tuna and burstingly ripe tomato topped with a delicate sous vide egg. $$$$$ Waxy OConnors690 SW 1st Ct., 786-871-7660While the menu of this casually craic (Gaelic for fun) Irish pub will be familiar to fans of the South Beach Waxys, the location is far superior -on the Miami River, with waterfront deck. And none of Miamis Irish eateries offers as much authentic traditional fare. Especially evocative: imported oak-smoked Irish salmon with housemade brown bread; puffpastry-wrapped Irish sausage rolls; lunchtimes imported Irish bacon or banger butty sandwiches on crusty baguettes, served with hand-cut fries, the latter particularly terrific dipped in Waxys curry sauce. $$Wok Town119 SE 1st Ave., 305-371-9993Judging from the takeout window, the minimalist dcor (with communal seating), and predominance of American veggies on the menu, this Asian fast-food eatery, owned by Shai Ben-Ami (a Miss Yip and Domo Japones veteran) May initially seem akin to those airport Oriental steam tables. Wrong. Custom-cooked by Chinese chefs, starters (like soy/garlic-coated edamame), salads, and have-it-your-way stir-fries, fried rice, or noodle bowls burst with bold, fresh flavor. The proof: a startlingly savory miso beef salad, with sesame/ginger/scallion dressing. Bubble tea, too! $$ Zuma270 Biscayne Blvd. Way, 305-577-0277This Miami River restolounge has a London parent on San Pellegrinos list of the worlds best restaurants, and a similar menu of world-class, Izakaya-style smallish plates (robatagrilled items, sushi, much more) meant for sharing over drinks. Suffice to say that it would take maybe a dozen visits to work your way through the voluminous menu, which offers ample temptations for vegetarians as well as carnivores. Our favorite is the melt-in-your-mouth pork belly with yuzu/ mustard miso dip, but even the exquisitely-garnished tofu rocks. $$$$Midtown / Wynwood / Design District3 Chefs Chinese Restaurant1800 Biscayne Blvd. #105, 305-373-2688Until this eatery opened in late 2010, the solid Chinese restaurants in this neighborhood could be counted on the fingers of no hands. So its not surprising that most people concentrate on Chinese and Chinese/American fare. The real surprise is the remarkably tasty, budget-priced, Vietnamese fare. Try pho, 12 varieties of full-flavored beef/ rice noodle soup (including our favorite, with well-done flank steak and flash-cooked eye round). All can be customized with sprouts and fresh herbs. Also impressive: Noodle combination plates with sauted meats, salad, and spring rolls. $$ Miamis Artisan Bakery! Made from Scratch, fresh breads daily! Acmes got Fall: Ask us about our Thanksgiving Packages

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Acme Bakery & Coffee3451 NE 1st Ave. #103, 786-507-5799 From Pious Pig Restaurant Group (whose other ventures include Vietnamese pop-up Phuc Yea! and the creative/rustic Federal Food, Drink & Provisions), this cozy bakery/caf is, again, just what its neighborhood needed. The specialty is homemade artisan breads, from Colonial-era Sally Lunn to crusty sourdough made with wild midtown Miami yeasts; these honest loaves make the places breakfasts, served all day, and lunchtimes sandwiches (like meatloaf and cheddar with onion marmalade) superior. Coffee is single-origin stuff from Wynwoods Panther. Also available: gift baskets featuring housemade preserves and pickles. $$ Adelitas Caf 2699 Biscayne Blvd., 305-576-1262From the street (which is actually NE 26th, not Biscayne) this Honduran restaurant seems unpromising, but inside its bigger, better, and busier than it looks. Unlike many Latin American eateries, this one sticks close to the source and proves a crowd-pleaser. On weekends especially, the dining rooms are packed with families enjoying authentic fare like baleadas (thick corn tacos), tajadas (Hondurass take on tostones), rich meal-in-a-bowl soups packed with seafood or meat and veggies, and more. $Basanis3221 NE 2nd Ave., 786-925-0911Despite this tiny places modern dcor, the family-run ambiance and Italian-American comfort food evoke the neighborhood red-sauce joints that were our favored hangouts growing up in NJs Sopranos territory. And low prices make it possible to hang out here frequently. Pizzas with hand-tossed crusts, not wood-oven but resembling honest bread, for less than fast food pizzeria prices? Its an offer you dont refuse. Dont refuse garlic rolls, either, or sinful zeppole (fried dough) for dessert. Theres more complex fare, like chicken la Francese, too. And they deliver. $$Bengal2010 Biscayne Blvd., 305-403-1976At this Indian eatery the dcor is cool and contemporary: muted gray and earth-tone walls, tasteful burgundy banquettes. And the menu touts Modern Indian Cuisine to match the look. Classicists, however, neednt worry. Americas favorite familiar north Indian flavors are here, though dishes are generally more mildly spiced and presented with modern flair. All meats are certified halal, Islams version of kosher which doesnt mean that observant orthodox Jews can eat here, but Muslims can. $$$Best Friends4770 Biscayne Blvd., 786-439-3999On a restaurant-starved stretch of Biscayne Boulevard, this spot serves the same sort of simple but satisfying Italian fare (antipasti, soups, salads, pizzas) as its older sibling, South Miamis Blu Pizzeria, plus burgers. The thin-crust, pliable pizzas, though lacking burn blisters, are brick-oven cooked, as are blues, unusual calzones (like the blu oceano, fatly filled with mozzarella, prosciutto crudo, arugula, and fresh tomatoes). Hefty half-pound burgers come similarly stuffed rather than topped. A sheltered patio and full bar make the place a pleasant neighborhood lounge, too. $$ Bin No. 181800 Biscayne Blvd., 786-235-7575At this wine bar/caf, the dcor is a stylish mix of contemporary (high loft ceilings) and Old World (tables made from wine barrels). Cuisine is similarly geared to the areas smart new residents: creative sandwiches and salads at lunch, tapas and larger internationally themed Spanish, Italian, or French charcuterie platters at night. Though the place is small and family-run friendly, chef Alfredo Patino offers sophisticated snacks like the figciutto: arugula, gorgonzola dolce, caramelized onions, pine nuts, fresh figs, and prosciutto. Free parking behind the building. $$Buena Vista Bistro 4582 NE 2nd Ave., 305-456-5909If a neighborhood eatery like this one which serves supreme ly satisfying bistro food were within walking distance of every Miami resident, wed be a helluva hip food town. Like true Parisian bistros, its open continuously, every day, with prices so low that you can drop in anytime for authentic rillettes (a rustic pt) with a crusty baguette, steak with from-scratch frites, salmon atop ratatouille, or many changing blackboard specials. Portions are plentiful. So is free parking. $$Buena Vista Deli4590 NE 2nd Ave., 305-576-3945At this casual caf/bakery, co-owned by Buena Vista Bistros Claude Postel, the day starts in authentic French fashion, with fresh breakfast breads, chocolate almond croissants, and other delights. At lunch cornichon-garnished baguette sandwiches (containing housemade pts, sinfully rich pork rillettes, superb salami, and other charcuterie classics) are irresistible, and a buttery-crusted, custardy quiche plus perfectly dressed salad costs little more than a fast-food combo meal. As for Postels homemade French sweets, if you grab the last Paris-Brest, a praline butter-cream-filled puff pastry, we may have to kill you. $-$$ Cafeina297 NW 23rd St., 305-438-0792This elegantly comfortable multi-room indoor/outdoor venue is described as an art gallery/lounge, and some do come just for cocktails like the hefty caf con leche martinis. But dont overlook chef Guily Booths 12-item menu of very tasty tapas. The signature item is a truly jumbo-lump crab cake with no discernable binder. At one South Beach Wine & Food Festival, Martha Stewart proclaimed it the best shed ever had. Our own prime pick: melt-in-your-mouth ginger sea bass anticuchos, so buttery-rich we nearly passed out with pleasure. $$ Catch Grill & Bar1633 N. Bayshore Dr., 305-536-6414A location within easy walking distance of the Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, in the extensively renovated Marriott Biscayne Bay, makes this casual-chic eatery, whose spe cialty is local and sustainable seafood, a great option for pre-show bites. Then again, enjoying lures like sweet-glazed crispy shrimp with friends on the outdoor, bayfront terrace is entertainment enough. Its worth calling to ask if the daily catch is wreckfish, a sustainable local that tastes like a cross between grouper and sea bass. Bonus: With validation, valet parking is free. $$$-$$$$ Cerviceria 100 Montaditos3252 NE 1st Ave. #104 305-921-4373Student budget prices, indeed. A first-graders allowance would cover a meal at this first U.S. branch of a popular Spanish chain. The 100 mini sandwiches (on crusty, olive oil-drizzled baguettes) vary from $1 to $2.50, depending not on ingredient quality but complexity. A buck scores genuine Serrano ham, while top-ticket fillings add imported Iberico cheese, pulled pork, and tomato to the cured-ham slivers. Other options revolve around pts, smoked salmon, shrimp, and similar elegant stuff. Theres cheap draft beer, too, plus nonsandwich snacks. $$City Hall the Restaurant2004 Biscayne Blvd. 305-764-3130After 30+ years spent guiding other owners restaurants to success, Miami Spice program creator Steve Haas has opened his own expansive, two-floor place, on a stretch of Biscayne Boulevard thats suddenly looking fashionable. The vibe is a mix of power-dining destination and comfie neighborhood hangout, and chef Tom Azar (ex-Emerils) has designed a varied menu to match. Highlights: an astonishingly thin/crunchycrusted pizza topped with duck confit, wild mushrooms, port wine syrup, and subtly truffled bchamel; crispy calamari (rings and legs) with light, lemony tomato emulsion; and tuna tartar that is refreshingly free of sesame oil. Big portions and a full bar to boot. $$-$$$$The Cheese Course3451 NE 1st Ave. 786-220-6681Not so much a restaurant as an artisanal cheese shop with complimentary prepared foods, this places self-service caf component nevertheless became an instant hit. Impeccable ingredients and inspired combinations make even the simplest salads and sandwiches unique -like bacon and egg, elevated by hand-crafted cream cheese, roasted red peppers, avocado, and chipotle Mayo. Cheese platters are exceptional, and customized for flavor preference from mild to bold, and accompanied by appropriate fruits, veggies, nuts, olives, prepared spreads, and breads. $$Clives Caf2818 N. Miami Ave., 305-576-0277Some still come for the inexpensive, hearty American breakfasts and lunches that this homey hole-in-the-wall has served for more than 30 years. Since about 1990, though, when owner Pearline Murray (Ms. Pearl to regulars) and cook Gloria Chin began emphasizing their native Jamaican specialties, the intensely spiced grilled jerk chicken has been the main item here. Other favorites: savory rice and pigeon peas; eye-opening onion/vinegar-flavored escovitch fish; sweet plantains; and cabbage that redefines the vegetable. $Crumb on Parchment3930 NE 2nd Ave., 305-572-9444Though located in a difficult spot (the Melin Buildings central atrium, invisible from the street), Michelle Bernsteins bakery/ caf packs em in, partly due to Bernsteins mom Martha, who makes irresistible old-school cakes: German chocolate with walnuts, lemon curd with buttercream frosting, more. Lunch fare includes inspired sandwiches like seared rare tuna with spicy Asian pickles and kimchi aioli. And for morning people, the savory chicken sausage, melted cheddar, kale, and shallot sandwich on challah will convince you that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. $-$$ The Daily Creative Food Co.2001 Biscayne Blvd., 305-573-4535While the food formula of this contemporary caf is familiar sandwiches, salads, soups, breakfast food, and pastries, plus coffee and fruit drinks a creative concept differentiates the place. Signature sandwiches are named after national and local newspapers, including Biscayne Times, giving diners something to chat about. Sandwiches and salads can also be do-it-yourself projects, with an unusually wide choice of main ingredients, garnishes, breads, and condiments for the creatively minded. $El Bajareque278 NW 36th St., 305-576-5170Dozens of little Latin American eateries, all looking almost identically iffy, line 36th Street. But this family-owned bajareque (shack) is one where you definitely want to stop for some of Miamis most tasty, and inexpensive, Puerto Rican home cooking, from mondongo (an allegedly hangover-curing soup) to mofongo, a plantain/chicharron mash with varied toppings plus garlicky mojo. Housemade snacks are irresistible, too, and great take-out party fare: pork-studded pasteles, similar to Cuban tamals but with a tuber rather than corn masa dough, or empanadas with savory shrimp stuffing. $ Egg & Dart4029 N. Miami Ave., 786-431-1022While co-owners Costa Grillas (from Marias, a Coral Gables staple) and Niko Theodorou (whose family members have several Greek islands restaurants) describe their cuisine as rustic Greek, there is surprising sophistication in some dishes: an

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102 especially delicate taramasalata (cod roe dip); precisely crispfried smelts (like a freshwater sardine); galactobourico, an often heavy and cloyingly vanilla-saturated dessert, here custardy and enlivened by orange flavor. Extensive lists of mezze (snacks) and creative cocktails make the expansive, invitingly decorated space ideal for large gatherings of friends who enjoy sharing. $$$ Egyptian Pizza KitchenShops at Midtown Miami Buena Vista Avenue, 305-571-9050Pizza, pita -hey, theyre both flatbreads. So while many pizzas do indeed, as this halal places name suggests, have initially weird-seeming Middle Eastern toppings, its really not surprising that the Giza (topped with marinated lamb, feta, olives, peppers, and pungently spiced cumin sauce) works at least as well as Italian classics. Additionally the menu includes interesting Middle Eastern fare like foul, a hummus-like but lighter Egyptian dish of favas, tahini, garlic, lemon juice, and olive oil. A brick oven makes both pizzas and homemade pitas superior. $$18th Street Caf210 NE 18th St., 305-381-8006Most seating in this cool, pioneering neighborhood caf is in a giant bay window, backed with banquettes, that makes the small space feel expansive -fitting, since the menu keeps expanding, too. Originally breakfast/lunch only, the caf, though closed weekends, now serves dinner till 10:00 p.m., with comfort food entres like secret-recipe meatloaf joining old favorites: daily-changing homemade soups, varied burgers, layered international salads, inspired sandwiches (like roast beef and provolone with creamy horseradish). Beer and wine is available, and now so is delivery. $$The Federal Food, Drink & Provisions5132 Biscayne Blvd., 305-758-9559At the Fed, expect what locals know to expect from sommelier/chef team Aniece Meinhold and Cesar Zapata, whose previous restaurant concepts have included Blue Piano (gourmet stoner snacks) and Vietnamese pop-up Phuc Yea. That is, expect the unexpected. The Fed is an updated tavern featuring creative, from-scratch takes on traditional American regional dishes: flaky Southern biscuits with sausage gravy (and crisp-coated sweetbreads, if desired); Northeasterninspired pig wings (pork drummettes with homemade Buffalo sauce, blue cheese mousse, and pickled veggies). Desserts, from third partner Alejandro Ortiz, include sinful sticky buns. $$-$$$Five Guys Famous Burger and FriesShops at Midtown Miami Buena Vista Ave., 305-571-8341No green-leaf faux health food here. You get what the name says, period, with three adds: kosher dogs, veggie burgers, and free peanuts while you wait. Which you will, just a bit, since burgers are made fresh upon order. Available in double or one-patty sizes, theyre well-done but spurtingly juicy, and after loading with your choice of free garnishes, even a little burger makes a major meal. Fries (regular or Cajun-spiced) are also superior, hand-cut in-house from sourced potatoes. $Gigi3470 N. Miami Ave., 305-573-1520As befits its location in artful, working-class Wynwood, Gigi has minimalist modern diner ambiance paired with truly creative contemporary Asian-influenced comfort food from Top Chef contender Jeff McInnis (formerly of the South Beach RitzCarlton) at surprisingly low prices. From a menu encompassing noodle and rice bowls, steam-bun ssams, grilled goodies, and raw items, highlights include pillowy-light roast pork-stuffed buns, and possibly the worlds best BLT, featuring Asian bun toast, thick pork belly slices rather than bacon, and house made pickles. Theres $2 beer, too. $-$$ Harrys Pizzeria3918 N. Miami Ave., 786-275-4963In this humble space (formerly Pizza Volante) are many key components from Michaels Genuine Food & Drink two blocks east -local/sustainable produce and artisan products; wood-oven cooking; homemade everything (including the ketchup accompanying crisp-outside, custardy-inside polenta fries, a circa 1995 Michael Schwartz signature snack from Nemo). Beautifully blistered, ultra-thin-crusted pizzas range from classic Margheritas to pies with housesmoked bacon, trugole (a subtly flavorful -fruity, not funky -Alpine cheese), and other unique toppings. Rounding things out: simple but ingenious salads, ultimate zeppoles, and Florida craft beers. $$Hurricane Grill & Wings Shops at Midtown MiamiBuena Vista Avenue, 305-576-7133This Florida fast/casual chain became an instant hit in Midtown Miami owing to a winning concept: more than 35 heat-coded sauces and dry rubs meant for custom-tossing with wings and other things (including white-meat boneless wings, really wing-shaped chicken breast pieces), accompanied by ranch or classic blue-cheese dip and celery. It would be silly to not pair your main with garlic/herb-butter parmesan fries. There are many other items, too, including salads. But hey, celery is salad, right? $$ Jean Pauls House2426 NE 2nd Ave., 305-573-7373Jean Paul Desmaison, original chef/co-owner of La Cofradia in Coral Gables, has chosen a decidedly less tony, more transitional neighborhood for this venture. But inside his renovated bungalow, ambiance is stylishly cozy, and the creative contemporary North/South American fusion cuisine is as elegant as ever. Best bets are dishes influenced by Desmaisons native Peru, including crispy pork belly braised in pisco with silky sweet potato pure, and a beautifully balanced nikkei (Japanese/Peruvian) salmon sashimi that does the impossible: tame leche de tigre, Perus infamous tigers milk marinade. $$$-$$$$ Jimmyz Kitchen2700 N. Miami Ave. #5, 305-573-1505No need to trek to South Beach for what many consider Miamis best classic Puerto Rican mofongo (fried green plantains mashed with fresh garlic, olive oil, and pork cracklings, surrounded by chicken or shrimp in zesty criollo sauce). This new location is bigger and better than the original, plus the mofongo is served every day, not just on weekends. But dont ignore the meal-size salads or high-quality sandwiches, including a pressed tripleta containing roast pork, bacon, Black Forest ham, provolone, and caramelized onions. $$Joeys Italian Caf2506 NW 2nd Ave., 305-438-0488The first new restaurant in the Wynwood Caf District, this stylish indoor/outdoor Italian hangout is as casually cool as one would hope and as affordable. Theres a five-buck half-serving of spaghetti al pomodoro and respectable vino for under $30. And few can resist delicately thin, crunchy-crusted pizzas like the creative Dolce e Piccante or orgasmic Carbonara. Pastas are fresh; produce is largely local; the mosaic-centered dcor is minimalist but inviting. And no need to be wary of the warehouse district at night: Valet parking is free. $$-$$$La Latina3509 NE 2nd Ave., 305-571-9655At last, an authentic Venezuelan arepera (purveyor of home made arepas, with a variety of meat, cheese, and veggie fillings) that isnt out in the boonies -and decidedly isnt a dive. With colorful dcor concocted from recycled objects, this space, though small, has truly eclectic, Midtown style. The signature corn cakes, crisped outside and fluffy inside, put sodden supermarket specimens to shame. And cachapas (softer, sweeter corn pancakes folded around mozzarella-like fresh cheese) or bollarepitas (cheese-stuffed deep-fried corn cakes, with tangy nata dip) may be even tastier. $-$$La Provence2200 Biscayne Blvd., 305-576-8002(See Brickell / Downtown listing.)Latin Caf 20002501 Biscayne Blvd., 305-576-3838The menu is similar to that at many of our towns Latin cafs, largely classic Cuban entres and sandwiches, with a smattering of touches from elsewhere in Latin America, such as a Peruvian jalea mixta (marinated mixed seafood), or paella Valenciana from Spain, which many Miami eateries consider a Latin country. What justifies the new millennium moniker is the more modern, yuppified/yucafied ambiance, encouraged by an expansive, rustic wooden deck. $$Lemoni Caf4600 NE 2nd Ave., 305-571-5080The menu here reads like your standard sandwiches/salads/ starters primer. What it doesnt convey is the freshness of the ingredients and the care that goes into their use. Entre-size salads range from an elegant spinach (goat cheese, pears, walnuts, raisins) to chunky homemade chicken salad on a bed of mixed greens. Sandwiches (cold baguette subs, hot pressed paninis, or wraps, all accompanied by side salads) include a respectable Cuban and a veggie wrap with a deceptively richtasting light salad cream. $-$$Lime Fresh Mexican GrillShops at Midtown Miami Buena Vista Avenue, 305-576-5463Like its South Beach predecessor, this Lime was an instant hit, as much for being a hip new Midtown hangout as for its care fully crafted Tex-Mex food. The concept is fast casual rather than fast food meaning nice enough for a night out. It also means ingredients are always fresh. Seafood tacos are about as exotic as the menu gets, but the mahi mahi for fish tacos comes from a local supplier, and salsas are housemade daily. Niceties include low-carb tortillas and many Mexican beers. $Limn y Sabor3045 Biscayne Blvd., 786-431-5739In this dramatically renovated space, the room is now light and open, and the food is authentic Peruvian, with seafood a specialty. Portions are huge, prices low, quality high. Especially good are their versions of pescado a lo macho (fish fillet topped with mixed seafood in a creamy, zesty sauce); jalea (breaded and deep-fried fish, mixed seafood, and yuca, topped with onion/pepper/lime salsa), and yuca in hot yet fruity rocoto chili cream sauce. $$Lost & Found Saloon185 NW 36th St., 305-576-1008Theres an artsy/alternative feel to this casual and friendly Wynwood eatery, which, since opening as a weekday-only breakfast and lunch joint in 2005, has grown with its neighborhood. Its now open for dinner six nights a week, serving Southwestern-style fare at rock-bottom prices. Dishes like pion and pepita-crusted salmon, chipotle-drizzled endive stuffed with lump crab, or customizable tacos average $5-$8. Also available: big breakfasts and salads, hearty soups, housemade pastries like lemon-crusted wild berry pie, and a hip beer and wine list. $Mandolin Aegean Bistro4312 NE 2nd Ave., 305-576-6066Inside this converted 1940s homes blue-and-white dining room -or even more atmospherically, its tree-sheltered garden -diners feast on authentic rustic fare from both Greece and Turkey. Make a meal of multinational mezes: a Greek sampler of creamy tzatziki yogurt dip, smoky eggplant pure, and airy tarama caviar spread; and a Turkish sampler of hummus, fava pure, and rich tomato-walnut dip. The meze of mussels in lemony wine broth is, with Mandolins fresh-baked flatbread, almost a full meal in itself. $$-$$$ Mercadito Midtown3252 NE 1st Ave., 786-369-0423Some people frequent this fashionable restolounge, festooned with graffiti-style murals designed to evoke a bustling Mexican street market, just for the dangerously smooth margaritas. But 1035 N. 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the main must-haves here are tacos, encased in a rarity: genu inely made-from-scratch corn tortillas, small but fatly-stuffed. Of 11 varieties, our favorite is the carnitas (juicy braised pork, spicy chili de arbol slaw, toasted peanuts). A close second: the hongos, intensely flavorful huitlacoche and wild mushrooms, with manchego and salsa verde -a reminder that vegetarian food need not be bland. $$-$$$Michaels Genuine Food and Drink130 NE 40th St., 305-573-5550An instant smash hit, this truly neighborhood-oriented restaurant from chef Michael Schwartz offers down-to-earth fun food in a comfortable, casually stylish indoor/outdoor setting. Fresh, organic ingredients are emphasized, but dishes range from cutting-edge (crispy beef cheeks with whipped celeriac, celery salad, and chocolate reduction) to simple comfort food: deviled eggs, homemade potato chips with pan-fried onion dip, or a whole wood-roasted chicken. Theres also a broad range of prices and portion sizes to encourage frequent visits. Michaels Genuine also features an eclectic, affordable wine list and a full bar. $$-$$$$Ming Yuan3006 NW 2nd Ave., 305-576-6466What this tiny (three booths plus counter seats) Wynwood place serves isnt authentic Chinese cuisine. Its Chinese immigrant cooking: Americas original Cantonese-based chop sueys and egg foo youngs plus later, spicier but also Americanized Szechuan/Hunan-inspired 1970s inventions like Mongolian beef and General Tsos this-or-that. But all the above (ordered extra-spicy if you like heat), plus crab rangoons and treatpacked special fried rice, are truly tasty. And since almost everything on the menu comes in several sizes, with even small being substantial, prices are unbeatable. $-$$ Mikes at Venetia555 NE 15th St., 9th floor, 305-374-5731This family-owned Irish pub, on the pool deck of the Venetia condo, for more than 15 years has been a popular lunch and dinner hang-out for local journalists and others who appreciate honest cheap eats and drinks. Regulars know daily specials are the way to go. Depending on the day, fish, churrasco, or roast turkey with all the trimmings are all prepared fresh. Big burgers and steak dinners are always good. A limited late-night menu provides pizza, wings, ribs, and salad till 3:00 a.m. $-$$Morgans Restaurant28 NE 29th St., 305-573-9678Housed in a beautifully refurbished 1930s private home, Morgans serves eclectic, sometimes internationally influenced contemporary American cuisine compelling enough to attract hordes. Dishes are basically comfort food, but ultimate comfort food: the most custardy, fluffy French toast imaginable; shoe string frites that rival Belgiums best; mouthwatering maplebasted bacon; miraculously terrific tofu (crisply panko-crusted and apricot/soy-glazed); even a voluptuous grilled cheese sandwich -definitely a dont ask, dont tell your cardiologist item. $$-$$$NoVe Kitchen & Bar1750 N. Bayshore Dr., 305-503-1000At NoVe, the restolounge at the Opera Tower condo in NoVe (new nickname for the bayfront neighborhood north of the Venetian Causeway), the food is East-West. Meaning you can get burgers, pasta, and so on, or try the inventive Asian small plates and sushi specialties Hiro Terada originated at his past posts, Doraku and Moshi Moshi: the Atlantis roll (tempura conch with asparagus, avocado, scallions, and curry sauce); spicy, crunchy fried tofu atop kimchi salad; much more. Open 6:00 a.m. for breakfast to 3:00 a.m., it is kid-friendly and dogfriendly, too. $$-$$$Orange Caf + Art2 NE 40th St., 305-571-4070The paintings hanging in this tiny, glass-enclosed caf are for sale. And for those who dont have thousands of dollars to shell out for the local art on the walls, less than ten bucks will get you art on a plate, including a Picasso: chorizo, prosciutto, manchego cheese, baby spinach, and basil on a crusty baguette. Other artfully named and crafted edibles include salads, daily soups, several pastas (like the Matisse, fiocchi pouches filled with pears and cheese), and house-baked pastries. $ Pashas 3801 N. Miami Ave., 305-573-0201(See Brickell/Downtown listing)Pasta FoliesShops at Midtown Miami3252 NE 1st Ave. #118, 786-382-0205In France the word folie can mean extravagant. More often it means madness. Its the latter translation that first comes to mind when perusing the menu of this French Rivera pasta/ pizza fast-casual chain, whose concept is pastas, plus pizzas, from around the world -even Italy. Dont expect authenticity from the more exotic toppings; they basically contain one typical ingredient (along with a generic onions/peppers/veg assortment): bean sprouts in Thailands spaghetti, pineapple in Balis, curry sauce on Indias. Do expect super-fresh sauces, made daily. Friendly staffers and fun. $$Pieducks3500 N. Miami Ave., 305-576-5550(See Brickell / Downtown listing)Primos1717 N. Bayshore Dr., 305-371-9055The imposing, cavernous lobby of the Grand doesnt have that do drop in locals hangout vibe. But this lively Italian spot is actually a great addition to the neighborhood. The pizzas alone brick-oven specimens with toppings ranging from classic pepperoni to prosciutto/arugula would be draw enough. But pastas also please: diners choice of starch, with mixand-match sauces and extras. And the price is right, with few entres topping $20. The capper: Its open past midnight every day but Sunday. $$Primo Pizza Miami3451 NE 1st Ave., 305-535-2555Just a few years ago, chain pizza joints were dominant most everywhere. Today many places now offer authentic Italian or delicate designer pizzas. But a satisfying Brookyn-style street slice? Fuhgedit. Thankfully thats the speciality of this indoor/ outdoor pizzeria: big slices with chewy crusts (made from imported NY tap water) that arent ultra-thin and crisp, but flexible enough to fold lengthwise, and medium-thick -sturdy enough to support toppings applied with generous all-American abandon. Take-out warning: Picking up a whole pie? Better bring the SUV, not the Morris Mini.Sakaya KitchenShops at Midtown Miami, Buena Vista Avenue 305-576-8096This chef-driven, fast-casual Asian eatery is more an izakaya (in Japan, a pub with food) than a sakaya (sake shop). But why quibble about words with so many more intriguing things to wrap your mouth around? The concept takes on street-food favorites from all over Asia, housemade daily from quality fresh ingredients. French Culinary Institute-trained Richard Hales does change his menu, so wed advise immediately grabbing some crispy Korean chicken wings and Chinese-inspired, openfaced roast pork buns with sweet chili sauce and homemade pickles. $$ Sake Room 275 NE 18th St., 305-755-0122Sake takes a back seat to sushi and sophisticated dcor at this small but sleek restolounge. Among the seafood offerings, you wont find exotica or local catches, but all the usual sushi/ sashimi favorites, though in more interesting form, thanks to sauces that go beyond standard soy spicy sriracha, garlic/ ponzu oil, and many more. Especially recommended: the yuzu hamachi roll, the lobster tempura maki, and panko-coated spicy shrimp with hot-and-sour Mayo and a salad. $$-$$$Salad Creations2001 Biscayne Blvd., 305-576-5333At this fast-casual restaurant, diners can enjoy a wide variety ofchef-created salads and wraps, or go the DIY route, choosing from one of four greens options; four dozen add-ons (fresh, dried, or pickled veggies and fruits, plus cheeses and slightly sinful pleasures like candied pecans or wonton strips); a protein (seafood or poultry); and two dozen dressings, ranging from classic (Thousand Island, bleu cheese) to creative contemporary (spicy Asian peanut, cucumber wasabi, blueberry pomegranate). Additionally, the place creates lovely catering platters, plus individual lunchboxes -perfect picnic or plane food. $-$$ Salumeria 1043451 NE 1st Ave. #104, 305-424-9588In Italy, salumerias started, like American delicatessens, as shops selling salumi (cured meats), but evolved into the equivalent of eat-in deli/restaurants that also serve cold and hot prepared foods. At this modern Midtown salumeria, the soupsto-salads-to-sweets range of fare is the same. Custom-sliced imported cold cuts are a main focus, especially for those who enjoy taste-testing a plate pairing Italys two most famous prosciuttos: Parma and San Daniele. But homemade pastas are also impressive, as are hard-to-find regional entres like fegato alla Veneziana, which will turn liver-haters into lovers. $$-$$$ Salsa Fiesta2929 Biscayne Blvd., 305-400-8245The first stateside offshoot of a popular Venezuelan mini chain, this urban Mexican grill serves health-conscious, made-freshdaily fare similar in concept to some fast-casual competitors. But there are indeed differences here, notably pan-Latin options: black beans as well as red; thin, delightfully crunchy tostones (available as a side or as the base for a uniquely tasty take on normal nachos). Other pluses include weekday happy hours with two-for-one beers -and free parking. $-$$ S & S Diner1757 NE 2nd Ave., 305-373-4291Some things never change, or so it seems at this classic diner. Open since 1938, people still line up on Saturday mornings, waiting for a seat at the counter and enormous breakfasts: corned beef hash or crab cakes and eggs with grits; fluffy pancakes; homemade biscuits with gravy and Georgia sausage everything from oatmeal to eggs Benedict. The lunch menu is a roll call of the usual suspects, but most regulars ignore the menu and go for the daily blackboard specials. $-$$Shokudo World Resource Caf 4740 NE 2nd Ave., 305-758-7782At its former Lincoln Road location, World Resources caf was better known for people-watching than for its standard sushi/Thai menu. But as the new name signals, this relocation is a reinvention. The indoor/outdoor space is charming, but creative takes on popular pan-Asian street foods are the real draw. Travel from Japan and Thailand through Korea, Vietnam, China, the Philippines, and beyond via light housemade momo, curried potato-stuffed Tibetan/Nepalese steamed dumplings; savory pulled pork buns with kimchi and crisped onions. Noodle dishes, hot or chilled, are especially appealing. $$-$$$ Sugarcane Raw Bar Grill3250 NE 1st Ave.,786-369-0353This chic indoor/outdoor space is an offspring of Lincoln Roads SushiSamba Dromo and a sibling of Sugarcane lounges in NYC and Las Vegas, but more informal than the former and more food-oriented than the latter, as three kitchens -normal, raw bar, and robata charcoal grill -make clear. Chef Timon Balloos LatAsian small plates range from subtle orange/ fennel-marinated salmon crudo to intensely smoky-rich short ribs. At the daily happy hour, select dishes (like steamed pork buns with apple kimchi) are discounted. $$-$$$Tapas y Tintos3535 NE 2nd Ave., 305-392-0506With about 50 different generously sized traditional tapas plates, from simple (imported Spanish cheeses and cured meats; varied croquetas, including beautifully smooth spinach)

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104 to sophisticated (crisp-fried soft-shell crab with aioli dip; the witty Popeye y Olivia, garlicky wine-sauced chickpeas with spinach and olive oil) plus complex salads, paellas, and charbroiled meat and seafood entres, all add up to entertaining eating even without this tapas/wine bars live entertainment. This second T&T feels less nightclub and more neighborhood than the South Beach original. Great for dates, business lunches, or very happy hours. $$$Tony Chans Water Club1717 N. Bayshore Dr., 305-374-8888The dcor at this upscale place, located in the Grand, looks too glitzy to serve anything but politely Americanized Chinese food. But the American dumbing-down is minimal. Many dishes are far more authentic and skillfully prepared than those found elsewhere in Miami, like delicate but flavorful yu pan quail. Moist sea bass fillet has a beautifully balanced topping of scallion, ginger, cilantro, and subtly sweet/salty sauce. And Peking duck is served as three traditional courses: crpe-wrapped crispy skin, meat sauted with crisp veggies, savory soup to finish. $$-$$$Vintage Liquor & Wine Bar3301 NE 1st Ave. #105, 305-514-0307Gentrified ambiance, a remarkably knowledgeable staff, and a hip stock (including global beers as well as liquor and wine, plus gourmet packaged foods to accompany), and self-service wine dispensers for sampling make this an enjoyable retail shop. A wine/cocktail/tapas bar, open from 4:00 p.m. daily, makes it an enjoyable neighborhood hangout, too. Tapas include beef carpaccio, bruschetta cones, varied salads and empanadas, a daily ceviche, and fresh-made sandwiches. And remember to ask about special events: karaoke Thursdays, monthly wine dinners, tastings, more. $-$$ Wine Vault MiamiShops at Midtown Miami Fountain Circle #105, 786-691-2000From a Wine Vault press release: Over 1300 square feet of pure decadence. In fact, the soaring, two-story space, complete with glass elevator, has a look that lives up to the hype. But the most decadent thing inside is a nibble from its tapas list: chocolate-covered bacon. Go ahead and make a meal of it. We grown-ups can eat what we want. More substantial plates to accompany the roughly four dozen wines, artisan beers, or cocktails include chorizo with new potatoes, and sweetly piquant piquillo peppers stuffed with shredded tuna. Happy-hour wine prices are so low wed better not mention them. $$-$$$ Wynwood Kitchen & Bar2550 NW 2nd Ave., 305-722-8959The exterior is eye-popping enough, with murals from worldfamous outdoor artists, but its the interior that grabs you. Colorful and exotic work by Shepard Fairey, Christian Awe, and other acclaimed artists makes it one of the most striking restaurant spaces anywhere. As for food, the original menu has been replaced with Spanish/Latin/Mediterranean-inspired favorites from chef Miguel Aguilar (formerly of Alma de Cuba): gazpacho or black bean soups; shredded chicken ropa vieja empanadas with cilantro crema; grilled octopus skewers with tapenade; plus fingerling potato-chorizo hash and other seasonal farm-to-table veg dishes. $$-$$$ Upper EastsideAndiamo5600 Biscayne Blvd. 305-762-5751With brick-oven pizzerias popping up all over town the past few years, its difficult to remember the dark days when this part of Mark Soykas 55th Street Station complex was mainland Miamis sole source of open-flame-cooked pies. But the pizzas still hold up against the newbie pack, especially since exec chef Frank Crupi has upped the ante with uniqueto-Miami offerings like a white (tomato-free) New Haven clam pie. Also available: salads, panini, and a tasty meatball appetizer with ricotta. Theres a respectable wine and beer list, too. $$Balans Biscayne6789 Biscayne Blvd., 305-534-9191It took longer than expected, but this Brit imports third Miami venue finally opened, and rather quietly -which has an upside. Its easier to get a table here (and to park, thanks to the free lot on 68th Street) than at Lincoln Road or Brickell. This, along with the venues relatively large, open-to-the-street outdoor area, contributes to a more relaxed, neighborhood-focused vibe. The fun menu of global comfort food is the same (ranging from a creamy-centered cheese souffl through savory Asian potstickers and, at breakfast, fluffy pecan/maple-garnished pancakes) and prepared as reliably well. $$-$$$Blue Collar6730 Biscayne Blvd., 305-756-0366Like its predecessor in this space (Michael Bloises American Noodle Bar), this working-class-themed eatery is helmed by a former fine-dining chef, Daniel Serfer, a Chef Allens vet who now crafts casual, creative fare at prices all can afford. Dishes are eclectic. The roughly dozen veggie dishes alone range from curried cauliflower pure to maduros to bleu cheese roasted asparagus. Shrimp and grits compete with any in Charleston; pork and beans, topped with a perfectly runny fried egg, beats Bostons best. $-$$Boteco916 NE 79th St., 305-757-7735This strip of 79th Street is rapidly becoming a cool alt-culture enclave thanks to inviting hangouts like this rustic indoor/outdoor Brazilian restaurant and bar. Especially bustling on nights featuring live music, its even more fun on Sundays, when the fenced backyard hosts an informal fair and the menu includes Brazils national dish, feijoada, a savory stew of beans plus fresh and cured meats. But the everyday menu, ranging from unique, tapas-like pasteis to hefty Brazilian entres, is also appealing and budget-priced. $$Buddha Sushi Bar1071 NE 79th St., 305-677-3633While the setting is still more low-rent/high-speed causeway than restaurant row, this stylish, much-more-than-sushi spot definitely brings the street giant steps toward destinationdining status. The invention and skill shown in makis like the Fruity (shrimp, salmon, tuna, whitefish, roe, asparagus, and peaches, dressed with creamy mustard sauce), or small plates like shrimp crullers with a red wine reduction, isnt surprising considering the crafter is Michael Asalie, original chef at downtowns Little Lotus. Order from the menu or grab something from the circulating sushi river, whatever floats your boat. $$$ Chef Creole200 NW 54th St., 305-754-2223Sparkling fresh Creole-style food is the star at chef/owner Wilkinson Sejours two tiny but popular establishments. While some meatier Haitian classics like griot (fried pork chunks) and oxtail stew are also available and a $3.99 roast chicken special seafood is the specialty here: crevette en sauce (steamed shrimp with Creole butter sauce), lambi fri (perfectly tenderized fried conch), poisson gros sel (local snapper in a spicy butter sauce), garlic or Creole crabs. The Miami branch has outdoor tiki-hut dining. $-$$DeVitas7251 Biscayne Blvd., 305-754-8282This Italian/Argentine pizzeria, housed in a charming bungalow and featuring a breezy patio, covers multicultural bases. If the Old World Rucola pizza (a classic Margherita topped with arugula, prosciutto, and shredded parmesan) doesnt do the trick, the New World Especial (a Latin pie with hearts of palm and boiled eggs) just might. Also available are pastas, salads, sandwiches, dinner entres (eggplant parmigiana with spaghetti, lomito steak with Argentinean potato salad), and desserts (tiramisu or flan). $ Dogma Grill7030 Biscayne Blvd. 305-759-3433Since Frankie and Priscilla Crupi took over this hot dog stand, the menu has changed significantly, with some items eliminated (any vegetarian hot dogs, salads, chichi toppings like avo cado). But choices have expanded to include new dog choices (brats, Italian sausage, more) plus burgers and other classic eastern U.S. regional urban street foods: New England lobster rolls, New Orleans poboys, Jersey shore cheese Taylors (pork roll), Baltimore crab cake sandwiches, and naturally, Phillys of all sorts -cheese steak and beyond. $-$$ East Side Pizza731 NE 79th St., 305-758-5351Minestrone, sure. But a pizzeria menu with carrot ginger soup? Similarly many Italian-American pizzerias offer entres like spaghetti and meatballs, but East Side also has pumpkin ravioli in brown butter/sage sauce, wild mushroom ravioli, and other surprisingly upscale choices, including imported Peroni beer. As for the pizza, they are classic pies, available whole or by the slice, made with fresh plum tomato sauce and Grande mozzarella (considered the top American pizza cheese). Best seating for eating is at the sheltered outdoor picnic tables. $Garden of Eatin136 NW 62nd St., 305-754-8050Housed in a yellow building thats nearly invisible from the street, the Garden has the comfortable feel of a beach bar, and generous servings of inexpensive Afro-Caribbean vegan food. Large or small plates, with salad and fried sweet plantains (plus free soup for eat-in lunchers), are served for five or seven bucks. Also available are snacks like vegetarian blue corn tacos, desserts like sweet potato pie, and a breakfast menu featuring organic blueberry waffles with soy sausage patties. $Go To Sushi5140 Biscayne Blvd., 305-759-0914This friendly, family-run Japanese fast-food eatery offers original surprises like the Caribbean roll (a festively green parsley-coated maki stuffed with crispy fried shrimp, avocado, sweet plantain, and spicy Mayo), or a wonderfully healthful sesame-seasoned chicken soup with spinach, rice noodles, and sizable slices of poultry. Health ensured, you can the enjoy a guiltless pig-out on Fireballs: fried dumplings of chicken, cabbage, and egg, crusted with quills -really a delectable crunchy noodle mix. $Gourmet Station7601 Biscayne Blvd., 305-762-7229Home-meal replacement, geared to workaholics with no time to cook, has been popular for years. But the Gourmet Station has outlasted most of the competition. Main reason: deceptive healthiness. These are meals that are good for you, yet taste good enough to be bad for you. Favorite items include precision-grilled salmon with lemon-dill yogurt sauce, and lean turkey meatloaf with homemade BBQ sauce sin-free comfort food. Food is available la carte or grouped in multimeal plans customized for individual diners nutritional needs. $$Jimmys East Side Diner7201 Biscayne Blvd., 305-754-3692Open for more than 30 years, Jimmys respects the most important American diner tradition: breakfast at any hour. And now that the place is open for dinner, you can indulge your breakfast cravings for several more hours. There are blueberry hot cakes and pecan waffles; eggs any style, including omelets and open-face frittatas; and a full range of sides: biscuits and sausage gravy, grits, hash, hash browns, even hot oatmeal. And dont forget traditional diner entres like meat loaf, roast turkey, liver and onions, plus burgers, salad platters, and homemade chicken soup. $-$$La Cigale7281 Biscayne Blvd., 305-754-0014Bistro can mean almost anything these days, but with owners who are a husband/wife team recently arrived from Marseille, its not surprising that this neighborhood wine bistro is the classic kind found in France -a home away from home where

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the contemporary but cozy space is matched by the southern French comfort food coming from the open kitchen. Drop in for drinks and snacks such as artisan cheeses and charcuterie, or enjoy full meals ranging from classic (wine-poached mussels; a boldly sauced steak/frites) to creative (Parma ham-wrapped tuna loin). $$-$$$ Lo De Lea7001 Biscayne Blvd., 305-456-3218 In Casa Toscanas former space, this cute, contemporary parillada is proof that you can have an Argentinean meal and a cholesterol test in the same month. While traditional parillada dishes are tasty, theyre meat/fat-heavy, basically heaps of grilled beef. Here the grill is also used for vegetables (an unusually imaginative assortment, including bok choi, endive, and fennel), two of which are paired with your protein of choice. You can indulge in a mouthwateringly succulent vacio (flank steak), and walk out without feeling like youre the cow. $$-$$$Magnum Lounge709 NE 79th St., 305-757-3368Its a restaurant. Its a lounge. But its decidedly not a typical Miami restolounge, or like anything else in Miami. Forbidding from the outside, on the inside its like a time-trip to a cabaret in pre-WWII Berlin: bordello-red dcor, romantically dim lighting, show-tune live piano bar entertainment, and to match the ambiance, elegantly updated retro food served with style and a smile. For those feeling flush, home-style fried chicken is just like mom used to make in her wildest dreams. $$$Metro Organic Bistro 7010 Biscayne Blvd., 305-751-8756 Big changes have come to Karma the car wash, the first being a separate new name for the revamped restaurant: Metro Organic Bistro, an all-organic fine-dining restaurant where simple preparations reveal and enhance natural flavors. An entirely new menu places emphasis on grilled organic meat and fish dishes. Try the steak frites organic, grass-fed skirt steak with organic chimichurri and fresh-cut fries. Vegetarians will love the organic portabella foccacia. Dine either inside the architect-designed restaurant or outdoors on the patio. Beer and wine. $-$$$ Michys6927 Biscayne Blvd., 305-759-2001Dont even ask why Michele Bernstein, with a top-chef rsum, not to mention regular Food Network appearances, opened a homey restaurant in an emerging but far from fully gentrified neighborhood. Just be glad she did, as you dine on white almond gazpacho or impossibly creamy ham and blue cheese croquetas. Though most full entres also come in half-size portions (at almost halved prices), the tab can add up fast. The star herself is usually in the kitchen. Parking in the rear off 69th Street. $$$-$$$$ Mi Vida Caf7244 Biscayne Blvd., 305-759-6020At this indoor/outdoor vegetarian and raw-food vegan caf, culinary-school-trained chef/owner Daniela Lagamma pro duces purist produce-oriented dishes that are easy to understand, like sparkling-fresh salads and smoothies, plus more technique-intensive mock meat or cheese items, based on soy proteins, that satisfy even confirmed carnivores. Particularly impressive on the regular menu: a superior Sloppy Joe made with mushroom confit, braised homemade seitan, spinach, and rich almond romescu sauce; and cannelloni de verdura, homemade crepes stuffed with spinach and cashew ricotta. Do check the daily specials, too. $$-$$$Moonchine7100 Biscayne Blvd., 305-759-3999Like its Brickell-area sibling Indochine, this friendly Asian bistro serves fare from three nations: Japan, Thailand, and Vietnam. Menus are also similar, split between traditional dishes like pad Thai and East/West fusion creations like the Vampire sushi roll (shrimp tempura, tomato, cilantro, roasted garlic). But it also carves out its own identity with original creations, includ ing yellow curry-spiced fried rice. Nearly everything is low in sodium, fat, and calories. A large rear patio is inviting for dining and entertainment. $$-$$$Moshi Moshi 7232 Biscayne Blvd., 786-220-9404This offspring of South Beach old-timer Moshi Moshi is a cross between a sushi bar and an izakaya (Japanese tapas bar). Even more striking than the hip dcor is the foods unusually upscale quality. Sushi ranges from pristine individual nigiri to over-the-top maki rolls. Tapas are intriguing, like arabiki sausage, a sweetsavory pork fingerling frank; rarely found in restaurants even in Japan, theyre popular Japanese home-cooking items. And rice-based plates like Japanese curry (richer/sweeter than Indian types) satisfy even the biggest appetites. $-$$$Namaste7420 Biscayne Blvd., 786-536-9050With food served from steam-table-type stations, plus plastic utensils and plates, this neighborhood Indian place is definitely no frills. But its also excellent value for the money, especially if you go for the all-day $8.99 special, which includes two entre items plus sides for which most Indian restaurants charge extra: rice, choice of bread (garlic naan recommended), and refreshing raita. Invest some of your savings in BhelPapri chat, a savory snack featuring crisp chips topped with cilantrospiked chickpeas, onions, potatoes, yogurt, and piquant tamarind sauce. $-$$News Lounge5582 NE 4th Ct., 305-758-9932Mark Soykas new News is, as its name suggests, more a friendly neighborhood hangout and watering hole than a fullfledged eatery. Nevertheless the menu of light bites is along with other lures like an inviting outdoor patio and rest rooms that resemble eclectic art galleries part of the reason visitors stay for hours. Especially recommended are fat mini-burgers with chipotle ketchup; a brie, turkey, and mango chutney sandwich on crusty baguette; and what many feel is the original cafs Greatest Hit: creamy hummus with warm pita. $ Ni.Do. Caffe & Mozzarella Bar7295 Biscayne Blvd., 305-960-7022Dont let this little cafs easily overlooked strip-mall location, or its informal interior, fool you. The warm welcome is authentically Italian, as are cleverly crafted antipasti, simple but full-flavored pastas, and homemade pastries (from rosemary breadsticks to fruit-topped dessert tortas) that will transport your taste buds to Tuscany. And the housemade mozzarella or burrata cheeses -truly milk elevated to royalty -will transport you to heaven. A small market area provides Italian staples, plus superb salumi and the magnificent mozz, to go. $$-$$$Royal Bavarian Schnitzel Haus1085 NE 79th St., 305-754-8002With Christmas lights perpetually twinkling and party noises emanating from a new outdoor biergarten, this German restaurant is owner Alex Richters one-man gentrification project, transforming a formerly uninviting stretch of 79th Street one pils at a time. The fare includes housemade sausages (mild veal bratwurst, hearty mixed beef/pork bau ernwurst, spicy garlicwurst) with homemade mustard and catsup; savory yet near-greaseless potato pancakes; and, naturally, schnitzels, a choice of delicate pounded pork, chicken, or veal patties served with a half-dozen different sauces. $$-$$$Siam Rice7941 Biscayne Blvd., 305-758-0516Youll find all the familiar favorite Thai and Japanese items here, and prices for curries and noodle dishes (all customizable regarding choice of protein, preparation, and heat level) are especially good at lunch. But dont overlook somewhat pricier specialties like a deep-fried yet near-greaseless bone less half duck with veggies in red curry sauce. Theres also an unusually extensive list of salads, some with inventive fusion touches, like a grilled shrimp/soba salad featuring traditional Thai flavors (sriracha chiles, fish sauce, lime) and Japanese green tea noodles. $-$$$ Soyka5556 NE 4th Court, 305-759-3117Since opening in 1999, Soyka has often been credited with sparking the Upper Eastsides revival. But the 2010 arrival of three Joe Allen veterans as executive chef, pastry chef, and sommelier signaled a culinary revival for the restolounge, always a neighborhood focal point, now more food-focused. The contemporary comfort food menu ranges from fun small plates (deviled eggs with smoked salmon and dill, crisp-fried fiocchi pockets with gorgonzola sauce, oysters Rockefeller) to heftier items like burgers and steak au poivre. And dont miss the sticky date/toffee pudding. $$-$$$ Sushi Siam5582 NE 4th Ct., 305-751-7818On the menu of sushi-bar specialties plus a small selection of Thai and Japanese cooked dishes, there are a few surprises, such as a unique lobster maki thats admittedly huge in price ($25.95), but also in size: six ounces of crisp-fried lobster chunks, plus asparagus, avocado, lettuce, tobiko (flying fish), masago (smelt) roes, and special sauces. Thai dishes come with a choice of more than a dozen sauces, ranging from traditional red or green curries to the inventive, such as an unconventional honey sauce. $$$Uvas6900 Biscayne Blvd., 305-754-9022Formerly UVA 69, this casual-chic caf/lounge, a MiMo neighborhood pioneer, has changed its name and original owners, but remains an all-day-to-late-night hangout. And menu strong points also remain, from fresh-baked pastries and breads to elegant cross-cultural sandwiches (particularly two Latin-inspired upgrades: a classic Cuban with French ham, cornichons, and a baguette; and la minuta, a beer-battered fish fillet on focaccia with cilantro aioli). Whether diners opt for full entres or make a meal of small plates, the subtle global blending makes fusion make sense. $$-$$$Yiyas Gourmet Cuban Bakery646 NE 79th St., 305-754-3337A true community jewel, this bakery is also a most welcoming caf, serving lunch specials from chef Delsa Bernardo (who co-owns the place with attorney Abbie Cuellar) that are home made right down to the herbs grown on the bakerys window sills. Bernardos pan con lechon sandwiches and flaky-crusted Cuban pastries are legend. But she also crafts treats not found at average Cuban bakeries, like pizzas using housemade Indian naan bread. Additionally Bernardo carries unique treats produced by a few friends: candies, cupcakes, and exotically flavored flans. $NORTH BAY VILLAGEThe Crab House1551 79th St. Causeway, 305-868-7085Established in 1975, this Miami fish house was acquired by Landrys in 1996 and is now part of a chain. But the classic dcor (knotty pine walls, tile floors, booths, outdoor waterfront deck) still evokes the good old days. Though the all-you-can-eat seafood/salad buffet ($20 lunch, $30 dinner) is a signature, freshness fanatics will be happiest sticking to la carte favorites like the All-American fishermans platters, or global spe cials like Szechuan shrimp, that change seasonally. $$$-$$$$Japanese Market and Sushi Deli1412 79th St. Causeway, 305-861-0143Inside a small market that is widely considered Miamis pre mier source of Japanese foodstuffs, the Sushi Deli restaurant component is nothing more than a lunch counter. But chef Michio Kushi serves up some sushi found nowhere else in town. Example: traditional Osaka-style sushi layers of rice, seasoned seaweed, and marinated fresh mackerel, pressed into a square box, then cut into lovely one-bite sandwich squares. Whil e raw fish is always impeccable here, some unusual vegetarian sushi creations also tempt, as do daily entres. $

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Oggi Caffe1666 79th St. Causeway, 305-866-1238This cozy, romantic spot started back in 1989 as a pasta factory (supplying numerous high-profile restaurants) as well as a neighborhood eatery. And the wide range of budget-friendly, homemade pastas, made daily, remains the main draw for its large and loyal clientele. Choices range from homey, meaty lasagna to luxuriant crab ravioli with creamy lobster sauce, with occasional forays into creative exotica such as seaweed spaghettini, with sea scallops, shitakes, and fresh tomatoes. $$-$$$Shuckers Bar & Grill1819 79th St. Causeway, 305-866-1570Cheap eats and a million-dollar view is the sound bite manager Philip Conklin uses to describe this outdoor beach bar, hidden in back of a bayfront motel. The joint dates from South Beachs late 1980s revival, but the kick-off-your-shoes vibe couldnt be farther from SoBe glitz. The food ranges from classic bar favorites (char-grilled wings, conch fritters, raw or steamed shellfish) to full dinners featuring steak, homemade pasta, or fresh, not frozen, fish. $-$$Sushi Siam1524 NE 79th St. Causeway, 305-864-7638(See Miami / Upper Eastside listing)Trio on the Bay1601 79th St. Causeway, 305-866-1234Several ventures have failed in this expansive indoor/outdoor waterfront space, but thats hard to imagine once youve experienced this stunning incarnation as an exciting yet affordable restaurant/nightclub where food definitely doesnt play second fiddle to entertainment. Former Crystal Caf chef Klime Kovaceski created the original menu, and among his dishes still available is the filet mignon atop surprisingly pistachio-studded barnaise sauce. Now there is a range of Mediterranean offerings as well, from grilled calamari steaks to mahi picatta. $$$NORTH BEACHCaf Prima Pasta 414 71st St., 305-867-0106Who says old dogs cant learn new tricks? Opened in 1993 (with 28 seats), the Cea familys now-sprawling trattoria has added inventive chef Carlos Belon and modern menu items, including fiocchi rapera (pear/cheese-filled pasta purses with truffled prosciutto cream sauce), an unlikely (soy sauce and parmesan cheese?) but luscious Italian/ Japanese fusion tuna carpaccio, and fresh-fruit sorbets. But traditionalists neednt worry. All the old favorites, from the cafs famed beef carpaccio to eggplant parm and pastas sauced with Argentine-Italian indulgence, are still here and still satisfying. $$$-$$$$ KChapas1130 Normandy Dr., 305864-8872Formerly the Peruvian restaurant Pachamama, this space is now both Peruvian and Venezuelan -but not fusion. The Venezuelan sisters who run the place keep dishes true to country. Most Big Food comes from Peru: fresh ceviches, classic cooked entres. But its the Venezuelan breakfast/snack items that keep us coming, especially signature cachapas, somewhat similar to arepas but harder to find in restaurants. These moist pancakes, made from ground corn kernels instead of just corn meal, are folded over salty white cheese for a uniquely bold balance of sweetness and savor. $-$$Lous Beer Garden7337 Harding Ave., 305-704-7879Beer garden conjures up an image of Bavarian bratwurst, lederhosen, and oompah bands -none of which youll find here. Its actually a hip hideaway in the New Hotels poolpatio area, a locals hangout with interesting eclectic fare and a perennial party atmosphere. Especially recommended: delicately pan-fried mini-crab cakes served with several house made sauces; hefty bleu cheese burgers with Belgian-style double-cooked fries; blackened angry shrimp with sweet/ sour sauce; fried fresh sardines. And of course much beer, a changing list of craft brews. $$-$$$Rouge CineCafe908 71st St., 305-865-5955 This friendly cafs dcor is indeed playfully red, and the cine refers to vintage films projected unobtrusively on a wall. But the main attraction is the French and Moroccan food, both genres as authentically homey as youll find in the homes of those cuisines. For hearty eaters, exotically spiced tagine stews, like lamb with prunes, are the way to go. Grazers will find Rouges bocaditos (evocatively French saucisson sec, or Moroccan merguez sausage with grilled onions and hot harissa sauce, both on crusty Boulart bread) irresistible -as are housemade desserts. $$-$$$ Tamarind Thai 946 Normandy Dr., 305-861-6222When an eaterys executive chef is best-selling Thai cookbook author Vatcharin Bhumichitr, youd expect major media hype, fancy South Beach prices, and a fancy SoBe address. Instead Bhumichitr joined forces with Day Longsomboon (an old Thai school pal whod moved to Miami) at this unpretentious, authentic (no sushi) neighborhood place. Some standout dishes here are featured in the chefs latest tome, but with Tamarinds very affordable prices, you might as well let the mans impeccably trained kitchen staff do the work for you. $$-$$$The Wine Market908 71st St., 305-865-6465This rustic-chic wine shop, tapas bar, and restaurant is the sort of place that every emerging neighborhood needs. The wine stock isnt huge but the selection is thoughtful, with many bottles priced from $10 to $20. Take it home or pay a small corkage fee and drink on-premises over a meal centered on typical Parisian bistro entres like steak or moules frites (the latter regularly available all-you-can-eat). If youd prefer going the tapas bar route, highlights include a silky cognac/truffle chicken liver mousse and battered shrimp with remoulade sauce to make your own poboy crostinis. $$-$$$ MIAMI SHORESCte Gourmet9999 NE 2nd Ave., #112, 305-754-9012If only every Miami neighborhood could have a neighborhood restaurant like this low-priced little French jewel. The menu is mostly simple stuff: breakfast croissants, crpe, soups, sandwiches, salads, sweets, and a few more substantial specials like a Tunisian-style brik (buttery phyllo pastry stuffed with tuna, onions, potatoes, and tomatoes) with a mesclun side salad. But everything is homemade, including all breads, and prepared with impeccable ingredients, classic French technique, and meticulous attention to detail, down to the stylish plaid ribbons that hold together the cafs baguette sandwiches. $-$$ Iron Sushi 9432 NE 2nd Ave., 305-754-0311With three Biscayne Corridor outlets (plus several branches elsewhere in town), this mostly take-out mini chain is fast becoming the Sushi Joint That Ate Miami. And why do Miamians eat here? Not ambiance. There isnt any. But when friends from the Pacific Northwest, where foodies know their fish, tout the seafoods freshness, we listen. There are some surprisingly imaginative makis, like the Maharaja, featuring fried shrimp and drizzles of curry Mayo. And where else will you find a stacked sushi (five assorted makis) birthday cake? $-$$ Miami Shores Country Club10000 Biscayne Blvd., 305-795-2363Formerly members-only, the restaurant/lounge facilities of this classy 1939 club are now open to the public always, lunch and dinner. Not surprisingly, ambiance is retro and relaxed, with golf course views from both bar and indoor/outdoor dining room. The surprise is the food some classic (steaks, club sandwiches) but other dishes quite contemporary: an Asian ahi tuna tower; a lavish candied-walnut, poached-pear, grilled chicken salad; and fresh pasta specials. Prices are phenomenal, with dinner entres $9 to $17; drinks average $3 to $4. $$ PizzaFiore9540 NE 2nd Ave., 305-754-1924Owned by Arcoub Abderrahim, who opened South Beachs original PizzaFiore way back in 1996, this caf serves the kind of nostalgic, medium-thin crusted, oozing-with-gooey-cheese pizzas reminiscent of our childhood pies in northern NJ Sopranos territory, except now there are options for todays toppings -sundried tomatoes, buffalo mozzarella, etc. But theres also a full menu of Italian-American classics, including antipasto salads, subs, and particularly popular, pastas. Garlic rolls are a must, but we didnt have to tell you that. $-$$NORTH MIAMIAlaska Coffee Roasting Co.13130 Biscayne Blvd., 786-332-4254When people speak of the West Coast as the USAs quality coffeehouse pioneer territory, theyre thinking Seattle -and then south through coastal California. North to Alaska? Not so much. But owner Michael Gesser did indeed open this hip places parent in Fairbanks back in 1993, after years of traveling through every coffee-growing country in the world. Brews like signature smooth yet exotic Ethiopian Yirgacheffe dont even need cream or sugar, much less frappe frou-frou. All beans are house-roasted. Theres solid food, too: brick-oven pizzas, salads, sandwiches, and pastries. $-$$ Bagel Bar East1990 NE 123rd St., 305-895-7022Crusty outside (even without toasting) and substantially chewy inside, the bagels here are the sort homesick ex-New Yorkers always moan are impossible to find in Miami. For those who prefer puffed-up, pillowy bagels? Forget it. Have a nice onion pocket. Theres also a full menu of authentic Jewish deli specialties, including especially delicious, custom-cut -not pre-sliced -nova or lox. Super size sandwiches easily serve two, and theyll even improvise a real NJ Sloppy Joe (two meats, Swiss, coleslaw, and Russian dressing on rye) if you ask nice. $$Bagels & Co.11064 Biscayne Blvd., 305-892-2435While this place is often referred to as Guns & Bagels, one cant actually buy a gun here. The nickname refers to its location next to a firearms shop. But theres a lot of other stuff aside from bagels here, including a full range of sandwiches and wraps. Breakfast time is busy time, with banana-walnut pancakes especially popular. But whats most important is that this is one of the areas few sources of the real, New York-style water bagel: crunchy outside, challengingly chewy inside. $Bulldog Barbecue/Bulldog Burger15400 Biscayne Blvd., 305-940-9655These adjacent restaurants are really one place with two dining areas, since they connect and diners can order from either menu. They also share a BBQ/burger master: Top Chef contender Howie Kleinberg, whose indoor electric smoker produces mild-tasting cue ranging from the expected pulled pork, ribs, brisket, and chicken to more unusual items like hot-smoked salmon. As for burgers, many feature unique ingre dients such as mayo flavored like red-eye gravy, with strong coffee, or the bun of the infamous Luther: a sweet-glazed mock (holeless) Krispy Kreme donut. Costs are comparatively high, but such is the price of fame. $$-$$$Cane Sucre899 NE 125th St.,305-891-0123From the Vega brothers (who pioneered the Design and MiMo districts with, respectively, the original Cane A Sucre and UVA 69), this charming artisanal sandwich bar is the perfect breakfast/lunch stop before or after ingesting visual arts at nearby MOMA. Actually, creations like El Fig (fig confit, gorgonzola cheese, walnuts, and honey on an authentically French crisp-crusted fresh-baked baguette) are art in their own right. Inventive, substantial salads, sides, daily soups, and home made sweets (including mouthwateringly buttery croissants) complete the menu. $-$$ Captain Jims Seafood12950 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-892-2812This market/restaurant was garnering critical acclaim even when eat-in dining was confined to a few Formica tables in front of the fish counter, owing to the freshness of its seafood, much of it from Capt. Jim Hansons own fishing boats, which supply many top restaurants. Now theres a casual but pleasantly nautical side dining room with booths. Whether its garlicky scampi, smoked-fish dip, grilled yellowtail or hog or mutton snapper, perfectly tenderized cracked conch or conch fritters, everything is deftly prepared and bargain-priced. $$ Casa Mia Trattoria 1950 NE 123rd St., 305-899-2770Tucked away, off to the side on the approach to the Broad Causeway and the beaches, this charming indoor/outdoor trattoria seems to attract mostly neighborhood regulars. But even newcomers feel like regulars after a few minutes, thanks to the staffs Italian ebullience. Menu offerings are mostly classic comfort foods with some contemporary items as well. Housemade pastas are good enough that low-carb dieters should take a break, especially for the tender gnocchi with pesto or better yet, delicate fagottini beggars purses stuffed with pears and cheese. $$Chen-huyae15400 Biscayne Blvd., 305-956-2808Diners can get some Tex-Mex dishes here, if they must. But the specialty is Mayan-rooted Yucatan cuisine. So why blow bucks on burritos when one can sample Caribbean Mexicos most typical dish: cochinita pibil? Chens authentically succu lent version of the pickle-onion-topped marinated pork dish is earthily aromatic from achiote, tangy from bitter oranges, and meltingly tender from slow cooking in a banana leaf wrap. To accompany, try a lime/soy/chili-spiced michelada, also authentically Mexican, and possibly the best thing that ever happened to dark beer. $$-$$$Chef Creole13105 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-893-4246(See Miami listing)Flip Burger Bar1699 NE 123rd St.,305-741-3547 Casual-chic burger bars, everywhere in South Beach, are still rare farther north. One reason this easy-to-miss venue is a

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must-not-miss for North Miami locals: The hefty half-pounders on fresh brioche buns include a scrumptious patty with Gruyere, mushrooms, and onion marmalade. The Fireman is a jalapeo/ chipotle scorcher. There are even turkey and veggie variations. Other draws are hand-cut fries, beer-battered onion rings, a topdrawer beer list, budget-priced combo specials, conversationfriendly acoustics, and a South Beach rarity: free parking. $-$$Giraffas1821 NE 123rd St., 786-866-9007Festooned with eye-poppingly colored panels and giraffes -subtler but everywhere -this first North American branch of a wildly popular, 30-year-old Brazilian fast/casual chain is the flagship of a planned 4000 U.S. Giraffas. Given that the steaks, especially the tender, flavorful picanha, rival those at the most upscale rodizio joints -and beat the sword-wielding grandstanders for custom cooking (because staff asks your preference) -wed bet on giraffe domination. Overstuffed grilled sandwiches, salads, even tasty veggie options are all here, too. The cheese bread is a must. $$Happy Sushi & Thai2224 NE 123rd St.,305-895-0165Grab a booth at this cozy eatery, which serves all the expected Thai and sushi bar standards, including weekday lunch specials. But there are also delightful surprises, like grilled kawahagi (triggerfish) with seasoned Japanese mayonnaise. This intensely savory/sweet Japanese home cooking treat satisfies the same yen as beef jerky, except without pulling out your teeth. Accompanied by a bowl of rice, its a superb lunch. For raw-fish fans, spicy, creamy salmon tartare (accompanied by hiyashi wakame seaweed) is a winner. $$-$$$ Here Comes the Sun2188 NE 123rd St., 305-893-5711At this friendly natural foods establishment, one of Miamis first, theres a full stock of vitamins and nutritional supplements. But the places hearty soups, large variety of entres (including fresh fish and chicken as well as vegetarian selections), lighter bites like miso burgers with secret sun sauce (which would probably make old sneakers taste good), and daily specials are a tastier way to get healthy. An under-tenbuck early-bird dinner is popular with the former long-hair, now blue-hair, crowd. Frozen yogurt, fresh juices, and smoothies complete the menu. $-$$Il Piccolo Caf2112 NE 123rd St., 305-893-6538Talk about a neighborhood institution. The owners of this longtime Italian eatery remember frequent visits from Miami native Michelle Bernstein and her parents -when the celebrity chef was a kid. The place is still child-friendly, and though the piccolo space is indeed small, portions are prodigious. Most dishes will evoke nostalgia, including our own favorite whitewine-sauce-drenched sin -lemony egg-battered veal piccata with capers and artichokes. But there are surprises not found at most old school red-sauce joints, too, like lunchtimes surprisingly tasty Cuban sandwich. $$Le Griot de Madame John975 NE 125th St., 305-892-9333When Madame moved her base of operations from her Little Haiti home to a real restaurant (though a very informal one, and still mostly take-out), she began offering numerous traditional Haitian dishes, including jerked beef or goat tassot and an impressive poisson gros sel (a whole fish rubbed with salt before poaching with various veggies and spices). But the dish that still packs the place is the griot: marinated pork chunks simmered and then fried till theyre moistly tender inside, crisp and intensely flavored outside. $Little Havana 12727 Biscayne Blvd. 305-899-9069In addition to white-tablecoth ambiance, this place features live Latin entertainment and dancing, making it a good choice when diners want a night out, not just a meal. Its also a good choice for diners who dont speak Spanish, but dont worry about authenticity. Classic Cuban home-style dishes like mojomarinated lechon asado, topped with onions, and juicy ropa vieja are translated on the menu, not the plate, and fancier creations like pork filet in tangy tamarind sauce seem universal crowd-pleasers. $$$Los Antojos11099 Biscayne Blvd., 305-892-1411If its Sunday, it must be sancocho de gallina, Colombias national dish. If its Saturday, it must be ajiaco. Both are thick chicken soups, full meals in a bowl. For Colombian-cuisine novices, a bandeja paisa (sampler including rice, beans, carne asada, chicharron, eggs, sauted sweet plantains, and an arepa corn cake) is available every day, as are antojitos little whims, smaller snacks like chorizo con arepa (a corn cake with Colombian sausage). And for noncarnivores there are several hefty seafood platters, made to order. $$Mama Jennies11720 NE 2nd Ave. 305-757-3627For more than 35 years this beloved red-sauce joint has been drawing students and other starvation-budget diners with prodigious portions of lasagna, spaghetti and meatballs (the latter savory yet light-textured), veal marsala topped with a mountain of mushrooms, and other Italian-American belly-busters. All pasta or meat entres come with oil-drenched garlic rolls and either soup (hearty minestrone) or a salad (mixed greens, tomatoes, cukes, brined olives, and pickled peppers) thats a dinner in itself. Rustic roadhouse ambiance, notably the red leatherette booths, add to Mamas charm. $-$$Pastry Is Art12591 Biscayne Blvd., 305-640-5045Given owner Jenny Rissones background as the Eden Rocs executive pastry chef, its not surprising that her cakes and other sweet treats (like creamy one-bite truffle lollipops) look as flawlessly sophisticated as they taste -perfect adult party fare. What the bakerys name doesnt reveal is that its also a breakfast and lunch caf, with unusual baking-oriented fare: a signature sandwich of chicken, brie, and caramelized peaches and pecans on housemade bread; quiches; pot pies; even a baked-to-order Grand Marnier souffl. The pecan sticky buns are irresistible. $$ Petit Rouge12409 Biscayne Blvd., 305-892-7676From the mid-1990s (with Neals Restaurant and later with Il Migliore), local chef Neal Coopers neighborhood-oriented Italian eateries have been crowd-pleasers. While this cute 32-seat charmer is French, its no exception, avoiding pretense and winning fans with both classic and nouvelle bistro fare: frise salad with lardons, poached egg, and bacon vinaigrette; truite Grenobloise (trout with lemon/caper sauce); consomm with black truffles and foie gras, covered by a buttery puff pastry dome; perfect pommes frites, and equally perfect apple or lemon tarts for dessert. $$$Rice House of Kabob14480 Biscayne Blvd., 305-944-4899Since 2006, South Beachs original Rice House has been serving up mountainous platters of basmati rice and Greek salad topped with Persian-style marinated/char-grilled meat, poultry, seafood, or veggie kabobs -for very little money. This branch of what is now a growing chain has the same menu (which also features wraps, for lighter eaters) and the same policy of custom-cooking kabobs, so expect fresh, not fast, food. Sides of must-o-keyar and must-o-mooseer (thick yogurt dips with herbed cukes or shallots) are must-haves. $$ Smashburger14730 Biscayne Blvd., 786-406-6614Two things distinguish the griddled patties of this Denverbased chain, touted as the nations fastest-growing better burger restaurant, from other better burgers: a nod to local tastes (like toppings of fried chorizo and potato fritas), and the smashing technique, producing an appealing thickly crusted exterior. Got burger overkill? Substitute chicken, or have a salad. An added draw: unusual veggie sides, which go beyond regular and sweet potato fries to crisp onion strings, veggie frites (carrots, string beans), and an Old South fish-camp classic: fried pickles. $-$$Steves Pizza12101 Biscayne Blvd., 305-891-0202At the end of a debauched night of excess, some paper-thin designer pizza with wisps of smoked salmon (or similar fluff) doesnt do the trick. Open till 3:00 or 4:00 a.m., Steves has, since 1974, been serving the kind of comforting, retro pizzas people crave at that hour. As in Brooklyn, tomato sauce is sweet, with strong oregano flavor. Mozzarella is applied with abandon. Toppings are stuff that give strength: pepperoni, sausage, meatballs, onions, and peppers. $Tiny Thai House12953 Biscayne Blvd., 305-895-1646The space is tiny. The menu, which features Thai specialties but includes sushi plus Japanese appetizers and entres, is not. Despite the huge selection of sushi/Thai restaurant standards, though, dont overlook items harder to find in America, like floating noodle soup, a popular street food from Thailands boat-based market stalls; similar in savor to Vietnamese pho, the dish contains beef, bean sprouts, and noodles heaped in umami-rich beef broth. Among the nicely priced sushi selections, the Mylo roll (tuna, salmon, crab, avo cado, and cuke, topped with tempura fish and eel sauce) is a tasty pick. Dont miss sticky rice with mango for dessert. $Wongs Chinese Restaurant12420 Biscayne Blvd., 305-891-4313The menu reads like a textbook on how to please everyone, with food ranging from traditional Chinese to Chinese-American to just plain American. Appetizers include honey garlic chicken wings or Buffalo wings. A crab-claw starter comes with choice of pork fried rice or French fries. Seafood lovers can get shrimp chop suey, or salty pepper shrimp (authentically shell-on). And New Yorkers will find a number of dishes that are mainstays of Manhattan Szechuan menus but not common in Miami: cold sesame noodles, Hunan chicken, twice-cooked pork. $$Woodys Famous Steak Sandwich13105 Biscayne Blvd., 305-891-1451The griddle has been fired up since 1954 at this nostalgic hangout. New owners have made some changes, including a dcor/ambiance upgrade (theres now a patio lounge, with music) and an expanded menu featuring contemporary comfort foods like fire-grilled pizzas with fresh toppings (homemade mozzarella, etc.), several salads, and veggie burgers. But timetested road food favorites remain: big beef burgers, hot dogs, and of course, Woodys famous cheesesteak, done traditional Philly-style with shaved ribeye. You can even get Cheese Whiz. To drink, there are nine draft beers plus old-school shakes. $$NORTH MIAMI BEACH8 Oz. Burger Bar14815 Biscayne Blvd., 305-830-1988Celebrity chef Govind Armstrongs first 8 Oz., in South Beach, almost singlehandedly started Miamis burger craze, and when Armstrong severed ties with the Alton Road original, this location became his standard-bearer. Burgers are far from bargainpriced, but ingredients like grass-fed Wagyu beef, Niman Ranch lamb, and Humboldt Fog goat cheese, plus garnishes shining with chef-driven creativity (charred escarole, unctuous short rib, fried caper tartar sauce) justify the extra bucks. Kobe corn dogs, grilled artichokes with herb aioli, and stout-battered onions rings are also highly recommended. $$-$$$ Bamboo Garden1232 NE 163rd St., 305-945-1722Big enough for a banquet (up to 300 guests), this veteran is many diners favorite on the 163rd/167th Street Chinatown strip because of its superior dcor. But the menu also offers well-prepared, authentic dishes like peppery black bean clams, sauted mustard greens, and steamed whole fish with ginger and scallions, plus Chinese-American egg foo young. Default spicing is mild even in Szechuan dishes marked with red-chili icons, but dont worry; realizing some like it hot, the chefs will customize spiciness to heroic heat levels upon request. $$Blue Marlin Fish House 2500 NE 163rd St., 305-957-8822Located inside Oleta River State Park, this casual outdoor eatery is a rare surprise for nature lovers. The featured item is still the house-smoked fish this historic venue began producing in 1938, available in three varieties: salmon, mahi mahi, and the signature blue marlin. But the smokehouse now also turns out ribs and delectable brisket. Other new additions include weekend fish fries. Entry is directly from 163rd Street, not through the main park entrance. No admission fee. $ Chipotle Mexican Grill14776 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-2779Proving that national fast-food chains dont have to be bad for either diners or the environment, Chipotle serves what the company calls food with integrity. The fare is simple, basically tacos and big burritos: soft flour or crisp corn to rtillas stuffed with chipotle-marinated steak or chicken chunks, bolder shredded beef barbacoa, or herb-scented pork carnitas. But these bites contain no evil ingredients (transfats, artificial color/ flavor, antibiotics, growth hormones). And the food, while not the authentic Mex street stuff dreams are made of, is darned tasty, too. $Cholos Ceviche & Grill1127 NE 163rd St., 305-947-3338Dont be misled by the mini-mall location, or the relatively minimal prices (especially during lunch, when specials are under $6). Inside, the dcor is charming, and the Peruvian plates elegant in both preparation and presentation. Tops among ceviches/tiraditos is the signature Cholos, marinated octopus and fish in a refined rocoto chili sauce with overtones both fiery and fruity. And dont miss the molded causas, whipped potato rings stuffed with avocado-garnished crab salad -alto gether lighter and lovelier than the tasty but oily mashed spud constructions more oft encountered in town. $-$$Christines Roti Shop16721 NE 6th Ave.,305-770-0434Wraps are for wimps. At this small shop run by Christine Gouvela, originally from British Guyana, the wrapper is a far more substantial and tasty roti, a Caribbean megacrepe made from chickpea flour. Most popular filling for the flatbread is probably jerk chicken, bone-in pieces in a spiced stew of potatoes, cabbage, carrots, onions, and more chickpeas. But there are about a dozen other curries from which to choose. Take-out packages of plain roti are also available; they transform myriad leftovers into tasty, portable lunches. $

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Duffys Sports Grill Intracoastal Mall3969 NE 163rd St., 305-760-2124Located in a sprawling indoor/outdoor space at the Intracoastal Mall, Duffys, part of a popular chain that identifies as the official sports grill of every major Miami team, features roughly a zillion TVs and an equally mega-size menu of accessibly Americanized, globally inspired dishes designed to please crowds: stuffed potato skins, crab Rangoon, coconut-crusted fish fingers with orange-ginger sauce, jumbo wings of many flavors. Imagine a sports-oriented Cheesecake Factory. What makes this particular Duffys different and better? Location, location, location -fronting the Intracoastal Waterway. Theres even a swimming pool with its own bar. $$-$$$ Empire Szechuan Gourmet of NY3427 NE 163rd St., 305-949-3318In the 1980s, Empire became the Chinese chain that swallowed Manhattan -and transformed public perceptions of Chinese food in the NY metropolitan area. Before: bland fauxCantonese dishes. After: lighter, more fiery fare from Szechuan and other provinces. This Miami outpost does serve chop suey and other Americanized items, but dont worry. Stick with Szechuan crispy prawns, Empires Special Duck, cold sesame noodles, or similar pleasantly spicy specialties, and youll be a happy camper, especially if youre an ex-New Yorker. $$ El Gran Inka3155 NE 163rd St., 305-940-4910Though diners at this upscale Peruvian eatery will find ceviches, a hefty fried-seafood jalea, and Perus other expected traditional specialties, all presented far more elegantly than most in town, the contemporary Peruvian fusion creations are unique. Especially recommended are two dishes adapted from recipes by Perus influential nikkei (Japanese/Creole) chef Rosita Yimura: an exquisite, delicately sauced tiradito de corvina, and for those with no fear of cholesterol, pulpo de oliva (octopus topped with rich olive sauce). $$$-$$$$ Ginza Japanese Buffet16153 Biscayne Blvd., 305-944-2192Highlighting the lunch and dinners spreads at this all-youcan-eat Japanese buffet are a hibachi station (where chefs custom-cook diners choice of seafood or meat), plus many types of maki rolls and individual nigiri sushi, both featuring a larger variety of seafood than at many sushi bars -not just salmon and tuna but snapper, escolar, surf clam, snow crab, and more. But there are also steam-tabled hot Japanese and Chinese dishes; an array of cold shellfish and salads with mixand-match sauces; and desserts. Selections vary, but value-formoney is a given. $$Green House Organic Food Restaurant3207 NE 163rd St., 305-594-6787The name sounds a bit healthfoody, but theres no crunchy granola here. Argentine-born, globally traveling chef Marcelo Marino, whos also an instructor at Le Cordon Bleu Miami, uses only organic and/or sustainable produce and proteins to serve upscale avant-garde fusion fare: halibut atop traditional French Nantua (creamy lobster) sauce, with lemongrass/ saffron-infused faro risotto; octopus with delicate black radish tempura and coconut/pineapple/tea foam; and similar stuff requiring mad skills in both classic cooking and molecular gastronomy. Breads, cheeses, and cured meats are all made in-house, too. $$$ Hannas Gourmet Diner13951 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-2255When Sia and Nicole Hemmati bought the Gourmet Diner from retiring original owner Jean-Pierre Lejeune in the late 1990s, they added Hannas to the name, but changed little else about this retro-looking French/American diner, a north Miami-Dade institution since 1983. Customers can get a cheeseburger or garlicky escargots, meatloaf in tomato sauce or boeuf bourguignon in red wine sauce, iceberg lettuce and tomatoes, or a mushroom and squid salad with garlic dressing. For oysters Rockefeller/tuna-melt couples from Venus and Mars, it remains the ideal dinner date destination. $$-$$$ Hiro Japanese Restaurant3007 NE 163rd St., 305-948-3687One of Miamis first sushi restaurants, Hiro retains an amusing retro-glam feel, an extensive menu of both sushi and cooked Japanese food, and late hours that make it a perennially popu lar after-hours snack stop. The sushi menu has few surprises, but quality is reliable. Most exceptional are the nicely priced yakitori, skewers of succulently soy-glazed and grilled meat, fish, and vegetables; the unusually large variety available of the last makes this place a good choice for vegetarians. $$ Hiros Sushi Express17048 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-949-0776Tiny, true, but theres more than just sushi at this mostly takeout spin-off of the pioneering Hiro. Makis are the mainstay (standard stuff like California rolls, more complex creations like multi-veg futomaki, and a few unexpected treats like a spicy Crunch & Caliente maki), available la carte or in value-priced individual and party combo platters. But there are also bento boxes featuring tempura, yakitori skewers, teriyaki, stir-fried veggies, and udon noodles. Another branch is now open in Miamis Upper Eastside. $Heelsha1550 NE 164th St., 305-919-8393If unusual Bangladeshi dishes like fiery pumpkin patey (cooked with onion, green pepper, and pickled mango) or Heelsha curry (succulently spiced hilsa, Bangladeshs sweet-fleshed national fish) seem familiar, its because chef/owner Bithi Begum and her husband Tipu Raman once served such fare at the critically acclaimed Renaisa. Their menus mix-and-match option allows diners to pair their choice of meat, poultry, fish, or vegetable with more than a dozen regional sauces, from familiar Indian styles to exotica like satkara, flavored with a Bangladeshi citrus reminiscent of sour orange. $$-$$$Jerusalem Market and Deli16275 Biscayne Blvd., 305-948-9080Specialties like shawarma, spinach pies, kebabs, hummus, and kibbeh (a savory mix of ground lamb and bulgur) are native to many Middle East countries, but when a Lebanese chef/owner, like this eaterys Sam Elzoor, is at the helm, you can expect extraordinary refinement. There are elaborate daily specials here, like lemon chicken or stuffed cabbage with a variety of sides, but even a common falafel sandwich is special when the pita is also stuffed with housemade cabbage and onion salads, plus unusually rich and tart tahina. $-$$Kabobji3055 NE 163rd St., 305-354-8484This place makes a very good tahini sauce. In fact that alone is reason enough to visit. We prefer ours with this bright, cheery eaterys delightfully oniony falafel or a veg-garnished wrap of thin-sliced marinated beef schwarma. They also do a beautifully spiced, and reassuringly fresh-tasting, raw kibbi naye (Middle Eastern steak tartare). Its hard to resist putting together a grazing meal of starters and wraps, but theres also a roster of full entres (with soup or salad plus starch), including tempting vegetarian and seafood meals for noncarnivores. $$Kebab Indian Restaurant514 NE 167th St., 305-940-6309Since the 1980s this restaurant, located in an unatmospheric mini strip mall but surprisingly romantic inside (especially if you grab one of the exotically draped booths) has been a popular destination for reasonably priced north Indian fare. Kormas are properly soothing and vindaloos are satisfactorily searing, but the kitchen will adjust seasonings upon request. They aim to please. Food arrives unusually fast for an Indian eatery, too. $$King Palace330 NE 167th St. 305-949-2339The specialties here are authentic Chinatown-style barbecue (whole ducks, roast pork strips, and more, displayed in a glass case by the door), and fresh seafood dishes, the best made with the live fish swimming in two tanks by the dining room entrance. Theres also a better-than-average selection of seasonal Chinese veggies. The menu is extensive, but the best ordering strategy, since the place is usually packed with Asians, is to see what looks good on nearby tables, and point. $$ Kings County Pizza18228 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-792-9455If your feelings about Brooklyn-style pizza have been formed by Dominos flopsy-crusted, ketchupy, cheesefoody pies, stop here to sample a slice of the real thing. Admittedly, the crusts are not those of the coal-fired classics from Brooklyns legendary Totonnos or Grimaldis, but theyre similarly medium-thin and crisp -though not like a cracker; you can fold them for neat street eating, and they taste like honest bread, not cardboard. A variety of toppings are available even on slices. There are also whole pies with varied toppings. The large is humongous. $-$$ KoneFood387 NE 167th St., 305-705-4485Cones contain ice cream. Kones, however, contain anything and everything edible -at least at this eatery, locally founded (though the original concept of ultimate portable convenience meals, in sealed flatbread cones, came from Italy). In their melting-pot American version, kone fillings range from breakfast items like huevos rancheros to Thai chicken, chicken curry, coconut shrimp, kones kon lechon (slow-roasted pork with mojo), various pizzas, BBQ, chicken Florentine, healthy green salads, more. There are even desserts like a flambed apple Kone la Normande. Authentic Belgian frites, too. $ Lime Fresh Mexican Grill14831 Biscayne Blvd., 305-949-8800(See Midtown / Wynwood / Design District listing)Laurenzos Market Caf16385 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-945-6381Its just a small area between the wines and the fridge counters no potted palms, and next-to-no service in this cafeteriastyle space. But when negotiating this international gourmet markets packed shelves and crowds has depleted your energies, its a handy place to refuel with eggplant parmesan and similar Italian-American classics, housemade from old family recipes. Just a few spoonfuls of Wednesdays hearty pasta fagiole, one of the daily soup specials, could keep a person shopping for hours. And now that pizza master Carlo is manning the wood-fired oven, you can sample the thinnest, crispiest pies outside Napoli. $-$$Little Saigon16752 N. Miami Ave., 305-653-3377This is Miamis oldest traditional Vietnamese restaurant, but its still packed most weekend nights. So even the places biggest negative its hole-in-the-wall atmosphere, not encouraging of lingering visits becomes a plus since it ensures fast turnover. Chef/owner Lily Tao is typically in the kitchen, crafting green papaya salad, flavorful beef noodle pho (served with greens, herbs, and condiments that make it not just a soup but a whole ceremony), and many other Vietnamese classics. The menu is humongous. $-$$The Melting Pot15700 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-2228 For 1950s and 1960s college students, fondue pots were standard dorm accessories. These days, however, branches of this chain are generally the only places to go for this eating experience. Start with a wine-enriched four-cheese fondue; proceed to an entre with meat or seafood, plus choice of cooking potion (herbed wine, bouillon, or oil); finish with fruits and cakes dipped in melted chocolate. Fondue etiquette dictates that diners who drop a skewer in the pot must kiss all other table companions, so go with those you love. $$$New China Buffet940 North Miami Beach Blvd., 305-957-7266The venue (a former Bennigans) is clean, casual, and not kitschy. The all-you-can-eat fare is voluminous -scores of Chinese dishes (recommended: Mongolian pork, spicy garlic shrimp, and surprisingly authentic steamed fish with ginger and scallion); international oddities (pizza, plantains, pigs-inblankets); plus sushi, salad, and pastry/ice cream bars. And the price is sure right. Lunch is $6.75 ($7.75 Saturday and Sunday). Dinner features more seafood, $9.55. Theres an inexpensive take-out option, too, and reduced kids prices. $Oishi Thai14841 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-4338 At this stylish Thai/sushi spot, try the menu of specials, many of which clearly reflect the young chefs fanatical devotion to fresh fish, as well as the time he spent in the kitchen of Knob: broiled miso-marinated black cod; rock shrimp tempura with creamy sauce; even Nobu Matsuhisas new style sashimi (slightly surface-seared by drizzles of hot olive and sesame oil). The specials menu includes some Thai-inspired creations, too, such as veal massaman curry, Chilean sea bass curry, and sizzling filet mignon with basil sauce. $$$-$$$$Panya Thai520 NE 167th St., 305-945-8566Unlike authentic Chinese cuisine, theres no shortage of genu ine Thai food in and around Miami. But Panyas chef/owner, a Bangkok native, offers numerous regional and/or rare dishes not found elsewhere. Plus he doesnt automatically curtail the heat or sweetness levels to please Americans. Among the most intriguing: moo khem phad wan (chewy deep-fried seasoned pork strips with fiery tamarind dip, accompanied by crisp green papaya salad); broad rice noodles stir-fried with eyeopening chili/garlic sauce and fresh Thai basil; and chili-topped Diamond Duck in tangy tamarind sauce. $$-$$$ Paquitos16265 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-5027From the outside, this strip-mall Mexican eatery couldnt be easier to overlook. Inside, however, its festivity is impossible to resist. Every inch of wall space seems to be covered with South of the Border knickknacks. And if the kitschy dcor alone doesnt cheer you, the quickly arriving basket of fresh (not packaged) taco chips, or the mariachi band, or the knockout margaritas will. Food ranges from Tex-Mex burritos and a party-size fajita platter to authentic Mexican moles and harder-to-find traditional preparations like albndigas spicy, ultra-savory meatballs. $$-$$$Racks Soprano Caf & Italian Restaurant3933 NE 163rd St. (Intracoastal Mall), 305-917-7225Racks has a new owner and a new name. Italian chef Rocco Soprano is bringing his authentic Italian flavors and style to a lovely setting. Well have more details next month, but we know the specialties include Italian steaks, seafood, and an oyster bar. One thing that wont change: the coal-fired pizza oven, which reliably turns out an astonishingly light yet chewy crust that makes the pies a revelation. Especially enjoyable is the waterfront deck. $$

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Roasters & Toasters18515 NE 18th Ave., 305-830-3354Attention ex-New Yorkers: Is your idea of food porn one of the Carnegie Delis mile-high pastrami sandwiches? Well, Roasters will dwarf them. Consider the Carnegie-style monster containing, according to the menu, a full pound of succulent meat (really 1.4 pounds; we we ighed it), for a mere 15 bucks. All the other Jewish deli classics are here too, including perfectly sour pickles, silky hand-sliced nova or lox, truly red-rare roast beef, and the cutest two-bite mini-potato pancakes ever eight per order, served with sour cream and applesauce. $$Sangs Chinese Restaurant1925 NE 163rd St., 305-947-7076Sangs has three menus. The pink menu is Americanized Chinese food, from chop suey to honey garlic chicken. The white menu permits the chef to show off his authentic Chinese fare: salt and pepper prawns, rich beef/turnip casserole, tender salt-baked chicken, even esoterica like abalone with sea cucumber. The extensive third menu offers dim sum, served until 4:00 p.m. A live tank allows seasonal seafood dishes like lobster with ginger and scallion. Recently installed: a Chinese barbecue case, displaying savory items like crispy pork with crackling attached. $$$Shing Wang Vegetarian, Icee & Tea House 237 NE 167th St., 305-654-4008At this unique, mostly Taiwanese eatery, all seafood, poultry, and meats used to be skillfully crafted and delicious vegetarian imitations. These are still here, plus theres now a wider choice of dishes, some featuring real meat. Try the authentic-tasting Vietnamese banh mi sandwiches (available with a variety of meat and mock-meat fillings). Bubble tea is the must-not-miss drink. The cold, refreshing boba comes in numerous flavors, all supplemented with signature black tapioca balls that, sipped through straws, are a guaranteed giggle. $Siam Square54 NE 167th St., 305-944-9697Open until 1:00 a.m. every day except Sunday (when is closes at midnight), this relatively new addition to North Miami Beachs Chinatown strip has become a popular late-night gathering spot for chefs from other Asian restaurants. And why not? The food is fresh, nicely presented, and reasonably priced. The kitchen staff is willing to customize dishes upon request, and the serving staff is reliably fast. Perhaps most important, karaoke equipment is in place when the mood strikes. $-$$Slices Pizza & Pasta13750 Biscayne Blvd., 305-949-5684While pizza by the slice is common street food in every city in the USA, this informal Italian eatery offers a variation particularly appropriate to Latin American-influenced Miami: slices served rodizio-style. Brazils traditional rodizio restau rants feature many different grilled meats, served tableside by a continuing parade of waiters till diners cry uncle. Here the concept is the same, with dozens of varieties of pizza (plus several pastas) replacing the beef. $$ Sushi House15911 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-6002In terms of dcor drama, this sushi spot seems to have taken its cue from Philippe Starck: sheer floor-to-ceiling drapes, for starters. The sushi list, too, is over the top, featuring monster makis like the Cubbie Comfort: spicy tuna, soft-shell crab, shrimp and eel tempura, plus avocado, jalapeos, and cilantro, topped with not one but three sauces: wasabi, teriyaki, and spicy Mayo. Hawaiian King Crab contains unprecedented ingredients like tomatoes, green peppers, and pineapple. Boutique wines, artisan sakes, and cocktails are as exotic as the cuisine. $$$-$$$$Sushi Sake13551 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-4242Chic Asian-accented dcor, video screens, 99-cent drink deals, and late-night hours make this hip hangout not just a sushi bar but sort of a neighborhood bar, too. That said, the sushi is impressive, mainly because seafood is delivered daily and all except the shrimp is fresh, not frozen (as is customary at most Miami sushi places). Also notable: All sauces are housemade. Cooked makis like a crunch-topped Miami Heat are most popular, but its as sashimi that the fishs freshness truly shines. $$-$$$ Tanias Table18685 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-932-9425A location at the tail end of a tiny, tired-looking strip mall makes this weekday lunch-only kosher eatery easy to miss. But the cute bistro, an extension of chef Tania Sigals catering company, is well worth seeking for its unusually varied daily-changing menus -not just familiar Eastern Europeanderived dishes (chicken matzoh ball soup, blintzes, etc.) but numerous Latin American specialties (zesty ropa vieja), Asian-influenced items (Thai chicken/noodle salad), lightened universal Ladies-Who-Lunch classics (custardy quiches, grilled trout with mustard sauce), and homemade baked goods. $$Tunas17850 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-932-0630 www.tunasrawbarandgrille.com The reincarnated Tunas has gained new owners, a new name, a dazzling outdoor bar and dining area, and a new chef, Rolf Fellhauer, who spent 28 years at the famed La Paloma. He has added his touch to the menu, with delicacies such as Oysters Moscow, mussels Chardonnay, and Grouper Brittany. Traditional house favorites remain, and the emphasis is still on fresh fish from local waters. Open daily till 2:00 a.m., the place can get rather festive after midnight, but since the kitchen is open till closing, Tunas draws a serious late-night dining crowd, too. $$-$$$ Vegetarian Restaurant by Hakin73 NE 167th St., 305-405-6346Too often purist vegetarian food is unskillfully crafted bland stuff, spiced with little but sanctimonious intent. Not at this modest-looking vegan (dairy-free vegetarian) restaurant and smoothie bar. Dishes from breakfasts blueberry-packed pancakes to Caribbean vegetable stews sparkle with vivid flavors. Especially impressive: mock meat (and fake fish) wheat-gluten items that beat many carnivorous competitors. Skeptical? Rightly. But we taste-tested a Philly cheese steak sandwich on the toughest of critics -an inflexibly burger-crazy six year-old. She cleaned her plate. $$Yakko-San3881 NE 163rd. St. (Intracoastal Mall), 305-947-0064After sushi chefs close up their own restaurants for the night, many come here for a rare taste of Japanese home cooking, served in grazing portions. Try glistening-fresh strips of raw tuna can be had in maguro nuta mixed with scallions and dressed with habit-forming honey-miso mustard sauce. Other favorites include goma ae (wilted spinach, chilled and dressed in sesame sauce), garlic stem and beef (mild young shoots flash-fried with tender steak bits), or perhaps just-caught grouper with hot/sweet/tangy chili sauce. Open till around 3:00 a.m. $$Yes, Pasta! Trattoria Italiana 14872 Biscayne Blvd., 305-944-1006At Roman-native Flaminia Morins casual, family-friendly eatery, the specialty is pasta yo ur way. Choose one of seven fresh or dried pastas (including gluten-free options), then one of 15 sauces ranging from traditional carbonara to inventions like Mozzarella Filante (creamy tomato sauce with melted cheese); la carte meat, seafood, or veg addons are also available. Build a full Italian feast with antipasti, salads, six secondi (entres), and desserts. Budget diner alert: Check out Monday-Friday lunch specials, two courses plus drink for $8. BAY HARBOR ISLANDSAsia Bay Bistro1007 Kane Concourse; 305-861-2222As in Japans most refined restaurants, artful presentation is stunning at this Japanese/Thai gem. And though the voluminous menu sports all the familiar favorites from both nations, the Japanese-inspired small plates will please diners seeking something different. Try jalapeo-sauced hamachi sashimi; toro with enoki mushrooms, bracing ooba (shiso), tobiko caviar, and a sauce almost like beurre blanc; rock shrimp/shitake tempura with a delicate salad; elegant salmon tartare with a mix-in quail egg. And spicy, mayodressed tuna rock makis are universal crowd-pleasers. $$$ Caffe Da Vinci1009 Kane Concourse,305-861-8166After renovations in 2010, this old favorite (since 1989) reopened with a hip new lounge -but no fixes to what aint broke, notably handmade artisanal pastas sauced with high quality ingredients. Choose luxe stuffed models (like crabfilled ravioli with rich lobster sauce) or relatively pristine preparations like linguini with garlic, wine, and fresh little necks. Eating light? Make a meal of lavish salads or starters like true beef carpaccio -dressed, like the original from Venices Harrys Bar, with creamy mustard sauce rather than mere olive oil. $$$ Le Pine1052 Kane Concourse, 305-861-1059This upscale Lebanese restaurant serves dishes with the sort of understated sophistication that makes clear why Beirut was called the Paris of the East. Youll find familiar Middle Eastern favorites, but many have refinements that lift them above average: pita thats housemade, charmingly fluffy when warm from the oven; falafel incorporating flavorful fava beans with the usual ground chickpeas. Especially appealing are more uncommon items like crisp-fried cauliflower with tahini, fateh (a chickpea casserole iced with thick yogurt), and buttery cheese/herb-filled sambusak pastries. Finish exotically with a hookah. $$-$$$ Open Kitchen1071 95th St., 305-865-0090If we were on Death Row, choosing a last meal, this very chef-centered lunchroom/markets PBLT (a BLT sandwich with melt-in-your-mouth pork belly substituting for regular bacon) would be a strong contender. Co-owners Sandra Stefani (ex-Casa Toscana chef/owner) and Ines Chattas (ex-Icebox Caf GM) have combined their backgrounds to create a global gourmet oasis with a menu ranging from light quiches and imaginative salads to hefty balsamic/ tomato-glazed shortribs or daily pasta specials (like wild boar-stuffed ravioli). Also featured: artisan grocery products, and Stefanis famous interactive cooking class/wine dinners. $$-$$$ The Palm9650 E. Bay Harbor Dr., 305-868-7256It was 1930s journalists, legend has it, who transformed NYCs original Palm from Italian restaurant to bastion of beef. Owners would run out to the butcher for huge steaks to satisfy the hardboiled scribes. So our perennial pick here is nostalgic: steak la stone -juicy, butter-doused slices on toast, topped with sauted onions and pimentos. This classic (whose carb components make it satisfying without la carte sides, and hence a relative bargain) isnt on the menu anymore, but cooks will prepare it on request. $$$$$AVENTURA / HALLANDALEAnthonys Coal Fired Pizza17901 Biscayne Blvd., 305-830-2625When people rave about New York pizzas superiority, they dont just mean thin crusts. They mean the kind of airy, abundantly burn-bubbled, uniquely flavorful crusts that can only be consistently produced by a traditional coal (not wood) oven -like those at Anthonys, which began with one Fort Lauderdale pizzeria in 2002 and now has roughly 30 locations. Quality toppings, though limited, hit all the major food groups, from prosciutto to kalamata olives. There are salads, too, but the sausage and garlicsauted broccoli rabe pie is a tastier green vegetable. $$Bagel Cove Restaurant & Deli19003 Biscayne Blvd. 305-935-4029One word: flagels. And no, thats not a typo. Rather these crusty, flattened specimens (poppy seed or sesame seed) are the ultimate bagel/soft pretzel hybrid -and a specialty at this bustling Jewish bakery/deli, which, since 1988, opens at 6:30 a.m. -typically selling out of flagels in a couple of hours. Since youre up early anyway, sample elaborately garnished breakfast specials, including unusu ally flavorful homemade corned beef hash and eggs. For the rest of the day, multitudes of mavens devour every other delectable deli specialty known to humankind. $$BagelWorks18729 Biscayne Blvd., 305-937-7727Hard as it is for old-time NYC expats to believe, theres evidently a younger generation that doesnt equate the Jewish deli experience with loudmouthed servers and the smell of 75 years of fermenting pickle juice in the flooring. This cleanly contemporary place attracts this younger generation with the full range of classics, including many varieties of hand-sliced smoked fish, but also healthy options, most notably a wide array of substantial salads with grilled protein add-ons. Bagels, while machine-made rather than hand-rolled, are freshly baked all day. $$ Bella Luna19575 Biscayne Blvd., Aventura Mall, 305-792-9330 If the menu here looks familiar, it should. Its nearly identical to that at the Upper Eastsides Luna Caf and, with minor variations, at all the rest of Tom Billantes eateries (Rosalia, Villaggio, Carpaccio), right down to the typeface. But no argument from here. In a mall a setting more accustomed to food court dishes like carpaccio al salmone (crudo, with portobellos, capers, parmesan slices, and lemon/tomato dressing) and linguine carbonara (in creamy sauce with pancetta and shallots) are a breath of fresh, albeit familiar, air. $$-$$$Blu Sushi600 Silks Run Rod., 954-744-4398Even hard-core sushi-bar addicts must admit that many such establishments suffer from a certain sameness. Not Blu. At this restolounge in the Village at Gulfstream Park, part of a mini-chain originating in southwest Florida, the specialty makis are outdone in outrageousness only by 2426 NE 2nd Ave | Miami FL 33137 | Tel. 305.573.7373 Open: Monday-Friday 11:30am-10:00pm Saturday 5:30-11:00pm www.jeanpaulshouse.com Come celebrate your holiday parties in our private dining room Follow us on:

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110 extravagant cocktails. Yes, there are California rolls. But why be bored when you have an alternative like Kin-SO: tempura king crab salad, tuna, and avocado with scallions, smelt roe, and tempura flakes, plus mayo and sweet eel sauce. $$$ Bourbon Steak 19999 W. Country Club Dr., 786-279-0658 (Fairmont Hotel, Turnberry Resort)At Bourbon Steak, a venture in the exploding restaurant empire of chef Michael Mina, a multiple James Beard award winner, steakhouse fare is just where the fare starts. There are also Minas ingenious signature dishes, like an elegant deconstructed lobster/baby vegetable pot pie, a raw bar, and enough delectable vegetable/seafood starters and sides for noncarnivores to assemble a happy meal. But dont neglect the steak flavorful dry-aged Angus, 100-percent Wagyu American Kobe, swoonworthy grade A5 Japanese Kobe, and butter-poached prime rib, all cooked to perfection. $$$$$BurgerFi18139 Biscayne Blvd., 305-466-0350 Its not surprising that this Florida-based better burger franchise is one of Americas fastest-growing. With dcor thats relaxingly retro yet futuristically earth-friendly (think recycled Coke bottle chairs), beverages ranging from milkshakes to craft beers, and sourced hormone/antibiotic-free, grass-fed Angus burgers on branded buns, for prices rivaling those for fast-food junkburgers, whats not to love? There are also vegetarian quinoa burgers or Kobe dogs, plus accessories including hand-cut fries, killer crisp-battered onion rings, freshly made, all-natural frozen custard, and toppings galore. $ Cadillac RanchVillage at Gulfstream Park 921 Silks Run Rd. #1615, 954-456-1031Its hard to decide if the most fun interpretation of beef here is the weekend prime rib dinner special (with two sides and a meat hunk hefty enough for sandwiches the next day) or the mechanical bull. Party like its 1980 at this all-American restolounge/sports bar, which includes two outdoor patios with fire pits and, sometimes, live rootsy music. If you miss out on the roast beef (it goes fast), there are burgers, steaks, meal-size salads, and classic bar bites. $$-$$$ Caf Bistro @ Nordstrom19507 Biscayne Blvd. #15, 305-937-7267In the days before quick-bite food courts, upscale depart ment stores had their own real restaurants, civilized oases where Ladies Who Lunch took leisurely respite from shopping. In todays Women Who Work times, those restaurants (and privileged ladies) are anachronisms, but this room, hidden on Nordstroms second floor, is a relaxing time-trip back. Enjoy creamy crab bisque, extravagant salads (shrimp with cilantro-lime dressing; pear, blue cheese, and candied walnuts with cherry balsamic vinaigrette), or a retro-modern club sandwich. Organic ingredients from local purveyors are emphasized. $$$Fresko19048 NE 29th Ave., 786-272-3737Forget thick, dough-wrapped potato knishes and blintzes slathered with sour cream. As its name suggests, this kosher dairy eatery eschews the starch/sugar-laden traditional tfavorites for salads, smoothies, and similar healthy fare as casual, clean, and contemporary as the restaurants dcor. Asian-influenced items, like wakame-topped tuna tartare with pineapple chutney, are particularly appealing, while those craving classic combinations like smoked salmon and cream cheese can enjoy them on a light-crusted designer pizza. To drink, smoothies are supplemented by refreshing herbal infusions like green lemonade (with mint and basil). $$Fuji Hana2775 NE 187th St., Suite #1, 305-932-8080A people-pleasing menu of typical Thai and Japanese dishes, plus some appealing contemporary creations (like the Spicy Crunchy Tuna Roll, an inside-out tuna/avocado/ tempura maki, topped with more tuna and served with a luscious creamy cilantro sauce) has made this eatery a longtime favorite. But vegetarians -for whom seafood-based condiments can make Asian foods a minefield -might want to add the place to their worth a special drive list, thanks to chefs winning ways with tofu and all-around accommodation to veg-only diets. $$-$$$The Grill on the Alley19501 Biscayne Blvd. (Aventura Mall), 305-466-7195Ensconced in a leather booth, with dark hardwood everywhere and a massive bar dispensing two-fisted drinks, youd never know you were dining in a shopping mall -or in the new millennium. This upscale mini chain salutes Americas great grill restaurants of yesteryear, with prodigious portions of charbroiled meats and seafood, plus classics like creamy chicken pot pie. New retro dishes are added quarterly, but our favorite remains Sunday nights prime rib special: a $32 hunk of juicy beef thatll take care of Mondays meals too. $$$$$ Il Migliore2576 NE Miami Gardens Dr., 05-792-2902This attractive trattoria gets the food right, as well as the ambiance. As in Italy, dishes rely on impeccable ingredients and straightforward recipes that dont overcomplicate, cover up, or otherwise muck about with that perfection. Fresh fettuccine with white truffle oil and mixed wild mushrooms needs nothing else. Neither does the signature Pollo Al Mattone, marinated in herbs and cooked under a brick. And even low-carb dieters happily go to hell in a hand basket when faced with a mound of potatoes alla Toscana, herbsprinkled French fries. $$-$$$ Kampai3575 NE 207th St., 305-931-6410At this longtime neighborhood favorite Japanese/Thai restaurant, many come just for the slightly pricy but very generous sushi specialties. Most makis are cooked, but for raw-fish fans the tempura-flake-topped crunchy tuna/ avocado roll with spicy mayo, and tuna both inside and out, is a people-pleaser. Dont neglect Thai specialties, though, especially red and green curries customizable as to heat (mild, medium, hot, and authentic Thai hot). And for a bargain light lunch, try tonjiru, miso soup jazzed up with veggies and pork. $$-$$$La Estancia Argentina17870 Biscayne Blvd., 305-932-6477At this market/restaurant, theres a small but quality selection of Argentine grocery staples and wines, plus a butcher counter where backyard BBQers can find everything necessary for a parrillada party. Alternatively, grab a table and let La Estancia do the cooking -anything from tapas and elegant miga mini-tea sandwiches to hefty grilled parrillada plates. Most irresistible, though, are the savory and sweet baked goods, especially elaborately frosted layer cakes and delicately crusted empanadas plumply stuffed with hand-cut flank steak, mushrooms in onion sauce, much more. $-$$Luca Bella19088 NE 29th Ave., 305-792-2222In the space that once housed Chef Allens, this trattoria offers a crowd-pleasing combination: dcor with whitetablecloth elegance, yet the family-friendly feel of a classic checkered-tablecloth eatery -and Italian-American comfort food to match. Highlights: Mickeys Meatballs (named for owner Mickey Maltese), a meal-size marinara-sauced starter featuring whipped ricotta and creamy mascarpone; veal Bella Luca, mixing modern and traditional influences via a hefty breadcrumb-coated pan-fried chop with a topping of bracing balsamic reduction-dressed mesclun. $$$Mos Bagels & Deli2780 NE 187th St., 305-936-8555While the term old school is used a lot to describe this spacious (160-seat) establishment, it actually opened in 1995. It just so evokes the classic NY delis we left behind that it seems to have been here forever. Example: Lox and nova arent pallid, prepackaged fish, but custom-sliced from whole slabs. And bagels are hand-rolled, chewy champions, not those machine-made puffy poseurs. As complimentary pastry bites suggest, and the massive size of the succulent, sufficiently fatty pastrami sandwiches confirm, generous Jewish Mo(m) spirit shines here. $$Mr. Chefs Fine Chinese Cuisine & Bar18800 NE 29th Ave. #10, 786-787-9030Considering our countys dearth of authentic Chinese food, this stylish eatery is heaven-sent for Aventura residents. Owners Jin Xiang Chen and Shu Ming (a.k.a. Mr. Chef) come from Chinas southern seacoast province of Guangdong (Canton). But youll find no gloppily sauced, Americanized-Cantonese chop sueys here. Cooking is properly light-handed, and seafood specialties shine (try the spicy/crispy salt and pepper shrimp). For adventurers, theres a cold jellyfish starter. Even timid taste buds cant resist tender fried shrimp balls described this way: With crispy adorable fringy outfit. $$-$$$Pilar20475 Biscayne Blvd. 305-937-2777Chef/owner Scott Fredel previously worked for Norman Van Aken and Mark Militello. He has been executive chef at Rumi, and cooked at NYCs James Beard House. Armed with those impressive credentials, Fredel and his wife launched Pilar (named for Hemingways boat) aiming to prove that top restaurants can be affordable. Consider it proven. Floribbean-style seafood is the specialty: fresh hearts of palm slaw and Caribbean curry sauce, rock shrimp spring rolls with sweet soy glaze, yellowtail snapper with tomato-herb vinaigrette. Forget its strip-mall location. The restaurant itself is elegant. $$-$$$Pizza Roma19090 NE 29th Ave. 305-937-4884Despite its name, this homey hidden eatery serves not Romes wood-cooked, crunchy-crusted pizzas but New Yorkstyle pies with medium-thick crusts pliable enough to fold in half for neat street eating. Unlike chains, though, this indie is accommodating, so if you want your crust thin and crisp, just ask. Also featured are Italian-American entres like baked manicotti (thats mani-goat, for those not from NJ) big enough to share, and sub sandwiches, here called bullets, to put you in a Sopranos frame of mind. $$Sushi Siam19575 Biscayne Blvd. 305-932-8955(See Miami / Upper Eastside listing)SUNNY ISLES BEACHChef Philip Ho16850 Collins Ave., 305-974-0338Deep-pocketed diners who ate at the Setai when Jonathan Wright was executive chef already know chef Hos work. His dazzling dim sum were the menus highlight. Now theyre affordable for all. Dumplings (chive and shrimp, green tea duck, truffle-spiked scallop, more) have skins delicate enough to see through; open shrimp dumplings with dried scallops are almost flower-like in appearance; steamed cheung fan (rice noodle crpes) rolled around Chinese crullers are simply sinful, as are flaky-crusted egg custard tarts. And the regular menu measures up to the small plates. $$-$$$Copper Chimney18090 Collins Ave., 305-974-0075At this family-owned (and kid-friendly), white-tablecloth Indian restaurant, prices are more upscale than average, but so is the foods elegant presentation -plus features like a full bar, live Bollywood/belly dancing on weekends, and, among familiar North Indian fare, dishes blending contemporary touches with traditional tastes. Especially enjoyable: starters inspired by street snacks, like bikaneri chaat (fried gram flour crisps, chickpeas, and yogurt) served with two chutneys; anything featuring paneer cheese, from classic spinach/cheese palak paneer to creative khazazs-elazzat (sundried tomato-stuffed paneer/potato dumplings in smooth cream sauce). $$$Epicure Gourmet Market & Caf17190 Collins Ave., 305-947-4581Who even knew that the late Rascal House had an ocean view? Diners may have to eat standing up to glimpse water over the dunes from the panoramic caf windows of the gourmet market that replaced the Rascal, but you know youre on a tropical beach, not Brighton Beach. The big, bright cafs menu, more global diner than Jewish deli, includes daily specials ranging from spa-grilled chicken to homemade Italian sausage and peppers. But its worth seeking out items that made South Beachs original Epicure famous: sandwiches featuring housemade rare roast beef; shrimp or chunky smoked whitefish salads; fresh baked goods. $$$The H Restaurant17608 Collins Ave., 305-931-9106This friendly, family-owned bistro is the sort of homeawayfrom-home found every few blocks in France -here Gerard and Karin Herrison, plus chef son Julien, formerly had a restaurant -but theyre rarely found in South Florida. Burgers, et al., are available, but with garlicky escargots, a savory/ sweet-dressed salad of duck confit atop frise, pan-seared foie gras with port/raspberry sauce, fish with an impeccable lemon beurre blanc, and a satisfying steak/frites (with peppery cognac cream sauce). Wed leave the American stuff to the kids. $$$-$$$$Il Mulino New York17875 Collins Ave., 305-466-9191If too much is not enough for you, this majorly upscale Italian-American place, an offshoot of the famed NYC original, is your restaurant. For starters, diners receive enough freebie food -fried zucchini coins, salami, bruschetta with varying toppings, a wedge of quality parmigiano, garlic bread -that ordering off the menu seems superfluous. But mushroom raviolis in truffle cream sauce are irresistible, and perfectly tenderized veal parmesan, the size of a large pizza, makes a great take-out dinnerfor the next week. $$$$-$$$$$Kitchen 30516701 Collins Ave., 305-749-2110Offering eclectic American fare, this resort restaurant room, despite its contemporary open kitchen, has the retro-glam look of a renovated discotheque -which is what it was. In fact, its still as much lounge as eatery, so its best to arrive early if you want a relatively DJ-free eating experience. A seductive mango-papaya BBQ sauce makes ribs a tasty choice any night, but most local diners in the know come on nights when the restaurant features irresistibly priced seasonal seafood specials (all-you-can-eat stone crabs one night, lobster on another). A spacious dining counter overlooking the cooks makes the Kitchen a comfortable spot for singles. $$$Piazzetta17875 Collins Ave., 305-918-6816You cant help feeling optimistic about a tourist towns food scene when its resort restaurants, which generally walk the middle of the road, get creative. And it doesnt get much more creative than this stylish restaurant and Italian market, which bills itself as a trip to an Italian-inspired little market square, but which, along with artisanal salumi plus pizzas and pastas, serves sushi. Particularly tasty: the native Neapolitan pizza chefs truffled taleggio and mushroom pies; meltingly tender braised short ribs; an impeccable market-driven meat and cheese platter. $$$St. Petersburg Deli17080 Collins Ave., 305-947-9696Dont expect fancified stuff like menus, or the English language, at this informal market/cafe. If theres signage identifying the prepared foods behind the counters, its in Russian, and daily dishes are pretty much what the cooks feel like making. So look and point. Wed suggest pointing at cold yogurt-based soups like tangy okroshka (with cukes, egg, scallions, potatoes, and dill) or holodnik (similar, with beets added); eggplant roulades, stuffed with spiced shredded carrots, are also a refreshing summer dish. Hot choices include meatballs in rich cream sauce and chicken Kiev. $$ Timo17624 Collins Ave., 305-936-1008Since opening in 2003, the inventive yet clean and unfussy Italian/Mediterranean-inspired seasonal food at this hot spot, created by chef/owner Tim Andriola (at the time best known for his stints at Chef Allens and Marks South Beach), has been garnering local and national raves. Dont bother reading them. Andriolas dishes speak for themselves: a salad of crisp oysters atop frise, cannelloni bean, and pancetta; foie gras crostini with a subtle caramelized orange sauce; a blue crab raviolo with toasted pignolias and brown butter; or a wood-oven three-cheese white pizza. $$$-$$$$ Werner Staubs Peppermill350 Bayview Dr., 305-466-2016Itll likely be years until diners stop instinctively heading for the tropic-alpine chalet that formerly housed the Peppermill at the Waterways in Aventura. But this new indoor/outdoor spaces bay views are much more spectacular. And the food is the same unique old-school stuff. Seafood is featured, and while there are contemporary preparations, you cant resist hard-to-find retro dishes like imported Dover sole almondine, Swiss-style poached trout with champagne-shallot sauce, an elaborate steak tartar, and for dessert, peach Melba or strawberries Romanoff. $$$ rfntbrbrffnnfbnbrbrrrffrrntb r f n f t

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112 metro1.com MIAMIS URBAN REAL ESTATE LEADERTALENT WANTED NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for the next generation of commercial & residential real estate associates.BUENA VISTA: 4300 NE 1ST AVE JUST SOLD 3,395 SF 4 BD / 3 double corner lot home in the historic Buena Vista area. Many original details: red oak wood oors, cathedral ceilings, amazing staircase leading to grand master bedroom suite. Jane Russell, P.A | 305.799.7436 jrussell@metro1properties.com BISCAYNE CORRID OR: 3550 BISCAYNE BLVD Ofces For Lease | Price Upon Request Locate your business at 3550 Biscayne, a 7 story ofce building with onsite parking. Featuring a very central location on Biscayne Boulevard. Upgraded ofce suites 150 SF + up available for lease. Tony Arellano | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com MIDTOWN: 3557 NE 2ND AVE Retail For Lease | $30 PSF Exclusive opportunity to lease prime retail space at the entrance to Miamis most exciting neighborhoods: Midtown & The Design District. Spaces available from 7,500 10,000 SF. Will build to suit. Tony Arellano | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com BELLE MEADE: 671 NE 77 ST For Sale $1,499,000 3,045 SF 3 BD / 3 BA waterfront home on a 23,900 SF lot with 100 on the water. Large sunlight lled open oor plan, stunning dark hardwood oors throughout with two replaces. Gated neighborhood! Jane Russell, P.A | 305.799.7436 jrussell@metro1properties.com LITTLE RIVER: 6300 NE 4 CT For Sale $590,000 The Trackside Loft building is a free-standing multibay warehouse on NE 4th court that includes a gated parking lot. This property is located blocks away from Biscayne Blvd. Property was recently leased. Tony Arellano | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com DESIGN DISTRICT: 4030 NORTH MIAMI AVE For Sale $5M | For Lease $65 NNN Prime street retail located at the entrance to Miamis Design District. Only a block away from the 195 exit. This 9,907 SF space will be renovated, and features glass storefront windows overlooking North Miami ave. Tony Cho | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com MIAMI GARDENS: 1111 PARK CENTRE Price Upon Request Centrally located ofce building. Flexible terms, aggressive rates, class A amenities. Ample / free parking, updated building with surveillance + on-site security. Individually controlled AC. Tony Arellano | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com metro 1 properties exclusive listings metro 1 commercial exclusive listingsMIAMI SHORES: 1200 NE 103 ST Reduced to $999,000 4 BD / 4 BA beautiful mid-century modern open oor plan home. House has been completely updated. Pool is nished with Pebbletec. Beautiful gardens, huge open rooms, terrazzo oors and impact windows. Irene Dakota | 305 972 8860 idakota@metro1properties.com BISCAYNE CORRID OR: 12550 BISCAYNE BLVD For Lease | $30 PSF NNN Wells Fargo space located at 12550 Biscayne Blvd., offering surface as well as building signage. Approximately 7,000 SF space with four drive through lanes. Tony Arellano | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com UPPER EAST SIDE: 243 NE 62 ST For Sale & For Lease | Price Upon Request 3,200 7,000 SF warehouses available for sale and for lease. These warehouses feature an excellent location, and are minutes away from Downtown Miami, Design District and Miami Beach. Irene Dakota | 305 972 8860 idakota@metro1properties.com MIAMI SHORES: 85 NW 102 ST For Sale $220,000 Newly renovated 3 BD / 2 BA home in Miami Shores! The property has a brand new kitchen, bathrooms and the roof has just been redone. The house now has central A/C, new washer, dryer and sprinklers. Irene Dakota | 305 972 8860 idakota@metro1properties.com DESIGN DISTRICT: 3 711 NE 2 AVE For Sale $8,200,000 The iconic Power Studios is back on the market. This 13,102 SF building sits on a 11,336 SF lot and allows over +/100,000 SF of gross development. Will not last. Tony Cho | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com rendering JUST SOLD


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Full Text


BISCAYNE
December 2012 www.BiscayneTimes.com Volume 10 Issue 10


Drawing


the


on


Future


When will Miami's art scene
Give it a few more years
Perhaps quite a few
pg. 34


grow up?


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SUNDAY


DEC. 4-9


MONDAY


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY


FRIDAY


BACK WITH
NEW SURPRISES!


SATURDAY

Free Adrienne
Arsht Center Tour
12PM I]
The Nutcracker,
A Magical New Play
3&7:30PM E


Florida Grand Opera:
La boheme
2 PM []
The Nutcracker,
A Magical New Play
4PM []


Stomp
2&7:30PM []
The Nutcracker,
A Magical New Play
4PM FI
The Legend of
Zelda: Symphony of
the Goddesses
8PM I3

The Nutcracker,
A Magical New Play
4PM []
Free Gospel Sunday
A Christmas
Celebration
4PM 1B


George Balanchine's
The Nutcracker"
1 &6:30 PM []
The Nutcracker, 51
A Magical New Play 4 PM
The Nutcracker,
A Magical New Play
4PM [
Salute to Vienna
7PM E


Stomp
8:00 PM H
Stomp is back with
new surprises! See
what all the noise is
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Miami City Ballet
presents
George Balanchine's
The Nutcracker"
1 PM I]
Come and enjoy the
Holiday Classic!


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305.949.6722 arshtcenter.org


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Stomp 8 PM El
"If you haven't seen
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seen it, take someone
and share the
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Boston Globe
The Nutcracker,
A Magical New Play
7:30 PM H]
"A riveting reinvention!
More nightmare than
dream, this production
is no simple sugar
plum!"
The Chicago Sun-Times


The Nutcracker,
A Magical New Play
7:30 PM K]
"The stakes are
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Time Out Chicago


The Nutcracker,
A Magical New Play
7:30 PM []
"The modern spin on
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Chicago Now


The Nutcracker,
A Magical New Play
7:30 PM []
Stomp
8PM M
'Stomp has a beat that
just won't quit!"
San Francisco Chronicle


The Nutcracker,
A Magical New Play
7:30 PM H]
'A charmingly
complex alternative
to the sugary
sweetness most
theatre is steeped in
this time of year!"
Chicago TheaterAddict

The Nutcracker,
A Magical New Play
7:30 PM K]
Miami City Ballet
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George Balanchine's
The Nutcracker'"
7:30 PM []


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It is a delightful,
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Super Sax
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Maceo Parker and
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Miami City Ballet
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2&7:30PM []
The Nutcracker,
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7:30 PM H]
'The storytelling is
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The Nutcracker,
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Free Adrienne
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12PM [
Stomp
2&8PM ]
The Nutcracker,
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7:30 PM [

Free Adrienne
Arsht Center Tour
12 PM ]
The Nutcracker,
A Magical New Play
7:30 PM [
The Borscht Film
Festival: Borscht 8
8PM ]

Free Adrienne
Arsht Center Tour
S12PM [
George Balanchine's
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The Nutcracker,
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7:30 PM ]

Free Adrienne
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The Nutcracker,
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7:30 PM ]
"An imaginative and
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Chicago Now



BISCAYNET&


Convenient parking is plentiful!
Info: arshtcenter.org/parking


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com December 2012


N1


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012


[ER















































































































Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012


















Foreign
Film Series:
Poetry

) Dec 11



Cirque
d'Amour


I Jan 20

Family Fun
Series:
Pinkalicious


) Jan 13


Forbidden
Broadway


) Jan 4-5


Sister
Robert
Anne's
Cabaret
Class
I Feb 7-10

Opera Atelier
presents
Great Opera
Moments

) Jan 27


Lindsey Alley
A night
of laughter
and song

I Jan 18-19



Hal
Linden


) Feb 28


Neil Simon's
Biloxi Blues


) Mar 29


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com December 2012


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012


















































Quick Delivery I Factory Direct Pricing I Limitless Possibilities


MIAMI DESIGN DISTRICT- EXPANDED
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Miami Design District, F. 33137
Phone 305.572.1222


FORT LAUDERDALE
4000 N. Federal Highway
Fort Lauderdale, Fl. 33308
Phone 954.530.5650


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012







CONTENTS

COVER STORY
34 Drawing on the Future: Miami's Art Scene
COMMENTARY
12 Feedback: Letters
18 Gaspar's "Cult Following"
22 Jack King: Comedy, Drama, and Chaos
26 Christian Cipriani: The Art of Deco, a Novel
OUR SPONSORS
30 BizBuzz: December 2012
COMMUNITY NEWS
52 ATale of Two Banks
52 Tase the Season: A Cautionary Yarn
53 Historic Monument or Monumentally Ugly
NEIGHBORHOOD CORRESPONDENTS
62 Jay Examines a Very Disturbing Lawsuit
64 Wendy Bids Farewell to a Loving Friend
66 Craig Says Small Things Make a Big City
68 Mark on the Museum of Contemporary Art
70 Frank Bemoans Flori-duh Once Again
ART & CULTURE
72 Melissa Wallen Goes Off the Basel Path
74 Melissa's Galleries + Museums: Basel Edition
82 Events Calendar
POLICE REPORTS
84 Derek McCann's Biscayne Crime Beat
PARK PATROL
86 Jim W. Harper: Getting Green in Sunny Isles
COLUMNISTS
83 Picture Story: Miami Before Tuttle and Flagler
88 Pawsitively Pets: Weekend Getaways with Fido
90 Going Green: Saving Nemo and the Reefs
91 Kids and the City: Home for the Holidays
92 Your Garden: The Root of the Problem
93 Vino: Bubbly That Won't Bust Your Budget
94 Dish: So Long, Red Light, Hello Everyone Else!
DINING GUIDE
95 Restaurant Listings: 308 Biscayne Corridor Restaurants


BISCAYNE*


PO Box 370566, Miami, FL 33137 www.biscaynetimes.com
Serving communities along the Biscayne Corridor: Arch Creek East, Aventura, Bay Point, Bayside, Biscayne
Park, Belle Meade, Buena Vista, Coventry, Design District, Downtown, Eastern Shores, Edgewater, El Portal,
Enchanted Lake, Hibiscus Island, Highland Lakes, Keystone Point, Miami Shores, Morningside, North
Greynolds, North Bay Island, North Miami, North Miami Beach, Oak Forest, Oakland Grove, Palm Grove,
Palm Island, Sans Souci, Shorecrest, Sky Lake, Sparling Lake, Star Island, Wynwood, and Venetian Islands


PUBLISHER & EDITOR
Jim Mullin
jim.mullin@biscaynetimes.com
CONTRIBUTORS
Erik Bojnansky Senior Writer
erik.bojnansky@biscaynetimes.com
Anne Tschida, Arts Editor
anne.tschida@biscaynetimes.com
Jay Beskin, Pamela Robin Brandt,
Crystal Brewe, Terence Cantarella,
Craig Chester, Christian Cipriani,
Bill Citara, Karen-Janine Cohen,
Wendy Doscher-Smith, Gaspar Gonzalez,
Margaret Griffis, Jim W. Harper,
Lisa Hartman, Jen Karetnick,
Derek McCann, Frank Rollason,
Silvia Ros, Mark Sell, Jeff Shimonski,
Melissa Wallen


BUSINESS MANAGER
Sal Monterosso
sal.monterosso@biscaynetimes.com
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Commentary: LETTERS


As Long as Politicians Can Keep
Pulling in Cash from Casino
Interests, Don't Expect Any
Votes Anytime Soon
In his story about the future of gambling
in Miami and elsewhere in Florida ("You
Can Bet on It," November 2012), Erik
Bojnansky notes that the Genting Group
is making plans to do an end run around
our state legislators and go straight to the
people with a referendum on legalizing
casino-style games of chance.
A big reason Genting is probably
going to do that was illustrated in the
two informational boxes accompanying
the story. They showed the millions of
dollars the company has been funneling
to political groups and individual politi-
cians. The numbers are staggering.
As long as Genting's top brass are will-
ing to throw that kind of money at politi-
cians all over the state, why should the pols
ever resolve the gambling question? If they
can string along Genting for another few
years without actually doing jt\ ilinii' it's
just that much more cash in their pockets.
It looks like Genting, in poker terms
I'm sure they understand well, is prepar-
ing to call the politicians" bluff. I like
that, because I dislike our politicians
even more than I dislike gambling.
Jonathan Harbrough
Miami

Editor's note: For more on the Genting
Group and its proposed Resorts World
Miami, see "Historic Monument or
Monumentally Ugly," page 53.

If the Future of Voting Is Snail
Mail, Won't We Need a Postal
Service That Actually Works?
Obviously Jack King wrote his column
"Voter Fraud That Works" (November
2012) before election day, but it was a
portent of the voting debacle that un-
folded: Excessively long wait times in line
caused by an enormously long ballot with
multiple amendments, initiatives, straw
ballots, and printing in three languages.
This was on top of the normal glitches in
ballot printing, machinery, and human
failures that always haunt Florida voting.
I am a core member of the MoveOn.
org Miami Council. I would like to
know if Biscayne Times and its readers
would participate in initiating a proposed
Florida constitutional amendment to
switch all state voting to 100 percent by
mail, which, as reported in Jack King's
piece, has been successfully working in
Oregon and Washington State for years.


Just think of the improvement in effi-
ciency, the money savings, and the elimi-
nation of travel to and wait time at polling
places. In addition, I am sure that the per-
centage response of registered voters would
be increased substantially. With the money
saved, the counties could even offer a small
cash rebate to all who returned their ballot,
just like the Nielsen television balloting.
The goal should be 100 percent
participation, not the 25 percent we see
in most elections.
Printing all ballots in three languages
is also in need of adjustment. All ballots
should of course be printed in English, with
an additional printing in one other language,
as a selected option recorded on your voter
registration card. There is absolutely no
reason to print all ballots in three languages.
We at MoveOn would probably
initiate it with a petition at Signon.org,
funneled through the MoveOn state
network, followed by letters to the editor
at various state newspapers.
We would love for Biscayne Times to be
involved at the start. What do you think?
Alfred Sasiadek
MoveOn.org Miami Council

Political Hit Squads of Miami
Shores: They Never Saw an
Obama Sign They Wouldn't Steal
If Jack King thinks the only problems with
last month's election occurred at polling
places and with absentee ballots, he doesn't
know Miami Shores very well. Now that the
election is over, for better or worse, it's time
for someone to take a look at the undercur-
rent of political warfare in the Shores.
The most recent "terrorist" attacks
on Democrats was just business as usual
in "Pleasantville."
Twenty-four hours after the first
Obama-Biden yard signs went up in the
vicinity of 96th Street and NE 6th Avenue,
all were stolen. This is the same location
where, in our local election two years ago,
a candidate's sign was defaced with the
word "FAGGOT" scrawled across it.
The Shores police department, when
contacted immediately after the incident, as-
sured the homeowner: "We'll write a report."
To add insult to injury, our code en-
forcement "professionals" followed up after
the stolen signs on 96th Street were re-
placed by confiscating all but one of the
replacement signs. These were confiscated,
not merely requested to be removed, and to
date no one knows their whereabouts.
Code enforcement removed more
than a dozen Obama-Biden signs in
Continued on page 14


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012










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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Commentary: LETTERS


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Letters
Continued from page 12
Miami Shores, supposedly because they
were "in violation of the code."
More than 24 Obama-Biden signs
were stolen from the yards of Miami
Shores residents. This was not coinci-
dental mischief. All Obama yard signs
on 96th Street and all signs on NE 6th
Avenue, plus signs on NE 2nd Avenue,
NE 101st Street, and NE 5th Avenue were
removed in a sweep on October 13, the
morning of the Miami Shores street fair.
This, the third wave of yard-sign
theft, kept the buzz going at the street fair.
Rumors abounded that a resident or resi-
dents were paying a bounty for Obama
signs. We have no idea as yet if that was a
fact, but the political "hit squad" exists.
We in the "peaceful" village of Miami
Shores seem to have a piece of our demo-
cratic fabric shot full of holes each election
season. In the world of trend-watching, this
trend is decidedly not our friend.
I know of no one in the Shore's "Pine-
apple Republic" ruling elite who will stand
up on this issue. Perhaps it's time to assidu-
ously ask that question of our leaders.
Bob Domlesky
Miami Shores

From One Wino to Another:
We'll Drink to That!
I just wanted to write a quick note and let
you know how much I enjoy and appreci-
ate your regularly published wine columns
by Bill Citara ("Vino: Red, white, and you
- agreeable wine for $12 or less").
As someone in the industry working
as a wine steward, wine reviewer, and
blogger I look forward to every issue.
I am always excited to see what
new topic or wine Bill is helping me to
discover, agree with, or even at times
disagree on. Please keep them coming.
Salud!
Ernest M Gonzalez
Whine and ( I.... for Wine
www. WhineAnd( ....I. i ii'ine.com

Cop, Biker, Hippie, Womanizer,
Intelligent Businessman? That
Could Only Be Neil
When I read Erik Bojnansky's story
about Tobacco Road's 100th anniversary
("Soul Survivor," November 2012), I was
reminded of the old saying: "History is
written by the winners." In this case, by
the last man standing.
I think my old friend Neil Katzman
was given short shrift. Neil was a cop,


biker, hippie, womanizer (but weren't we
all...), and a very intelligent businessman.
When he bought Tobacco Road in
1977, it was just barely surviving. He saw
the potential of the Brickell area not unlike
those who saw the potential of South Beach
Neil worked hard to keep the bar going, and
by the time he sold it after the police raid in
1981, it was a successful enterprise.
Neil lived life to its fullest. His house
was a hangout for a variety of characters,
both men and women. There seemed to
always be a party there, and his gyneco-
logical examining chair was a big hit.
So wherever Neil is, whether living
on a boat in the Grove, in Mexico, or
Tahiti, I'm sure it's party time.
Alfred McKnight
El Portal

Hey, Commish, Fix This Before
Trying That
In response to Jay Beskin's Neighbor-
hood Correspondents column "Other
Side of the Tracks" (November 2012), I
ask the former Aventura commissioner
this: Instead of thinking about Aven-
tura's future expansion into western ter-
ritories, why not think about fixing the
traffic problem at Biscayne Boulevard
and Miami Gardens? Fixing it now. It
gets worse by the minute!
Or instead of fixing the traffic
problem at said intersection, maybe we
should take advantage of it and have
police officers write traffic tickets on the
railroad crossings.
C'mon. commish. Fix one before you
start another!
Jorge Fregonese
Formerly Aventura, now North
Miami Beach

More Memories, More Tales,
More Brewe
Crystal Brewe's articles make you
not only think about the way you are
parenting, she always tends to brings in
wonderful, nostalgic memories in her
column, ones that jolt my own ("Kids
and the City").
Her writing speaks to you, asks
you to learn and feel good about your
parenting skills, regardless of the subject
matter. They are as well very interesting
and great summations.
She needs to write more articles and
perhaps have a second column in Biscayne
Times. Her skills and voice are an asset to
the BT without a shadow of a doubt.
Debra Savittieri
Scottsdale, Arizona


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


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Commentary: CULT FOLLOWING


Fish Flop

The Miami Marlins trade away a truckload of players and everyone
is shocked. Really?


By Gaspar GonzAlez
BT Contributor

S ho knew there would be a
Miami Marlins column in
S December? After a season in
which the hometown team lost a disap-
pointing 93 games, finishing last in its divi-
sion, the general consensus was, the less
said about the Fish, the better. Best to look
to the future. Well, the future has arrived
early, and it isn't what most fans expected.
In mid-December, Marlins owner
Jeffrey Loria signed off on a deal to
trade five of his highest-paid players to
the Toronto Blue Jays: pitchers Mark
Buehrle and Josh Johnson, outfielder
Emilio Bonifacio, catcher John Buck,
and shortstop Jos6 Reyes. This deal
followed two mid-season trades in
which the Fish sent pitcher Anibal San-
chez and second baseman Omar Infante
to the Detroit Tigers and shortstop-
turned-third baseman Hanley Ramirez to
the Los Angeles Dodgers and an Oc-
tober trade that delivered reliever Heath
Bell to the Arizona Diamondbacks.
In return for all this, the Marlins got
an assortment of young prospects. But
they mostly got to dump salary. A lot of
it. The team's payroll in 2012 was around
$118 million; as of this writing, they're
committed to spending only $16 million
in 2013, pending additional player sign-
ings. (Observers expect the final figure
to be in the $40-$50 million range.) As a
result, Marlins fans are probably looking
at several more losing seasons.


The hand-wringing and moans were
instantaneous. At the center of it all, of
course, was the roughly $485 million
local taxpayers contributed to the Marlins
Park project. "Loria has a moral obliga-
tion to the county, city, and taxpayers who
substantially built the stadium for him
[to field a competitive team]," cried Greg
Cote in the Herald. Not to be outdone, his
colleague Dan Le Batard went homo-
phonic: "It feels today like our poor city
helped build a bejeweled cathedral for
false prophets in search of false profits."
It's enough to give one a case of the
vapors. It's also a crock, this idea that we've
somehow been betrayed by Loria and the
Marlins. Loria is a businessman. His goal,
as a team owner, is to make money. There
are essentially two ways to do that: 1) Spend
a lot on high-priced talent, quickly mold a
contender, and reap the profits that come
with increased attendance, TV revenue, and
merchandising, or 2) Spend modestly on
unproven players, commit/resign yourself to
a long potentially endless rebuilding
process, and bank all the money you can
from stadium income and Major League
Baseball's revenue-sharing plan.
Loria claimed that, once he had his
new ballpark, he would pursue the first
strategy and, for one season, he did;
he's now opting to do the latter. Is that
immoral? No more than capitalism is.
Businesses change their approach all the
time, based on what they perceive to be
in their long-term interests.
No, the problem isn't with Loria.
It's with the staggeringly bad deal we,


collectively, made. We built Loria a ball-
park, increasing the value of his private
business to approximately $450 million
(according to Forbes). We did so on the
premise shown by sports economists
to be largely unsupported that a base-
ball stadium produces tangible benefits
for its host neighborhood.
In exchange, we had Loria double-
dog swear he would field a competitive
team. Not that we could do anything
about it if he didn't, except stay away
from games and deny him a few bucks
in ticket sales a pittance compared to
what we'd already bestowed upon him.
None of that makes Loria a "false
prophet." If you think about it, he and Marlins
president David Samson have been startlingly
honest Remember last spring, when Samson
reportedly told a gathering of business types
that Miami residents were "not that smart"?
He later said he had been misquoted, but I
prefer to think that was just damage control.
Because he was right: We're not that smart.
People who are don't write blank checks to
millionaires expecting much in return


As for this recent rash of deals, Loria
says he's basically just blowing up a
team that wasn't very good. And you
know what? Despite the initial optimism
that surrounded this squad, he's not
lying about that, either.
Coming into 2012, Ramirez already
had a reputation for playing hard only
when it suited him; after the Reyes sign-
ing moved him from shortstop to third
base, he seemed to quit trying altogether.
Buck was one of the worst hitters in
baseball -but not as inept as Bell was at
saving games. And the pitching staff, for all
the buzz surrounding it, didn't have a single
starter who could be considered a legitimate
ace. (Johnson? Perhaps if baseball games
lasted five innings instead of nine.) And
then there was manager Ozzie Guillen...
Loria inaugurated his new ballpark
with an ill-assembled, overhyped team, and
he's admitted it. He's being straight with
us. Going forward, the least we can do is be
straight with ourselves. About everything.

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Commentary: MIAMI'S KING


Comedy, Drama, and


Chaos
Just another election cycle spinning itself dizzy


By Jack King
BT Contributor

The 2012 election cycle is over, at
least in most places. It took nutcase
Allen West two weeks to concede, but
finally he did. President Obama is still in
office, and it wasn't even close.
Right up to election day it seemed
close, thanks to wild variations in
national polls that kept people guessing.
Pollsters like Gallup and Rasmussen
played weird games with the numbers.
Gallup just seemed to be lost and tried
to make it look like both sides were
winning. Rasmussen was more direct:
Romney was going to win. Rasmussen is
looking more like a wing of the Repub-
lican Party than a legitimate polling
operation.
But the most inspired predictions
came from political hacks Dick Morris
and Karl Rove. Morris, who is obviously
better at procuring hookers than calling
elections, said that Romney would win
in a landslide. When that didn't happen,
he tried to cover his rear by proclaim-
ing he was just saying that to make the
Romney camp feel good in the last days
of the campaign, because it didn't look
good for them.
The best was saved for election night
when Fox News called Ohio for Obama.
Rove went crashing across the set to
their election central, throwing a temper


tantrum like someone had stolen his
favorite teddy bear. I'm still laughing.
One thing Romney did win: Presi-
dency of the old Confederacy. He carried
every state but Florida and Virginia.
Closer to home and in spite of a large
number of election glitches, 70 percent
of Floridians voted. Much of that very
respectable turnout can be attributed to
early and absentee voting, even though
state Republicans shortened the early
voting time and severely restricted the
number of polling places. Back when we
had a single day of voting on a Tuesday
and limited polling places, we barely got
to 50 percent. People had to take time
off from work and stand in long lines,
sometimes in the heat and rain. The new
voting procedures show that people do
want to vote and that we should make it
as easy as possible.
As I've said before, I think the
answer to this problem is voting by mail,
but if nothing else, we should increase
the early voting time to include at least
two weekends. That, along with easier
registration procedures, could get us to
90 percent of the electorate voting, and
that would be more in the American way.
Florida voters shot down eight of
the eleven state constitutional amend-
ments. That was fine, but I wish they
all had gone down. None of them was
worthwhile. I hope Gov. Rick Scott and
the Republican legislature ponder the


r. BARA: 0IWNr


fact that a ton of their crap on the ballot
went down in flames. I hope the elector-
ate remembers this stuff in the 2014
election cycle.
Thankfully we had at least one situ-
ation where money did not buy the elec-
tion. That was with the retention of three
Florida Supreme Court justices. The
Koch brothers, who want to buy every-
thing in sight, tried their best to get rid
of the justices, but even spending more
than a million dollars, they just couldn't
do it. That's great for Florida and bad for
billionaires. Keep it up, Florida!
One last thing on the political
front: U.S. Rep. David Rivera was
soundly defeated by Joe Garcia. Let's
hope this is the last time we mention
Rivera in the same breath that we dis-
cuss elected officials.
Rivera was a crony of Marco Rubio
in the Florida legislature, when they
ran roughshod over both the people of
Florida and the ethics of political office.
I'm glad Rivera is gone. He's been an
embarrassment to South Florida for
years and he deserves to be gone. Now
what do we do about Rubio?
On a slightly different note, our
$600 million (eventually $2.4 billion)


investment in the Miami Marlins seems
to be going south even more rapidly
than we expected. Last season they had
a huge payroll with name players, yet
ended in last place with a miserable
69 wins and 93 losses. So how do the
Marlins respond? They trade all the big-
name players and save more than $160
million in salary commitments.
A weird coalition of local politicians,
including Miami Mayor Manny Diaz and
county Mayor Carlos Alvarez, plus most
of the Miami Herald staff, convinced
everyone this stadium was good deal. It
was not and never will be, and we'll be
suffering the financial consequences for
decades to come.
I think the only way we citizens
can stop such insanity is to change the
county and city charters so a voter refer-
endum is required for any bond measure
worth, say, $50 million or more.
Speaking of Manny Diaz, I'm dying
to read his new book about his time as
mayor: Miami Transformed: Rebuilding
America One Neighborhood, One City
at a Time. Transformed is the word. The
city has gone from pathetic to pauper.

Feedback: letters@tbiscaynetimes.com


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Commentary: URBANIA


The Art of Deco

A new novel turns Miami on its head and no, it's not by Tom Wolfe


By Christian Cipriani
BT Contributor
Love Miami. Hate Miami. Love to
hate Miami. I wrestle with myself
over this city on an almost daily
basis. It keeps me in shape. But the fact
is that I'm endlessly captivated by our
town, its history, and its bizarre inhabit-
ants. So is the author J.J. Colagrande.
Colagrande moved here from New
York when he was 18, but he's become
a Miamian in the truest sense of the
word a man whose heart and soul
seem staked here. As he puts it: "I love
Miami very much and I'm committed to
bringing a deeper, richer, more intellec-
tual evolution to our city. I don't like our
city's image, still leftover from the '80s
- a place of vice and shallow debauch-
ery. I'd like to stay here the rest of my
life and contribute with my voice."
He's a writing professor at both Miami-
Dade College (Wolfson campus) and Barry
University; he's written countless articles for
the Huffington Post and New Times, among
others; and in his independently published
sophomore novel, Deco, Colagrande stirs
together everything to love and loathe about
South Florida in an abuela's cauldron, then
kicks it over on its ear.
No sacred cow goes unslaughtered in
this swirling, fast-paced satire on modern
Miami. Deco follows its eponymous main
character, an overeducated yet shallow
and self-absorbed wannabe writer who
talks a lot about hard work without ever


doing any. He's credit card rich. He dates
a supermodel named Chichi ("shee-shee"),
whose exotic heritage includes Australian
Shepherd (yeah, the dog). He lives a two-
dimensional life without substance, where
appearances are everything.
Dec6's perfectly fake world crum-
bles when the adjustable-rate mortgage
on his unit at The Stupendously Luxuri-
ous jumps from 3.2 percent to 17.9. He
goes broke and loses his electro-hybrid-
turbo convertible. His part-dog super-
model girlfriend exits the picture. The
velvet ropes close on him, and he's rel-
egated to a humiliating new existence in
Wynwood, where extremely judgmental
hipsters twirl their mustaches, pretend
to be open-minded, worship their own
creativity, and form ultra-secret societies
that schmooze for corporate grants.
Anything to avoid real work.
When he falls to the pavement
during a Critical Mass bike ride, Dec6
blacks out "about three minutes into the
fifty-two minutes of being absolutely
plummeted by every conscientious bike
rider in the city."
He finally comes to on the other side
of the tracks, in Allapattah, where Dec6
begins stumbling naively through a rol-
licking kaleidoscope of Miami neighbor-
hoods, cultures, and characters on an
unlikely journey of self-discovery.
Colagrande says he was inspired after
teaching Voltaire's classic 18th-century
satire Candide several times to his stu-
dents. Like Candide, Dec6 is 30 spritely,


episodic chapters, 30,000 words, and takes
aim at the modern Zeitgeist with scathing
enthusiasm. The more you know about and
appreciate Miami, the funnier and more
rewarding it is to read. A revolving cast of
archetypes instantly recognizable to any
Miamian come in and out of the story. No
character is especially deep.
And that's sort of the point. Dec6
isn't concerned with the interior life of
its inhabitants. It's a book about their
society written in prose that relishes the
ridiculous and bounces along with plenty
of wordplay and inexplicable events that
invite you to keep reading: Dec6 thinks
he impregnates the Queen of Allapattah
by leaning on her shoulder, so he goes
to work earning money for their baby by
helping her cousin Lazaro move Coke -
Coca-Cola, as he believes.
He ends up at Ultra Festival but
doesn't know who Molly is and why ev-
eryone wants to party with her. He finds
an old friend demoralized; she's reduced
to prying money from slick Brickell bank-
ers in unspeakable ways. Once in a while
she woofs. For much of the book, lessons
are utterly lost on our confused hero.
At Dec6's heart is an earnest explo-
ration of the tension between American


exceptionalism and American entitle-
ment. As Colagrande sees it, what most
Miamians (and Americans) no longer
wish to believe is that to truly succeed,
you have to be both exceptional and re-
lentless. We think that if we just get our
foot in the door, it will naturally open to
a room full of rewards and riches.
"Americans today feel we deserve
a good-paying job, an inside advantage,
and we want to take the easy way out,"
he says. "Our pop culture, sports, and
fashion are superior; our defense spend-
ing is massive. This gives us a superior-
ity complex. The characters in the book
evolve from a celebrity-obsessed, drug-
dealing lifestyle into a more traditional
view of working hard for success."
And that's what eventually happens
to our dear Dec6, but the real reward is
the journey.
If you're ready to take it, or if you
just want a great holiday gift for the
Miami-lover in your life, grab a copy
for $12.95 at DecoTheNovel.com. There
you can also read the first seven chapters
online. Paperback and Kindle versions
are available at Amazon.com.

Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012






















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December 2012


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Our Sponsors: DECEMBER 2012


BizBuzz

Sales, special events, and more f
Biscayne Times possible

By Pamela Robin Brandt
BT Contributor

It's here. The time to deck the halls
with, well, whatever is appropriate
for the holidays you celebrate this
time of year. But whether you favor
Christmas or Hanukkah or Kwanza or
the Winter Solstice or New Year's Eve,
there's plenty of preparing to do: gifts to
buy, reservations to make, getting your
home and yourself ready for all Decem-
ber's parties and other festivities.
No worries. Our sponsors have
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The folks at CleanStart Total
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range of services and products.
If looking good is what gets you
feeling good, visit returning advertiser
Anastasia Molchanov Salon (7242
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Little can make you feel worse about
how you look than acne. But new adver-
tiser Horwitz Dermatology (2999 NE
191st St., PH1), a medical and cosmetic
research firm, offers help in this issue's
ad. People ages 18-40 with moderate to
severe facial acne may qualify for clini-
cal studies of investigational medications
and be compensated for their time and
transportation. Call 305-933-1151 for
more info.
Several new advertisers this
month are Realtors, suggesting that
many people feel the best way to get a
fresh start in the new year is in a new
home. Welcome to new advertisers
Judy "Luck" Jordan and Lisa Mula
of Prudential Florida Realty (19056 NE
29th Ave., 305-934-6373), multimillion-
dollar agents who sell properties all
over South Florida and whose very
name (Judy's, that is) says she can find
your new dream abode, whether you're
looking to buy or rent.
Broker Robbie Bell (901 S. Miami
Ave. #215, 305-528-8557), a new adver-
tiser, is an "urban lifestyle specialist"-
meaning she has a passion for finding
homes for folks who want to live, work,
and play in the same neighborhood. That
has actually become possible in the past
few years in Miami, with downtown/
Brickell becoming a 24/7 urban center. So
contact her: Robbie@gotorobbiebell.info.


At new advertiser Sydney Server
Real Estate (also at 901 S. Miami Ave.
#215, 305-562-7363) an international
team meaning they're fluent not just
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Chinese sells hip luxe real estate
using the latest technology and social-
media marketing. Call/text 305-562-7363
and visit SidneyServerRealEstate.com
for the latest news.
There's big real estate news at
Midtown Miami: Less than two months
after launching sales of 304 condo
units in the high-rise, mixed use tower
4 Midtown, 113 residences have been
sold $40 million worth of condos!
Though with amenities like a gym, hot
tub, sauna, steam room, concierge,
valet, garage parking, 24-hour security,
and ground-level retail (including cool
restaurants that deliver hot food), it's not
surprising that units are being snapped


up so speedily. See this issue's ad on
page 3 for more details about condo life
in Midtown's residential towers, and
about remaining units, from owner Gold
Krown Financial.
For elderly people in need of as-
sistance with their living activities, one
of the greatest gifts is simply to be able
to remain in their own homes rather than
to be placed in a nursing facility. Contact
new advertiser Visiting Angels (11601
Biscayne Blvd. #302, 305-505-2294).
This bonded, licensed, and insured
firm offers all manner of temporary or
long-term non-medical home care for
senior citizens: meal prep, housekeep-
ing, errands, hygiene/dressing assistance,
companionship, and more.
To spruce up your present home,
drop by Modern Home 2 Go (270-286
NE 39th St., 305-572-1222), where a

Continued on page 32


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December 2012








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Our Sponsors: DECEMBER 2012


BizBuzz
Continued from page 30

super close-out sale is running through-
out December owing to the showroom's
expansion. Items on sale include Italian
leather sectionals, side tables, and lounge
chairs, plus high quality, all-weather
outdoor dining and lounging sets made
from eco-friendly materials.
You'll also find distinctive design
solutions at new advertiser Arravanti
Contemporary Interiors (5046 Bis-
cayne Blvd., 305-576-0620), where the
specialty is fine contemporary Italian/
European furniture. In addition to retail
sales of furniture and accessories, Ar-
ravanti provides custom design services
from fabric selection to building wall
units to fit customers' specific needs.
Gifting your children with high-end
fashions is a cinch thanks to new ad-
vertiser Inna Gaber Kondrashova's two
stores named for her own boy and girl:
Gabriel & Ko: A Classy Kids Boutique
(located in the Village at Gulfstream
Park, 601 Silks Run #1420, Hallandale
Beach, 954-404-6342) and newer Sophie
Rose Children's Boutique (35 NE 207th
St. #B-8, 305-466-2800). This month
take advantage of three deals: an end-
of-season sale of 30-70% off selected
merchandise; a 20% discount on non-
sale merchandise with the coupon in this
issue's ad; and something for you, too:
Buy a $100 holiday gift card and get a
$20 card for yourself.
Sportsters on your holiday list are
in luck at new advertiser and vener-
able business Biscayne Tennis (12733
Biscayne Blvd., 305-891-1728, and new
location at 19021 Biscayne Blvd., 305-
932-0200), which is offering 20% off on
all apparel. With this issue's ad coupon,
you'll also get a free can of tennis balls,
even without a purchase.
For the runners on your list, visit
new advertiser 11 Runners (1055 SE
1st Ave., 305-358-0400). Actually, the
heck with the runners. Go take a gander
at this issue's ad. This store's gorgeous
athletic shoes would give the gimmes to
even certified sloths.
Need a brief respite from all your
shopping-type running around? Take
a break with a Philly cheesesteak at
new advertiser Woody's Famous Steak
Sandwich (13105 Biscayne Blvd., 305-
891-1451), which has been serving classic
road food since 1953. The danger here
is that, as well as new menu items, new
owner Mike Marano has added a patio


lounge with comfie couches and
serves nine kinds of draft beer. So you
may never resume shopping.
Just down the Boulevard at Bagels
and Company (11064 Biscayne Blvd.,
305-892-2435), owner David Cohen is
repeating his tempting offer from No-
vember: a complete turkey feast for ten
at $175. Order early to guarantee you're
included.
If your friends seem to have ev-
erything, and/or you just don't have a
clue about what they'd like, there's one
thing we can guarantee will be unique:
a custom photo-to-canvas print from
Canvas Lifestyle (1932 NW Miami Ct.,
305-395-7450). Stop by the shop with
a favorite photograph, or go to www.
canvaslifestyle.com, and a wall-worthy
piece of art will be on its way, fast.
There's a gift for BT readers, too: Use
promotional code BISCAYNE30 for a
hefty 30% discount.
Buying the perfect gifts, sadly, isn't
the end of it. You also have to get them
to your out-of-town friends and family -
preferably not broken in a zillion pieces.
Hey, don't bother Santa; he's a busy guy.
Instead go see Barbara and Nancy at
Private Postal Systems (12555 Biscayne
Blvd., 305-895-6974), which has been
in business for an impressive 33 years.
(Those ladies do not look or act their age,
which we love!) Among their full range
of mail services, the grrrls specialize in
complete packing and shipping ser-
vices via UPS, FedEx, DHL, or the post
office. Just tell 'em where you want your
wrapped gifts to go and they'll see that
the treasures get there in perfect shape.
If you're planning on entertaining
at home for the holidays, you'll want to
check out two exciting new farmers mar-
kets just opened by returning advertiser
The Market Company (305-531-0038).
Owner Claire Tomlin, the force behind
many of Miami's pioneer green markets,
says that the North Bay Village venture,
every Friday from 2:00-7:00 p.m. (in
the waterfront parking lot of the Crab
House, 1551 79th St. Cswy.) features
more than 20 vendors, selling not just
fresh produce and herbs, but locally
made breads, pastas, cheeses, snack
foods, and more. Claire's latest Saturday
market, from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at
Brickell's brand-new Flatiron Park (1100
SE 1st Ave.), carries the same variety of
products to craft your holiday feasts.
As for sweets: With chef Jenny
Rissone's background as the Eden
Roc's executive pastry chef, you'd


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012









expect her desserts at Pastry Is Art
(12591 Biscayne Blvd., 305-640-5045)
to impress even the most sophisticated
guests. You'd be right. New feature at
the bakery: all manner of sugar-free or
gluten-free cakes and cookies. Custom
cakes, too, with any theme you choose,
whatever the holiday or event.
To keep the family dogs off the
dining table, visit Salon Pooch-ini
(1019 Kane Concourse, 305-864-1944).
As well as providing grooming services,
the salon wants Santa's helpers to know
that it is also a boutique, providing or-
ganic treats, plus toys and other stock-
ing stuffers.
Those who'd rather eat out during
the holidays are often out of luck, since
chefs and other restaurant personnel
want to celebrate at home. But Kitchen
305, in the Newport Beachside Hotel
& Resort (16701 Collins Ave., 305-
749-2110), is offering a Christmas Eve
midday prix fixe menu for $36 and a
Christmas Day buffet for $35. Both
run from 1:00-6:00 p.m. There's also a
very reasonably priced $65 four-course
dinner on New Year's Eve. Oh, and don't
miss the Kitchen's Wednesday lobster
madness special: $35 for all you can eat,
plus soup or salad and two sides, plus
(ready?) ladies drink free from 9:00-
11:00 p.m. Steady on your feet, girls.
Speaking of being steady on your
feet, by the way, have you ever wanted to
be the belle/beau of the ball and totally
blow people away with your danc-
ing, like Fred Astaire always did in the
movies? Naturally, who you should call
is new advertiser Fred Astaire Dance
Studio (18835 Biscayne Blvd., 305-692-
5800), which teaches almost two dozen
different kinds of social dances, ball-
room or Latin. They do wedding dance
consultations, too, from helping you
select the first dance song to choreo-
graphing it, so you start your new life in
style. Also offered, for those more into
fitness than flash: Zumba.
Rather watch pros do the danc-
ing? At the Aventura Arts & Cultural
Center (3385 NE 188th St., 877-311-
7469), Arts Ballet Theatre of Florida
presents The Nutcracker December
14-16. Also on December's performance
schedule: American Idol finalist Kimber-
ley Locke singing great American diva
hits to inaugurate a new Cabaret by the
Bay series, December 7-8; Cuban piano
virtuoso Jorge Luis Prats on December
9; and continuing the Aventura Foreign
Film Series, Poetry (a 2010 Cannes Film


Festival winner) on December 11.
Our blessed cool weather may not
have you thinking about your air condi-
tioning, but One Hour Air Condition-
ing and Heating says: Think again. It's
actually an ideal time to care for that
unit, when it's not constantly working.
Which is why One Hour is offering BT
readers a special $39 Go-Green AC Tune
Up (value: $115) that includes a 25-point
safety and inspection check. Call them at
305-865-1220.
There's some especially fun family
entertainment this month, too, includ-
ing the fourth annual Reindeer Races,
presented by the Shops at Midtown
(3401 N. Miami Ave., 305-573-3371), on
December 15 at 11:00 a.m., at the shops'
central fountain. Participants actually
race "rubber duck reindeer" (which
appear to be either rubber ducks with
antlers or rubber reindeer with duck
bills) through the massive waterworks.
You can also meet Santa and get a free
family photo, plus enjoy bounce houses,
face painting, and more.
Don't forget the spiritual side of the
season that, despite the presents and par-
tying, is at the heart of all December's
holidays. New advertiser First Church
of Christ, Scientist (1836 Biscayne
Blvd., 305-373-1645) will be bringing
it into focus for you with Cuban-born
Miamian Lorenzo Rodriguez's free
lecture "Finding the True Brotherhood of
Man," at 2:30 p.m. on December 9. Note:
The event is not at the Biscayne Boule-
vard church but at the Doubletree Grand
Hotel (1717 N. Bayshore Dr.). Free valet
parking is provided and all are welcome.
At First United Methodist Church
of Miami (400 Biscayne Blvd., 305-371-
4706), December 9's 11:00 a.m. service
will feature a particularly inspirational
speaker, Patrick Knight, who was shot
in what 2009 newspapers called the
"Thanksgiving Day Massacre." After
three months in a coma, he went on to a
full work and family life, recounted in
his new book Blessed to Survive. The
church will also be offering a Christmas
Eve candlelight service on December 24
at 6:00 p.m.
We at the BTjoin all the above
advertisers in wishing you a Happy New
Year's Eve and a Merry Whatever-Other-
December-Holidays you celebrate before
the final day of the year.

\ ,i. hi,,n special coming up atyour busi-
ness? Send info to bizbuzz@biscaynetimes.
com. For BT advertisers only.


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December 2012


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on


the


MAM chief curator Tobias Ostrander: "We're a laboratory. As the years
go on, the rest of the United States will look more like us."


during this year's Art Basel feast
of fests, the Miami Art Museum
(MAM) will be showcasing a
number of local artists in an exhibition
called Ni%\\ Work Miami 2013."
The Nic\\ Work" series at MAM has
been on-going for several years. Back in
February 2003, for instance, the museum
gave over a room for new work from the
Argentine duo Roberto Behar and Rosa-
rio Marquardt, who created their visually
stunning House of Cards installation;
and in July 2010, the museum presented
a Nic\\ Work Miami" exhibit featuring a
whopping 35 artists.
But this one is different. It is the
featured and only new show that MAM
will exhibit for Miami's premier art week.
This is a departure for Miami museums, as
locally created art often gets lost in the
shuffle when Basel marches into town, a
complaint heard far and wide since the ar-
rival of the massive fair (and fairs) in 2002.


As an example, last year MAM
featured paintings from the 1960s by
Faith Ringgold. This year North Mi-
ami's Museum of Contemporary Art
(MOCA) will open a retrospective of the
pioneering video artist Bill Viola, who
lives and works in the Los Angeles area;
while FIU is highlighting the Chilean
light sculptor Ivan Navarro; UM's Lowe
museum is showing Christo prints; and
the Bass Museum, in collaboration with
Art Basel Miami Beach, is putting up an
expansive international outdoor sculp-
ture show.
All of this is good, and underscores
how sophisticated our institutions have
become, even if that sophistication
seems to come at the expense of artists
living and working in Miami.
MAM's Ni.\% Work" arrives at a
time when Miami's art scene appears to
Continued on page 36


FTuteure

Talented artists are leaving Miami.
Those still here feel isolated.
The public doesn't understand
contemporary art and is not
buying it literally. But there is
always tomorrow...

ByAnne Tschida
Photos by Silvia Ros


December 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com










Drawing on the Future
Continued from page 35

be in another transitional period, another
phase of its growth perhaps moving
from tween years into teenage years,
displaying all the energy and anxiety
associated with that evolution. It's telling
that the emphasis in this exhibition is on
collaboration among the artists, and with
the space itself. MAM is also in transi-
tion; this will be one of the last shows
in the old building before the museum
moves to its new, Herzog & de Meuron-
designed home on Biscayne Bay.
"This was not trying to be a survey
of contemporary art in Miami today,"
says Tobias Ostrander, the new chief
curator at the museum. "It is supposed
to be works in dialogue with the archi-
tecture of Miami. These are different
generations [of artists] from different
disciplines who were asked to collabo-
rate, to join in the spirit of building."
That building is both immediate -
site-specific installations at the museum
- and broader in the sense of developing
a more solid structure for an arts com-
munity. Ostrander says the exhibition


MOCA director Bonnie Clearwater: "Those studios can be lonely. I think
that artists are not interacting as much as they once were."


serves the dual purpose of nurturing a
local scene as well as giving exposure
to local artists when the eyes of the art


world are on us.
The ten invited artists work in
photography, sculpture, installation, and


painting. Some of the names will be
familiar to local art followers, such as
George Sanchez-Calderon, Consuela
Castafieda, and Bhakti Baxter, who have
been showing regularly here for a decade
or so. Others are less known.
While all of them call Miami home,
only two were actually born here; others
hail from countries such as Croatia, Cuba,
Venezuela, and England. That under-
scores what a migratory center Miami is,
which, not surprisingly, is reflected in its
art scene. But it also highlights the notion
that we are a place perpetually in flux.
So where do we stand today, in the
spectrum of art centers, nationally and
internationally, as we enter the 13th year
of the 21st Century?

It's helpful first to look back at where
we've been. For the first few decades
after World War II, when Miami's
population burgeoned and absorbed the
first wave of Cuban immigration after
1959, the art scene remained tiny. There
were a handful a galleries, no contempo-
rary museums, and artists were mostly

Continued on page 38


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Drawing on the Future
Continued from page 36

faculty at relatively small art depart-
ments in area colleges.
In the 1980s and 1990s, that began
to change as recently arrived, Cuban-
born artists started making a splash,
MAM and MOCA were born, the New
World School of the Arts graduated its
first crop of young artists, major col-
lectors opened up spaces, and galleries
dedicated to showing local art began
popping up.
A batch of youthful, emerging art-
ists garnered attention from galleries,
museums, and even some national press;
and a native scene sprouted, including a
number of artist-run alternative spaces
that helped support a lively, if still not
huge, community.
Then Art Basel arrived at the begin-
ning of the last decade, and changed
the equation. Artwork at Basel and the
various satellite fairs gave us up-close
exposure to the best in contemporary
art, and to a lesser extent, exposed our
art community to the rest of the world.
More recently, the John S. and James L.


.............. ...i.-iiiiiiii
Bus Shelter Paintings at MAM by Loriel Beltran, who wants collectors "to believe in at least a small group of
artists and start spending some money here."


Knight Foundation's funneling of money
into the local cultural scene also had a
dramatic effect.


Then, over the past couple of years,
some of the artists who had generated
interest and excitement beyond Miami


began leaving people like Daniel
Arsham, Luis Gispert, and Hernan Bas.
Continued on page 40


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December 2012





















































































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December 2012


ILao 1 C-4









Drawing on the Future
Continued from page 38

Just this year another group took off
for Los Angeles, including Bert Ro-
driguez, Jen Stark, and Friends With
You. The departures left many feel-
ing a little unsettled, prompting some
important questions, such as: What is
Miami missing? Why can't we both
nurture budding artists and keep active
artists here?
Conversations with people in the arts
community from artists both local
and recently departed, gallerists, and
museum leaders reveal a range of
opinions about what it will take to bring
Miami to the next level not least of
which is simply time.
A few months ago the director of
MOCA, Bonnie Clearwater, felt a need
to address a sense that Miami was losing
cohesion. "Some of the people who were
strong as catalysts moved on," she says,
for a variety of reasons, including a
dwindling number of affordable studios,
which in a weak local art market is criti-
cal; and a paucity of gallery and museum
shows that combined a mix of artists.
"Those studios can be lonely," says
Clearwater, "and I think that artists are


Mariangela Capuzzo: "It's a transitory city, it always has been and
always will be, and so will never have that solid foundation some other
places have."


not interacting as much as they once
were. It was a good moment to try to
make some connections between artists
and also with the community."


She brought back an exhibition
called "Trading Places," first produced
a decade ago, in which she selected a
group of artists, both accomplished and


right out of school. Like the MAM show,
they were encouraged to work together,
but the work would be in real time. Each
space for the five chosen artists would
serve as a studio for the duration of the
exhibit, where they would work on their
art and collaborate. Museum visitors
could also could watch and interact.
"We need to create more of a sup-
port group out there," says Clearwater,
support that will also attract artists from
elsewhere, replacing those who have left,
an essential part of our eventual growth,
she believes.
Jacin Giordano has a show for Art
Basel week at the noncommercial space
Locust Projects. He used to exhibit with
Fred Snitzer and in numerous group
shows, but he has moved to western
Massachusetts, where his wife is going
to school. Miami has come a long way
since he was a kid, he says: "I remember
coming back to Miami after graduat-
ing college in 2000 and seeing the
Rubell collection for the first time. I
immediately decided that I could stay in
Miami for a while. It was the first time it
occurred to me that I could make art in
Miami and people might pay attention."

Continued on page 42


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December 2012









IVI


Two artists in MAM's "New Work" show: Loriel Beltran (left), who has left Miami, and Bhakti Baxter, who still lives and works here.

Drawing on the Future But then, he remembers, after some "This way of thinking led to a certain and they showcase
Continued from. p ge 40 exciting years, things began to change. amount of stagnation in the art scene." which seems increc


So Giordano began layering globs of oil
paint, creating art in his signature style,
in his hometown.


"It's like at some arbitrary moment in
time, people stopped helping one another
and instead just got interested in getting
ahead and gaining attention," he recalls.


There are, Giordano acknowledges,
some bright spots: "Spaces like [the
artist-run alternative] Bas Fisher and
Dimensions Variable are good for Miami,


artists helping artists,
libly important for the


longevity of an art scene. And, of course,
Locust Projects, which is consciously

Continued on page 44


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Drawing on the Future
Continued from page 42

juxtaposing local Miami artists and art-
ists from other cities." Giordano has no
plans to move back to Miami at anytime
soon mostly, he says, because it was
simply time for a change.

Mariangela Capuzzo is the
Miami-based lead curator for
ICArt, which develops cor-
porate art collections, including those
for cruise ships. She procured the art for
the newest Celebrity Cruise Line's ship,
Reflection, which includes several local
artists, along with a handful who are
legends. There are a variety of things that
could help develop Miami's art world, she
says, but first people need to understand
the fundamental nature of the place. "It's
a transitory city," she says, "it always has
been and always will be, and so will never
have that solid foundation some other
places have." This is not necessarily bad,
she adds, as it means a certain freshness
and energy will always be here.
Although Miami is home to some of
the world's largest private collections of


MAM's "New Work" show arrives at a time when Miami's art scene
appears to be in another transitional period, another phase of its growth.


contemporary art, until a serious group
of smaller, local buyers emerges, artists
will have a hard time living and making
art here, Capuzzo says. The absence
of such local financial support is one


of the most common complaints from
those in the art world. Miami may now
be known for its burgeoning art scene,
but many artists and gallerists say the
Art Basel-instigated attention has not


translated to sustainable sales.
Loriel Beltran, a native of Caracas
and graduate of the New World School
of the Arts, is one of the artists featured
inMAM's Nc \% Work" show. His burnt-
wood sculptures were given a solo outing
at the Snitzer gallery last year. Beltran
doesn't necessarily want to let even the
big collectors off the hook. It would be
great, he thinks, "if collectors started to
believe in at least a small group of artists
and start spending some money here
rather than only on well-known artists. If
you compare the price of a single work
by a big artist to our community, it could
buy many artists' yearly production for
the price of a single work from an estab-
lished artist. This would give the artists
time to spend on their work rather than
trying to make ends meet, helping not
only the production of the artists' work,
but in creating events, lectures, commu-
nity programs things central to any
artistic community. Thankfully some
local institutions are growing up and are
becoming central to this development in
a different way."

Continued on page 46


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Drawing on the Future
Continued from page 44

Capuzzo also believes there has been
a tendency to show only a select group
of artists in shows around town, an "in-
crowd" clique (very definitely a teenage
phenomenon) that stifles the growth of a
broader arts community.
That seemed to be particularly true
by the end of the last decade, when
the same names seemed to appear
in every exhibit. That has changed,
evidenced by the fact that both MOCA
and MAM's latest exhibits include a
number of local artists who have rarely
been heard from.
Aliona Ortega is the director of
Waltman Ortega Fine Art, a branch
of a Paris gallery that opened in the
heart of Wynwood Arts District over
a year ago. The reason, according to
Ortega: "Miami has a huge potential.
The local museums and galleries are
very dynamic and produce remarkable
shows. However, a big number of them
take place and go away without any or
little attention from the press." Which
brings her to a major problem she has


Aliona Ortega: "The museums and galleries produce remarkable shows.
However, a big number of them take place and go away without any
attention from the press."


had since opening little notice owing
to a lack of arts writing and general
coverage, and by extension, a limited
"arts-educated" community.


Ortega, a native of Russia, thinks
that in order for Miami's art scene to
grow, "it has to gain respectability
and more attention from the media,


collectors, and curators throughout
the world to really become a destina-
tion," and that requires a dedicated,
educated crop of writers who help to
educate the public.
Ostrander at MAM concurs. "We
need more criticism, good writing, and
critiques," he says. "We need to critically
connect with the community, and engage
more with our universities."
Michelle Weinberg is a respected,
locally based artist. Her current instal-
lation, "Shelf Life," is on display at
the historic Alfred I. DuPont building
downtown, and she has several pieces
on the cruise ship Reflection. But like
many artists trying to make a living
here, she must show her work elsewhere,
and at times actually work elsewhere, to
compensate for the limited number of art
enthusiasts and collectors here in Miami.
"How can more folks who have the means
to patronize art on a smaller, normal
scale not mega collectors who build
their own warehouse collection spaces -
get involved? The more individuals who
connect with art, with investing in it,

Continued on page 48


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December 2012









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Drawing on the Future
Continued from page 46

enjoying it, the more the city's art scene
will thrive."
Adds artist Giordano: "There is a
pretty low ceiling in the Miami art world
that requires artists to leave at some
point, whether that means your work
leaves or you physically take flight."

ert Rodriguez is one of the more
prominent artists who has taken
flight from Miami, landing in Los
Angeles. He still shows with the Snitzer
gallery, and also with his L.A. gallery
OHWOW (which will have its own fair here
during Art Basel). He too has a piece on the
new cruise ship, a giant tree sculpture in the
main foyer. Of his recent move, he says, "I
am extremely happy I did what I did." For
him to progress as an artist, he explains, he
needed a bigger and more supportive place.
"I got isolated in Miami," Rodriguez says.
"There wasn't really any room for growth for
me anymore. It would have been irrespon-
sible of me to have stayed. The truth is, at
this stage in my career, I probably should
have left a long time ago."


Cruise-ship art by Michelle Weinberg: "The more individuals connect
with art investing in it, enjoying it the more the city's art scene
will thrive."


While Rodriguez identifies many of
the same challenges others have brought
up, he says there's really nothing that
can be done about it. What could Miami


do to improve the environment for its
arts community? "Nothing," he replies.
"Miami only needs time, and that's some-
thing nobody can change."


Rodriguez also likens Miami to a
teenager, filled with anxiety and eager
to move up to the next level, not particu-
larly receptive to the idea that growing
up is a long-term process. "I was one
of those people," he continues, "trying
so hard to push Miami forward, nudge
Miami to someplace it just isn't yet.
Miami will get there, but it could 20
years or 50 years who knows?"
He hasn't abandoned his hometown.
Rodriguez still has a studio here, deep
family roots, and a Miami gallery to
exhibit his work.
That gallery, Fredric Snitzer, has an-
nounced changes of its own. In its 35th
anniversary year, one of the pioneering
anchors of the Wynwood district will be
leaving its location in March, to a desti-
nation unknown.
Snitzer says the main reason for his
decamping from the art center is eco-
nomic: He got a good deal on the sale of
his centrally located building. But there
are other reasons as well.
The Second Saturday art walk, he
says, "became the gallery circus walk,
ruining its intention." He also says that
Continued on page 50


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Drawing on the Future
Continued from page 48


at his stage in his career as a gallerist, he
doesn't need to be in the thick of things
- collectors come to him. He rarely even
opens his gallery when others do.
As rents have soared in Wynwood,
he most likely won't find another place
there; more likely around the Bacardi
buildings on Biscayne Boulevard (now
home to the YoungArts Foundation) or
even better, he says, back to Bird Road
where he started.
Snitzer echoes others in addressing
what Miami needs: "A more discrimi-
nating audience. Really, only a handful
of people are interested. Until we get
that, we're not going to grow." Also, he
believes, a serious graduate school. "We
need to attract artists from out of town
to come and live and work here."
Most everyone, however, feels there
is great promise in Miami, which dif-
ferentiates it from other art centers. Like
artist Bert Rodriguez, gallery director
Aliona Ortega thinks Miami should be
cut some slack for its youth. "I think we


Bert Rodriguez left for Los Angeles: "I got isolated in Miami. There
wasn't any room for growth. It would have been irresponsible of me to
have stayed."


have to give some time to the art scene to
develop and mature in Miami," she says.
"We live in a very young city with all
of the challenges and opportunities that
this implies. All of the art institutions
are fairly new as well. You can sit here
and talk about what is lacking, but we've
chosen to see it all as a great opportunity


for us to grow with the city."
Adds Tobias Ostrander: "There's a lot
of space for us to grow. We're a labora-
tory. As the years go on, the rest of the
United States will look more like us, with
all the implications of that."
As Miami embraces its vibrant
diversity and is educated about its own


Fred Snitzer on what Miami needs:
"A more discriminating audience.
Really, only a handful of people are
interested. Until we get that, we're
not going to grow."

history including art history Os-
trander believes it will take its unique
place at the art world table.

Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com


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December 2012


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Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDOR


A Tale of Two Banks


One eagerly anticipated,
works in progress


the other widely despised, both now


'I 71' L. '

I The hulking behemoth at NE 2nd Avenue and 79th Street as it looked two
I years ago.


Because of contamination, the old BP gas station site has sat vacant for
a year.


By Erik Bojnansky
BT Senior Writer
Downtown Miami, Brickell,
Midtown Miami, and the Design
District continue to dominate
business headlines, but there's plenty of
real estate news occurring in Biscayne
Corridor neighborhoods farther north.


Earlier this year, for example, the Adler
Group announced plans to build two
20-story rental towers on the Shorecrest
site that the Related Group tried to build a
condo project three years ago. The water-
front buildings will rise just north of NE
79th Street where it meets Biscayne Bay.
In Aventura, Martin Z. Margulies's
Bellini Williams Island, the first major


residential project to break ground follow-
ing the real estate crash, is scheduled for
completion next summer. Margulies fi-
nanced the 70-unit luxury tower by putting
up 59 pieces from his acclaimed art collec-
tion as collateral for a construction loan.
Miami developer Avra Jain this past
June declared her intention to renovate
the iconic Vagabond Motel in Miami's
MiMo Historic District. Earlier this
year, restaurateur Steven Perricone and
partner Jay Solowsky finished work on
Milebella, a $1 million, 10,000-square-
foot commercial building also in the
MiMo Historic District, at 61st Street
and the Boulevard. Several other retail
and motel rehab projects are planned
throughout the Upper Eastside.
But this story is about banks two
bank buildings, actually. One is a Chase


branch that will soon begin construc-
tion after months of delay; the other is a
long-vacant, 180,000-square-foot former
Bank of America office building that
is being repurposed as an affordable-
housing project with an adjacent, new
President Supermarket.
We'll start with the new bank.
In November 2011, in an article
titled "Banking on the Boulevard," the
BT reported that the 20-year-old BP gas
station at 6800 Biscayne Blvd. was being
replaced by a Chase bank. Nine months
passed before Boos Development, a
C lii iw ia company that builds banks
for JP Morgan Chase, finally bought
the land. Alex Lucas, retail manager for
Boos Development, blames the delay on

Continued on page 56


Tase the Season
On the eve of the holidays, a false charge of identity theft leads to a
near-stunning confrontation with Aventura police __


By Derek McCann
BT Contributor

I have been writing "Biscayne Crime
Beat" since the BT's inception nearly
ten years ago. "Crime Beat" is a
column I like to write for our faithful
readers. This story is different. It's one I
do not want to write, but one I feel I need
to write.
Early in November, I applied online
for a Zales store credit card. A message
pop-up appeared at the end of the applica-
tion, advising me to call the company


because it needed additional information.
(I had forgotten that I placed a precaution-
ary fraud alert on my Equifax account.)
I called, they confirmed my identity, and
approved me for the card. They then gave
me the card number. I asked if I could go
to the store and make a purchase without
the actual card. They told me all I needed
was my driver's license and one more
piece of identification.
On November 8, at approximately
8:00 p.m., I walked into the Zales store
in Aventura Mall. I knew what I wanted,
but the effusive salesperson talked me


EU A """A
into buying a more expensive item.
When it came time to charge my pur-
chase, I explained what the Zales card
people had told me, and showed her my
card number, which I had written down


somewhat sloppily on the back of an en-
velope. I also asked to confirm my credit
limit. I provided my driver's license.
Continued on page 58


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December 2012

















Historic Monument or


Monumentally Ugly

Is the effort to save the Miami Herald building genuine, or is it a


sly maneuver to squeeze a casino

By Erik Bojnansky
BT Senior Writer
ecky Roper Matkov is on dead-
line. Besides being CEO of the
Dade Heritage Trust, a non-
profit historic preservation organization,
Matkov is editor of Preservation Today,
a sporadically published magazine. It's
upcoming issue, the first one in three
years, will be filled with stories about the
Miami Herald, its history, Pulitzer Prize-
winning reporters and photographers,
and its enormous 770,000-square-foot
headquarters that was built 49 years ago.
The purpose of the issue, aside
from fundraising, is to demonstrate how
important the Herald building has been
to Miami's history. "It was the biggest
building in the state of Florida when it
was completed in 1963," Matkov says.
Now Matkov is trying to get the
magazine completed before December
10. On that day, the Dade Heritage Trust
will appear before the City of Miami's
Historic and Environmental Preservation
(HEP) Board for the second time asking
that the Herald building be preserved.
Opposing that effort is the new owner
of the building, the Genting Group, a
$45 billion Malaysian corporation that
owns half of Norwegian Cruise Lines and
operates casino resorts in five countries,
including Resorts World New York.
Genting purchased the Miami Herald
building and adjoining parking lots last
year during a $500 million buying spree
in the Edgewater/Omni area, where the
company plans to build Resorts World
Miami, a project that would include
hotels, condo towers, restaurants, and
perhaps a casino, if the company can
ever obtain a gaming license. (See the
BT's "You Can Bet On It," November
2012.) As part of those plans, Genting
intends to demolish the Herald's old
headquarters after the newspaper's staff


moves to Doral in May 2013.
But the fate of the Herald building
might not be sealed on December 10.
If Genting, Dade Heritage Trust, or a
city commissioner doesn't like the HEP
Board's ruling, they'll have
15 days to appeal o the full
Miami City Commission.
Genting's representatives
didn't return calls for com-
ment following a meeting of
the HEP Board on October
22, when the company's ..
team of architects and plan-
ners, including former Dade 1
Heritage Trust president
Richard Heisenbottle and
former Miami-Dade historic
preservation director Ivan
Rodriguez argued that the
Herald building was not only
too young to be considered
historic, but was downright
ugly. The HEP Board, by
a vote of 6 to 4, decided to
continue the process of deter-
mining whether the building
deserves historic designation.
Seth Gordon, a Miami
publicist and political consul-
tant not involved with either
side, is sure Genting will When pre
appeal to the full commis- more they
sion if the HEP Board rules
for preservation. "I can't see how Genting
can allow that to happen after investing
hundreds of millions of dollars in the
property," he says. "When you sink that
much money into real estate, you don't let
people restrict your use of it."
Matkov says her group hasn't yet de-
cided what it would do if the HEP Board
rules against preservation. "That is an
interesting question," she says. "We'll
have to ponder that."
As for Miami's city commissioners,
they aren't talking. "I'd rather not get


The Herald building incorporates architectural elements of Miami
Modern (MiMo) design.


servationists were given a tour, the
Ssaw, the more they liked.

into that," Commission chairman Francis
Suarez says. "If it comes to us, we'll
have to analyze the facts and make a
decision on that basis."
Commissioner Marc Sarnoff, whose
district includes the Omni/Edgewater
area, didn't return phone calls from BT
Commissioners Michelle Spence-Jones,
Wilfredo Gort, and Frank Carollo also
didn't return calls seeking comment.
Mayor Tomas Regalado, who has
the power to veto commission decisions,
was too busy distributing Thanksgiving


a: turkeys to nursing homes to talk about
| the Herald building, according to an aide.
Gordon believes that Genting has
2 enough clout to prevail if the issue
. comes before the city commission. The
ca company's American subsidiaries have
contributed at least $2.6 million to
county and state political campaigns,
including $10,000 to Future Is Now, a
group affiliated with Commissioner
Suarez. Genting also has a platoon of
lobbyists who will argue that Resorts
World Miami will provide lots of jobs
and property taxes for a city still strug-
gling to balance its budget.
If the carrot doesn't work (jobs,
property taxes), there is always the stick.
"I think there would be a mammoth Burt
J. Harris Act lawsuit that could bankrupt
the city," predicts Steve Geller, a lobby-
ist and former state senator, referring to
Florida's property-rights law.
Vicky Garcia-Toledo, an attorney
and one of Genting's lobbyists, may have
already laid the groundwork for such a legal
action, or the threat of one. During the Oc-
tober 22 meeting, she argued that her clients
would have never bought the Herald build-
ing and 14 acres of land from owner Mc-
Clatchy for $236 million if they thought the
structure would ever be declared historic.
Gordon doubts that the Dade Heritage
Trust will succeed in preserving the build-
ing, but the group might be able to obtain
concessions from Genting if its members
just continue fighting, thereby encumber-
ing the property. "They [Genting's execu-
tives] will keep saying no until it makes
sense for them to say yes," Gordon says.

Continued on page 54


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December 2012


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Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDOR


Historic or Ugly
Continued from page 53

Matkov and other Dade Heritage
Trust members insist their only intent is
to see the Miami Herald building, or at
least some portions of it, preserved. "It's
a shame that it wasn't designated a long
time ago and that we had to wait until
there was a crisis," says Nancy Liebman,
a Dade Heritage Trust advisor. "It's a
very important building, period. It's a
really big part of the history of Miami."
At the least, it helped to shape
Miami's waterfront. Prior to its construc-
tion, the Edgewater bayfront was filled
with hotels, warehouses, restaurants, and
bait shops, remembers historian Arva
Moore Parks, a Dade Heritage Trust ad-
visor and longtime Miami-Dade resident.
In the 1950s, James "Jimbo" Luznar ran
a shrimping business on the site, prior to
moving to Virginia Key, where he later
founded Jimbo's, a landmark hangout
that finally closed last year. There was
also illegal casino gambling where the
Herald building now stands at the Little
Palm Club, Moore adds. Ironically, it
was the Herald's Pulitzer Prize series


on illicit gambling and orga-
nized crime in Miami that shut
the Palm Club and many other
underground gambling operations
in 1952.
Moore remembers seeing
giant neon liquor signs when her
family drove across the MacAr-
thur Causeway from Miami Beach
to Miami. All that changed when
the new Herald building was
completed in March 1963. "When
the Herald was built, it was a
major improvement," she says.
Genting's consultants,
Heisenbottle and Rodriguez, see
it differently. In a September 4
opinion piece in the Herald, they
described the area as a "vibrant
commercial neighborhood"
before the Herald came along. "A
number of the buildings were fine
examples of Mediterranean Re- Pre
vival and Art Deco architecture," is u
they wrote. "The Herald building wh
demonstrated a complete lack of
sensitivity to its beautiful scenic vistas
and waterfront setting, as well as the
scale and character of the surrounding


servation opponents say the building
gly and ruined existing neighborhood
en it was built.

neighborhood at the time."
The Herald building was indeed a
big 631 feet long, 220 feet wide, and


more than 117 feet tall with a heliport
large enough to accommodate six heli-
copters, according to a 47-page report
prepared by Dade Heritage Trust and
Morris Hylton III, director of the Uni-
versity of Miami's historic preservation
program. More than 250,000 pounds of
steel and enough concrete to build 2000
homes were used to construct a building
strong enough to withstand hurricanes.
John and James Knight, two brothers
who headed Knight Newspapers, hired
a pair of Chicago architects, Sigurd
Naess and Charles Murphy, to design the
company's new base of operations. (The
Herald had outgrown its previous loca-
tion at 200 S. Miami Ave.)
The Trust report notes that it was
their work on the Chicago Sun-Times
building that particularly impressed the
Knights, a notion that was seized upon
by Heisenbottle and Rodriguez, who
denounced the Herald headquarters as
a copy of the Sun-Times building, so
hated by Chicago residents that no one
protested when it was demolished by
Donald Trump in 2004.

Continued on page 59


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Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDOR


Tale of Two Banks
Continued from page 52

underground contamination, which is
still being cleaned up.
On behalf of Chase, Boos bought the
30,000-square-foot parcel for nearly $3
million from Carlos Fontecilla, whose
company, Victory Petroleum, once owned
more than 80 gas stations throughout
South Florida. According to Lucas, Chase
executives feel the property was well
worth the price. Aside from being across
the street from the affluent Bayside
neighborhood, the future Chase branch is
located in a "gap" where the nearest bank
branches (both Bank of America) are
located at 5000 and 8101 Biscayne Blvd.
Says Lucas: "The marketing study shows
there's a clientele in that area that's not
being served properly."
This isn't Chase's first gas station
deal. Chase took control of four former
gas stations within the past year. "They
are just great sites," Lucas explains.
"They're on prime commercial corners,
and that's where banks want to be."
Joseph Canale, a board member
of the nearby Palm Bay Yacht Club


m
Today the building is undergoing a
housing in mind.

Condominium Association, won't miss
the 24-hour gas station, calling it "a
draw for really seedy characters, es-
pecially after hours." A bank, on the
other hand, will have security cameras
and street lights that will dissuade drug
dealers and prostitutes from conducting
their business at night. "They'll know
that there will be a camera on 24/7," he


complete makeover, with af


says, "and Chase will have th
illuminated."
Lyle Chariff, a real estate
who is partnering with Alex
Karakhanian to renovate the
Motel at 7350 Biscayne Blvd
mercial complex at 6700 Bis
sees the bank branch as a pos
for the MiMo Historic Distri


stretches from 50th Street to 77th Street
Along the Boulevard. "It shows that the
area is viable," says Chariff, president of
SChariff Realty Group. "When you have
a Starbucks and a Chase Bank [across
, *; -.. = the street from each other], that means
Something. That's what you call 'credit
Tenantss' Credit tenants are what we're
a looking for."
: While the Upper Eastside gains a
Chase Bank, Little Haiti will lose a Bank
of America. In fact, the bulky structure
at the corner of NE 2nd Avenue and NE
79th Street, which also housed offices for
the Department of Children and Families
and South Florida Workforce, has been
shuttered since Hurricane Wilma dam-
fordable aged it in October 2005.
In spite of a security fence, the 1973
building, a classic example of "Brutal-
le building ist" architecture, with its thick con-
crete walls and narrow windows, was
e broker frequented by vagrants, vandals, drug
and Rena addicts, prostitutes, and pimps. (The
Sunshine BT covered the abandoned structure's
and a com- problems in "Eyesore #1: Little Haiti's
cayne Blvd., Hulking Behemoth," November 2010.)


sitive sign
ct, which


Continued on page 61


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December 2012






















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Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDOR


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Tase the Season
Continued from page 52

\\ o you look different without
hair," she said, taking my license. My
license picture is nine years old; I was
about 20 pounds heavier and I had a mop
of hair. I currently shave my head. She
asked me to sit in a chair.
Within three minutes, a police offi-
cer came into the store, glared at me, and
said, "This is the guy."
More officers filed into Zales. Their
numbers kept growing. Suddenly, ap-
proximately 15 officers and a German
shepherd were surrounding me. I was
still sitting in the chair. I murmured a
couple of soft questions regarding what
this was about. They told me I knew
what it was about.
Then I saw a stern, stoic face; my
defacto judge and jury. The face glared
at me and said, "You better not move or
give me any trouble." He held something
in his hand. It had a blinking light. He
said, "You see this? This is a Taser. I'll
tase you right now if you let me. Don't
make any moves. You are going to
cooperate. We are going to do this the
hard way, or the easy way. I'll tase you
right now." The light kept blinking. I
completely froze.
They pulled my body up out of the
chair, told me to place my hands behind
me, and clamped handcuffs on me.
The officer with the Taser, who was
guiding the other officers, put his hand
over my heart, which was racing, and
said, "Why is your heart beating so fast?
You look nervous. Why are you nervous?
You know exactly why we're here." He
was smiling. Another officer searched
my pockets.
They accused me of committing
identity theft. They talked about the FBI.
The Taser was right next to me as they
ordered me to back into the chair. I was
facing the store entrance and could see a
bunch of people watching this spectacle.
The sales associate who had so
graciously helped me had disappeared
behind me, but I couldn't move my head
to the side to see what was happening for
fear of being tasered. The officer with
the Taser (he put it down next to him)
towered above my seat, one foot away.
He was guarding me.
The supervising officer asked me
several questions; I answered them.
"This picture on your driver's license
looks nothing like you." I explained why.
They eventually removed the handcuffs,


but told me to remain seated.
My partner, who was heading to the
mall to meet me for dinner, called me
on my cell. The officer with the Taser
granted me permission to pick up the
phone and speak with him.
As things calmed down slightly, I
asked the officer about the Taser. I told
him that was the reason my heart had
been racing. He eventually apologized
to me. Another officer overheard us
and said, "We can do that. I could
point a knife at you if I wanted. I carry
a knife with me, and I could point a
knife at you."
Eventually my partner arrived and
witnessed the scene.
After a period, they released me
without telling me how they had cleared
me, and said, "I'm sorry this happened
to you and you were embarrassed."
Embarrassed?
I thought I was going to be tasered!
Being embarrassed was not my concern,
but in hindsight, it was embarrassing.
They offered this: "You better change
that driver's license picture or this is
going to happen to you again."
The officers left and I could hear
them laughing in the distance, talking
among themselves. The Zales store per-
sonnel swore to me they had not called
the police; they said they didn't know
why the officers showed up. They were
both extremely apologetic; I believed
them. Wanting a return to something
like normality, I actually made my pur-
chase. My partner told me I was shaking,
and that he'd never seen me like this.
The following day I made some
phone calls and discovered the general
consensus was that this sort of reaction
to alleged credit card fraud or identity
theft is unusual, to put it mildly. I won-
dered why I'd been treated that way. I
have a lot of tattoos, but the officers said
that had nothing to do with it. They kept
saying when I was in handcuffs: "This is
for your own protection."
Fifteen officers, a German shepherd,
and a Taser are now needed to detain an
individual who is suspected of commit-
ting identity theft? Apparently a new
task force has been created in partner-
ship with the FBI in an effort to crack
down on identity theft.
This is the second time police officers
have harassed and threatened me. The
prior incident was recounted in the BT
six years ago. At the time, I spoke to one

Continued on page 60


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012






Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDOR


Brothers John and James Knight commissioned the Chicago architects
who designed the Sun-Times building.


Historic or Ugly
Continued from page 54

But there are differences between
the two buildings, the Trust report as-
serts. The Herald building had design
elements matching the Miami Modern
(MiMo) style that dominated the region
during the 1950s and 1960s: exposed
structural columns, yellow mosaic tiles,
angled sun-grilles above the windows,
and wrap-around terraces.
If Matkov had her way, the HEP
Board would be treated to a tour, similar
to the one Genting provided Dade
Heritage Trust members in February,
two months after the group applied for
historic designation. The guides hoped
they would be able to show the Trust
how horrible the building was. "They
wanted to point out everything that was
wrong," Matkov recalls, "but the more
we saw, the more we liked."
She liked it so much, in fact, that
Matkov tried to convince their guides
that they'd have no problem converting
the Herald building for its uses or
at least incorporate its facade into its
grand plans. Genting, in turn, only
offered reasons why they couldn't,
Matkov says. Among the reasons, ac-
cording to Matkov: They wanted to
build an underground, 1500-space park-
ing garage where the building stood,
and the Herald's design wasn't compat-
ible with a world-class, waterfront hotel
or a luxury condo.
Matkov, though, is confident
Genting's project would be enhanced by
mixing the old with the new: "The major
impact of respecting a historic landmark
like the Herald building is that it gives


the project an identity like no other."
Historic preservation has a financial
benefit, too, Matkov contends: Genting
can qualify for property-tax exemptions
from the city and Miami-Dade County.
Tax breaks and a unique look, how-
ever, aren't enough to compensate for the
cost of transforming the Herald building
into a luxury resort, says Peter Zalewski,
a real estate consultant and founder of
CondoVultures.com. Besides the extra
engineering and contracting costs, Za-
lewski argues that the Herald building
depreciates the value of Genting's proj-
ect because it hinders the owner's ability
to build to maximum density. Plus "a big
chunk of waterfront is now eliminated."
Not everyone believes Dade
Heritage Trust's assertion that it is only
interested in protecting the building.
Among the skeptics is Lynn Lewis, a
Trust board member. "It seems that
historic preservation is being misused
and that we are grappling with utilizing
historic preservation in lieu of zoning
or in lieu of legislation," she said at the
October HEP Board meeting. But since
"demolition is forever," Lynn asked for a
"full, long, detailed professional review"
by the city's historic preservation staff
prior to making a final decision. "Al-
though I will tell you that if I had to
decide today, I'd be persuaded by the
opponent," she warned.
Matkov does acknowledge that
historic preservation might influence
future development on the site. "Part
of what we object to is that Genting is
saying, 'Let us tear down the building
next May and then put all your faith in

Continued on page 60


;HIP PACKB WRA TSHIP*PA


December 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Community News: BISCAYNE C(


Historic or Ugly
Continued from page 59

us that we have a good plan,'" she says.
"That's why it's important to designate
the building now. Then the HEP Board
will have some control over what is put
in that place."
Indeed, Genting's plans have
fluctuated. The original idea called for
construction of 5200 hotel rooms, more
than 1000 condominium units, 50-plus
restaurants and bars, 700,000 square
feet of convention space, and gambling
areas large enough to hold up to 8500
slot machines. But after some neighbors
balked at the project's size, and the leg-
islature declined to pass a resorts casino
bill, Resorts World Miami president
Christian Goode told the Herald that its
project will only have 1500 new hotel
rooms, two condo towers, and 100,000
square feet of retail and restaurant
space. (Genting has yet to submit these
new plans.)
Liebman, a former Miami Beach
commissioner who lives on Belle Isle
at the eastern end of the Venetian
Causeway, confesses her unease over
the casino resort's potential effect on
traffic. "It isn't right for that site," she
says. "We have enough traffic conges-
tion as it is." Yet she stresses that the
effort to preserve the Herald building
has nothing to do with trying to con-
trol development.


Tase the Season
Continued from page 58

of the most influential criminal defense
lawyers in South Florida. While under-
standing my position, he said I didn't have
much recourse because one cannot sue
over bad behavior by cops. If we could,
law enforcement would go broke.
He did tell me, though, that almost
every police-harassment story he heard
from prospective clients began with "I
was at Aventura Mall and..."
This didn't stop me from filing a
formal complaint with the Aventura
Police Department. Using a depart-
mental picture book, I pointed out the
offending officers to Sgt. Karyn Brin-
son, who was gracious enough to give
me her time. She told me the depart-
ment's internal affairs division would
be in touch.
Two weeks later, Capt. Michael
Bentolila contacted me and informed me


)RRIDOR


Preventing construction of a casino
that could suck money away from South
Beach and downtown Miami has been
cited as another possible motive behind
Dade Heritage Trust's preservation
efforts. While Matkov insists Trust
members are divided on the issue of
gambling, she can't help but mention
that the late Alvah Chapman, the former
CEO of Knight-Ridder newspapers, was
a steadfast opponent of gambling.
Local publicist Seth Gordon thinks
the best way for Genting to fight the
preservation effort is for the company
once again to interact with the public,
perhaps even seek input on their plans,
and show they can be a good corporate
citizen. "People are waiting for the new
face of Genting to emerge," he says.
Meanwhile, Dade Heritage Trust is
collecting letters of support from the
Urban Environment League, the Florida
Trust for Historic Preservation, and local
architects. Then there is the letter from
Alvah ( 1.Ipinan s widow, Betty. She
sees the Herald building as a monu-
ment to a medium of communication
that is "shrinking day by day" daily
newspapers. "It is important for future
generations to know what a significant
role newspapers have had in our life-
time," she wrote. "We have been almost
dependent upon the outpouring of news
they gave us whether good or bad."

Continued on page 61


he was following up. He was extremely
supportive and explained the process to
me. He also confirmed that one of the
employees from Zales had, in fact, called
police that day.
So Zales apparently lied to me. No
wonder they didn't return my repeated calls.
Captain Bentolila hopes to examine
the video and interview the Zales em-
ployees, as well as the officers who were
present. (His investigation was ongoing
at press time.)
As shoppers take to the malls for the
busiest shopping month of the season,
they need to be aware of what may await
them. Is that driver's license picture
too old? Have you changed your hair or
gained or lost weight? Do you have one
too many tattoos?
Be especially careful if you're in
Aventura Mall and you're buying
diamonds at Zales.

Feedback: letters@ biscaynetimes.com


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012






Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDOR


Historian and preservation advocate Arva Moore Parks (left) with Dade
Heritage Trust's Becky Roper Matkov.


Historic or Ugly
Continued from page 60

Matkov admits that Dade Heritage
Trust hadn't bothered to protect the
Herald building earlier because they
assumed it didn't need it. "Until Genting
announced they were going to demolish

Tale of Two Banks
Continued from page 56

Now it's being ripped apart by
construction workers with blowtorches
and jackhammers. The entire building,
formerly known as the Little River Center,
won't be demolished, explains Fausto Al-
varez, an accountant and registered agent
for the building's new owner. Instead
it'll serve as the skeleton for a 110-unit
affordable housing project. A Presidente
Supermarket will be built on an adjoining
parking lot just west of the building.
The developer for both projects is
Pedro Rodriguez, president of Presi-
dente Supermarkets, a chain of 26 South
Florida grocery stores aimed at Hispanic
shoppers. PAR Family Investments Inc.,
owned by Rodriguez and his wife Ana,
bought the building and the 2.5-acre
parcel for $3 million this past March.
The seller was a subsidiary of Sabadell
Bank, which foreclosed on the property
two years ago. The Sabadell subsidiary
also helped finance the deal with a $2.5
million balloon mortgage that PAR
Family Investments must pay in full by
2017, according to public records.
Alvarez says his client is still work-
ing on plans for the affordable-housing
project, which will be Rodriguez's first
venture into that highly regulated and


the building, it didn't cross our minds,"
she says. "The Herald was such a strong
organization within the community that
you just assumed it would always be
there. It's really a shame that they've
chosen to leave the downtown area."

Feedback: letters@tbiscaynetimes.com

complicated development field. Still, Ro-
driguez has no plans to partner with an
experienced builder of affordable hous-
ing. "We can do this project ourselves,"
says Alvarez.
Plans for the supermarket, Alvarez
notes, have already been submitted to
the City of Miami for approval. If all
goes well, the new market will be com-
pleted in less than eight months.
The Presidente chain is no stranger
to this neighborhood. A Presidente
market operated for six year just a few
blocks east in Biscayne Plaza at NE 79th
Street and Biscayne Boulevard. Alvarez
says Presidente left that space in March
2011 "because the lease expired and the
owner of the property wanted too much
money for the rent."
Sabor Tropical, another locally
owned supermarket chain that targets
the Hispanic market, took over the space,
agreeing not only to sign a ten-year
lease but to invest $1 million rehabbing
the building. Now both supermarkets
will compete for immigrant, working-
class customers living west of Biscayne
Boulevard. Sabor Tropical's business,
Alvarez assures, won't be harmed by
the Presidente store. "There are a lot of
clients here for everybody," he insists.

Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com


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Neighborhood Correspondents: AVENTURA


When Oversight Is Overlooked
A lawsuit against Aventura and its city manager raises some very
disturbing questions


By Jay Beskin
BT Contributor
here is a spring ritual in Aventura,
and it is not housecleaning. It
is the city commission's annual
review of city manager Eric Soroka.
This is how it works.
At a morning workshop, which almost
no residents attend, the city manager asks
for an annual raise of $10,000 and a $10,000
lump-sum bonus. Each of the commission-
ers commends the manager on performing
an outstanding job during the previous year,
and then they unanimously approve his
request. The entire process takes about five
minutes. That's it. Nary a critical comment,
or even a recommendation for how the man-
ager might improve his performance.
A gambling man might want to bet that
this 15-year-old ritual may change next spring.


This past November 2, after a month-
long trial, a Miami-Dade jury in state court
awarded former Aventura charter school
principal Katherine Murphy $155 million
in damages against the city and Soroka for,
among other things, harassment, slander,
intentional infliction of emotional distress,
and creating a discriminatorily abusive
working environment during Murphy's
tenure at the school, known as Aventura
City of Excellence School (ACES).
That sum probably exceeds the
limits of the city's insurance coverage
by 15 times, and is approximately $137
million in excess of Aventura's carefully
safeguarded reserve accounts for use in
an emergency. Well, this judgment just
might be the emergency. Or maybe not.
Lest you worry that property taxes
will immediately increase fivefold in
order to pay this penalty, just three


business days after the jury's decision,
Judge Rosa Rodriguez, who presided
over the case, tossed out the award. Ben
Kuehne, an attorney for Murphy and one
of the more esteemed members of the
Florida Bar, remarked that to overturn
the jury's work so quickly was unprece-
dented. Kuehne says Murphy will appeal.
The city is not yet off the hook.
Murphy, who was the school's
founding principal (2003), first brought
her case in the federal courts after being
terminated in 2006. Both the federal trial
court and appeals court found that, even
if some of her allegations were true, she
had no claims that could be remedied by
federal law. However, the federal courts
did affirm her right to pursue the case in
state court.
Murphy's claims have now been
addressed in three judicial forums, and


Former ACES principal Katherine
Murphy claims she was a victim of
slander and harassment.

certain allegations continue to be litigat-
ed. If any of them are true, they would
besmirch the governance of our City of
Excellence. Here is a summary of some
of the allegations contained in Murphy's


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December 2012









complaint. That a jury apparently found
them credible is alarming, and raises
very disturbing questions.
First, the manager allegedly direct-
ed "vulgarities and obscenities," some
containing "unwelcome sexual com-
ments," at Murphy. Soroka also alleg-
edly threatened her for speaking with
commissioners, even under the most
innocuous of circumstances. In addi-
tion, the complaint claims that Soroka
ordered Murphy, despite her protest, to
turn over certain student records to the
city clerk, even though the law says
those records cannot leave the custody
of school officials.
Has Soroka behaved similarly
toward other members of the city staff?
Has he created such a hostile work envi-
ronment in Aventura that city employees
are fearful for their jobs if they question
him? Can the city attract the best and
brightest employees if they know they'll
labor under difficult work conditions and
not be free to say what they think? Is the
commission failing to receive important
information about the city administra-
tion because employees are afraid to
speak candidly?


Second, Murphy's complaint states that,
although the city commission functions as
the ACES' board of directors and is obli-
gated to exercise continuing oversight of the
school, "nevertheless, Soroka required his
name to be listed as the chair of the school's
governing board on all papers to be filed
with the Miami-Dade School District, and
made all decisions unilaterally and indepen-
dently of the governing board."
Indeed the board's representative
to the School Advisory Council is not
one of its own, but rather the manager.
Kuehne claims that ACES is the only
school he knows of that operates under
the control of a city manager and not an
experienced education professional.
Murphy's complaint also makes note
of a policy that allows nonresident employ-
ees of ACES to enroll their own children
at the school, thereby precluding some
number of Aventura children from enroll-
ing. Did the manager establish that policy?
Is the commission even aware of it?
How can the commission properly
oversee the school if one of its own
members does not participate with
administrators, teachers, and parents on
the School Advisory Council, and if as a


result, all information gets bottled up in
the manager's office?
Third, Florida law requires that all
city vendors must go through a neutral
bidding process for large contracts. Ap-
plicants are scored by a set of criteria,
including design. In the contract to build
ACES, Soroka allegedly determined
that his favored contractor would build
the school, even though that contractor
failed to present any design plans. Did
the city enter into an expensive contract
that subverted the legal bidding process?
Fourth, the commission exercises direct
oversight and control over three municipal
positions: the city manager, the city clerk,
and the city attorney. None of these positions
is answerable to the other. The purpose for
this is to ensure there is system of checks and
balances in our city, and that accountability
rests solely with the commission
Yet the city clerk, who is married
to the manager, may have taken direct
orders from him with respect to the al-
legedly illegal custody of school records.
Has the clerk in fact improperly taken
direction from the manager?
Not surprisingly, the manager's son is
employed by the city attorney, which is the


private law firm of Weiss Serota. This on its
face presents a conflict of interest. To whom
does Weiss Serota owe its allegiance to
the manager, who is the father of one of its
attorneys, or to the city commission?
Have the manager and Weiss Serota
been counseling the commission on how
to proceed in the Murphy matter? If they
have, wouldn't that represent an inherent
conflict of interest? Should the commis-
sion have considered its strategy outside
the presence of the manager?
Perhaps none of these allegations,
even if true, rises to the level of illegality.
But for a city that prides itself on excel-
lence, even the possibility that the man-
ager's conduct has included "vulgarities
and obscenities" is shameful.
That our residents may not be receiv-
ing the best possible government is unac-
ceptable, and that the city may still be
liable for $155 million is untenable. It's
time for commissioners to exercise their
oversight function, and they should hire
independent counsel to assist them.
Then maybe there will be a true
housecleaning next spring.

Feedback: letters@tbiscaynetimes.com


a


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012






Neighborhood Correspondents: MIAMI AT LARGE


Goodbye, Anise
Our correspondent's beloved cocker spaniel dies at age 18, leaving
her owner with half-a-lifetime of memories

By Wendy Doscher-Smith of horrors, snapshots of the end that
BT Contributor replay on a loop in one's mind. Eigh-
teen years is a long time to have a pet
Ive avoided my laptop for the past or maintain any relationship. Just ask
week. Not because I didn't have a divorce lawyers. Since I had Anise for
topic, but because I did. Here I am 18 years, her death conjures up memo-
again in grimly familiar territory: a dog ries not just of her, but also of other
tribute. This time it's a memorial to my events. (I'll take that double whammy
cocker spaniel, Anise, who was more with cheese, thanks!)
than a pet. Among other designations, Simply put, Anise, as she was known
she was a landmark. What else do you for her first 12 years, or "Granny," a.k.a.
call an 18-year-old dog? "Tribe Elder," as she was known for the
In five years, I have witnessed three last six, was always here. And now, just
dogs my children, really die in front like that, she isn't.
of me. Two were ill and had to be put down, Anise was given to me as a gift
and Anise, well, her heart just stopped. when I was a college senior. I'm now
None of it gets any easier, and each 38. Had Anise been human, I might be
case offers its own personal bouquet dropping her off at her college dorm,


instead of deciding on the destination of
her ashes.
You are never prepared to outlive
your children, even if they are furry. Yet
that is the fate of every responsible dog
lover/owner. The irony is, I started wor-
rying about Anise passing a few years
ago, when she would sleep so deeply
she would awake with a start. But as she
trooped on, energetic as ever, I stopped


thinking about it. Anise had a spirit that
seemed too stubborn to go. (We joked
that if she heard us mention her senior-
citizen status, there would be hell to pay.)
When she finally did die, it was quick
and on her own terms. Typical Anise!
Anise was my first dog. It was the
mid-1990s, before cell phones, the Inter-
net, college graduation, starting my first
job, and marriage. There were landlines.


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December 2012









Online dating and Facebook did not
exist. The Walkman, not the iPod, was
the portable music listening device of the
day. Print media was a thriving indus-
try, the Twin Towers stood, and eating
organic food was considered freakish.
When I was sick, it was Anise who
gave me the most comfort. When I went
on a date, it was Anise who gave her
approval, and when my heart was broken,
gave me her soft fur to cry into. Anise
lived with one parrot, countless cats, and
many dogs, but from the start, she was
independent-minded, preferring the com-
pany of people to animals. In her later
years (I'm talking the last 12), "Granny"
was a feisty curmudgeon who demanded
her meals be served on time and her
treats to be tasty.
There are people who believe dogs
do not have souls, that they are meant
to live outside, and that the love for
an animal is inferior to that which is
between humans. I feel sorry for those
people, because they have a limited
capacity for love.
To never know the love of a dog is
to miss out on life itself. And if life is
a lonely road, grief is that unmarked,


unpaved turnoff you see at night from the
highway. The one that makes you shudder
a bit because you wonder where it leads,
yet you don't want to find out. Everyone,
at some point, travels down that road, and
they do it alone. The difference is how
you handle the gravel underfoot.
If I drank, I would take my grief
neat; no ice diluting my feelings or
olive juice tainting my recollections.
You cannot heal if you don't face your
injuries. It's the rip-the-Band-
Aid-off approach. It hurts a
great deal at first, but slowly,
eventually, the sting subsides, big
Family and friends try Anis
to help, but in the end, grief
claims the individual. And
grief is greedy. Grief steals
your joy, your time, and in
some cases, your sanity, temporarily or
otherwise. But grief is also your friend;
without it, you would not be able to
continue.
In the days after Anise died, I went
to feed her first, as per the routine. (We
have multiple dogs.) Twice. I heard foot-
steps behind me and thought it was her
wanting to go out, but it was another of


our dogs. I saw a shape in my periphery,
and did a double take, but it was a dog
bed. I've been sleeping with her blanket.
Crying jags come and go at will.
I can still see Anise in the pet store
in Gainesville, in that glass enclosure
with the "For Sale: $300" sign above her
small black body and white nose. She
was a tiny thing, just three months old,
glancing up at me tentatively with big,
brown eyes.


With her long, floppy ears,
eyes, and standout white nose,
>e was the dictionary definition
of adorable.



On the car ride back to my town-
house, I held her in my hands (she fit in
that small space) and marveled at how
lucky I was to finally have a dog of my
own. I decided to name her "Anise," after
the licorice flavor. I walked her and a
group of schoolchildren would surround
us, all petting at once. While a puppy,
people often commented on how her nose


looked like it was dipped in whipped
cream. With her long, floppy ears, big
eyes, and standout white nose, Anise was
the dictionary definition of adorable.
The bond a person has with his or
her dog cannot be matched. Much to
their credit, dogs are not people. They
are not as evolved, and therefore, para-
doxically, seem somehow more evolved.
Their love is unconditional, and that
is a quality you will never find in any
human. It's simply not in our nature. I
think that is why some dog lovers prefer
their dogs to their spouses, partners,
children, and grandchildren.
I hear it constantly: "Oh, I'd trade
my husband (or wife, or child) for my
dog any day!" they say. Or "This is the
way I feel about (fill in the blank situa-
tion), and my mind is made up. If my (fill
in the blank once again) doesn't like it,
they can leave. But the dog stays!"
Usually these people claim to be sur-
prised by their admission. I'm not. And if
they laugh uncomfortably afterward and
say, "Oh, just kidding," I look at them
directly and reply, "I know you're not."

Feedback: letters@tbiscaynetimes.com


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41 &


December 2012






Neighborhood Correspondents: BRICKELL / DOWNTOWN




The Power of


Thinking Small

Sidewalks, streetlights, and signs aren't sexy, but they're necessary
if we want to create a more vibrant downtown


By Craig Chester
BT Contributor
Think Big. It's a mantra preached
by entrepreneurs, politicians,
business people, motivational
speakers, and coaches. But is that motto
really the key to releasing the potential
of downtown Miami?
The "think big" catchphrase has
played out quite extravagantly before our
eyes in Miami over the past 15 years or
so. Grandiose projects like the Adrienne
Arsht Center, American Airlines Arena,
Marlins Park, and mega-condos galore
come to mind. The Miami Art Museum
and Miami Science Museum are both
under construction, and a downtown
resort casino could be on the horizon.


These projects represent tremendous
investments geared toward turning
downtown Miami into a cultural and
entertainment hub on a par with those of
other leading world cities.
When measured individually, the new
cultural and entertainment destinations
can boast varying degrees of success. But
big, expensive projects are not a foolproof
formula for urban revitalization. The
vitality of a city isn't measured by the
annual revenue or number of visitors to a
particular attraction. A city's dynamism
is greater than the sum of its parts, and
it's often the smaller, finer grains of the
urban experience that enhance the quality
of a place and foster affection toward it.
There are a series of questions we
should be asking about life in downtown


Miami that are emphatically
about the small and simple
things: Are the sidewalks
clean and inviting, or are
they caked with old chew-
ing gum and poorly lit? Are
there public maps to guide
people around? Is the transit
system easily navigable? Are
there attractive public spaces
with places to congregate?
Is bicycle parking readily Unauthor
available? Are there places Miami Im
for children? Pets? Adequate
crosswalks and crossing times? Does
walking feel safe and inviting?
If the answer to some of these ques-
tions is no, the solutions are usually simple,
relatively inexpensive, and can offer a high
return on investment. Their importance
must not be dismissed, though it some-
times feels like these basic livability issues
are hardly being addressed.
I spend a lot of time downtown and
often imagine myself in the shoes of a


-
ized wayfinding sign courtesy of the
provement Alliance.

first-time visitor. What is their experience
like? One place new visitors frequently
wind up is the Metromover, Miami's
elevated transit system. For a free service
with a seemingly simple route network
(three "loops," as they are called), the
Metromover can be fraught with poten-
tial misadventures. While the maps on
the station platforms identify the three
loops using distinct colors (blue, pink,
and orange), the maps onboard the actual


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December 2012









cars inexplicably abandon those colors,
instead using three different shades of
bluish-gray to demarcate the same exact
routes. Confused yet?
As the train approaches, you need
to make sure you're boarding the right
loop. A digital display on the platform is
supposed to tell you this information, but
when the screens are frequently unintel-
ligible or not operational, this poses a real
problem. A recurring sight is a confused
rider sticking his or her head inside a mo-
mentarily stopped train to ask other riders
which loop the train is on. The typical
reaction is a lot of shoulder shrugging.
If you are fortunate enough to arrive
at your destination without boarding the
wrong train, many of the stations lack
crosswalks at their exit points to the
street. Roaring traffic is hardly an invit-
ing welcome in an unfamiliar place.
Even as a self-identified transit buff,
I find navigating the Metromover system
maddeningly frustrating. Why must it
be so difficult? The negative impression
this experience has on visitors must not
be underestimated.
Presently, popular destinations like the
Arsht Center and American Airlines Arena


sit on islands lacking any integration with
their surroundings. Are people leaving the
Arsht Center or the arena likely to visit the
restaurants or shops downtown? Will they
walk there? The answer is probably not, if
the walking conditions are as uninviting as
they currently are.
In 2009, Miami's Downtown Devel-
opment Authority drafted a master plan
for downtown titled, "The Epicenter of
the Americas." It outlines a number of
projects intended to "enhance our posi-
tion as a business and cultural epicenter."
To the DDA's credit, the plan addresses
many of the smaller details that would
enhance the downtown experience: im-
proved pedestrian conditions, public art
installations, more ways to get around
(like trolleys and pedicabs), and enriched
public spaces, among others. While the
plan is well intentioned, progress has not
exactly been transpiring at warp speed.
That is where ordinary citizens like
Scott Douglass have stepped in. Dou-
glass is a Miami resident and founder
of the Miami Improvement Alliance, a
group of Miamians eager to speed up the
revitalization of downtown by executing
low-cost but impactful projects on their


own. Their mission statement is powerful:
"We will be the manifestation of positive
force downtown. Using both sanctioned
and unsanctioned tactics, we will work to
improve the safety, beauty, and prosperity
of Miami's core districts. The city must
endure and thrive if it is to have a future;
we are the agents of that success. Where
bureaucracy fails, we will prevail."
The group's first project was the
creation of "urban wayfinding signs" to
encourage visitors to the recent Red
Bull Flugtag event at Bayfront Park to
venture across Biscayne Boulevard and
explore what downtown Miami has to
offer. While unsanctioned by any local
authorities, the initiative had the blessing
of many local business owners.
The 11 wayfinding signs featured
simple walking directions to things like
public transportation stops, ATMs, cultural
destinations, local businesses, and also
featured a Twitter hashtag (#WalkMIA) so
people could interact with the project.
"People tend to overestimate the
amount of time it takes to walk some-
where," says Douglass. "These signs
showed people just how close things
actually are."


These types of interventions quick,
cheap, often temporary projects that aim
to make a small part of a city more lively
or enjoyable have a new name: tactical
urbanism. Guerrilla gardening, convert-
ing parking lots into temporary parks,
pop-up retail shopping, weed bombing
(painting brightly colored "weeds" on
forlorn lots) are all examples of tactical
urbanism projects that ordinary citizens
have recently executed in Miami.
While it's easy to be seduced by the
flashy mega-projects, they are not a cure-
all for absent urban vitality. To truly
unlock the potential of downtown Miami,
collectively we need to take a closer
look at the human-scale experience -
how we interact with downtown on a
daily, street-level basis and perhaps
follow the lead of Enrique Pefialosa, the
former mayor of Bogota, Colombia, who
declared, "We invested in high-quality
sidewalks, pedestrian streets, parks,
bicycle paths, libraries; we got rid of
thousands of cluttering commercial signs
and planted trees. All our efforts have
one objective: happiness."

Feedback: letters@tbiscaynetimes.com


Just like all of us, classical music lives
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December 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Neighborhood Correspondents: NORTH MIAMI


Home Is Where the Art Is

North Miami's MOCA has garnered international attention, but it
could really use some local love- and money


By Mark Sell
BT Contributor

A s surely as the sun will rise on
Tuesday, December 4, some
4000 souls will descend on 125th
Street for the fourth annual Vanity Fair
party at the Museum of Contemporary
Art (MOCA) in North Miami.
This year's international crowd of
artists, dealers, curators, investors, media
mavens, and celebrities will join North
Miami council members, city residents,
and art fans from all over South Florida.
The peg for this year's celebration:
the December 5 opening of an exhibition
by Bill Viola, whose meditative, Bud-
dhism-inflected video art just got MOCA
a high-profile write-up in the New York
Times. That's a big deal for this fractious,
gritty city of 60,000.


While last year's party featured a
quirky celebrity A-list that included
Calvin Klein, Donna Karan, and the
mayor of Port-au-Prince (now practically
a sister city to North Miami), this year's
will feature fashion designer and Viola
patron Stella McCartney, daughter of Sir
Paul. She will likely bring some bold-
face names with her. And who knows?
Perhaps a Kardashian or two will drop
in. (Kourtney and Kim are currently
ensconced in an 11,000-square-foot Sans
Souci mansion, filming their upcoming
series Kourtney and Kim Take Miami.)
The real queen bee of the proceed-
ings, of course, will be Bonnie Clearwa-
ter, MOCA's founding executive director
and curator. She is fresh from a Novem-
ber 14 reception at the White House,
where MOCA received the National
Medal for Museum and Library Service,


Lark Keeler, MOCA's curator of education, introduces local youngsters to
modern art.


the highest honor American museums
and libraries can receive for service to
their communities.
Over the past 16 years, C lci iw.. I
has transformed this municipal museum
adjoining city hall from a funky outlier
into an international force in art and
community service; its youth-accented
programs serve 20,000 people a year
through countywide magnet, after-school,
and teen programs, among them Women
on the Rise, which takes local artists to


juvenile detention centers to help teens
express themselves through art.
MOCA's very success has strained the
museum beyond its capacity, prompting
the need for expansion. And yet for all the
acclaim and the victories, outreach and
pushback collided this year for MOCA
and C 1k., iwc i as the museum took its
case to the public and came up short. On
August 14, North Miami residents nar-
rowly rejected a 20-year, $15 million bond
issue to double the museum's size and


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012









triple its exhibition space.
The bond issue would have cost city
property owners $48 a year per $100,000
in assessed property valuation. It simply
proved too big a pill to swallow for the
hard-up residents who crowd city hall
when water assessments go up three dol-
lars a month, and perhaps too bitter a pill
for some of the well-to-do in the eastern
neighborhoods, who take a jaded view
of the city council, particularly Mayor
Andre Pierre.
"Of course I would have liked to see
a positive response," Clearwater says,
adding that "the city and the MOCA
board are discussing the options, and the
architects are completing the working
drawings and construction documents.
We're moving forward with the expan-
sion as envisioned."
Prominent opponents of the bond
issue, who would not talk on the record
for this column, have no harsh words for
C 1. in u.ic i or MOCA, but they believe
that private donors, rather than residents,
should fund the museum's expansion.
They also have called the city's five-
week summer campaign for the bond
issue dishonest in failing to disclose


to property owners the real cost of the
proposed measure.
While that is history now, the answer
to the question of how much of the $15
million would be private and how much
public or if it will be raised at all is
anyone's guess. One possible clue may
come on December 11, when the North
Miami City Council will discuss the first
$2.5 million of the $17.5 million bundle
the city recently received from Biscayne
Landing developer Michael Swerdlow.
The agenda item raises the possibility
that public money for the museum may
be back in the mix. (MOCA was a big
factor in the original Swerdlow deal with
the city, a subject that has resurfaced
since the defeat of the bond issue.)
"The bond issue's failure was a
reflection of the economy and the lack
of attachment of some people in the
community to MOCA's programs," says
Councilman Scott Galvin, arguably the
museum's most passionate advocate on
the council (along with his otherwise
frequent adversary, Mayor Pierre). "The
closeness of the vote tells you that there
is certainly a large percentage of resi-
dents who support expansion of MOCA


at the $15 million level. I think the con-
versation will veer back in that direction
before too long."
In its relatively short history, the
museum's annual budget has increased
roughly fourfold, to $4 million, but the
city's financial commitment to the insti-
tution has grown only modestly, from $1
million to $1.3 million. The other $2.7
million of the museum's annual budget
comes from MOCA's nonprofit founda-
tion, supported by private donations.
Galvin sees an upside in the bond
issue's narrow defeat, in that it has
refocused the discussion on the museum
and its good works, which extend well
beyond the city limits. (The John S. and
James L. Knight Foundation has taken
notice of the museum's outreach efforts
and in January launched a $100,000-
a-year challenge grant for community
outreach over three years.)
"We go far beyond what any museum
does," Clearwater says, making a case
that MOCA's community outreach has
benefited the residents of the city enough
to justify greater financial support. "From
our spring campaign alone, we got 2000
households in North Miami as registered


members. Conservatively, that's 4000
people and that's just registered people.
"At Jazz at MOCA on the last Friday
of every month, at least a third of the
audience is from North Miami. And with
our education programs, no one is telling
kids they have to be here with the
self-esteem, the freedom they feel, the
friends they are making, they have a safe
place, off the street, where they have fun
and meet like-minded people."
(Full disclosure: Both my daughters
went through the children's art programs
at MOCA. The youngest became a star
junior docent, opening gates of contem-
porary art perception to her sometimes
flummoxed father and other visitors, and
is today a busy intern with her own aspi-
rations to become an art curator or dealer.)
Another art museum director with
Clearwater's national reputation might
be tempted to make a move to an institu-
tion more fully embraced by its com-
munity, but C 1c. in\ .i i appears to have
no plans to leave, despite this summer's
setback. "I love it," she says of her work.
"Just look at what we've been able to do."

Feedback: letters@tbiscaynetimes.com


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Neighborhood Correspondents: BELLE MEADE


It's Flori-duh, in a Landslide


No question about it


our inability to run an election makes us


the most backward state in the unii

By Frank Rollason
BT Contributor
What a debacle. What an embar-
rassment. What a demonstra-
tive showing of how inept
our beautiful state is when it comes to
dealing with elections.
Once again our state has lived up to
its well-earned moniker of Flori-duh!
From the governor on down to local of-
ficials throughout the state, we showed
the nation what a bunch of jerkwater,
incompetent, uncaring officials we have
- officials who theoretically occupy our
elected and appointed professional posi-
tions, at a significant cost to us taxpayers,
to simply take care of business and have


failed miserably one more time.
I mean, think about it. We had four
years since 2008 to prepare for this last
presidential election and the results of that
supposed preparation have made Flori-duh
the laughingstock of the rest of the nation.
As I sit here at my computer writing
this column, it is Wednesday evening, 24
hours since the polls closed, and Flori-
duh still does not have its results for-
warded to the rest of the nation. (Florida
was finally called for President Obama
on Saturday, November 10, four days
after the election.) It is unbelievable to
me that, once again, we could not stand
up to the challenge.
Our esteemed governor, Rick Scott,
cut the days for early voting from 14 to


8 and, even though the lines were blocks
long from day one, the governor stood
fast in has assessment that eight days
was surely more than enough to handle
the load. His decision would be funny if
it weren't so sad.
Worse, thanks to our wise state legis-
lators, early-voting sites are restricted to
city halls and public libraries. In Dade
County, with more than 1.3 million
registered voters, we had a measly 20
locations where people could vote early.
Then we have the debacle dealing with
absentee ballots; another fiasco earning our


state the Flori-duh title. Is there any doubt
in anyone's mind that absentee ballot fraud
is alive and well in Flori-duh? And where
is Katherine Fernandez Rundle, our newly
re-elected State Attorney? Not a peep. Do
you think she might empanel a grand jury
to look into absentee ballot fraud? Don't
hold your breath.
Then we have the early-voting
miscue on the Sunday before Elec-
tion Day, where the county opened the
supervisor of elections' office to allow
voters to pick up and drop off, of all
things, absentee ballots only to have


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December 2012









Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez
countermand that operation and order
the doors closed, thereby incurring the
wrath of the masses demanding their
constitutional rights to an absentee ballot
or they would "Storm the Bastille!"
About an hour later the mayor came
to his senses and reopened the doors,
thus defusing another black eye for
Flori-duh, or at least recasting the whole
thing as a minor glitch. Regardless of
how this particular incident materialized,
the buck stops with the mayor on this
one. On this issue, the mayor and no
one else owes the public an apology.
Then we have the miscues on Election
Day itself. Multiple machines failed to oper-
ate properly, which is not unexpected for
any device that combines mechanics with
computers. Keep in mind, however, that
Miami-Dade County spent millions of our
tax dollars to replace all voting machines
in an effort to rectify the hanging-chad syn-
drome that marked the 2000 election. The
point was to give voters confidence that our
votes would not only count but be recorded
for the candidates we had selected.
Why not bring back the old gray
monsters that mechanically registered


our vote, kept a paper record of all votes
cast, and best of all, gave the voter a
sense of mission accomplished when the
red handle controlling the curtain was
pulled back and you could see all the
keys pop back up as each vote selected
was registered? Call me a dinosaur, but
that was voting.
Aside from the mechanical
failings, the biggest black eye
was the length of lines and the Y
inability of our elections de-
ass
apartment to adequately plan for
this. I mean, we were all told OCCL
weeks ago to expect round-the-
block waits because the ballot
was so long. So if I were the
elections supervisor, I would have
gone to my boss and said, "Boss, we are
facing another embarrassing moment for
Miami-Dade County if we are incapable
of handling the anticipated voter turnout
with an inadequate number of machines
and personnel to tackle the work load."
I remember as a kid that my dad
would instill in me the responsibility to
vote. He would tell me that all over the
world people stand in the bitter cold all
through the night to be able to stuff a


paper ballot into a box. And today, at the
ripe old age of 67, I see my father's ad-
monitions coming home to roost as many,
many voters here stood in lines into the
wee hours of the morning to register
their vote long after the presidential
race had been called, making their vote
on that particular race irrelevant.



ur vote does not make a rat's
Sbit of difference as to who will
ipy the White House for the next
four years.



Can you imagine that you have
endured all the mudslinging, robocalls,
presidential debates, shortened early-
voting periods, and been jerked around on
the process of obtaining and submitting
an absentee ballot only to find out in the
end that you are in line to vote for the
President of the United States in the year
2012 and your vote does not make a rat's
ass bit of difference as to who will occupy
the White House for the next four years?


Something is wrong, folks, if we, in
the most technologically advanced coun-
try in the world, with all our smartphones,
iPads, and the like, have to stand in a line
for hours to cast a vote. We have put a
man on the moon and a mechanical rover
on Mars, and we're still standing in line
to cast our vote for president. And even
that process is being screwed up by those
we hire to make it happen. How pathetic.
The really sad part is that, now that
the election is over, we will all go back
to our mundane lives and this, too, shall
pass. Our elected officials will pledge that
"steps will be taken to assure that this will
never happen again" and perhaps some
underlings will be subjected to disciplin-
ary action (probably not deserved) and
we may even have to spend some more of
our tax dollars to icsolh c the deficiencies
that this election brought to light."
The bottom line, however, is that,
regardless of what actions take place
post-election, come 2016, we will still be
Flori-duh to the rest of the nation. And,
my friends, as Lily Tomlin's child char-
acter used to say, that's the truth!

Feedback: letters(@ibiscaynetimes.com


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Culture: THE ARTS


Off the Basel Path 2012
Some recommended stops beyond the main event at the
convention center


By Melissa Wallen
BT Contributor
Miami is at its finest, although
not always its best behaved,
during Art Basel Miami
Beach. As international tourists
descend upon the esteemed bastion of
art and commerce, the rest of the area
pulls out all the stops, luring enthusi-
asts into oftentimes more refreshing
waters. This year will see a glut of
new satellite fairs, galleries, pop-up
restaurants, installations, dance parties,
concerts, exhibitions, and ultimately
confusion, as we dash headlong into
the craziest week on the cultural calen-
dar. Here are suggestions for some less
prominent but perhaps more interest-
ing events during Basel.


Plane Text: The first step off the Basel
path begins not forward but up, as we
direct our attention skyward. Plane Text
is a delightful spin on airplane advertise-
ments, in which a group of revered artists,
including John Baldessari and Jenny
Holzer, is given creative control of the
content flown overhead. These whimsical
adverts, pulled by three airplanes circling
Miami Beach, have been commissioned
by the Morgans Hotel Group, and will
begin making the rounds beginning De-
cember 4 at 9:00 a.m.
Plane Text by John Baldessari, Mel
Bochner, Martin Creed, Jenny Holzer, the
Estate ofSol LeWitt, Jack Pierson, Rich-
ard Prince, Kay Rosen, Alan Ruppersberg,
Gary Simmons, Alexis Smith, Hank Willis
Thomas, and Lawrence Weiner; Decem-
ber 4 ;h,. ;,hii 9, 9:00 a.m. to 1:00p.m.


Bliss, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson, New World Symphony's SoundScape wall.


Ragnar Kjartansson's Bliss: Fans of
the chaotic and absurd, rejoice! Ragnar
Kjartansson's 12-hour cinematic endur-
ance epic is making its way to the New
World Symphony's 7000-square-foot
SoundScape wall for a free all-night
screening. Bliss is a feat of arduous rep-
etition and subsequent spiraling chaos


Wild Blue Yonder, 2012, Kay Rosen, Plane Text.


-1"ftnil 1I
^ ^ ** ^ a m~ m fl f


involving the artist, Icelandic opera sing-
ers, and an earnest attempt to circumvent
self-awareness. Does it work? No, it
can't, but watching the actors desperately
try to re-create the final five minutes of
Mozart's The Marriage oj I ... for 12
hours straight proves to be both a chal-
lenge and transcendent.
Bliss, by Ragnar Kjartansson, Decem-
ber 8, 6:00p.m. to 6:00 a.m., New World
Symphony, 500 17th St., Miami Beach,
305-673-3330, free outdoor ....r,, i

KURJ. Considering the wounded genius
of Kurt Cobain's music and the linger-
ing mystery of his last days, it's no
surprise that artists find his troubled life
fertile ground for interpretation. The
Gusman Center examines the former
Nirvana lead's legend in a three-part
multidisciplinary exhibition, aptly titled
KURT, featuring video by experimental
filmmaker Adarsha Benjamin, a cho-
reographed re-creation of Nirvana's


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012


























Soul Manufacturing Corporation, 2012, Theaster Gates, Locust Projects.


KURT, 2012, Adarsha Benjamin, Olympia Theater at the Gusman.


landmark music video "Smells Like Teen
Spirit," and music by close friend and
Sonic Youth frontman Thurston Moore.
All we're missing is a seance.
KURT byAdarsha Benjamin, Ryan
Heffitngl tn. and Thurston Moore, Decem-
ber 6, 7:00 p.m., tickets $25 and $50, Olym-
pia Theater at the Gusman Center for the
PerformingArts, 174 E. Fil. -, St., Miami,
305-374-2444 or www.gusmancenter.org.

Painters Painting, a documentary by
Emile de Antonio: While we're busy get-
ting caught up in the glitz, glamour, and
commerce of the contemporary art world,
we should remember the creative ge-
niuses behind it all. Filmmaker Emile de
Antonio's restored documentary, Painters
Fioi,,,,i. is considered a landmark study
of the world at large and how it influ-
enced Abstract Expressionists between
the 1940s and 1970s. Artists interviewed
include Frank Stella, Willem de Kooning,
Jasper Johns, and Barnett Newman. A
must-see for anyone with even a fleeting
interest in the history of modern art.
Painters 1,,,oi, o by Emile de Antonio,
December 7 8:00p.m., Colony Theatre,


1040 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, 305-674-
1040. Free admission but!, i, ... .. I n,,

Theaster Gates's Soul Manufactur-
ing Corporation: Inspired by educa-
tional and entertainment programming
brought to illiterate workers in the
early industrial era, Theaster Gates's
powerful yet simple Soul Manufactur-
ing Corporation is the first in a series of
multi-city projects built into art exhibi-
tions. By employing the skills of work-
ers who will create arbitrary "things,"
the artist presents a bold statement on
the value of production and process.
Yoga instructors, DJs, and readers will
entertain and instruct both workers
and the audience during the exhibition.
Theaster Gates was recently awarded
the inaugural Vera List Center Prize for
Art and Politics, so be prepared to face
some tough questions pertaining to race,
labor, and art.
Soul Manufacturing Corporation
by Theaster Gates, ;li,. i,-i December
21, Locust Projects, 3852 N. Miami
Ave., Miami, 305-576-8570 or www.
locustprojects. org.


Design at Fairchild: Sitting Naturally
and Pardo on the Allee: There's no better
time of the year to visit Fairchild Tropical
Botanic Garden a lush oasis showcas-
ing the flora of South Florida and the
globe than during the mosquito-free
winter. Thankfully, the powers-that-be
have risen to the challenge of somehow
making Fairchild seem even more magical,
and have graced the grounds with hun-
dreds of lamps by Cuban-born artist and
designer Jorge Pardo. "Pardo on the Allee"
is the inaugural exhibition in Fairchild's
Design at Fairchild Arts Initiative, and was
originally shown at the Hammer Museum
in Los Angeles. Also on display are sculp-
tures designed specifically as seats, where
casual passersby can relax while savoring
the views throughout the park.
Design at Fairchild: Sitting Naturally
and Pardo on the Allee, December 1
;i,. ,oli, March 31, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30p.m.,
Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, 10901
Old Cutler Rd., Coral Gables, 305-667-
1651 or www.fairchildgarden.org.


Delano will re-create Club Silencio, the
mysterious cabaret from David Lynch's
surrealist nightmare, MulhollandDrive,
under the direction of the man himself.
Expect lots of pantomiming, exquisite
designer furniture, and expensive taste in
coffee-table reading material. Meanwhile,
the Lords South Beach hotel will be trans-
formed into an oversize I\ c nous. black
dog named Gypsy" who "will tell your
future" by barking and discharging smoke,
thanks to the New York Times's "artist of
the moment," Desi Santiago. While instal-
lation art takes three defiant steps back-
ward, there's no denying that it's going to
be one extremely dark, fun trip.
Silencio Miami by David Lynch and
the Morgans Hotel Group, December
4 ;h,. ',-'i 8, 11:00p.m. to 6:00 a.m.,
Delano South Beach, 1685 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach, 305-672-2000 or www.
delano-hotel.com.
The Black Lords by Desi \, I,'," '.
December 3 ;i,. bJi 9, 11:00 a.m. to
2:00 a.m., Lords South Beach, 1120 Col-
linsAve., Miami Beach, 305-674-7800 or
www.lordssouthbeach. com.


Nightlife Highlights: Two hotel installa-
tions stand proudly on opposite ends of the
spectrum of good and bad taste. First, the Feedback: letters@(biscaynetimes.com


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012







Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION


WYNWOOD GALLERY WALK & DESIGN
DISTRICT ART + DESIGN NIGHT
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2012

ART FAIRS

AQUA ART MIAMI
1530 Collins Ave, Miami Beach
Aqua Hotel
206-399-5506
www aquaartmiami com
December 6 through 9
Hours December 6, noon to 9 p m
December 7 through 8, 11 a m to 9 p m
December 9, 11a m to 4pm
Admission $10
VIP Reception December 5, 7:30 to 11 p.m.

ART AFRICA MIAMI
919 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
www artafricamlaml com
305-576-7101
December 7 through 9
Hours December 7 and 8, 11 a m to 7 p m
December 9, 11 am to 6 p m
VIP Reception December 6, 6 to 10 p.m.

ART ASIA
Midtown Miami
110 NE 36th St
212-268-6148
www artaslafair com
December 5 through 9
Hours December 5 through 8, 11 a m to 7 p m
December 9, 11 am to 6 p m
Admission $20

ART BASEL
Miami Beach Convention Center
1901 Convention Center Dr
www artbaselmlamlbeach com
December 6 through 9
Hours December 6 through 8, noon to 8 p m
December 9, noon to 6 p m
Admission $24-$90

ARTEXPO MIAMI
Midtown Miami
3011 NE 1st Ave
www artexpo-mlami com
December 5 through 9
Hours December 5, 11 a m to 7 p m
December 6 through 8, 11 a m to 8 p m
December 9, 11 am to 6 p m
Admission $15
VIP Reception December 4, 6 to 10 p.m.

ART MIAMI
Midtown Miami
NE 1st Avenue at 31st Street
520-529-1108
www art-miami com
December 4 through 9
Hours December 5, 6, and 8, 11 am to 7 p m
December 7, 11 am to 9 p m
December 9, 11 am to 6 p m
Admission $20
VIP Reception December 5, 5:30 to 10 p.m.

L -^


CONTEXT
Midtown Miami
3101 NE 1stAve, Miami
305-515-8573
www contextartmlaml com
December 5 through 9
Hours December 5, 6, and 8, 11 a m
to 7 p m
December 7, 11 a m to 8 30 p m
December 9, 11 a m to 6 p m
Admission $20-65
VIP Reception December 4, 5:30 to
10 p.m.

DESIGN MIAMI
Miami Beach Convention Center
Meridian Avenue and 19th Street
305-572-0866
www designmlaml com
December 5 through 9
Hours December 5, 11 am to 9 p m
December 6 through 8, noon to 8 p m
December 9, noon to 6 p m
Admission $25
Collector's Preview December 4,
noon to 6 p.m.
VIP Reception December 4, 6 to 9
p.m.

FOUNTAIN MIAMI
2505 N Miami Ave, Miami Moira
917-650-3760 Miami,
www fountainartfair com
December 7 through 9
Hours December 7 and 8, noon to 7
pm
December 9, noon to 5 p m
Admission $10-15
VIP Reception December 6, noon to 5 p.m.
Public Reception December 7, 7 p.m. to midnight

INK MIAMI ART FAIR
1850 Collins Ave, Miaml Beach
Suites of Dorchester
212-674-6095
www inkartfair com
December 5 through 9
Hours December 5, noon to 5 p m
December 6 through 8, 10 a m to 7 p m
December 9, 10 am to 3 p m
Admission Free

JUST MAD MIAMI
2136 NW 1st Ave, Miami
wwwjustmadmia com
December 7 through 9
Hours December 7 and 8, noon to 8 p m
December 9, noon to 7 p m
Admission $15-25
VIP Reception December 6, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

MIAMI PROJECT
Midtown Miami
NE 1st Avenue at 30st Street
212-260-8100
www miami-project com
December 4 through 9
Hours December 5, 11 am to 5 p m
December 6 and 8, 11 a m to 7 p m


Holohan, Untitled (Copied II), video animation, 3-channel video, 2012, at
Art Museum.


December 7, 11 a m to 8 30 p m
December 9, 11 a m to 6 p m
Admission $20-35
Reception December 4, 5:30 to 10 p.m.

MIAMI RIVER ART PROJECT
400 SE 2nd Ave, Miami
James L Knight Center
www mlamlriverartfair com
December 5 through 9
Hours December 5 through 8, 11 a m to 8 p m
December 9, 10 a m to 2 pm
Admission $10-30
Reception December 4, 6 to 10 p.m.

NADA ART FAIR
6701 Collins Ave, Miami Beach
Deauville Beach Resort
212-594-0883
www newartdealers org
December 6 through 9
Hours December 6, 2 to 8 p m
December 7 and 8, 11 am to 8 p m
December 9, 11 a m to 5 p m
Admission Free
VIP Reception December 6, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

OVERTURE MIAMI
Midtown Miami
Buena Vista Avenue at NW 34th Street
305-318-6554
www overturemiami com
December 5 through 9
Hours December 5 through 8, 11 a m to 7 p m
December 9, 11 a m to 6 p m


Admission $15
VIP Reception December 4, 7 to 9 p.m.

POOL ART FAIR
1100 Biscayne Blvd Miami
Sky House Marquis
212-604-0519
www poolartfair com
December 7 through 9
Hours 3 to 10 p m
VIP Reception December 6, 6 to 11 p.m.

PULSE MIAMI
1400 N Miam Ave, Miami
The Ice Palace
212-255-2327
www pulse-art com
December 6 through 9
Hours December 6, 1 to 7 p m
December 7 and 8, 11 a m to 7 pm
December 9, 11 am to 5 pm
Admission $20-25
VIP Reception December 4, 7 to 10 p.m.
VIP Brunch December 6, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

RED DOT MIAMI
Midtown Miami
3011 NE 1st Ave 917-273-8621
www reddotfair com
December 4 through 9
Hours December 5 through 9, 11 a m to 7 pm
December 6 through 8, 11 a m to 8 pm
December 9, 11 am to 6 pm
Admission $15
Reception December 4, 6 to 10 p.m.


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December 2012







Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION


SCOPE MIAMI
Midtown Miami
110 NE 36th St
212-268-1522
www scope-art com
December 5 through 9
Hours December 5 through 8, 11 a m to 7 p m
December 9, 11 am to 6 p m
Admission $20
VIP Reception December 4, 3 to 9 p.m.

SCULPT MIAMI
46 NW 36th St, Miami
305-448-2060
www sculptmlaml com
December 3 through 9
Hours 11 am to 8 pm
Admission Free

SELECT FAIR
1732 Collins Ave, Miami Beach
Catalina Hotel
www select-fair com
December 6 through 9
Hours December 6 through 8, 11 a m to 8 p m
December 9, 11 a m to 6 p m
Admission Free
VIP Reception December 5, 7 to 10 p.m.
Reception December 7, 6 to 10 p.m.

SEVEN
2637 N Miami Ave, Miami
973-452-3283
www seven-miami com
December 4 through 9
Hours December 4, 1 p m to 8 p m
December 5 through 8, 11 a m to 7 p m
December 9, 11 am to 5 p m
Admission Free
Reception December 4, 6 to 8 p.m.

UNTITLED
12th Street and Ocean Drive, Miami Beach
www art-untitled com
December 5 through 9
Hours December 5 through 8, 11 a m to 7 p m
December 9, 11 am to 6 p m
Admission $20
VIP Reception December 3, 6 to 9 p.m.

VERGE ART MIAMI BEACH
1001 Collins Ave, Miami Beach
Essex House
1020 Ocean Dr, Miami Beach
Clevelander Hotel
312-612-2270
www vergeartfair com
December 7 through 9
Hours December 7 and 8, noon to 8 p m
December 9, noon to 6 p m
Admission Free
Reception December 6, 6 to 10 p.m.

GALLERIES
101/EXHIBIT
101 NE 40th St, Miami
305-573-2101
www 101exhibit com


c .


Theaster Gates, Soul Food Rickshaw for Sitting, wood and wheels, 2012
at Locust Projects.


December 4 through January 31
"Se7n" by Chambliss Giobbi

ABBA FINE ART
233 NW 36th St, Miami
305-576-4278
www abbafineart com
Call gallery for exhibition information

ACND GALLERY OF ART
4949 NE 2nd Ave, Miami
305-751-8367
www acnd net
Through January 18 "Art from Within" with Yunler
Cervino Oliver, and Jose Ramirez

ALBERTO LINERO GALLERY
2294 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
786-287-7789
www albertolinerogallery com
Call gallery for exhibition information

ALEJANDRA VON HARTZ FINE ARTS
2630 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-438-0220
www alejandravonhartz net
December 3 through January 26
"Paper Folding" by Odalis Valdivieso
"Ceremony" by Matthew Deleget
"Painted/Stacked 2012" by Russell Maltz
"Rio Corrente, Running River" by Artur Lescher

ALMA FINE ART
2242 NW 1st PI, Miami
305-576-1150
www almafineart com
Through January 20
"Vidente" by Marta Maria Perez Bravo
"Implications" with Veronica Grassl, Paula Herrera,
Diana Maguire, Roberto Martinez, and Yanina Monti


ART FUSION
1 NE 40th St, Miami
305-573-5730
www artfusiongallery com
Through December 17 "Fusion IX Seducing the
Globe" with various artists

ART NOUVEAU GALLERY
348 NW 29th St, Miami
305-573-4661
www artnouveaugaleria com
Through January 30 Rafael Barrios

ART WORK IN PROGRESS
171 NW 36th St, Miami
305-573-4009
www jacques-harvey com
Call gallery for exhibition information

ARTSEEN GALLERY
2215 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-237-3559
http //artseenspace wordpress com
Call gallery for exhibition information

ASCASO GALLERY
2441 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-571-9410
www ascasogallery com
Through January 31
"Recent Works" by Jose Antonio Davila

BAKEHOUSE ART COMPLEX
561 NW 32nd St, Miami
305-576-2828
www bacfl org
Through January 18 "If a Tree Falls, a Chain
Reaction "with various Bakehouse artists, juried by
Carol Jazzar, curated by Ananda DeMello
'Take Me Home" with various Bakehouse artists


VIP Reception December 8, 7-11 pm
Admission $10

BAS FISHER INVITATIONAL
122 NE 11th St, Miami
DWNTWN ArtHouse
www basfisherinvitational com
December 3 through January 15
"Shell-Reflexive" with Absolute Vitality Inc (Keller/
Kosmas), Simon Denny, Yngve Holen, Ilja Karilampl,
Nedberg & Kantun, Katja Novitskova, Halvor Renning,
Timur SI-Qin, Spring Break, Anne de Vrles, and Phillip
Zach
December 8 "Weird Miami Bus Tours" by Spring Break
Reception December 4, 6 to 9 p.m.
VIP Reception December 7, 9 a.m. to noon

BLACK SQUARE GALLERY
2248 NW 1st PI Miami
786-999-9735
www blacksquaregallery com
Through January 5
Scribe's House" by Pablo Lehmann

BORINQUEN ART GALLERY
" 100 NE 38th St, Miami
305-491-1526
www borinquenhealth org
Call gallery for exhibition information

BRIDGE RED STUDIOS / PROJECT SPACE
12425 NE 13th Ave #5, North Miami
305-978-4856
www bridgeredstudlos com
Through January 20 "The Rule of Law" by Joe Nicastrl
"Paintl" with George Bethea, Lucas Blanco, Juan
Carballo, Shirley Henderson, Mary Maim, Jordan
Massengale, Yolanda Sanchez, and Claudia Scalise

BUENA VISTA BUILDING
180 NE 39th St, Suite 120, Miami
Through December 9
"Inventory 03 Experience of a City" with Rodolfo
Agrella, Bell Design Factory, Jacob Brillhart, Chen
Chen and Kal Williams, Paul Clemence, Anabella
Georgl, Paul Kopkau, LMNOQ, Lemon Yellow, Shawn
Maximo, Mr O, Luls Pons, Michael Whitney, Amore
de Madre, Marko Brajovik, Leo Capote, and Guto
Requena
Through December 10
"Inside/OUT" by Ray Azcuy
December 1 through 28 "100 Years of Artitude 1913-
2013 Pataphysics for Dummies" with various artists,
curated by Swampspace Gallery
December 5 through 9
"Ping Pong" with Robert Chambers, Tommerup / Brant,
Jacek Kolasinskl, Walter Robinson, Avra Jain, Bhakti
Baxter and Mel Xian Qiu, Dmitry Kmelnitskl, Susan
Sironi, York Chang and Sue Iron, Aldo Bonato, Dirk
Bonsma, and Street Art Video's with "Dare" and others,
curated by Anthony Thomas and Team
"Architecture for Dogs" with Atelier Bow Wow, Hiroshl
Nalto, Kazuyo Sejima, Kengo Kuma, Konstantin
Grclc, MVRDV, Relser+ Umemoto, Shigeru Ban, Sou
Fujimoto, Torafu, and Toyo Ito, curated by Kenya Hara
December 5 through 12
"Storefront" with Kevin Arrow, Lornel Beltran, Christy
Gast, Daniel Clapp, Patti Hernandez, Crlstina Lei
Rodriguez, Nicolas Lobo, Justin H Long, Robert Lone,


) InnerBalance
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December 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


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December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


\.








Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION


Hugo Montoya, Gean Moreno, Ernesto Oroza, Carlos
Rigau, Cesar Trasobares, and Viking Funeral, curated
by Ibett Yanez
December 7 through 14
"Circumferences Reforming Peel Till They Bloom" by
Sumakshi Singh

BUZZART
2750 NW 3rd Ave, Suite 6, Miami
305-571-8100
www buzz-art net
Through December 14
"A Retrospective 1989-2012 Fotografias" by Juan
Carlos Alom
Reception December 7, noon to 6 p.m.

CALDWELL / LINFIELD GALLERY & STUDIO
8351 NE 8th Ct, Miami
305-754-2093
www susannacaldwell com
Through June 1
"Mahogany Sculptures and Sculptural Offering Bowls
carved from Florida Hardwoods" by
Susanna Caldwell

CAROL JAZZAR CONTEMPORARY ART
158 NW 91st St, Miami Shores
305-490-6906
www cjazzart com
By appointment carol@cjazzart com
Through December 9
"Byways" by Robert Huff
Reception December 7, 7 to 11 p.m.

CARIDI GALLERY
758 NE 125th St North Miami
786-202-5554
www carldlgallery com
Through December 15
"Aguaviva" by Cecilia Sanchez Vegas

CASSINA MIAMI SHOWROOM
3800 NE Miami Ct, Miami
www Iccollection cassina com
Through January 12
"The Interior of the Cabanon, Le Corbusler 1952,
Cassina Reconstruction 2006" by Le Corbusier, curated
by Jean-Louis Cohen
VIP Reception December 6, 7 to 9 p.m.

CENTER FOR VISUAL COMMUNICATION
541 NW 27th St, Miami
305-571-1415
www visual org
Call gallery for exhibition information

CHAREST-WEINBERG GALLERY
250 NW 23rd St, Miami
305-292-0411
www charestwelnberg com
Call gallery for exhibition information

DANIEL AZOULAY GALLERY
Shops at Midtown Miami
Store # 120 Buena Vista Blvd Miami
305-576-1977
www danielazoulaygallery com
Call gallery for exhibition
information


_. ...

Rebeca Raney, Bathtub, mixed-aqua resin, fiberglass, wire, fabric, faux
fur, epoxy, hand embroidery, 2012, at Primary Projects.


DAVID CASTILLO GALLERY
2234 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-573-8110
www davidcastillogallery com
Through December 31
"Dark Flow Lurking" with Anna Betbeze, Sanford
Biggers, Kate Gilmore, Valerle Hegarty, Pepe Mar,
Melvin Martinez, Fabian Pena, Gamaliel Rodriguez,
Xaviera Simmons, Shinique Smith, Frances Trombly,
and Brenna Youngblood

DIANA LOWENSTEIN FINE ARTS
2043 N Miami Ave, Miami
305-576-1804
December 5 through January 31
Lorls Cecchini
VIP Reception December 4, noon to 4 p.m.
Reception December 8, 6 to 10 p.m.

DIASPORA VIBE GALLERY
3938 N Miami Ave, Miami
786-536-7801
www diasporavibe net
Call gallery for exhibition information

DIMENSIONS VARIABLE
100 NE 11th St, Miami
DWNTWN ArtHouse
305-607-5527
www dimenslonsvarlable net
Through January 5
"Paper Folding" by Odalis Valdivieso

DINA MITRANI GALLERY
2620 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
786-486-7248
www dinamitranigallery com
Through January 11
"Paris" by Willy Ronis
Reception December 3, 6 to 9 p.m.


DORSCH GALLERY
151 NW 24th St, Miami
305-576-1278
www dorschgallery com
Call gallery for exhibition information

DOT FIFTYONE ART SPACE
51 NW 36th St, Miami
305-573-9994
www dotfiftyone com
Through January 31
"leit mo tif" by Mauro Giaconi, Omar Barquet, Jose
Luls Landet, Gonzalo Fuenmayor, Leonel Matheu,
Liliane Eberle, Jorge Mino, Leslie Gabaldon, Yanina
Szalkowicz, and Hernan Cedola
Reception December 3, 7:30 to 10 p.m.

DURBAN SEGNINI GALLERY
2145 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
www durbansegninl com
Through February 19
"Painting and Architecture" by Cesar Paternosto

ELITE ART EDITIONS
46 NW 36th St, Miami
754-422-5942
www elitearteditions com
Call gallery for exhibition
information

ETRA FINE ART
50 NE 40th St, Miami
305-438-4383
www etrafineart com
Through December 7
"Retrospective" by Marlo Velez
December 8 through January 11
"Winter Group Show" with Rainer Lagemann, Christian
Awe, Douglass Freed, Hunt Slonem, and Marlo Velez
Reception December 8, 7 to 10 p.m.


FREDRIC SNITZER GALLERY
2247 NW 1st PI, Miami
305-448-8976
www snitzer com
December 1 through January 5
"35th Anniversary Group Show" with Alice Aycock,
Zack Balber, Hernan Bas, Jose Bedia, Lornel Beltran,
Timothy Buwalda, Zhivago Duncan, Naomi Fisher,
Mauricio Gonzalez, Ridley Howard, Jessica Laino,
Natalya Laskis, Maria Martinez-Canas, Gavin Perry,
Jon Pylypchuk, Bert Rodriguez, Crlstina Lei Rodriguez,
Diego Singh, Michael Vasquez
Reception December 6, 7 to 10 p.m.

GALERIE HELENE LAMARQUE
125 NW 23rd St, Miami
305-582-6067
www galerlehelenelamarque com
Call gallery for exhibition information

GALERIE SCHUSTER MIAMI
2085 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
786-266-2445
www galleryschuster com
Call gallery for exhibition information

GALLERY 212 MIAMI CONTEMPORARY ART
GALLERY
2407 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
786-431-1957
www gallery212miami com
Through January 1
"Art Basel 2012" with Pedro Zubizarreta, Sergey
Ashkeev, Irna Davydova, Agata Agatowska, Florlan
Fausch, and Maxim Wakultschik

GALLERY DIET
174 NW 23rd St, Miami
305-571-2288
www gallerydiet com
Through December 31
"The Working Day" by Ohad Meromi

GARY NADER FINE ART
62 NE 27th St, Miami
305-576-0256
www garynader com
Call gallery for exhibition information

GENERAL AUDIENCE PRESENTS
769 NE 125th St North Miami
786-467-0941
www generalaudiencepresents com
December 4 through February 2
"Yawar Mallku Look For Me In The Whirlwind" by
William Cordova
Reception December 4, 5 to 10 p.m.

HARDCORE ARTS CONTEMPORARY SPACE
3326 N Miami Ave, Miami
305-576-1645
www hardcoreartmlaml com
December 3 through March 2
"Recycle" by Consuelo Castaneda

HAROLD GOLEN GALLERY
2294 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-989-3359
www haroldgolengallery com


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com








Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION


Through December 29
"Photography" by Blake Fisher

IDEOBOX ARTSPACE
2417 N Miaml Ave Mami
305-576-9878
www ideobox com
December 3 through February 15
"Between Two Continents Spanish Geometric
Abstraction in Latin America" with Manolo Calvo, Jesus
de la Sota, Jose Maria de Labra, and Jose Duarte,
curated by Adolfo Wilson
VIP Reception December 6, 7 to 10 p.m.
Reception December 7, 7 to 10 p.m.

JUAN RUIZ GALLERY
301 NW 28th St, Miami
786-310-7490
www juanrulzgallery com
Through December 29
"One Of Us Can Be Wrong And Other Essays" by
Ruben Torres Llorca
Reception December 8, noon to 2 p.m.

KABE CONTEMPORARY
123 NW 23rd St, Miami
305-573-8142
www kabecontemporary com
December 3 through February 28
"From Color to Motion" by Antonio Asis
Reception December 3, 6 to 10 p.m.

KAVACHNINA CONTEMPORARY
46 NW 36th St, Miami
305-448-2060
www kavachnina com
Through January 10
"Eclectic Sweetness" by Noeml Sanguinetti
"The Origin of Originality" by Jon Davis

KELLEY ROY GALLERY
50 NE 29th St, Miami
305-447-3888
www kelleyroygallery com
Call gallery for exhibition information

KIWI GALLERY
48 NW 29th St, Miami
305-200-3047
www klwlartsgroup com
Ongoing
William John Kennedy's Fine Art Photography
Collection of Early Pop Artists

LELIA MORDOCH GALLERY
2300 N Miami Ave, Miami
786-431-1506
www galerleleliamordoch com
Call gallery for exhibition information

LOCUST PROJECTS
3852 N Miami Ave, Miami
305-576-8570
www locustprojects org
Through December 12
"Soul Manufacturing Corporation" by Theaster Gates
"Wound, Bound, Tied and Knottedem" by Jacin
Giordano
"Bus Shelter Project" by Nicole Eisenman


Bill Viola, The Quintet of the Astonished, color video rear projection,
2000, at Museum of Contemporary Art.


MAJOR GALLERY
3030 NE 2nd Ave, Miami
http //maormiami org
Call gallery for exhibition information

MARKOWICZ FINE ART
114 NE 40th St, Miami
786-362-5546
www markowiczfineart com
Through December 28
"Exhibition Beginnings & Ends" by Marcus
December 7 through 9
Maurice Renoma
December 15 through 31
"Head in the Clouds" by Alain Godon

MESTIZO CITY
81 NE 40th St, Miami
www mestizocity com
December 6 through 8
"Mestizo City" by Henry R Munoz
Reception December 6, 6:30 to 10 p.m.

MIAMI-DADE COLLEGE, CENTRE GALLERY
300 NE 2nd Ave, Miami
Bldg 1, Room 1365
305-237-3696
www mdc edu
Through December 21
"Sweat" with various artists

MIAMI-DADE COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART AND
DESIGN
Freedom Tower
600 Biscayne Blvd Miami


305-237-7700
www mdc edu
Through December 14
"CINTAS Foundation Fellows Competition Exhibition"
with various artists
Through February 2
"Toledo/Toledo Full Circle" by Isabel and Ruben Toledo
"Where Ideas Are Born A Juggler's Notebooks" by
Manuel Estrada
December 1 through January 26 "Foreverglades" with
Cracking Art Group and William Sweetlove

MIAMI-DADE COLLEGE, GALLERY NORTH
11380 NW 27th Ave, Miami
305-237-1532
www mdc edu
Through January 11
"Passages and Other Exploratory Journeys" with Victor
Gomez and Alena Fresquet

MIAMI-DADE COLLEGE, KENDALL GALLERY
1110 SW 104th St, Miami
305-237-2322
www mdc edu/kendall
December 7 through January 28
"TBD" with Jennifer Baslle, Tony Chirinos, Alberto
Meza, and Yomarle Silva
Reception December 6, 6 to 9 p.m.

MICHAEL JON GALLERY
20 NE 41st St, Suite 2, Miami
305-760-9030
www mlchaeljongallery com
Through December 1
"Crocuta Crocuta" by Krlsten VanDeventer


MICHAEL PEREZ POP ART GALLERY
Shops at Midtown Miami
Store #120 Buena Vista Blvd Miami
516-532-3040
www mlchaelperez-artist com
Call gallery for exhibition information

MYRA GALLERIES
177 NW23rd St, Miami
631-704-3476
www myragallerles com
Call gallery for exhibition information

NEW WORLD GALLERY
New World School of the Arts
25 NE 2nd St, Miami
305-237-3597
Call gallery for exhibition
information

NINA TORRES FINE ART
1800 N Bayshore Dr, Miami
305-395-3599
www ninatorresfineart com
Through December 22
"World Tour of Contemporary Art Miami 2012" with
various artists

NORMAN LIEBMAN STUDIO
2561 N Miam Ave, Miami
305-573-3572
www norman-liebman-studio con
Call gallery for exhibition information

0. ASCANIO GALLERY
2600 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-571-9036
www oascanlogallery com
Call gallery for exhibition information

OHWOW
743 Washington Ave, Miami Beach
www oh-wow com
December 6 through 9
"It An't Fair" with various artists
Reception December 6, 6 to 9 p.m.

OM GALLERY
8650 Biscayne Blvd Suite 21, Miami
305-458-5085
Through December 31
"Animals" by Hausey Leplat and
Julien Garcla

ONCE ARTS GALLERY
170-C NW 24th St, Miami
786-333-8404
www oncearts com
Ongoing
Pablo Gentile, Jalme Montana, Jalme Apraez, and
Patricia Chaparro

OXENBERG FINE ART
50 NE 29th St, Miami
305-854-7104
www oxenbergart com
Through January 3
"The Paintings of Ashley Collins" by
Ashley Collins


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December 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


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December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com







Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION


I
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lamps, steel armature, wood panels and pleats, Plexiglas mirrors, 2011,
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Dec. 26, 27 & 28, 2012

Jan. 2, 3 & 4,2013

Time: 9 am-4 pm


Ages: 6-12

Fee: $120.00 per week









mtcmiami.org

(305) 751-9550


MTC
miami theater center


PAN AMERICAN ART PROJECTS
2450 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-573-2400
www panamericanart com
Through January 5
"Un pais, una ilusl6n (A Country, an Illusion)" by Abel
Barroso
PAREDES FINE ARTS STUDIO
2311 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-534-2184
www miguelparedes com
Ongoing
"Elements of an Artist" by Miguel Paredes
PRIMARY PROJECTS
4141 NE 2nd Ave, Suite 104, Miami
www primaryprojectspace com
info@primaryflight com
December 6 through January 26
"RANEYTOWN" by Rebeca Raney
Reception December 6, 7 to 10 p.m.
SAGAMORE, THE ART HOTEL
1671 Collins Ave, Miami Beach
305-535-8088
www sagamorehotel com
December 5 through 9
"Fundamental 2012 Selections from the Cricket Taplin
Collection" with various artists
Reception December 8, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
SUMMER GALLERY
82 NE 29th St, Miami


SCainrlW Ftoai. am ame. E.guic,
TnuCk, S.IV AV A rvi d m pIir
.Baat rpn, wrudng daCkakldk erv
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0o1 .... cft r. t.ore s


305-441-2005
www artnet com/sammergallery html
Call gallery for exhibition information
SPINELLO PROJECTS
2930 NW 7th Ave, Miami
786-271-4223
www spinelloprojects com
Through January 5
"Closer" with Abby Double, Agustina Woodgate, Ana
Mendez, Antonla Wright, Federco Nessi, Ingrd Lee,
Manny Prieres, Naama Tsabar, Reeve Schumacher,
Robert Montgomery, Rowan Smith, Ruben Millares,
Sinisa Kukec, and TYPOE
Reception December 4, 7 to 10 p.m.
STASH GALLERY
162 NE 50th Terr, Miami
305-992-7652
www stashgallery com
Call gallery for exhibition information
SWAMPSPACE GALLERY
150 NE 42nd St, Miami
http //swampspace blogspot com/
swampstyle@gmall com
Call gallery for exhibition information
TONY WYNN MODERN ART GALLERY
3223 NE 2nd Ave, Miami
786-536-9799
www tonywynn com
Ongoing
"Patriotica" by Tony Wynn


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com December 2012


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012







Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION


THE ARMORY STUDIOS
572 NW 23rd St, Miami
www mlamithinkers com
December 7 through 9
"Miami Independent Thinkers" with various artists
VIP Reception December 6, 5 to 9 p.m.

THE JACQUELINE FALCONE BED AND
BREAKFAST
1040 NE 82nd St, Miami
By appointment jacqueline falcone@gmall com
Through December 12
"Marriage, Blood, and Adaptation" with Dogan
Arslanoglu, Kevin Arrow, P Scott Cunningham, Sinisa
Kukec, Ragnar Kjartansson, Kenton Parker

THE LUNCH BOX GALLERY
310 NW 24th St, Miami
305-407-8131
www thelunchboxgallery com
December 6 through February 2
"Craters" by Michael G Zimmerer
"Objectified" with Henry Hargreaves, Linus Morales,
Jose Joaquin Figueroa, and Rodolfo Vanmarcke
Reception December 6, 6 to 10 p.m.
THE SCREENING ROOM
2626 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
December 3 through January 6
"Anne Marie Was Here" by RPM Project
Reception December 3, 5 to 9 p.m.
UNDER THE BRIDGE
12425 NE 13th Ave North Miami
305-978-4437
Through December 31
"Mumbo Jumbo" with Fredric Snitzer and Justin Mills,
Bill Henry, Karen Rifas, Allen Walter, and New World
School of the Arts Faculty

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI GALLERY
2750 NW 3rd Ave, Suite 4, Miami
305-284-3161
www as miami edu/art
Through January 25
"Fifth Annual Cane Art Fair" with various artists

UNIX FINE ART GALLERY
2219 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-496-0621
www unixfineart com
Ongoing
Alexis Torres

WALTMAN ORTEGA FINE ART
2233 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-576-5335
www waltmanortega com
Through December 22
"Barcode" by Jorge Enrlque
"Closer" by Jerome Lagarrigue
WYNWOOD WALLS
NW 2nd Avenue between 25th and 26th streets
305-573-0658
www thewynwoodwalls com
Ongoing
"Wynwood Walls" with Retna, How & Nosm, Roa, b, The
Date Farmers, Saner, Sego, Liqen, Neuzz, Falle, Vhils,


Interesni Kazkl, Kenny Scharf, Nunca, Shepard Fairey,
Aiko, Ryan McGinness, Stelios Faltakis, and avaf
YEELEN ART GALLERY
250 NW 23rd St, Unit 306, Miami
954-235-4758
www yeelenart com
Call gallery for exhibition information

ZADOK GALLERY
2534 N Miami Ave, Miami
305-438-3737
www zadokgallery com
Through December 2
"Tapestries?" with Chuck Close, William T Wiley, Hung
Llu, Doug Hall, Enrlque Chagoya, Deborah Oropallo,
Guy Dlehl, and Mesaml Teraoka
December 6 through February 18
"Void and Substance" by Li Hui

MUSEUM & COLLECTION
EXHIBITS

ARTCENTER/SOUTH FLORIDA
800 Lincoln Rd Miami Beach
305-674-8278
www artcentersf org
December 1 through January 27
"The Gift of the Present Moment" by Lazaro Amaral and
Chloe Firetto-Toomey
December 5 through 26
"Migrating Inwards" with Luls Garcla-Nerey, Wendy
Wischer, Antonia Wright, and David Zalben
Reception December 5, 7 p.m. to midnight
December 15 through February 17
"Smoke Signals Istwa, Palsajes and Allegories" with
Onyedlka Chuke, Yanira Collado, Lourdes Correa-
Carlo, Rashawn Griffin, Leslie Hewitt, Glexis Novoa,
Howardena Pindell, Jerome Reyes, Carlos Sandoval
de Leon, Onajide Shabaka, Noelle Theard, Robert
Thlele, Anna Tsouhlarakis, and Mary Valverde
Reception December 19, 6 to 10 p.m.

BASS MUSEUM OF ART
2100 Collins Ave, Miami Beach
305-673-7530
www bassmuseum org
December 6 through March 17
"The Endless Renaissance Six Solo Artist Projects"
with Eija Lllsa Ahtila, Barry X Ball, Walead Beshty,
Hans Peter Feldmann, Ged Qulnn, and Araya
Rasdjarmrearnsook
VIP Reception December 5, 9 p.m. to midnight

CIFO (Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation)
1018 N Miaml Ave, Miami
305-455-3380
www clfo org
December 5 through March 3
"Unsaid/Unspoken" with various artists, curated by
Moacir dos Anjos and Jose Roca

CRAIG ROBINS COLLECTION
3841 NE 2nd Ave, Miami
Dacra
305-531-8700
www dacra com
Ongoing Richard Tuttle, Marlene Dumas, John


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mtcmiami.org

(305) 751-9550


December 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


MTC
miami theater center








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December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION


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Ruben Torres Llorca, Watch me disappear, mixed media, 2012, at Juan
Ruiz Gallery.


Baldessar, Elizabeth Peyton, and Kal Althoff, curated
by Tiffany Chestler
DE LA CRUZ COLLECTION CONTEMPORARY ART
SPACE
23 NE 41st St, Miami
305-576-6112
www delacruzcollection org
Ongoing "Works from the Collection of Rosa and
Carlos de la Cruz" with various artists
FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY FROST
ART MUSEUM


10975 SW 17th St, Miami
305-348-2890
thefrost flu edu
Through December 9
"Material and Meaning Earthenware, Stoneware, and
Porcelain from The Wolfsonian-FlU Collection" with
various artists
"Fragile Nature The Florida Artist Series" by Mark
Messersmith
Through January 13
"Reflections Across Time Seminole Portraits" with
various artists, curated by Annette B Fromm


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BiscyneTims ww.Bscane~ies~om eceber201


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012








Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ART BASEL EDITION


"Fluorescent Light Sculptures" by Ivan Navarro
Through February 24
"To Beauty A Tribute to Mike Kelley" with various artists
Through May 20
"American Sculpture in the Tropics" with John Henry,
Albert Paley, Dennis Oppenhelm, Chakala Booker, and
Verina Baxter

LEGAL ART (CANNONBALL)
1035 N Miami Ave, Suite 200, Miami
www legalartmlaml org
Call gallery for exhibition information

LOWE ART MUSEUM, UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI
1301 Stanford Dr, Coral Gables
305-284-3535
www lowemuseum org
Through January 13
"Prints and Objects" by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
Through February 10
"Saintly Blessings A Gift of Mexican Retablos from
Joseph and Janet Sheln" with various artists
Through April 21
"Adapting and Adopting Waves of Change as
East Encounters West, Modern and Contemporary
Japanese Art" with various artists

MIAMI ART MUSEUM
101 W FlaglerSt, Miami
305-375-3000
www mlamlartmuseum org
Ongoing
"Between Here and There Modern and Contemporary
Art from the Permanent Collection"
Through June 2 "New Work Miami 2013" with Gideon
Barnett, Bhakti Baxter, Lorlel Beltran, Consuelo
Castaneda, Molra Holohan, Sinisa Kukec, Emmett
Moore, George Sanchez-Calderon, Tom Sclcluna,
Odalis Valdivieso, and SPRING BREAK, curated by
Rene Morales and Diana Nawi

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART
770 NE 125th St North Miami
305-893-6211


www mocanoml org
December 5 through March 3
"Liber Insularum" by Bill Viola
VIP Reception December 4, 7 to 9 p.m.

THE MARGULIES COLLECTION
591 NW 27th St, Miami
305-576-1051
www margulieswarehouse com
Through April 28
Anselm Klefer, Richard Long, William Tucker, Simryn
Gill, Doug Aitken, David Ellis, Roberto Lange, Kader
Attla, Nathalie Djurberg, Leandro Erlich, Sabelo
Mlangenl, Barbara Probst, and Wael Shawky, curated
by Katherine Hinds
Reception December 5, 9:30 a.m. to noon

THE RUBELL FAMILY COLLECTION
95 NW 29th St, Miami
305-573-6090
http //rfc museum
December 5 through August 2
"Alone Together" with various artists

VIZCAYA MUSEUM AND GARDEN
3251S Miami Ave, Miami
305-250-9133
www vizcayamuseum org
Through March 18 "The Light Club of Vizcaya A
Women's Picture" by Josiah McElheny
VIP Reception December 6, 9 p.m. to
midnight

WORLD CLASS BOXING
Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection
170 NW 23rd St, Miami
305-438-9908
www worldclassboxing org
Through February 28
"Raga For Fishwife" by Aaron Angell

Compiled by Melissa Wallen
Send listings, jpeg images, and events information to
art@biscaynetimes com


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AVENTURA, FL 33180

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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com 81


December 2012






Culture: EVENTS CALENDAR


Lighting Up for a Good Cause
For the 19th year, those utterly awesome holiday lights that
make NE 137th Terrace in North Miami glow electric will be
up from Saturday, December 8, through Saturday, Janu-
ary 5. Holiday Lights at Enchanted Place benefits Care
Resource, which heads up myriad community health pro-
grams. The organization's mission includes the fight against
HIV/AIDS, which Care Resource asks you to donate to as you
drive or walk through the light display. It's a perfect way to
bring the holiday cheer to your neighbors. Open every night
from 6:00 to 11:30 p.m. Go to www.careresource.org.


Not Your Usual Nutcracker
Those cute dancing sugarplums and
nutcrackers, we know them so well, and,
frankly, are a little bored with them. So
enter The Nutcracker: A Magical New
Play, from the innovative House Theatre
of Chicago, to change it all up. This is
less a dance than a play, and focuses on
a story element many may have forgot-
ten namely, that little Clara was really
trying to keep a broken home together.
This Nutcracker is a tearjerker, involving
dialogue, puppetry, music, and a touch of
magic. It's made more intimate by being
performed in the Carnival Studio of the
Arsht Center (1300 Biscayne Blvd.). It
runs from the beginning of the month
through Sunday, December 30, at vari-
ous times. Tickets are $45. Go to www.
arshtcenter.org.

Imagine No Limits
Last winter, Bistoury Physical Theatre
delivered the most powerful of locally pro-
duced performances in a long time, Assas-
sins For One. i Once again, the group
promises something rare and original with
IMAGINARIUMLife, one of the first
adult performances at the newly named
Miami Theater Center, formerly the
Playground Theatre (9806 NE 2nd Ave.).
Through a combination of dance, theater,
and film, the production tells the story of
Ruben, who has decided to abandon his


tormented real life for a parallel one of
the imagination. Performances run from
Thursday, December 6, through Satur-
day, December 22, at 8:00 p.m. Cost is
$20. Log onto www.mtcmiami.org.

Rocking the Revolution
Stretching the limits seems, thank-
fully, to be a season highlight at our
locally run spaces. Take Miami Light
Project's latest offering at the Lightbox
at Goldman Warehouse (404 NW 26th
St.), Dayna Hanson: Gloria's Cause.
Running from Thursday, December
6, through Saturday, December 8, at
8:00 p.m., choreographer and performer
Hanson acts out iconic moments from
the Revolutionary War and rock musi-
cals yes, you read that right. It's being
called one part music, one part history
lesson, with lots of social and comedic
commentary folded in. Cost is $25. Go
to www.miamilightproject.com.

Cool Beats
What's cool about the Chromatics
(Italians Do It Better) is how the group
mixes punk, synth-pop, and hi- and low-fi
sounds. What's even cooler is that the
group will perform at the Olympia Theater
at the Gusman Center (174 E. Flagler St.)
on Friday, December 7 at 8:00 p.m. It's
timed to coincide with Art Basel week,
and the funky electronic group will be


joined by Prince Rama, once from Florida
and now Brooklyn-based. Presented by
local Sweat Records (with a sponsor in
the Knight Foundation), it all makes for
a darkly seductive night. Tickets are $20.
Visit www.gusmancenter.org.

Havana Meets Vienna
Beginning Sunday, December 9, at 5:00
p.m. is the first installment in the "Four
Classical Sundays at Five" series at the
Aventura Arts and Cultural Center (3385
NE 188th St.). This performance, titled
A Voyage from Vienna to Cuba, will
feature Cuban pianist Jorge Luis Prats
playing classics from the European tradi-
tion, along with island favorites with his
own particular flair. Prats has performed
as a soloist with the Royal Philharmonic
and the BBC Orchestra of London, and
is noted for his interpretations of every
thing from Liszt to Lecuona. Tickets cost
$30. Details at www.aventuracenter.org.

Reeling in Miami
For the past eight years, the Borscht Film
Festival has been commissioning local
short films, some of which have gone
on to win big awards, including at the
Sundance Film Festival. So Borscht 8,
which takes place on Saturday, Decem-
ber 15, at 8:00 p.m. in the Ziff Ballet
Opera House at the Arsht Center, will
be a chance to catch the latest in local


River Stories
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HIqioi MN luiI Ili ll \\ FLiaIli SI I i.a lriflct il inc
Illll 10 do o lll Illollll S Ilic Ii' cl Ic\ CAll o101 i'c
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bo [i Iclc '_ i [ 11I 11 I nd ic iin5 1i I 1I i' ,I in on
Saiu rd.i. December 15 Cost is $44 1oi ninhibi k
$54 foi IiOincinbcibS Ciall ''n5-''5-l (21


New Year, New Vibe
Once upon a time, going to Bayfront
Park to celebrate New Year's Eve was
considered a somewhat dangerous
excursion into an unpopulated, dark
downtown Miami. That is no more.
These days, downtown is exploding
with light and people, and Monday,
December 31, in Bayfront Park (301
Biscayne Blvd.) is no longer a lonely
outing. At 7:00 p.m., a DJ dance
party will get started while the "Big
Orange" descends down the side of
the InterContinental Hotel. All this
will be followed by fireworks at mid-
night. It's free and family-friendly. No
bottles, cans, or coolers allowed. Call
305-358-7550.


filmmaking, including entries from more
established filmmakers, some from total
newcomers, and all of them about our
strange, smoldering metropolis. Tickets
are $25. Go to www.arshtcenter.org.

Sounds Like Teen Spirit
Those teenage years are the ultimate study in
contradiction- young bodies and minds so
filled with spirit and, at the same time, anxi-
ety; with the desire to shout about everything
and also remain sullenly silent. Tigertail
Productions has realized that for years now,
which is why it produces the Wordspeak
project, which lets teens, many from the
inner city, express themselves in spoken-
word poetry. This month Wordspeak,
Spoken Word for Teens will include a book
launch and poems read by teen contributors
at Books and Books (265 Aragon Ave., Coral
Gables) on Thursday, December 27, at 8:00
p.m. The event is free.

Compiled by BT arts editor Anne Tschida.
Please send information and images to
calendar@(,biscaynetimes.com.


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012





Columnists: PICTURE STORY


Before Tuttle, Before

Flagler, a Pristine Miami
A view of our past from the archives of HistoryMiami


By Paul S. George
Special to the BT
he Miami River was quiescent, as
seen here, in the era prior to the
arrival of the Florida East Coast
Railway. Interestingly, this photograph
of the pristine north bank of the Miami
River near the mouth of the stream was
taken by Ralph Munroe, a transplanted
New Yorker who had earlier squatted in
the vicinity of the site shown here, but
was, by the 1880s, a leading light in Co-
coanut Grove (its earlier spelling), five
miles south of the river.


Taken from the south bank of the
stream near the Brickell family's flour-
ishing trading post, this 1890 picture
was a "seasons greetings" card from the
Munroe family.
Back beyond the spreading coconut
palm trees stand two structures repre-
senting the old William English Slave
Plantation House/Fort Dallas. Built in
the 1840s, the taller building was the
home of William English, who owned
the plantation, while the small building,
used as slave quarters, would also host
members of the U.S. Army in 1849, and
again from 1855-1858.


In the year following this photo-
graph, 1891, Julia Tuttle, a widow from
Cleveland, Ohio, along with her two
children, moved onto the property, and
nothing would ever be the same again.
In 1895 Tuttle convinced the indus-
trialist Henry M. Flagler to extend his
railroad, then terminating in West Palm
Beach, to the Miami River. Its arrival


in April 1896 transformed a wilderness
with few inhabitants into the City of
Miami. The rest is, as they say, history.

To order a copy ofthis photo, please contact
HistoryMiami archives manager Dawn Hugh
at305-375-1623, Fhick l hi. ei netie. rg.

Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com


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Columnists: POLICE REPORTS


Biscayne Crime Beat
Compiled by Derek McCann


Good Thing They Weren't Friends
100 Block ofNE 82nd Street
A dispute occurred between roommates.
Victim referred to her male roommate as
"an acquaintance." The acquaintance was
asked to leave the premises, which caused
quite a problem. After turning in his key
peacefully, he came back to the apartment
and kicked down the door, screaming at
his former roommate/acquaintance: "I am
going to kill you!" The landlord was also
threatened. The man eventually left, but
not before throwing a garbage can at a car,
causing $1500 in damage. Police tracked
down the scumbag, who said he had no idea
what they were talking about or how that
small baggie of weed got into his pocket.


Alibis Are Important
100 Block ofNE 10th Street
A witness saw two men pulling down
a fence and notified area police. When
an officer arrived, one of the suspects
simply attempted to walk away from
the scene. The officer detained him. It
was then that the hapless man claimed,
"I did it for him; he said he was going
to give me five dollars." Five dol-
lars? (Judging from the Crime Beat
files, that money may have been for a
rock or perhaps deodorant.) When
the officer stopped the other suspect,
the man looked at his accomplice and
said, "That's him. He must be hiding
his tools there." Thus the officer had


spontaneous statements from each of
the suspects implicating one another.
The fence suffered $2500 in damage
and these backstabbing accomplices
spent the night in jail.

Nothing Fare About This Scenario
5400 block ofN. Miami Avenue
An inebriated woman entered a cab and
told the driver she had no cash, but that
she did have a debit card. She handed
him the card and told him her desired
destination. After driving several
blocks the driver crankily replied, "I'm
not an ATM." He stopped his car and
told her to get out. She did, but ne-
glected to get her debit card back. A few
hours later, money went missing from
her account, as the cabbie managed to
use her debit card at several locations.
Victim did manage to obtain video from
a gas station where the card was used.
No arrest as of yet. Beware: Cabbies
have become as desperate as their dead-
beat passengers.


suw'
ii


We Hope He Left a Big Tip
300 Block ofNE 79th Street
People run a risk when they valet park
their car. In this case, the worst-case
scenario occurred when the valet ac-
cidently gave the victim's car to someone
else. The car had not been returned by
press time. Guess it was an upgrade for


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December 2012









the person who decided to take it. Crime
Beat wonders how this could happen so
easily. Miamians: Learn to parallel park.

Caffeine Rush Helps Victims
Fend Off Purse Snatcher
135th Street and Biscayne Boulevard
At this Starbucks, where yuppies come to
mash on their laptops and look important,
a dastardly opportunist hid behind one of
the bushes, ready to waylay an innocent
victim. Two women were enjoying their
time together when they saw hands
coming from the bushes, grabbing their
purses off a chair. A tug-of-war ensued
between victims and criminal. The
victims won the battle. (Even the yuppies
in North Miami are tough.) The man es-
caped, only to be tracked down by North
Miami's Finest at Highland Village Park.

Thief Withdraws Laptop at Bank
900 Block ofNE 125th Street
People who live in North Miami need
to be aware that any open door is an
invitation for criminal shenanigans -
even when that door is the trunk of your
car. Victim was using the drive-through
ATM machine of this bank and had


mistakenly left his hatchback trunk open.
During his transaction, someone went
into the trunk and took a Hewlett Pack-
ard laptop. There is surveillance tape of
the incident. Please be aware of your sur-
roundings all the time, everywhere.

Brand-Conscious Criminal Hits Home
600 Block ofNE 133rd Street
An intruder removed some jalousies -
those quaint vestiges of a much simpler
time, when crooks didn't roam our streets
in such huge numbers pushed open the
window screen, and unlocked the door to
this home. Perpetrator did this while the
victim was sleeping. The mystery guest
took an Apple laptop, a pair of Air Jordan
sneakers, a True Religion shirt, Victoria's
Secret panties, and $850 in cash. Fortu-
nately, fingerprints were taken, so there's a
chance the identity of the culprit will be re-
vealed and perhaps some of the items will
be returned. (We're guessing the victim
probably doesn't want the panties back.)

How Phony Is This Story in Dog Years?
12200 Block ofNE 11th Court
Woman came home and noticed her door
open. When she entered, she saw an


unknown man standing in her kitchen.
He said he followed her dog to her house
because it had bitten a woman, and he
wanted to locate the owner. When the
victim did not believe the story, the man,
who called himself "Tavaris," said he
would find the bite victim in question
and would return. He even left a cell
number. He never returned. He neglect-
fully dropped an ID card outside and
the police were called. Victim does not
know how he got into the home, and
there is no sign of forced entry. Police
are now searching for the intruder.

Long Workout Leaves Man's
Finances Lighter
12700 Block oj i: .i ,..- Boulevard
Victim parked his vehicle in front of
U.S. 1 Fitness at approximately 4:00
p.m. After a two-hour workout, he
returned to his vehicle and noticed
damage to the lock on the driver's-side
door. The car's cup holder, which had
contained $15 in change, was missing.
Underneath that cup holder, the victim
had placed $100 in cash, and that was
also missing. To make matters worse,
his wallet was taken from the center


console. The wallet contained eight
credit cards, a driver's license, a Social
Security card, and $600 in cash. Crime
Beat understands not wanting to carry
a wallet in your gym clothes, but do it
anyway. Tell people it's a muscle.

Thieves Pop In, Pop Out with TV
400 Block ofNE 125th Street
Victim heard someone knocking on his
door and opened it to find his friend
Louie with an unidentified male. Both
men entered without an invitation.
Civilized people call this "the pop-in."
While Louie, the victim, and the victim's
wife engaged in casual conversation in
the victim's bedroom, the unidentified
male remained in the living room by
himself. Not wanting to be a rude host,
the victim went to check on him and saw
him unplugging a flat-screen television.
The man refused to stop despite the
victim's protestations. Louie and the man
then lifted the television onto a waiting
pickup truck and fled the scene. Please,
people, don't tolerate the pop-in any-
more. Not in this city.

Feedback: letters@obiscaynetimes.com


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December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Columnists: PARK PATROL


Giving Way to Green

Town Center Park in Sunny Isles Beach is a former strip-mall site
transformed into an oasis for the city's children


By Jim W. Harper
BT Contributor

he City of Sunny Isles Beach
packs in towering condominiums
throughout the thin strip of land
it occupies between the Atlantic Ocean
and the Intracoastal Waterway. It also
seems intent on packing in parks. Before
long, Gateway Park at 163rd Street,
on the former site of a strip mall will
become the city's tenth park, provid-
ing a substantial link between the city's
historic Newport Pier, currently under
reconstruction, and the Intracoastal.
Since Gateway is still nothing more
than an empty lot surrounded by a
turquoise fence, however, we'll turn our
attention a bit farther north to another
park adjacent to Collins Avenue: Town
Center Park.
This park is mostly invisible from
ground level, and one of the first things
visitors encounter is a sign dissuading
them from entering: "Protected Habitat
Beyond Fence: No Trespassing." For-
tunately, there's only one part of Town
Center Park that you cannot enter, a
state-protected wetlands that honors
the "Original Creator of the Sunny Isles
area, Harvey Baker Graves," according


to a plaque located in the park's acces-
sible, playground area. This "Mangrove
Preserve" was dedicated in 2007.
The preserve is shaped like a golf
club, with the rounded head section vis-
ible from the playground, but the shaft
remains hidden as a long, thin strip of
land, about 30 feet wide, that parallels
a canal. (The side connected to land
is mostly hidden by a long apartment
complex, and the fence is formidable.
Trespassing simply would not be worth
the effort.)
This narrow section of protected
wetlands is both commendable and
lamentable. Commendable because it re-
minds us of what used to cover the area;
lamentable because it is laughably small.
Just around the corner is the massive
Oleta River State Park and its hundreds
of acres of mangroves, so by comparison
the approximately two acres here seems
like a lost piece of a puzzle. Several
invasive plants, such as Brazilian pepper,
are visible.
Another lamentable attribute is the
lack of accessibility: The children play-
ing in the park can only see what appears
to be a wall of vegetation being held
prisoner behind a black iron fence.


Centrally located, the park is frequented by residents of all ages.


Do not waste your
time, like I did, trying to
walk and drive around
the neighborhood to get a
closer look at the wetlands.
You will get stuck between
a private parking lot on
one side and the canal on
the other.
For the average soccer
mom and child visiting ."
Town Center Park, the
essential "park" is the half
that consists mainly of an The new s
open, grassy field sur- with kids
rounded by a walking trail
and corners of activity. The
park gets a lot of traffic in every sense,
being that it faces Collins Avenue and
that it offers the most centrally located
of the six public playgrounds in Sunny
Isles Beach.
For the more mature crowd, the
park's walking path and exercise
stations offer a change of pace
from the beach across the street -
not that you can see the beach, as it
is obscured by this strip's expan-
sive condominiums. On the other
hand, the vertical views of the
condominiums impress, especially
on a clear day.
In stark contrast to the towers
of white and blue are the two
human-scale sculptures along Col-
lins Avenue: One features three tiny
tots in bronze playing ring-around-
the-rosie, while the other, unnamed
modern piece is a purple zigzag that
creates the optical illusion of three
Floating cartons. They seem to be


kate park within the park is popular
but not so much with neighbors.

asking, "Why not here?"
Town Center Park opened in 2005,
replacing a strip mall (that seems to be a
theme in Sunny Isles Beach), and today
serves small children best of all. A wide,
square lawn is large enough for tossing
Frisbees and kicking soccer balls. The
main playground near the entrance has
a pavilion where parents can rest in the
shade while their kids tumble around on
the gleaming playground equipment. Yes,
children, you are free to squeal.
But the biggest draw of all may be
the addition in 2011 of a skate park.
Tucked away in the main section's
northwest corner, the skate park charges
an entrance fee. For residents it's $2 on
weekdays and $5 on weekends; for visi-
tors, $4 and $7, respectively.
To a nonskater like myself, it looks
"cool," but not necessarily intimidating,
as the tallest point seems no higher than
a few feet. The unmarked concrete struc-
ture is somewhat larger than a basketball
court, and it has steps, railings, and a


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com December 2012


NE 174th St




NE 172nd St


S NE 170th St
==
ae


NE 162nd St
AWN


O P MA


Park Rating


17200 Collins Ave.
Sunny Isles Beach
305-792-1706
Hours: 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
(Wed. 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Picnic tables: No
Barbecues: No
Picnic pavilions: Yes
(but no tables)
Tennis courts: No
Athletic fields: Yes
Night lighting: Yes
Swimming pool: No
Playground: Yes


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012























I Town center Park is not the sunny Isles
A narrow strip of mangroves is protected in honor The central grassy area is big enough for Frisbee of beaches and tourists, but of children
of Sunny Isles pioneer Harvey Baker Graves. and fun, and offers impressive vertical views, and snowbirds.


curved wall in the back with a ramp.
Shining in the sun, the smooth concrete
wall resembles aluminum.
Opening times for the skate park
vary (after 3:00 p.m. on school days), and
it closes daily at 7:00 p.m. Waivers and
helmets are required, and helmets and
skateboards can be rented onsite from
Sugar's Drop Shop. (Note to skate boys
and girls: Wheels are not allowed in the


rest of the park, so you will have to carry
your skateboard until you reach the des-
ignated entrance.)
Town Center Park has signs at the
main entrance explaining its many rules.
"Park in marked stalls only." "No skates.
No skateboards. No bicycles." "Lightning
Warning." "No rough or injurious activ-
ity." "No fires, cooking, or tents." "Thou
shalt not sue." (I made up that last one.)


Two conveniences also make this
park noteworthy: bathrooms and free
parking. Many signs warn visitors by
car to visit the park only; if you wander
across the street to eat at Epicure or head
over to the beach, you are inviting the
tow truck.
Town Center Park is clean, pleas-
ant, and kid-friendly. There are plenty
of benches, but no tables. Its fitness


stations dispense witty advice, such as:
"A positive attitude may not solve all of
your problems, but it will annoy enough
people to make it worth the effort."
The park's mixture of elements
creates a little something for everyone.
It seems to be singing, "I'm a little bit
swampy, I'm a little bit upper class."

Feedback: letters @biscaynetimes.com


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December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Columnists: PAWSITIVELY PETS


Weekend Getaways for

You and Yours
Five nearby staycations for people and pets


By Lisa Hartman
BT Contributor
he holiday season is upon us, and
everyone is busy making their
last-minute travel plans, visit-
ing relatives, welcoming relatives, and
shopping for holiday gifts. Regardless
of your plans or your budget in this still-
sluggish economy, you have to take care
of Number One. Why not plan a small
getaway with the individual who has
always stood by you, the one who is the
first to greet you when you come home,
and the one who always is there to give
you a kiss when you have a bad day? (Or


at least, let you kiss them.)
You need not go far. In fact, staying
close to home can be very stress-free. No
major packing or traveling required. My
two dogs and I are no strangers to stayca-
tions. Sometimes all I have is a day or two
free from work, so off we go to a local
pet-friendly hotel and pretend we're far,
far away. Sometimes a change of scenery
and free time (and possibly a massage) is
all you need. What's more, many pet-
welcoming hotels are not just dog friendly,
but cat, bird, hamster, and ferret-friendly
too! Here are a few we've been to.
If you're looking for an affordable
getaway with your best friend on South


Beach, then check out the Kent Hotel.
It's a small Art Deco inn with clean
rooms and helpful amenities, including
DVD players, flat-screen televisions, and
free Internet service. No goodie bag for
your pup, but as of this writing, no pet
fee either! On weekdays, rooms can be


had for $99 per night, and sometimes
they offer extra nights free. Kent Hotel,
1131 CollinsAve., Miami Beach, 305-
604-5068, www.thekenthotel.com.
Of course, the alpha dog of South
Beach hotels is the Loews Miami Beach.
Their motto is "Loews Loves Pets,"


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"We Groom ALL breeds of Dogs (and Cats)
Large and Smoll..."


" Walk in service available (teeth, nails, etc.)

W Our Boutique: A must doggy destination!

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88 Biscayne Times D www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012









and they show your pet the love from
the moment you check in. You the pet
owner may only get a room key, but your
pampered pooch is given a goodie bag
(or "amenity kit," as it's known in the
hospitality industry) filled with doggy
delights and necessities.
The last time I was there, the kit
featured a doggy bakery item, biscuits,
a Loews bowl and floor mat, tag, and
menu from the kitchen. On a beachside
corner of the property there is a dog
park and toilet area for your pet. The
Loews is adjacent to a wide, meander-
ing boardwalk that is dog-friendly for an
ocean-view jog or stroll with your pet.
Throughout the year, Loews hosts spe-
cial dog events, including a lavish, dog-
friendly brunch to benefit the Humane
Society of Greater Miami. Loews Miami
Beach, 1601 Collins Ave., Miami Beach,
305-604-1601, www.loewshotels.com/en/
Miami-Beach-Hotel.
If you're looking for a change of
scenery, pack up your pet and head
across Alligator Alley, then up to the
Loews Don Cesar in St. Pete Beach, on
the laid-back Gulf Coast. But don't think
the Loews is just about dogs. Loews


welcomes cats, too. Catnip, scratch-
ing posts, and cat beds will make your
feline feel right at home. Throughout
the year, seasonal packages are offered.
Loews hotels are generally known to
welcome pets of any size, but of course
check with each hotel property directly
for any restrictions and to avoid extra
fees. A respectable, one-time $25 clean-
ing fee is all the Loews chain usually
charges per stay, and two pets per room
is sometimes the max. Loews Don Cesar,
3400 Gulf Blvd., St. Pete Beach, 727-
360-1881, www.loewshotels.com/en/
Don- Cesar-Beach-Resort.
When I want a bit of luxury with
a relaxed island feel, Saffy, Jay-J, and
I head to Casa Morada in Islamo-
rada, Florida Keys. A small boutique
hotel with a chic, Caribbean feel, Casa
Morada welcomes dogs, but not small
children. This is a romantic, serene,
breezy place with a lavish Continental
breakfast on a second-story deck amid
the treetops. Bicycles, snorkeling gear,
and kayak rentals are included with the
price of admission, as are seasonal yoga
classes by the pool. Most snacks in your
fridge are also complementary. You are


more likely to hear a bossa nova beat
here than Jimmy Buffett. I've stayed in
three different rooms and all had some-
thing special to offer, including terraces,
sunken tubs with views, and sitting
rooms. I've not been charged a pet fee,
but you should always check before you
make reservations. The intimate prop-
erty includes lovely gardens to walk
your dog. Pets are pretty much allowed
anywhere except the pool area. Casa
Morada, 136 Madeira Rd., Islamorada,
305-664-0044, www.casamorada.com.
For a more family-friendly or
group-friendly resort in the Keys that
still retains some island charm, the
Islander Resort is a solid choice. It's
a beachfront hotel (Casa Morada is
on Morada Bay) also on Islamorada,
and has a selection of rooms set aside
for pets. A nonrefundable pet fee is
charged, and at $75 it is admittedly a
bit steep. Continental breakfast and free
parking is included. Islander Resort,
Mile Marker 82.1, Islamorada, 305-664-
2031, www.islanderfloridakeys.com.
When I'm on staycation with my
pets, I do all those things I just never
have time for during the daily grind. I


tour the local shops, swim in the ocean
and pool, and stay in bed a little longer
in the morning. Maybe I get a massage
or listen to live music. I also get to meet
a bunch of interesting people and their
pets from near and far.
Jay-J, my Dalmatian, loves checking
out new places and smells; a vacation for
his senses. Little Saffy just likes to know
where in this new place she'll find her
food bowl and where she'll be sleeping.
Taking a staycation not only rejuve-
nates you but it helps the local economy
as well. Furthermore you will be "going
green" and helping the environment by not
traveling by jet to distant locales. Always
check to see if there is a special for Florida
residents. The Internet is the easiest avenue
to find out about pet-friendly hotels. I'm
planning my next nearby getaway tonight.
I hope you are too.

Lisa Hartman is a dog-friendly trainer
and behavior specialist. You can reach
her at !, ili i, i. ,,r ,.. ,, .com, or
visit www.pawsitivelypetsonline.com. This
column first appeared in December 2010.

Feedback: letters@tbiscaynetimes.com


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December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Columnists: GOING GREEN








Saving Nemo

Preserving our coral reefs should be a much higher priority


By Jim W. Harper
BT Contributor

Nemo, the little orange clownfish of
Disney fame, is becoming endangered.
Soon he may be joining his other endan-
gered friends from Finding Nemo: Crush,
the green sea turtle; Bruce, the great
white shark; and Sheldon, the seahorse.
Imagine the inevitable question from
children with teary eyes: Why is Nemo
dying? (Say so long to ,,i. iII,, Nemo.
Say hello to Dying Nemo.)
The answer to Nemo's demise lies
within the symbolic name of his mother:
Coral. Many animals that call coral reefs
home are in trouble because the entire
reef system is in trouble big, nearly
incomprehensible trouble.
Nemo represents just one drop in the
reef's bucket list. This past September,
the Center for Biological Diversity filed
an official petition to list the orange
clownfish and six related reef fish as
imperiled. In 2006, the center success-
fully petitioned for two species of Carib-
bean coral, both of which used to live in
great numbers across South Florida, to
become the first ones listed as "threat-
ened." In 2009, the center requested the
listing of 83 individual coral species,
and a final ruling is expected this month.
"Threatened" is a less severe ranking
than "endangered," but both categories
imply that extinction is likely.
And it gets worse. Across the world,
the majority of the world's warm-water


reefs, not just the individual corals that
build them, are dying, and scientists are
predicting that coral reefs could become
the first ecosystem to succumb to extinc-
tion caused by humans. Kaput. Gone.
Like the rainforests on land, the "rain-
forests of the sea" are in jeopardy. How
is this decline possible in a place where
humans do not even live?
The answer involves an accumulation
of impacts primarily from land-based
pollution, overfishing, and climate change.
The last is accelerating so quickly some
scientists are stating that it is too late to
save the ecosystem, so we should shift
attention to saving bits and pieces of
it. Others find hope in the resilience of
nature, albeit with sobering reservations.
Coral animals are more tortoise than
hare: They grow and reproduce slowly,
and they don't move. What took centu-
ries to build could come crashing down
in one hurricane or one season of
extreme temperatures.
What really has the coral community
running scared is the trend of ocean
acidification, caused by the accumula-
tion of greenhouse gases. Think "acid
rain" turning into "acid ocean," and
then think of all the marine creatures
that have shells or, like corals, lay down
skeletons that we later call limestone.
After a certain tipping point in pH, those
shells and skeletons don't function. The
plug gets pulled.
We have known for years even
decades that Nemo's home is in big


trouble, so how has the U.S. reacted? We
have dropped a few pennies into the tip
jar and called it a day.
President Bill Clinton set up the jar
with an executive order in 1998, and
Congress followed in 2000 by filling it
with $16 million per year for four years.
Yet since 2004, despite several attempts,
Congress has failed to reauthorize the
Coral Reef Conservation Act.
Is $16 million too much to ask to
save Nemo, his friends, and their invalu-
able home? While coral reefs should be
considered priceless beyond measure,
their practical value to us includes pro-
tecting our shores, providing food and
medicinal resources, and entertaining
tourists, which, in turn, creates countless
jobs in the Florida Keys.
The reefs along southeast Florida's
coastline form the world's third largest
barrier reef and the most popular one for
tourists. Unfortunately, reefs across the
greater Caribbean are in worse condition
than in the Pacific (which is somewhat
good news for Nemo, because he lives
there and not here; those Florida license
plates of clownfish refer to aquarium fish
raised in captivity, not wild fish).
Will the U.S. become better friends
with Nemo? The National Oceanic and


Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
has been funding and coordinating
coral reef research for nearly a decade
while waiting for Congress to rejoin the
crusade. NOAA's Coral Reef Conserva-
tion Program has moved in the right
direction by taking the advice of experts
to generate more "on the ground, in the
water" action. It has correctly added an
international arm, because all reefs are
connected and because their primary
threats are global, and because no one
person, organization, or country alone
can save reefs.
Florida should play a leading role,
however, because of our many connections
to reefs. What Florida's reefs need now are
informed leaders who are willing to lead.
Internationally, this environmental
crisis may be the first true test of the
functionality of the global village, and
the U.S. can and should play a leading
role. So far, U.S. policy initiatives to
protect coral reefs have been too few. If
we continue to wait years to act, soon it
will be too late to find Nemo at all.

Send your tips and clever ideas to:
'Feedbak:. .let. tel r Is, l. Iscaynet .

Feedback: letters@ibiscaynetimes.com


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*- I


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012


-4
p. Q --- <

) I .4i^






Columnists: KIDS AND THE CITY


Home for the Holidays

Just because the family is staying put in South Florida this season
doesn't mean there aren't wintry things to do


By Crystal Brewe
BT Contributor
Holy Holiday Muzak, Batman!
It's here! It started earlier this
year with e-mails the day after
Halloween from Amazon "reminding"
me about Cyber Monday deals and
countless Facebook event invitations to
holiday events around South Florida. I
ignored it all because I had big plans
involving snow.
Who needs snow? I do! I spent the
year campaigning for a trip to Park City,
Utah, where the girls would have an in-
troduction to snow and I could revisit my
love for skiing. (Yes, I still ski.) I figured
my whole family, including brothers,
girlfriends, and cousins, would love this
idea. Only Scrooge himself wouldn't
ho-ho-ho there, right? Wrong. No one
bought into this very expensive plan.
So tropical temperatures be damned,
we are diving headfirst into the corniest of
South Florida holiday options. Don't get
me wrong; who wouldn't want to ride a
rollercoaster operated by a Christmas elf?
My husband and I have spent nearly
15 years bucking commercial holiday
traditions. But for some reason, this year
I can't help my attraction to malls that
make it snow and zoos with animatronic
holiday displays. Let's face it: In the
Sunshine State, we may not do holidays
like they do up north, but South Florida
has its own unique holiday fun that any
family can make its own.


Fairs, Festivals, and Snow: Your
brood will have their mind blown at
Miami-Dade College's North Campus chil-
dren's holiday. It's a diverse wonderland of
fun, with exhibits including a holiday vil-
lage complete with a 12-foot mountain of
snow where children slide down in tubes.
The event also features live performances
on three stages, ranging from children's
chorus to hula. (I told you it was diverse.)
Details at www.mdc.edu.
We've all seen the Santa's Enchanted
Forest advertisements boasting three
million holiday lights so bright they
can be seen from outer space. Through
January 6, this winter carnival includes
a 90-foot Christmas tree, a peek inside
Santa's workshop, 100 rides (only 20 of
which are appropriate for children), a
petting zoo, pony rides, nine live shows,
and of course, funnel cake. Visit www.
santasenchantedforest.com.
Onstage: Two Nutcrackers are better
than one! This year the Adrienne Arsht
Center has doubled down when it comes
to presenting this classic tale. Miami City
Ballet will offer its interpretation on the
Ziff Ballet Opera House stage, while a hip,
theater-in-the-round version (not a ballet)
will feature falling snow and a tension-filled
family. With a free family fest on December
15, and the classic, larger-than-life Broad-
way musicalMary Poppins, the holidays
have more than a spoonful of sugar. See
www.arshtcenter.org.
Boat Parades: What's better than
holiday-themed and LED-adorned


houses? Holiday-
themed and LED-
adorned boats! On
December 15, South
Florida has two boat
parades to choose
from: the Winterfest
Parade (www.winter
festparade.com) and
the Miami Outboard
Club Holiday Boat
Parade (www.miami
outboardclub.com).
Showboats, corporate
mega-yachts, and even pontoons will
feature hundreds of thousands of lights,
music, entertainment, and celebrities.
Snowfall at Dolphin Mall: I know,
I know... a mall? During the holidays?
If you're anything like us, you get the
Santa's lap thing out of the way early so
as to avoid the dreadful crowds and other
people's crying kids. The thing is, a rare
weather occurrence happens at Dolphin
Mall through the new year. Magic wands
are distributed every night to children
under 12 when their parents sign up
to receive the Dolphin Mall e-bulletin.
(The marketer in me is envious I didn't
come up with this.) At 7:00 p.m. the
children wave their wands in the air and
snow illuminates the sky with a warm
holiday glow. Trust me, it's well worth
the nausea malls normally cause.
Lions and Tigers and Lights, Oh
My!: What holiday is complete without a
drive to see other people's holiday lights?
My family used to crowd into my uncle's
van for an annual pilgrimage around the
neighborhood. The tradition evolved into
a contest of who could drag us to the most
dreadful displays of gaudy inflatables and


"Happy Birthday, Baby Jesus!" messages
written in LED on rooftops.
While a bit of a drive from Miami
proper, the Holiday Fantasy of Lights
offers a spectacular drive-through light
display described by many as one of
the most amazing in South Florida. It's
located at Tradewinds Park in Coconut
Creek and is open nightly from 6:00 to
10:00 p.m., through January 2. See www.
holidaylightsdrivethru.com.
Another terrific light display is much
closer to home, in North Miami. It's called
Holiday Lights at Enchanted Place. For de-
tails, see our Events Calendar on page 82.
Finally, dinner with Mrs. Claus should
be on everyone's top ten list, right? Zoo-
Miami has that and more, having stepped
up their holiday offerings to include a
brilliant animal-shaped light display, camel
rides, "ice-skating," and free 3-D glasses.
Check www.miamimetrozoo.com.
Whatever your traditions, be it
grandma's fruitcake or kayaking through
the Everglades, may you enjoy your time
with family and friends. Happy holidays!

Feedback: letters@ibbiscaynetimes.com


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II I


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December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Columnists: YOUR GARDEN


The Root of the Problem
New construction can damage trees, without the homeowner
suspecting a thing


By Jeff Shimonski
BT Contributor

I drive the same roads every day and,
while stuck in the inevitable traffic
jam, I spend the time checking out
interesting horticultural features. Trees
and new construction always draw my
attention, mainly because I want to see
how the trees fare over time.
There's one recently constructed
house I've been keeping an eye on. In
the front yard is a huge live oak tree. It
must have a trunk diameter of at least
four feet at chest height. The tree's
canopy towers over a good portion of
this two-story house. I imagine it was a
great selling point when potential buyers
came to look at the house. Too bad the
tree is dying.
That happens a lot with pre-existing
trees on construction sites: Many die a
slow death over a few years owing to the
impact of construction, leaving the new
homeowners to deal with the result-
ing issues and costs, even though they
probably didn't know the trees were in
decline when they moved in. They'll now
have to deal with tree removal reports
and permits, overworked city or county
inspectors, and the inevitable cost of the
removal of the offending tree, plus pos-
sible mitigation.
The City of Miami, along with every
other municipality, has a tree ordinance
that includes a section on tree protection
during construction. Briefly, the city re-
quires a protected and fenced-off radius of


ten feet around the base of the trees during
the course of construction. This is pretty
typical of most municipal tree ordinances.
Is it sufficient? For many trees, yes, but not
for all. It is obviously a compromise and
many codes allow for a certified arborist,
in writing, to make exceptions to this mea-
surement or propose an alternative tree and
root protection method.
Regardless of what the code man-
dates, I constantly see construction sites
throughout South Florida without the
required tree-protection barriers, or if
they have been installed, crushed un-
derneath vehicles or piles of debris. This
type of negligence causes soil compac-
tion, which not only damages the roots of
the tree directly, but restricts the access
of necessary oxygen and water to those
impacted tree roots.
As trees age, they begin to not only
grow slower, but have fewer resources
internally to repair or replace damaged
roots or branches. This is often when we
begin to see the first signs of tree damag-
ing fungi, which may have first entered
the tree as spores through damaged roots
or large pruning cuts. Once the trees
are stressed, they become vulnerable
to many different types of pathogens,
hastening the death of the tree.
I was inspecting a couple of newly
built homes recently and was very sur-
prised to find that there were numerous
mature trees on these sites, the trunks
of which were only three or four feet
from the foundation of the house. Most
of the trees were native and had been


I see this beautiful Ceiba speciosa on the way home from work, and I
don't mind sitting in traffic when it's blooming.


onsite years before the structures had
been built. Some of these trees I could
actually shake by just pushing on them.
If these trees don't blow down in a storm,
I believe most of them will die a prema-
ture death as a result of the tree's roots
having been cut so close to the trunks.
Healthy roots are very important
not only to the general health of a tree
but are what keep the tree attached to
the ground in a storm. It is apparent
that the trees I was looking at defi-
nitely had not been protected during
construction. You could see that large
gashes had been inflicted on the trunks,
probably from heavy machinery. Also,
with the trees being located only a few
feet from the walls of these two-story
houses, all the branches that had been
growing in the direction of the struc-
tures had been removed.
Excessive branch removal from the
lower half of a tree can be detrimental
to a tree's health. Large cuts made on
the trunk of a tree allow fungal spores
to easily enter and can cause rapid decay


of the trunk. I saw evidence of this on
the trees I surveyed. Removal of these
branches also takes away the tree's abil-
ity to increase the girth of its trunk. At
some point, as the tree grows taller, the
trunk cannot keep up structurally and
can bend and break under its own weight
or in a storm.
So is it the fault of the new home-
owners that their trees are dying? I don't
think it is, but they will have to pay the
costs for the eventual tree removal. I
would like to see municipalities and
building departments pay more atten-
tion to the trees on their construction
sites so homeowners don't have to suffer
the consequences of poor planning and
inadequate monitoring.

. i, ". \li'i,,,, I-, is an ISA-certified munic-
ipal arborist, director of horticulture at
Jungle Island, and principal of Tropical
Designs of Florida. Contact him atjeff@
tropicaldesigns. con.

Feedback: letters(ibiscaynetimes.com


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have the luxury of
b a backyard? .o


A: A dog park on
your patio


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012






Columnists: VINO


Bubbly That Won't Bust


Your Budget

Red, white, and you: Agreeable wine for $12 or less


By Bill Citara
BT Contributor

Imagine, if you would, the sad state of
a world without bubbly.
Celebrations would be puny and
joyless, as flat as a Nebraska cornfield.
Champagne would be just another
anonymous region in France; Kendall on
the Marne. Dom Perignon would not be
a revered figure who once "drank stars"
but a weird old guy in a dirty brown
robe. Newlyweds, World Series champi-
ons, rappers with more money than taste,
and Bond, James Bond, would be SOL.
And the New Year would be rung
in with something horrible. Like Pinot
Grigio. Or water.
All this is very, very bad.
In a world lousy with war, poverty,
recession, layoffs, foreclosures, and
Honey Boo Boo, we need all the bright,
lively, celebratory bubbles we can get,
whether in Champagne, cava, prosecco,
sekt, or sparkling wine. So for that
reason plus we just really like the stuff
- Vino once again presents this helpful
roster of affordable bubbles. If the world
is going to hell in a handbasket, we can at
least drink a toast on the way down.
Of course, it would be nice to drink it
with Champagne real Champagne, which
is to say, sparkling wine produced from
grapes grown on the approximately 85,000
acres of vineyards in the Champagne region
of France. There are other legal require-
ments, too, about varietals, growing, and


winemaking practices, but you get the idea.
Fortunately for quality (unfortu-
nately for our budgets), those limitations
make true Champagne a pricy special
occasion splurge. Sparklers made
beyond the borders of Champagne, how-
ever, offer much of the same fresh, bright
acidity, crisp bubbles, and intriguing
minerality of their more expensive and
exclusive counterparts.
Saint-Reine's NV Brut is a stellar
example and, at a mere $11.99, an exem-
plary value. This is the whole package:
fine, abundant, pinpoint bubbles; lovely
aromas of ripe peaches and citrus and
intriguing herbal nuances; flavors of
oranges and lemons, with a clean, crisp,
refreshing acidity. If you buy anything
from this month's tasting, it should be
the Saint-Reine.
I wasn't quite as enthusiastic about
the Depreville NV Brut. Though dis-
playing the requisite taut, citrus-green
apple fruit, nutty-toasty aromas, and
bracing mineral undercurrent, its bub-
bles faded quickly, the lemon-grapefruit
profile seemed unnecessarily harsh, and
there was a faint bitterness on the finish.
On the other hand, I've long been
enthusiastic about the quality of Span-
ish cava, especially given its generally
wallet-friendly price. Sadly, this batch
of Spanish sparklers was something of a
disappointment. Let's get the NV Ber-
berana Cava Ros6 Brut out of the way
first. Please. It's a pretty pale rose color
with aromas of rose petal, red apple, and


toast, but on the palate it's a
mouthful of tart, soapy, sour
bubblegum yuckiness.
The best parts of the
Rondel NV Cava Brut are its
cool royal blue bottle and pleas-
antly nutty, red apple aromas.
At first, it too tastes soapy and
bitter, but after a few minutes At the
it mellows out and delivers an (1475(
acceptable but undistinguished you'll
blast of citrus, the Be
As for homegrown bubbly, the De
there's not much that fits under for $8.
our $12 price ceiling, and Doma
much of what does is probably the Nc
better suited to flushing your (16355
car's radiator or scrubbing out $10.99
tough fabric stains than, you must,
know. .. drinking, at the
Like the NV Barefoot Bisca
Bubbly Brut from California,
one of two wines in the tasting
not made in the preferred method cham-
penoise (fermented in the bottle), but by
the less desirable bulk or charmat pro-
cess (fermented in stainless steel tanks
and then bottled). I don't want to say the
Barefoot tastes like old socks, so I'll just
say it's not very good. There are plenty
of better choices for $10. Beer, even.
Better and cheaper is the Chateau
Ste. Michelle NV Brut. This Washing-
ton State product shows off fuller, riper
fruit than its European competitors -
citrus, green apple, a little pear as
well as hints of herbs and minerals that


North Miami Total Wine & More
SBiscayne Blvd., 305-354-3270)
find the Saint-Reine Brut for $11.99,
*rberana Cava Rose for $9.99, and
'preville Brut and Rondel Cava Brut
.99 each. The Tosca Prosecco and
ine Ste. Michelle are available at
)rth Miami ABC Fine Wine & Spirits
SBiscayne Blvd., 305-944-6525) for
I and $8.99, respectively. And, if you
the Barefoot Bynum can be had
Biscayne Commons Publix (14641
yne Blvd., 305-354-2171) for $9.99.

give it a bit of richness and complexity.
An Italian sparkler, the Tosca NV
Prosecco Brut, hits much the same flavor
profile. Though prosecco is typically
made by the charmat process, this wine
has the freshness and fruitiness the Bare-
foot wine lacks. Not a lot of complexity
here, but the Tosca does deliver a mouth-
filling blend of smoky-toasty flavors com-
bined with citrus, peach, and red apple.
It's not Dom Perignon, but it's better
than a world without bubbly.


Feedback: letters@ibbiscaynetimes.com


PRISTINEI'rL.I R.P RY
--MANA I M f N I--

YouMange ou Prftt.*

We Mnagethe awl

HW*& CMUS I mkwmn


305 807 3321 1 PristinePJMcom


El' HIII flr. Ftif
Alt-kr-y Sablio. PurUthi


D2me wIis


December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Columnists: DISH


So Long, Red Light,


Hello Everyone Else!


Food news we know you can use

By Pamela Robin Brandt
BT Contributor
Feelings of sudden loss, irritabil-
ity, depression... Psychologists
predicted all these maladies might
torment people affected by "superstorm"
Sandy. Similar symptoms were cer-
tainly displayed in the aftermath of last
month's major disaster in the food world:
The announcement of the bankruptcy of
Hostess Brands and possible doom for
all its iconic snacks.
Locally this means that fans of deep-
fried Twinkles had better run, not walk,
to Burger & Beer Joint (900 S. Miami
Ave.), or be prepared to console your-
selves with their deep-fried Oreos.
Another major loss occurred last
month for those who eat out in BT terri-
tory. But a humongous number of restau-
rant openings provides solace.

CLOSING
Red Light Little River (7700 Biscayne
Blvd.). What was to be a temporary clos-
ing of this neighborhood-transforming
eatery at Motel Blu (formerly a hooker
hangout), to allow chef-owner Kris
Wessel to concentrate on opening a
new South Beach restaurant, turned
permanent when the owners of the
space, which changed hands during
Wessel's originally affordable five-year
lease, refused to renew. Fortunately the
similarly regional, and much-expanded,
menu at Wessel's new Florida Cook-
ery (1545 Collins Ave., Miami Beach;


786-276-0333) features all Red Light's
greatest hits, including the BBQ shrimp.

OPENINGS
Pride & Joy BBQ (2800 N. Miami Ave.,
305-456-9548) The outdoor beer garden
is the most relaxing place to eat at this
instantly popular joint from three-time
Memphis BBQ World Championship
winner Myron Mixon. From the full
range of 'cue, I'd skip the smoked wings
(which are mostly deep-fried) for perfect
St. Louis-style ribs tender without
being falling-off-the-bone overcooked,
as well as bigger and enjoyably fattier
than baby backs.
MC Kitchen (4141 NE 2nd Ave., 305-
456-9948). In the former Fratelli Lyon
space, modern Italian inventions from
chef Dena Marino. Expect local ingredi-
ents utilized in unexpected ways (stone
crab with faro, fennel salad, and lemon-
lime vinaigrette instead of mustard sauce).
And a dramatic stone oven is used for
beyond-pizza items like "Pia-Denas," a
play on Italian piadinas: flatbreads folded,
like soft tacos, around varied salads.
Oak Tavern (35 NE 40th St., 786-
391-1818). From chef/restaurateur David
Bracha of River Oyster Bar, this stylish
tavern (which has a large oak tree on the
outdoor dining patio, and lamps that look
like oaks inside) does offer oysters and
other raw-bar items. But most of the menu
is modeled after Michael's Genuine down
the block, with prepared Snacks, Small
Plates, Large Plates, etc. Highlight: arti-
sanal charcuterie, much of it housemade.


OTC (1250 S. Miami Ave., 305-
374-4612). This newcomer is a civilized
gastropub with over-the-counter (get it?
OTC!) service that encourages frequent
visits. See the Dining Guide (next page),
Nic\\ This Month" for more.
Bar Louie (3201 N. Miami Ave. #106,
786-879-8260). Cheese/bacon-loaded tater
tots; Bavarian pretzel sticks with cinna-
mon butter, cheese, and honey mustard;
burgers like the Fried Louie (bacon, ched-
dar, and fried egg), triple-deckable with
three times the meat for $6 more; s'mores
martinis... This branch of a growing
chain serves such over-the-top stoner food
and drink every day till 2:00 a.m.
Toro Toro (100 Chopin Plaza, 305-
372-4710). Chef/restaurant empire-builder
Richard Sandoval's first Toro Toro is in
the upscale emirate of Dubai, so it's not
unexpected that this #2, in downtown's
InterContinental Hotel, is ideal for power
meals either steakhouse stuff (includ-
ing a mini "rodizio experience"), or
refined Latin fusion small plates.
Porketta (43 NE 3rd Ave., 305-372-
0034). To paraphrase food critic Homer
Simpson: "Porchetta... Mmmmmmm."
[Add drooling.] See the Dining Guide's
Ni\\ Additions" for more.
Reggae Tacos (93 SE 2nd
St., 786-425-9558). Think of it as


Mexican-Jamaican fusion street/beach
food: Taco or burrito shells encase
jerk pork, curried goat, fish with spicy
escovitch veggies, and other island
dishes that are normally plated entrees,
transforming them into portable pack-
ages. Snacks like "festival" (cornmeal
mini-doughnuts), too.
MPP Brickell (14 SW 7th St.,
305-400-4610). In the space vacated
by elegant Mediterranean eatery Andu,
MPP is an elegant Peruvian eatery an
outpost of one of Lima's most popular
restaurants. The menu features both
upscaled versions of classic dishes (lomo
saltado with filet mignon) and fun fusion
fare like causa maki rolls.
Paladar Latin Kitchen & Rum Bar
(801 Silks Run Rd., Hallandale Beach,
954-455-0700). In the Village at Gulf-
stream Park, this new branch of a small
chain serves just what South Florida
has been missing: Pan Latin food from
Cleveland! Ropa vieja with aji pepper
aioli, "Cezar" salad, more.
Too many restaurants, too little room.
See this issue's "BizBuzz" for more food
news! Please send me tips: restaurants@
biscaynetimes.com.


Feedback: letters(ibbiscaynetimes.com


Sevie and Reacdl nakes
ond modes of Motoydes
acd Scooters





7&5=&W i


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December 2012


























Restaurant Listings W W


The Biscayne Corridor's most comprehensive restaurant guide. Total this month: 308. """""""""""""""""
1111111111111NEW THIS MONTH


Restaurant listings for the BT Dining Guide are written
by Pamela Robin Brandt (restaurantsdbiscaynetimes.
com). Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy,
but restaurants frequently change menus, chefs, and
operating hours, so please call ahead to confirm
information. Icons ($$$) represent estimates for a typical
meal without wine, tax, or tip. Hyphenated icons ($-$$$)
indicate a significant range in prices between lunch and
dinner menus, or among individual items on those menus.
$= $10 and under
$$= $20
$$$= $30
$$$$= $40
$$$$$= $50 and over



Brickell / Downtown
Aijo
231 Brickell Bay Dr., 786-452-1637
Hidden within Jade condo, this sleek Japanese fusion resto-
lounge (whose name means love") is also a jewel Food-loving
Venezuelan owner Rene Buroz encourages innovation, and
his chefs (including four from Zuma) respond with beautifully
plated items as fun as they are flavorful Don't miss the lay-
ered croquante (a sort of Asian croqueta mouthwatering crispy
rice. subtly smoked salmon, and creamy crab). AIO kani (king
crab legs with citrus foam clouds and rich emulsified butter
dip). or creative cocktails from a mixologst who also juggles
and plays with fire
Area 31
270 Biscayne Boulevard Way, 305-424-5234
Not that the sleek interior of this seafood restaurant (named
for fishing area 31, stretching from the Carolinas to South
America) isn't a glamorous dining setting But we'd eat out-
side From the expansive terrace of the Epic condo and hotel
on the Miami River the views of Brickell s high-rises actually
make Miami look like a real city It's hard to decide whether
the eats or drinks are the most impressive The food is impec-
cably fresh regional fish, prepared in a clean Mediterranean-
influenced style The cocktails are genuinely creative Luckily
you don't have to choose one or the other $$$-$$$$
Azul
500 Brickell Key Dr., 305-913-8254
Floor-to-ceiling windows showcase Biscayne Bay But diners
prefer ogling the raw-bar-fronted open kitchen, where glo-
betrotting chef Joel Huff crafts imaginative. often multi-part
dishes some Asian-inspired (like oysters with fresh wasabi
hibiscus granite, and Asian pear), as one would expect from
the Mandarin Oriental s top eatery But most of Huffs dishes
are strongly European-influenced primarily by New Spanish


With $50
Purchase








Purchase



125 isan lvNMam 0-8514


cuisine Elegant. playfully molecular gastronomy-accented
almond gazpacho with foie gras "snow" or "eggs bacon &
toast" (suckling pig, tempura duck egg. truffled potato, and
speck air") tell the story $$$$$
Balans
901S. Miami Ave., (Mary Brickell Village), 305-534-9191
Open until 4 00 a m on weekends, this London import
(Miami's second Balans) offers a sleeker setting than its peren-
nially popular Lincoln Road progenitor, but the same simple yet
sophisticated global menu The indoor space can get mighty
loud, but lounging on the dog-friendly outdoor terrace, over a
rich croque monsieur (which comes with an alluringly sweet/
sour citrus-dressed side salad), a lobster club on onion toast
some surprisingly solid Asian fusion items, and a cocktail is
one of Miami's more relaxing experiences $$-$$$
Bali Caf6
109 NE 2nd Ave., 305-358-5751
While Indonesian food isnt easyto find in Miami, downtown
has secret stashes small joints catering to cruise-ship and
construction workers This cute, exotically decorated cafe
has survived and thrived for good reason The homey cook-
ing is delicious, and the friendly family feel encourages even
the timid of palate to try something new Novices will want
Indonesia's signature rijsttafel, a mix-and-match collection of
small dishes and condiments to be heaped on rice Note bring
cash No plastic accepted here $-$$
Banana & Leaf
234 NE 3rd St., 786-431-5548
Ever get tempted by the convenience of supermarket sushi
boxes, but feel uneasy about freshness and disgruntled about
sparseness of fillings In the grab-and-go containers here.
raw fish glistens and makis like a plump snow crab roll have
a satisfying seafood-to-rice ratio If you'd rather dishes on the
larger custom menu arrive almost as fast There is also limited,
tasty Southeast Asian fare Most unbelievable Prices beat
supermarket sushi by far $
The Bar at Level 25 (Conrad Hotel)
1395 Brickell Ave., 305-503-6500
On the Conrad's 25th floor. The Bar's picture-windowed space
is notjust a watering hole with panoramic views At lunch it's
an elegant sandwich bar. at night it's a raw bar (with pristine
coldwater oysters) and (best) a tapas bar serving pintxos
That'sjust the Basque word for tapas, but here there's noth-
ing mere about the generously portioned small plates They
range from traditional items like cod fish equixada and saffron-
sauteed Spanish artichokes to inventive inspirations like foie
gras and goat cheese-stuffed empanadas $$$
Bento Sushi & Chinese
801 Brickell Bay Dr., 305-603-8904
Hidden in the Four Ambassadors Towers. this tiny spot (which
specializes in sushi plus Japanese small plates, but also serves
limited Chinese and Thai-inspired dishes of the mix-and-match,
pick-your-protein-then-preparation sort) has been mostly an
insider's secret deliveryjoint for Brickell residents But its


AvLem14115 West

Caf6 S Exrs

etlia Pizm eri


20% OFF

traditional

Pizza


Breakfast* Lunch Dinner

305-705-2434
17070 West Dixie Hwy
North Miami Beach, FL 33160


BRICKELL/DOWNTOWN

Machiya Ramen Noodle House
3250 NE 1st Ave. #116, 786-507-5025
While this chic-looking Japanese spot has an extensive
selection of today's popular Izakaya-style Asian fusion
small plates (miso-braised short ribs, marinated crudos).
the real reason to come is ramen -- both hot and cold
bowls of appealingly toothsome housemade noodles that
bear no resemblance to the packaged corkscrews that
got you through college Admittedly, these bowls aren't
student-budget ($15-$20), but seafood, meat, and exotic
veggie toppings are plentiful, and a $2 kae-dama" sys-
tem supplies an extra serving for your soup Reasonably
priced additional toppings are also available $$-$$$
OTC
1250 S. Miami Ave. 305-374-4612
Over-the-counter service usually connotes the classic fast
food "slider" experience both greaseburgers and patrons
are in and out quickly At this casually cool gastropub, the
counter ordering system encourages the opposite feel, of
comfie congeniality, it invites hanging out, just without
the fuss of formal dining out -- or the expense Most
plates are $10 or under Ingredient-driven dishes cover
today's favorite food groups (various mac-and-cheeses.
variously topped/seasoned fries and more) with some
unusual twists, like a scrumptiously lardon-laden frisee/
goat cheese salad brightened by fresh peaches Even the
condiments are housemade $$
Porketta
43 NE 3rd Ave., 305-372-0034
Warm, juicy, served with succulent pieces of crisp crack-
ling, herb-stuffed Italian porchetta (pronounced porket-
ta") roast, at its best, is hard to find even in much of Italy
except during festivals But every day is a festival here.
where the real thing (not the dry deli-style pork roll slices
that often pass for porchetta) is featured on a plate with
broccoli rabe and cannellinis, in the hefty Bombardino
sandwich, or in three mini-sandwiches, convenient for
sampling the place's three sauces Several salads and
carpacclos placate porkophobes $-$$
The Hoxton
1111SW 1st Ave., 786-691-2730
Though inland (and reportedly inspired by old England),
this urban beach bar/grill has the relaxing, refined-
rustic ambiance of a classic New England hangout, and


tauchbo Rhcb
*BS!tLL H OUTIQUE*



Q Grass Fed Beef
Organic Chicken
Larmb&Pork l
Bsn Duck Turkel
Oranic Sausages
SCage Free Eggs
Chimichurri & BB Sauoe
Olise nls & Sea Salts

I ,37

^l^^ig /


upscaled down shore" food to match Maine lobster
rolls, on brioche rather than hot dog rolls, a luxe take on
Quebecoise poutine (from-scratch fries with Vermont ched-
dar and duck confit gravy), an especially lavish clam bake
Also appealingly different from the Miami norm frequent
live bands of many musical genres in the comfortable
lounge area. plus almost spookily competent service $$$

MIDTOWN / WYNWOOD / DESIGN DISTRICT

South Street Restaurant & Bar
4000 NE 2nd Ave., 305-573-5474
In the historic Buena Vista post office building, this neo-
soul food" restaurant features family recipes from chef
Amarls Jones, a Philly native Along with tasty traditional
favorites like fried chicken or shrimp and cheese grits
with low-country gravy, there are lightened classics (green
tomatoes that are grilled, not fried, with basil cream aioli)
plus a few items whose street cred seems to come from
a Soul Train stop at the Bryn Mawr Country Club (surf and
turf) Food comes with a soul soundtrack befitting the
lounge vibe $$$



Sabor Latin Restaurant & Cafe
1880 79th St. Cswy., 305-741-2020
This family-run restaurant serves big portions of homey
traditional food from several Latin American countries,
including Cuba (pan con bistec, ropa vieja). Mexico
(nachos. tacos, quesadllas), and Peru (lomo saltado)
But the specialty is Colombian classics, from snacks
like empanadas to a bandeja paisa combo (grilled steak.
chorizo, a gargantuan crispy chicharron strip, fried egg,
arepa, plantains, beans, rice) Particularly recommended
daily specials including two meal-in-a-bowl chicken
soups, ajiaco, and sancocho If you've wondered about
the much-debated difference, here's where to test the
taste $-$$
Sports Grill
2995 NE 163rd St., 305-944-4552
Like the other five locations of this popular local mini
chain (which originated more than 20 years ago), NMB's
family-friendly sports bar/grill has walls lined with flat-
screen TVs and a menu packed with all the classic game-
watching munchies, some with Old South twists, like jala-
peno poppers with pepperjelly dipping sauce Must-haves
are the charbroiled special wings," meaty and mild But
for those who prefer more highly spiced wings, there are
six additional varieties Cool down with a craft beer from a
list that changes weekly to avoid boredom $-$$


^nnr.spOttstgrnllmam..corn

Special Grilled

Wings ust for You!


NOW Opn bi & Mlidm: Seach

2995 NE 163" ST
(305) 944,4552
LiSha ftk o 0kry ro Ti


December 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com








Dining Guide: RESTAURANTS



actually a pleasant place to relax outside, enjoying a bay view
and budget bento box specials that include miso soup, ginger-
dressed salad, California roll, and fresh orange sections, plus
two mini-entrees (the nigir assortment sushi and lacy-battered
tempura especially recommended) Bubble tea, tool $$-$$$

Bon Fromage
500 Brickell Ave. #106, 786-329-5632
Though independently owned instead of a chain cog, this
cheese and wine cafe/shop is like a pint-size version of
Midtown Miami's Cheese Course, right down to being officially
self-service But it is staffed by accommodating employees
who, unofficially, do their best to double as servers for eat-
in diners The cheese (plus charcuterie) menu of garnished
platters, salads, and crusty baguette sandwiches features
numerous high-quality, imported favorites, but don't miss more
unusual domestic treasures like Wisconsin bread, a cooked
cheese that, like hallouml, doesn't melt but tantalizingly soft-
ens when heated $$

Brother Jimmy's BBQ
900 S. Miami Ave. #135, 786-360-3650
The South Is supposed to be the source of barbecue But Bro
J evidently didn't hear about that His signature North Carolina
pork cue comes from NYC, where the first Brother Jimmy's
opened more than 20 years ago Miami's location is actually
the first south of the Mason-Dixon line But the slow-smoked
pulled pork butt tastes righteous -- no interfering glop, just
hot sauce-spiked vinegar to balance the fab fattiness There's
other cue, too, including big (not baby back) ribs, and respect-
able brisket $$-$$$

Bryan in the Kitchen
104 NE 2nd Ave., 305-371-7777
This quirky cafe-markets chef/owner is a former smoothle-
swilling model who is now into fresh whole foods, and though
his eclectic "green gourmet" menu does uniformly reflect his
dedication to ecological consciousness, it otherwise could
only be described as intensely personal Offerings are an odd
but appealing saint/sinner mix, ranging from healthy pasta/
grain salads and homemade-from-scratch snacks (beefjerky,
granola) to unique cupcakes featuring not-too-sweet adult
flavors and irresistible sticky buns If we had to choose just one
category, we'd sin But luckily, you can have it all $-$$

Caf6 Bastille
248 SE 1st St., 786-425-3575
Breakfasting on a ham-egg-cheese crepe at this very French-
feeling -- and tasting -- cafe is a most civilized way to start the
day Formerly breakfast and lunch only, the cafe is now open
for dinner, too And while the crepes (both savory and sweet)
are tempting and varied enough to eat all day, dinner choices
like homemade foie gras (with onion jam and Guerande salt),
salmon with lentils and fennel salsa, or a very affordable skirt
steak au poivre make it possible to resist $-$$$
Caf6 Sambal
500 Brickell Key Dr., 305-913-8358
Though the Mandarin Oriental Hotel describes this space as its
casual hotel restaurant," many consider it a more spectacular
dining setting than the upscale Azul, upstairs, owing to the
option of dining outdoors on a covered terrace directly on the
waterfront The food is Asian-inspired, with a few Latin and
Mediterranean accents For the health-conscious, the menu
includes low-cal choices For hedonists there's a big selection
of artisan sakes $$$-$$$$$

Cavas Wine Tasting Room
900 S. Miami Ave. #180, 305-372-8027
Like South Miami's predecessor (now closed), this Cavas
is mainly an upscale, high-tech tasting lounge for the wine-
curious Patrons buy prepaid cards to sample ounce, half-glass,
or full-glass portions from more than 50 self-service dispensing
machines But there's an extensive selection of tapas/pintxos
small plates, flatbread "pizzas," sandwiches, plus fully gar-
nished charcuterie and cheese platters specially selected to
pair well with vino Additionally, more substantial dishes have
been added, including a daily three-course lunch special and
some tasty, bargain-priced soups (carrot cream with Gouda
particularly recommended) $$-$$$
Chophouse Miami
300 S. Biscayne Blvd., 305-938-9000
Formerly Mannys Steakhouse, Miami's Chophouse retains
basically everything but the famed name (from the original
Manny's in Minneapolis), and remains Miami's most intention-
ally masculine steakhouse Here, ensconced in your black


leather booth, everything is humongous dry-aged choice-grade
steaks like the Bludgeon of Beef (a boldly flavorful 40-ounce
bone-in rlbeye, described as "part meat, part weapon"), king
crab legs that dwarf the plate, cocktail shrimp that could swal-
low the Loch Ness monster whole, two-fisted cocktails that
would fell a T-Rex Not for the frail $$$$$

The Corner
1035 N. Miami Ave., 305-961-7887
With a Zuma alum in the kitchen, a Gigl alum crafting classic
or creative cocktails, a warm pub feel, and hours extending
from lunch to nearly breakfast the next morning, The Corner
is transforming a desolate downtown corner into a neighbor-
hood hangout The nicely priced menu of sandwiches, salads,
snacks, and sweets (the latter from Om Nom Nom's cookie
queen Anthea Ponsetti) ranges from 100-percent homemade
ice cream sandwiches to the Crazy Madame, France's
elaborate Croque Madame (a bechamel sauce-topped grilled
cheese/ham/fried egg sandwich) plus bacon and caramelized
onion $-$$

Crazy About You
1155 Brickell Bay Dr. #101, 305-377-4442
The owners, and budget-friendly formula, are the same here
as at older Dolores, But You Can Call Me Lolita Buy an entree
(all under $20) from a sizable list of Mediterranean, Latin,
American, or Asian-influenced choices (like Thai-marinated
churrasco with crispy shoestring fries) and get an appetizer
for free, including substantial stuff like a Chihuahua cheese
casserole with chorizo and pesto The difference This place,
housed in the former location of short-lived La Broche, has
an even more upscale ambiance than Dolores -- including a
million-dollar water view $$$
Cvi.che 105
105 NE 3rd Ave., 305-577-3454
Fusion food -- a modern invention? Not in Peru, where native
and Euro-Asian influences have mixed for more than a century
But chef Juan Chipoco gives the ceviches and tiraditos served
at this hot spot his own unique spin Specialties include flash-
marinated raw seafood creations, such as tiradito a la crema
de rocoto (sliced fish in citrus-spiked chill/cream sauce) But
traditional fusion dishes like Chinese-Peruvian Chaufa fried rice
(packed with jumbo shrimp, mussels, and calamari) are also
fun, as well as surprisingly affordable $$

db Bistro Moderne
345 Avenue of the Americas, 305-421-8800
Just two words -- "Daniel Boulud" -- should be enough for food-
les craving creative French/American comfort cuisine to run,
not walk, to this restaurant If they can find it (Hint The mys-
terious "Avenue of the Americas" is really Biscayne Boulevard
Way Don't ask) Downtown's db is an absentee celeb chef
outpost, but on-site kitchen wizard Jarrod Verblak flawlessly
executes dishes ranging from the original NYC db Bistro's sig-
nature foie gras/short rib/black truffle-stuffed burger to local
market-driven dishes like crusted pompano with garlic/parsley
veloute $$$-$$$$

The Democratic Republic of Beer
255 NE 14th St., 305-372-4161
The food here? Beer is food The DRB serves 400 beers from
55 countries, ranging from $2 Pabst Blue Ribbon to $40 DeuS
(an 115% alcohol Belgian method Champenoise brew) But
for those favoring solid snacks, tasty global smallish plates
include fried fresh zucchini with dip (cheese recommended),
chorizo with homemade cilantro Mayo, or steak tacos, served
Mexican-style with onions, cilantro, and spicy salsa Sadly for
breakfast-brew enthusiasts, the DRB isn't open that early But
it is open late -- till 5 00 a m $$
D-Dog House
50 SW 10th St., 305-381-7770
While it has become increasingly common to find servers
at upscale restaurants utilizing computerized POS (point of
service) systems to take orders, this high-tech hole-in-the-wall
trumps them by replacing servers -- and in-house entertain-
ment, too -- with iPads that accept notjust food orders and
credit cards but music requests You can web surf or game,
too, while waiting for your choice of the house specialty super-
sized hot dogs, most overloaded with internationally inspired
toppings To accompany, hand-cut fries are a must And have
a cocktail There's a full liquor bar $-$$

Dolores, But You Can Call Me Lolita
1000 S. Miami Ave., 305-403-3103
From the stylish setting in Miami's historic Firehouse No 4,




la-GGS
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one would expect a mighty pricy meal But entrees, which
range from Nuevo Latino-style ginger/orange-glazed pork ten-
derloin to a platter of Kobe mini-burgers, all cost either $18 or
$23 And the price includes an appetizer -- no low-rent crapola,
either, but treats like Serrano ham croquetas, a spinach/
leek tart with Portobello mushroom sauce, or shrimp-topped
eggplant timbales The best seats are on the glam rooftop
patio $$$

Dominique Bistro-Club
1451S. Miami Ave., 305-371-8859
At typical restolounges, the "resto" part often gets the short
end of the stick But not at this chic but friendly spot, where
Gerardo Barrera, an alumn of Pars's Le Cordon Bleu, plus his
wife Dominque and her brother Jose Sigona, welcome diners
with France's best-known bistro classics coquilles St Jacques
(tender scallops in mushroom/white wine sauce), a precision-
cooked entrec6te rib-eye with Bearnalse or complex Cafe de
Paris butter, creme brulee (from scratch) or macaron cookies
(from heaven) No velvet ropes, and club music isn't cranked
till 1100 pm $$$

Edge, Steak & Bar
1435 Brickell Ave., 305-358-3535
Replacing the Four Seasons formal fine dining spot Acqua,
Edge offers a more kick-back casual welcoming vibe And in
its fare there's a particularly warm welcome for non-carnivores
Chef-driven seafood items (several inventive and unusually
subtle ceviches and tartares, a layered construction of corvina
encrusted in a jewel-bright green pesto crust, atop red plquillo
sauce stripes and salad, lobster corn soup packed with sweet
lobster meat, more) and a farm-to-table produce emphasis
make this one steakhouse where those who don't eat beef
have no beef $$$$-$$$$$
Elwoods Gastro Pub
188 NE 3rd Ave., 305-358-5222
Cordial English owners, classic rock music (sometimes live),
and updated classic pub fare make this hangout a home
Made from scratch with artisan ingredients, traditional Brit
bites like fish and chips can't be beat -- thick pieces of crisply
beer-battered moist cod, served with hand-cut fries and
"mushy [mashed] peas," plus housemade tartar sauce and
ketchup All desserts are also made in-house, including a deliri-
ously rich (but worth it) sticky date pudding with toffee sauce
Tie down your dental implants They/re in for a wild ride $$
Eos
485 Brickell Ave. (Viceroy Hotel), 305-503-0373
Originally opened by Michelin-starred "New Aegean" chef
Michael Psilakis, Eos changed upon the chefs departure into
a more familiar Mediterranean resort eatery, minus Greek-
inspired innovations Now inspiration comes mainly from Spain
and Italy, with nods to Morocco and Latin America Best bets
include a tasting platter of Spanish cheeses and cured meats,
a pistachio-garnished salad featuring Serrano ham, figs, and
arugula, crispy parmesan risotto balls with prosciutto and
smoked tomato dip, and olive/smoked paprika-rubbed roast
chicken At lunch burgers and upscale sandwiches are added
$$$-$$$$
Eternity Coffee Roasters
117 SE 2nd Ave., 305-6094981
Normally we list only full restaurants, but even a (not so) sim-
ple cuppa joe from Chris Johnson and Crstina Garcess sleek
micro-roastery will convince anyone possessing taste buds that
fine coffee can be as complex as fine wine, and as satisfying
as solid food A changing selection of superior single-origin
beans (many varieties from the Garces family's Colombian
farm, most others from Ethiopia and Kenya), roasted in-house,
produces "slow-pour" regular brews with amazing nuances of
fruits, chocolate, and more The espresso is so smooth sugar
isn't necessary Other treats flaky chocolate-stuffed "cigars"
and other locally baked pastries Free parking $

Fado Irish Pub
900 S. Miami Ave. #200, 786-924-0972
Unlike most Miami "Irsh" pubs, which serve mostly American
bar food, rarely foraying past fish and chips or shepherd's pie,
Fado (pronounced "fdoe") has a menu reflecting the pub grub
found today in Ireland, including solid standards But most
intriguing are dishes mixing classic and contemporary influenc-
es, particularly those featuring boxty, a grated/mashed potato
pancake Try corned beef rolls (boxty wraps, with creamy
mustard sauce and cabbage slaw), or smoked salmon on minl-
boxty "blini," with capers and horseradish sauce There's a
seasonal menu, too $$


Finnegan's River
401 SW 3rd Ave., 305-285-3030
Pool tables are expected in a sports bar and grill But an actual
pool? And a Jacuzzi? This Miami River hideaway has other
surprises, too, on its extensive outdoor deck, including a boat
dock and a large array of umbrella tables and lounge chairs
where its easy to while away many happy hours The menu
is the same array of bar bites served by South Beach's older
Finnegan's, but angus burgers are big and tasty, and zingy
jalapeno-studded smoked-fish dip is a satisfying table-snack
choice $$

First Hong Kong Caf6
117 SE 2nd St., 305-808-6665
Old Hong Kong saying If it walks, swims, crawls, or flies, it's
edible And nowhere is this truer than in this historically inter-
national trade port's "cafes" -- meaning fast-food restaurants
Typical menus present hundreds of items that are local inter-
pretations of dishes from all China, and most other nations
So believe us At this cafe, whose head chef is from HK, the
Indian-style curries, sambal-splked Indonesian chow fun, even
the borscht (a tomato/beef, not beet-based version of the
Russian soup) are as authentic as the kung pao whatever, and
as tasty $$
Fratelli Milano
213 SE 1st St., 305-373-2300
Downtown isn't yet a 24/7 urban center, but its experienc-
ing a mini explosion of eateries open at night That includes
this family-owned rlstorante, where even newcomers feel at
home At lunch it's almost impossible to resist panin, served
on foccacia or crunchy clabatta, even the vegetarian version
bursts with complex and complementary flavors During
weekday dinners, try generous plates of risotto with shrimp
and grilled asparagus, homemade pastas like seafood-
packed fettuccine al scoglio, or delicate Vitello alla Milanese
on arugula $$-$$$
Garcia's Seafood Grille and Fish Market
398 NW N. River Dr., 305-375-0765
Run by a fishing family for a couple of generations, this vener-
able Florida fish shack is the real thing No worries about the
seafood's freshness, on their way to the dining deck overlook-
ing the Miami River, diners can view the retail fish market
Best preparations are the simplest When stone crabs are in
season, Garcla's claws are as good as Joe's but considerably
cheaper The local fish sandwich is most popular grouper,
yellowtail snapper, or mahl mahl $-$$

Giovana Caffe
154 SE 1st Ave.305-374-1024
If the menu at this charming downtown hideaway contained
only one item -- pear and gorgonzola ravioli dressed, not
drowned, in sage-spiced cream sauce -- we'd be happy
But the cafe, formerly lunch-only but now serving weekday
dinners, is alsojustly famed for meal-size salads like grilled
skirt steak atop sweetly balsamic-dressed spinach (with
spinach, tomatoes, bacon, hard-boiled eggs, blue cheese,
and almonds), or an especially lavish chicken salad with
pine nuts, golden raisins, apples, and basil, an Italian twist
$$

Grimpa Steakhouse
901 Brickell Plaza, 305-455-4757
This expansive indoor/outdoor Brazilian eatery is sleekly con-
temporary, but no worries The classic sword-wielding gauchos
are here, serving a mind-reeling assortment of skewered beef,
chicken, lamb, pork, sausages, and fish And included in the
price (dinner $47, lunch $34) is the traditional belly-busting
buffet of hot and cold prepared foods, salad, cold cuts, and
cheeses A pleasant, nontraditional surprise unusual sauces
Ilke sweet/tart passion fruit or mint, tomato-based BBQ,
and mango chutney, along with the ubiquitous chimichurrl
$$$$-$$$$$

Half Moon Empanadas
192 SE 1st Ave., 305-379-2525
As with South Beach's original Half Moon, you can get wraps
or salads But it's this snackery's unique take on Argentine-
style empanadas that makes it seem a natural for national
franchising The soft-crusted, doughy crescents -- baked, not
fried, so relatively guilt-free -- are amply stuffed with fillings
both classic (beef and chicken, either mild or spicy) and
creative the bacon cheeseburger, the pancetta/mozzarella/
plum-filled Americana, and several vegetarian options Atjust
over two bucks apiece, they re a money-saving moveable
feast $


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December 2012














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December 2012








Dining Guide: RESTAURANTS



Hawa Jade
1331 Brickell Bay Dr., 305-905-5523
When thinking "fusion" cuisines, Japanese and Lebanese don't
instantly spring to mind. But taking the medieval Spice Route
connection as inspiration, the Hawa family makes the mix work
at both its original Coral Gables Hawa and this new location in
the Jade Residences. Golden Pockets (tofu crepes encasing
macadamias, avocado, and tuna, crab, shrimp, or Kobe-style
beef) are musts. Plus there are unique combos containing
makis plus substantial salads, like crunchy tuna enoki rolls
with falafel salad -- not the usual green garnish. Housemade
desserts with a French twist are also a pleasant surprise. $$

Hibachi Grill
45 NE 3rd Ave., 305-374-2223
Imagine a mini-express Benihana. This place specializes in
teppanyaki cuisine -- minus the thrilling (or terrifying) tableside
knife theatrics, true, but the one-plate meals of seasoned
steak slices, chicken, shrimp, or salmon plus dipping sauces,
fried rice, and an onion/zucchini mix come at bargain prices.
There are also hefty soups or Japanese, Thai, and Singapore-
style noodle and rice bowls loaded with veggies and choice
of protein (including tofu). The limited sides are Japanese
(shumai, plump chicken gyoza) and Chinese (various egg rolls).
Fancy? No but satisfying. $-$$

II Gabbiano
335 S. Biscayne Blvd., 305-373-0063
Its location at the mouth of the Miami River makes this ultra-
upscale Italian spot (especially the outdoor terrace) the perfect
power lunch/business dinner alternative to steakhouses. And
the culinary experience goes way beyond the typical meat mar-
ket, thanks in part to the flood of freebies that's a trademark of
Manhattan's II Mulino, originally run by II Gabbiano's owners.
The rest of the food? Pricy, but portions are mammoth. And
the champagne-cream-sauced housemade ravioli with black
truffles? Worth every penny. $$$$$

Indigo / Table 40
100 Chopin Plaza, 305-577-1000
Long known for its power-lunch buffet -- including hot entrees,
carving station, custom pastas, packed-to-the-gills salad, sushi,
and dessert stations -- the InterContinental Hotel's Indigo restau-
rant now has a hip offspring intended for private dining: Table
40. The charming, glassed-in wine "cellar" (actually in the kitch-
en) enables 12-14 diners to watch the action in heat-shielded,
soundproofed comfort while eating creations by veteran chef
Alexander Feher, combining Continental technique with local
seasonal ingredients. Highlights: tender house-smoked, stout-
braised short ribs; lavish lobster salad with grilled mango; and a
seductive fresh corn gazpacho. $$$-$$$$$


institution now has only one drawback: It closes at 1:00 p.m.
Never mind, night owls. If you're a first-timer here, order the
astonishingly fluffy pancakes with juicy beef sausage, and
you II set multiple alarm clocks to return. Classic drop bis-
cuits (preferably with gravy) are also must-haves. And hearty
Southern breakfast staples like smothered chicken wings or
fried fish do make breakfast seem like lunch, too. $

Jam6n, Jam6n, Jam6n,
10 SW South River Dr., 305-324-1111
From the outside, you know you're walking into the ground
floor of a new condo building. But once inside the charmingly
rustic room, you'd swear you're in Spain. Obviously Spain's
famous cured hams are a specialty, as are other pork prod-
ucts on the weekly changing menu, from a roast suckling pig
entree to a fried chorizo and chickpea tapa. But seafood is
also terrific. Don't miss bacalao-filled piquillo peppers, or two of
Miami's best rice dishes: seafood paella and arroz negro (with
squid and its ink). $$-$$$

Kork Wine & Cheese Bar
2 S. Miami Ave., 305-377-8899
From the owner of Transit Lounge, a hip hangout long before
the downtown/Brickell revival, this more upscale-cool venue
is worth checking out for its almost medieval dimly lit decor
alone, including a subterranean wine cellar/party room, former-
ly a WW II-era bomb shelter. Comestibles are limited to wine
and cheese plus accompaniments. Both are available to go.
Kork is as much market as lounge. But with a stock of roughly
5000 bottles, and a selection of roughly two dozen perfectly
ripe artisanal cheeses curated by a cheese sommelier who'll
create perfect pairings who needs more? $$

Largo Bar & Grill
401 Biscayne Blvd., 305-374-9706
Sure, Bayside Marketplace is touristy. But it can be fun to
spend a day playing visitor in your own city. If you do, this
waterfront place overlooking Miamarina is a superior food
choice. Expect nothing cutting edge, just tasty, familiar favor-
ites solidly prepared. You won't go wrong with stone crab claws
and Cajun mustard dip; inauthentic but delicious fish tacos in
hard blue corn tortillas with two sauces (cilantro and chipotle),
generously portioned fish sandwiches (grouper, mahi, snapper,
or daily catch), and festive cocktails. $$-$$$

La Loggia Ristorante and Lounge
68 W. Flagler St., 305-3734800
This luxuriantly neo-classical yet warm Italian restaurant was
unquestionably a pioneer in revitalizing downtown. With alter-
natives like amaretto-tinged pumpkin agnolloti in sage butter
sauce and cilantro-spiced white bean/vegetable salad dressed


La Moon
144 SW 8th St., 305-860-6209
At four in the morning, nothing quells the munchies like a Crazy
Burger, a Colombian take on a trucker's burger: beef patty,
bacon, ham, mozzarella, lettuce, tomato, and a fried egg, with
an arepa corn pancake "bun." While this tiny place's late hours
(till 6:00 a.m. Friday and Saturday) are surprising, the daytime
menu is more so. In addition to Colombian classics, there's
a salad Nicoise with grilled fresh tuna, seared salmon with
mango salsa, and other yuppie favorites. $-$$

La Provence
1064 Brickell Ave. 786-425-9003
Great baguettes in the bread basket, many believe, indicate a
great meal to come. But when Miamians encounter such bread
- crackling crust outside; moist, aromatic, aerated interior --its likely
not from a restaurants own kitchen, but from La Provence. Buttery
croissants and party-perfect pastries are legend too. Not so familiar
is the bakers cafe component, whose sandwich/salad menu
reflects local eclectic tastes. But French items like pan bagnats
(essentially salade Nigoise on artisan bread) will truly transport din-
ers to co-owner David Thau's Provengal homeland. $$

La Sandwicherie
34 SW 8th St., 305-374-9852
This second location of the open-air diner that is South Beach's
favorite apres-club eatery (since 1988) closes earlier (midnight
Sunday-Thursday, 5:00 a.m. Friday and Saturday), but the
smoothies, salads, and superb Parisian sandwiches are the
same: ultra-crusty baguette stuffed with evocative charcute-
rie and cheeses (saucisson sec, country pate, camembert,
etc.) and choice of salad veggies plus salty/tart cornichons
and Sandwicherie's incomparable Dijon mustard vinaigrette.
Additionally the larger branch has an interior, with a kitchen
enabling hot foods (quiches and croques), plus A/C. $-$$

Le Boudoir Brickell
188 SE 12th Terr., 305-372-233
At this French bakery/cafe, mornings start seriously, with choices
ranging from quality cheese, charcuterie/pate, or smoked salmon
platters to chic Continental and complete American breakfasts. At
lunch, generously salad-garnished, open-faced tartines are irresist-
ible. But sophisticated salads and homemade soups make the
choice tough. And do not skip dessert. Superb sweets include rich
almond/fresh raspberry or properly tangy lemon tarts, traditional
Madeleines, airy layered mousses, and addictive mini-macaroon
sandwich cookies with daily-changing fillings. $-$$

Lime Fresh Mexican Grill
1W. Flagler St., Suite 7, 305-789-9929
(See Midtown / Wynwood / Design District listing.)


with truffle oil, proprietors Jennifer Porciello and Horatio
Jackson Soul Food Oliveira continue to draw a lunch crowd that returns for dinner, Little Lotus
950 NW 3rd Ave., 305-377-6710] or perhapsjust stays on through the afternoon, fueled by the 25 N. Miami Ave. #107, 305-533-2700
With a recently refurbished exterior to match its classy/comfy Lawyer's Liquid Lunch, a vodka martini spiked with sweetened Secreted inside the International Jewelry Exchange, this eatery
retro interior, this 65-year-old Overtown soul food breakfast espresso. $$$ (owned by stealth super-foodie Sari Maharani -- paralegal by


day, restaurateur by night) is tough to find but seems destined
to become one of our town's toughest tables to book. Two
talented chefs, whose credits include Morimoto (NYC) and
hometown fave Yakko-san, create Japanese, Indonesian, and
fusion small plates that look remarkably artful and taste like
they're about ready to take on Iron Chef Morimoto himself.
Saucing, often with multiple but balanced potions, is especially
noteworthy. The prices? A steal. $-$$

LouLou Le Petit Bistro
638 S. Miami Ave., 305-379-1404
When Indochine's owner, Jacques Ardisson, closed his Asian
spot to open this charming French eatery in the same space,
it was a return to his roots. He and his daughter, for whom the
place is named, come from Nice. You'll be transported, too, by
dishes like lamb shank with flageolets (known as the caviar of
beans), duck leg confit on a bed of mouthwatering green lentils
from Le Puy, a classic moules/frites, a shared charcuterie plat-
ter with a bottle from the savvy wine list, and, of course, salade
nigoise. $$-$$$
Martini 28
146 SE 1st Ave., 305-577-4414
This stylish little lunch-only spot, a labor of love from a
husband-wife chef team, serves what might well be the most
impressive meal deal in town. From an ambitious, daily-chang-
ing menu of fare that's geographically eclectic but prepared
with solid classic technique, diners get a choice of about ten
entrees (substantial stuff like steak au poivre with Madeira
cream sauce and roasted potatoes, or pignolia-crusted salmon
with Dijon mustard sauce, potatoes, and veggies), plus soup or
salad and housemade dessert. Forjust $9.99. Told ya. $

Miami Art Caf6
364 SE 1st St., 305-374-5117
For businessfolk on the go, this breakfast/lunch-only French
cafe serves up evocative baguette sandwiches (like camem-
bert) loaded, if you like, with greens, olives, and more. For
those with time to sit, we'd recommend the savory crepes,
garnished with perfectly dressed salad, or sweet crepe like
the Bonne Maman (whose sugar/salted butter stuffing brings
Brittany to downtown). And quiches are nicely custardy. But
there are surprises here, too, including just a few full entrees,
with correctly made traditional sauces one wouldn't expect at a
luncheonette -- except, perhaps, in Paris. $-$$

Miami's Finest Caribbean Restaurant
236 NE 1st Ave., 305-381-9254
Originally from Jamaica, proprietor Miss Pat has been serving
her traditional homemade island specialties to downtown
office workers and college students since the early 1990s.
Most popular item here might be the weekday lunch special of
jerk chicken with festival (sweet-fried cornmeal bread patties),
but even vegetarians are well served with dishes like a tofu,
carrot, and chayote curry All entrees come with rice and peas,
fried plantains, and salad, so no one leaves hungry $


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012








Dining Guide: RESTAURANTS



Mint Leaf
1063 SE 1st Ave., 305-358-5050
Part of London's famous Woodlands Group, this stylish spot,
like its Coral Gables parent, serves the sort of upscale Indian
food rarely found outside Great Britain or India More interest-
ingly, the menu includes notjust the familiar northern Indian
"Mughlai" fare served in most of America's Indian restaurants,
but refined versions of south India's scrum ptious street food
We've happily assembled whole meals of the vegetarian chaat
(snacks) alone And dosal (lacy rice/lentil crepes rolled around
fillings ranging from traditional onion/potato to lamb masala
or spicy chicken) are so addictive they oughta be illegal
$$$-$$$$

Miss Yip Chinese Caf6
900 Biscayne Blvd., 305-358-0088
Fans of the South Beach original will find the decor different
Most notably, there's an outdoor lounge, and more generally
a nightclub atmosphere But the menu of Hong Kong-style
Chinese food, prepared by imported Chinese cooks, is familiar
Simple yet sophisticated Cantonese seafood dishes rock (try
the lightly battered salt-and-pepper shrimp), as does orange
peel chicken, spicy/tangy rather than overly sweet And a
single two-course Peking duck (skin in crepes, stir-fried meat
and veggies with lettuce cups) makes mouthwatering finger
food, shared among friends $-$$$
Naoe
661 Brickell Key Dr., 305-947-6263
Chances are you've never had anything like the $85 prx-
fixe Japanese dinners at chef Kevin Cory's tiny but nation-
ally acclaimed oasis, transplanted from its original Sunny
Isles space with its supreme serenity intact By reservation
only, in two dinner seatings of just eight people each, and
omakase (chef's choice) only, meals include a seasonal
soup, a four-course bento box, eight pieces of sushi, and
three desserts Cory personally does everything for you,
even applying the perfect amount of housemade artisan
soy sauce mix and fresh-grated wasabi to each mind-
reelingly fresh nigir Few eating experiences on earth are
more luxuriant $$$$$

neMesis Urban Bistro
1035 N. Miami Ave., 305-415-9911
Truly original restaurants are hard to find here, and harder
to describe in standard sound bites But they often are the
attention-grabbing people-magnets that spark revivals of
iffy neighborhoods That's our prediction for this quirkily
decorated bistro, where the kitchen is helmed by Top Chef
contestant Micah Edelstein The intensely personal menu
of creative dishes inspired by her global travels (plus her
fascination with unfamiliar ingredients) changes constantly,
but scrumptious signatures include South African smoked
veal bobotie, and Peruvian pinoli pancakes with housemade
chicken/apple sausage, hibiscus syrup, and maple gran-
ules $$$-$$$$


Novecento
1414 Brickell Ave., 305-403-0900
For those who think "Argentine cuisine" s a synonym for "beef
and more beef," this popular eatery's wide range of more
cosmopolitan contemporary Argentine fare will be a revelation
Classic parrilla-grilled steaks are here for traditionalists, but
the menu is dominated by creative Nuevo Latino items like a
new-style ceviche de chernia (lightly lime-marinated grouper
with jalapenos, basil, and the refreshing sweet counterpoint
of watermelon), or crab ravioli with creamy saffron sauce
Especially notable are the entree salads $$-$$$

Oceanaire Seafood Room
900 S. Miami Ave., 305-372-8862
With a dozen branches nationwide, Oceanaire May seem
more All-American seafood empire than Florida fish shack,
but menus vary significantly according to regional tastes and
fish Here in Miami, chef Sean Bernal supplements signature
starters like lump crab cakes with his own lightly marinated,
Peruvian-style grouper ceviche The daily-changing, 15-20
specimen seafood selection includes local fish seldom seen
on local menus pompano, parrot fish, amberjack But even
flown-in fish (and the raw bar's cold-water oysters) are ultra-
fresh $$$$

Ozzi Sushi
200 SE 1st St., 786-704-8003
Since its 1958 invention, conveyor-belt sushi has been the
most fun form of Japanese fast food, but problematic Who
knew how long plates had been circulating on the sushi-go-
round9 Happily, this sushi-boat spot avoids sanitation issues
with clear plastic covers, and as for freshness, low prices
ensure a steady stream of diners grabbing makis, nigir, and
more as they float by Highlights include glistening ikura (salm-
on roe) in a thin-sliced cucumber cup, a sweet-sauced mango/
guava/crab roll, and a festively frosted strawberry Nutella des-
sert maki $-$$

Pasha's
1414 Brickell Ave., 305-416-5116
The original branch on Lincoln Road was instantly popular, and
the same healthy Middle Eastern fast food is served at sev-
eral newer outlets The prices are low enough that you might
suspect Pasha's was a tax write-off rather than a Harvard
Business School project, which it was by founders Antonio
Ellek and Nicolas Cortes Dishes range from falafel and gyros
to more unusual items like muhammara (tangy walnut spread)
and silky labneh yogurt cheese Everything from pitas to lemon-
ade is made fresh, from scratch, daily $-$$

Pega Grill
15 E. Flagler St., 305-808-6666
From Thanasios Barlos, a Greek native who formerly owned
North Beach's Arston, this small spot is more casually contem-
porary and less ethnic-kitschy in ambiance, but serves equally
authentic, full-flavored Greek food Mixed lamb/beef gyros


(chicken is also an option), topped with tangy yogurt sauce and
wrapped, with greens and tomatoes, in fat warm pita bread,
are specialties But even more irresistible is the taramasalata
(particularly velvety and light carp roe dip), available alone or
on an olive/pita-garnished mixed meze platter $$

Peoples Bar-B-Que
360 NW 8th St., 305-373-8080
Oak-smoked, falling-off-the-bone tender barbecued ribs
(enhanced with a secret sauce whose recipe goes back
several generations) are the main draw at this Overtown
institution But the chicken is also a winner, plus there's a full
menu of soul food entrees, including what many aficionados
consider our town's tastiest souse And it would be unthink-
able to call it quits without homemade sweet potato pie or
banana pudding, plus a bracing flop half iced tea, half
lemonade $-$$

Perricone's
15 SE 10th St., 305-374-9449
Housed in a Revolutionary-era barn (moved from Vermont), this
market/cafe was one of the Brickell area's first gentrified ame-
nities At lunch chicken salad is a favorite, dinner's strong suit
is the pasta list, ranging from Grandma Jennie's old-fashioned
lasagna to chichi fiocchi purses filled with fresh pear and gor-
gonzola And Sundays $15 95 brunch buffet ($9 95 for kids)
- featuring an omelet station, waffles, smoked salmon and
bagels, salads, and more remains one of our town's most
civilized all-you-can-eat deals $$

Pieducks
1451 S. Miami Ave., 305-808-7888
If you can overlook a name as unenlightening as most in-jokes
(it evidently refers to a favorite character of owner Claudlo
Nuness kids -- we assume the Pokemon Psyduck), you'll
experience pretty perfect pizza Sadly, not all brick ovens turn
out perfectly char-blistered crusts, crisp outside and airy/chewy
inside, but that's what you'll consistently find here and a newer
take-out/delivery-only Midtown branch And unlike many arti-
san pizzerias, Pleducks doesn't get cheesy with cheese quan-
tity (though we like that extra cheese is an option) Elaborate
salads complete the menu $$

Pier 94
94 SE 1st St., 305-379-5652
Tucked into "The Village," a collection of courtyard eateries
far from any waterfront, this ceviche bar specializes in fresh
seafood dishes from chef/owner Alex Del Corral s native
Peru, but also features famous Peruvian meat and poultry
dishes (including a refined aji de gallina, chicken in aji pep-
per-spiced cream sauce) Emphasis is particularly strong on
Peru's penchant for fusion food, including traditional Chifa
(Chinese-Peruvian) rice or noodle stir-fries But the chef also
fuses classic and creative influences Try contemporary cau-
sas, combining Peru's favorite starch, potatoes, with unique
new sauces $$


Pizzarium
69 E. Flagler St., 305-381-6025
Roman-style rectangular pizzas, served in square slices, have
been available in the Miami area since the mid-1990s But
the familiar squares and Pizzarium's are similar only in shape
Main difference dough, here allowed to rise for four days The
resulting crusts are astonishingly airy, as authentic Roman
slices, intended as light street snacks, should be Toppings, a
rotating selection of nearly 30 combinations, are highlighted by
quality imported ingredients -- not to mention a healthy imagi-
nation, as the zucca glalla attests pumpkin cream, pancetta,

smoked scamorza cheese $ Pollos & Jarras
115 NE 3rd Ave., 786-567-4940
From Juan Chipoco, Peruvian chef/co-owner of seafood-centric
Cvi Che 105, this stylish but affordable two-level restaurant
is centered around polio a la brasa, as a huge rotisserie oven
attests Grilled steaks, unique sandwiches, anticuchos, and
varied starters and sides are also served, but the must-not-
miss is rotisserie chicken, marinated in roughly a dozen-and-
a-half seasonings before a self-basting spin on the spit cooks
it to incomparable juiciness Its served with crisp fries and a
substantial salad Meals also come with a complimentary cup
of aguadito -- assertively cllantro-spiked chicken rice soup $$

Prelude
Adrienne Arsht Center
1300 Biscayne Blvd., 305-949-6722
Though the opening of Barton G s elegant performing arts
center eatery did feature a live giraffe, the food's actually more
grown-up than at his original SoBe spot The concept is prlx
fixe Any three courses on the menu (meaning three entrees if
you want) for $39 Highlights include silky, tarragon-inflected
corn/bacon chowder, beautifully plated beef carpaccio with
horseradish/mustard and shallot olive oil dipping sauces, and
over-the-top playhouse desserts, one with a luscious creme
fralche ice cream pop $$$$

Raja's Indian Cuisine
33 NE 2nd Ave., 305-539-9551
Despite its small size and decor best described as "none," this
place is an institution thanks to south Indian specialties rarely
found in Miami's basically north Indian restaurants The steam-
tabled curries are fine (and nicely priced), but be sure to try the
custom-made dosal (lacy rice crepes with a variety of savory
fillings) and uttapam, thicker pancakes, layered with onions
and chils, both served with sambar and chutney $$

The River Oyster Bar
650 S. Miami Ave., 305-530-1915
This casually cool jewel is a full-service seafood spot, as
evidenced by tempting menu selections like soft-shell crabs
with grilled vegetables, corn relish, and remoulade There are
even a few dishes to please meat-and-potatoes diners, like
short ribs with macaroni and cheese But oyster fans will find
it difficult to resist stuffing themselves silly on the unusually


December 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com








Dining Guide: RESTAURANTS



large selection, especially since oysters are served both raw
and cooked fire-roasted with sofrito butter, chorizo, and
manchego There's also a thoughtful wine list and numerous
artisan beers on tap $$$
Rosa Mexicano
900 S. Miami Ave., 786425-1001
This expansive indoor/outdoor space offers a dining experi-
ence that's haute in everything but price Few entrees top $20
The decor is both date-worthy and family-friendly festive but
not kitschy And nonsophisticates needn't fear, though nachos
aren't available, there is nothing scary about zarape de pato
(roast duck between freshly made, soft corn tortillas, topped
with yellow-and-habanero-pepper cream sauce), or Rosa's
signature guacamole en molcajete, made tableside A few
pomegranate margaritas ensure no worries $$$
Scalina
315 S. Biscayne Blvd., 305-789-9933
Comparisons between this new Tom Billante venture and the
other (slightly pricier) Italian eatery in the same building are
inevitable, especially considering similarities like key personnel
from NYC's II Mulino, Mullno-style abundant free appetizers,
and a power-dining crowd But why focus on competitive non-
sense when you can relax on the river-view terrace enjoying
chef Enrico G iraldo's specialties, including an elaborate take
on Venice's famed fegato (calfs liver and onions), upscaled
with Lucanica sausage and a balsamic reduction Or maybe an
even more evocative Roman ice cream tartufo? Manglal $$$$
Soi Asian Bistro
134 NE 2nd Ave., 305-523-3643
From the owners of Calle Ocho's hip Mr Yum and 2B Asian
Bistro, Sol sports similar casual-chic ambiance and eclectic Thai/
Japanese cuisine Traditional Thai curries and familiar sushi rolls
are prepared with solid skill and style But most intriguing are new
inventions adding Peruvian fusion flair to the Asian mix, such as
a spicy, tangy tangle of crisp-fried yellow noodles with sauteed
shrimp plus slivered peppers and onions -- mod mee krob, with
jalea-like tart heat replacing the cloying sweetness $$
Soya & Pomodoro
120 NE 1st St., 305-381-9511
Life is complicated Food should be simple Thats owner
Armando Alfano's philosophy, which is stated above the entry
to his atmospheric downtown eatery And since it's also the
formula for the truest traditional Italian food (Alfano hails from
Pompeii), its fitting that the menu is dominated by authenti-
cally straightforward yet sophisticated Italian entrees There
are salads and sandwiches, too The most enjoyable place to
dine is the secret, open-air courtyard Alfano serves dinner on
Thursday only to accompany local musicians and artists $-$$
Sparky's Roadside Restaurant & Bar
204 NE 1st St., 305-377-2877
This cowboy-cute eatery's chefs/owners (one CIA-trained, both


BBQ fanatics nicknamed Sparky) eschew regional purism,
instead utilizing a hickory/apple-wood-stoked rotisserie smoker
to turn out their personalized style of slow-cooked, complexly
dry-rub fusion ribs, chopped pork, brisket, and chicken Diners
can customize their orders with mix-and-match housemade
sauces sweet/tangy tomato-based, Carolinas-inspired vinegar/
mustard, pan-Asian hoisin with lemongrass and ginger, tropical
guava/habanero Authenticity aside, the quality of the food is
as good as much higher-priced barbecue outfits $-$$
Sushi Maki
1000 S. Miami Ave., 305-415-9779
Fans of the popular parent Sushi Maki in the Gables will find
many familiar favorites on this Brickell branch's menu But
the must-haves are some inventive new dishes introduced to
honor the eatery's tenth anniversary and Miami multicultur-
alism "sushi tacos" (fried gyoza skins with fusion fillings like
raw salmon, miso, chill-garlic sauce, and sour cream), three
tasty flash-marinated Asian/Latin tiraditos, addictive rock
shrimp tempura with creamy/spicy dip Also irresistible four
festive new sake cocktails $$-$$$
SuViche
49 SW 11th St., 305-960-7097
This small Japanese-Peruvian place serves food influenced by
each nation distinctly, plus intriguing fusion items with added
Caribbean touches Cooked entrees, all Peruvian, include an
elegant aji de gallina (walnut-garnished chicken and potatoes
in peppery cream sauce) But the emphasis is on contem-
porary ceviches/tiraditos (those with velvety aji amarillo chill
sauce particularly), plus huge exotic sushi rolls, which get pret-
ty wild When was the last time you encountered a tempura-
battered tuna, avocado, and scallion maki topped with Peru's
traditional potato garnish, huancalna cheese sauce $$
TIKL Raw Bar & Grill
1450 Brickell Ave. #110, 305-372-0620
From restaurateur Claudlo Giordano and chef Simon
Stojanovic, the team behind longtime South Beach seafood
favorite Altamare, this eatery is similar in food genre (contem-
porary American), though more global influences, especially
from Asia, are evident here Additionally, rather than serving
conventional three-course meals, TIKL's menu focuses on
small plates creative crudos (like hamachl with yuzu, wasabi,
and olive oil powder), plus robata-grilled and otherwise cooked
items Standouts garlic/citrus-splked local white shrimp with
sweet shishito peppers, Thai curried mussels with crisped
sushi rice, sinful bacon toast $$$-$$$$
Tobacco Road
626 S. Miami Ave., 305-374-1198
Prohibition-era speakeasy (reputedly a fave of Al Capone), gay
bar, strip club Previously all these, this gritty spot has been
best known since 1982 as a venue for live music, primarily
blues But it also offers food from lunchtime to late night (on


weekends till 4 00 a m ) The kitchen is especially known for its
chil, budget-priced steaks, and burgers There's also surpris-
ingly elegant fare, though, like a Norwegian salmon club with
lemon aloli A meat-smoker in back turns out tasty ribs $$
Trapiche Room
1109 Brickell Ave., 305-329-3656
With multiple Marriott hotels in Brickell and downtown, one
of them housing high-profile db Bistro, its not surprising that
this small, second-floor restaurant is something of a "best kept
secret" But it deserves discovery Chef Maria Tobar hasn't
Daniel Boulud's fame, but she does have classic European-
type technical skills, combined with contemporary creativity
that turns even ultimately old-fashioned items, like a pork/
cabbage strudel, into 21st century fine-dining fare Both decor
and service, similarly, are swelegant, not stuffy, and the room's
intimacy makes it a romantic spot for special occasions $$$$
Tre Italian Bistro
270 E. Flagler St., 305-373-3303
"Bistro" actually sounds too Old World for this cool hangout,
from the owners of downtown old-timer La Loggia, but "resto-
lounge" sounds too glitzy Think of it as a neighborhood "bistro-
lounge" The food is mostly modernized Italian, with Latin and
Asian accents a prosclutto-and-fig pizza with Brazilian catupiry
cheese, gnocchi served either as finger food (fried, with cala-
mata olive/truffle aloli), or plated with orange-ginger sauce But
there are tomato-sauced meatballs with rigawt for Grandpa
Vinnie, too $$-$$$
Truluck's Seafood, Steak, and Crabhouse
777 Brickell Ave., 305-579-0035
Compared to other restaurants with such an upscale power-
lunch/dinner setting, most prices are quite affordable here,
especially if you stick to the Miami Spice-priced date-dinner
menu, or happy hour, when seafood items like crab-cake
"sliders" are half price Most impressive, though, are seasonal
stone crabs (from Trulucks own fisheries, and way less expen-
sive than Joe's) and other seafood that, during several visits,
never tasted less than impeccably fresh, plus that greatest
of Miami restaurant rarities informed and gracious service
$$$-$$$$
Tuyo
415 NE 2nd St., 305-237-3200
Atop the revolutionary Miami Culinary Institute, this upscale
eatery, unlike the cafe downstairs, isn't student-run Rather
its designed to showcase school ideals -- including sustain-
ability as well as definitive Miami cuisine The changing menu,
from a culinary Dream Team headed by "New World Cuisine"
inventor/MCI instructor Norman Van Aken (plus former prote-
ges Jeffrey Brana and Travis Starwalt), mixes citrus-inflected
creamy conch chowder and other pioneering signatures with
new inventions like mind-reelingly multidimensional oyster pan
stew, or tartare of tuna and burstingly ripe tomato topped with
a delicate sous vide egg $$$$$


Waxy O'Connor's
690 SW 1st Ct.,
786-871-7660
While the menu of this casually craic (Gaelic for "fun") Irish
pub will be familiar to fans of the South Beach Waxy's, the
location is far superior -- on the Miami River, with waterfront
deck And none of Miami's Irish eateries offers as much
authentic traditional fare Especially evocative imported
oak-smoked Irish salmon with housemade brown bread, puff-
pastry-wrapped Irish sausage rolls, lunchtime's imported Irish
bacon or banger "butty" sandwiches on crusty baguettes,
served with hand-cut fries, the latter particularly terrific dipped
in Waxys curry sauce $$
Wok Town
119 SE 1st Ave., 305-371-9993
Judging from the takeout window, the minimalist decor (with
communal seating), and predominance of American veggies on
the menu, this Asian fast-food eatery, owned by Shal Ben-Ami
(a Miss Yip and Domo Japones veteran) May initially seem akin
to those airport Oriental steam tables Wrong Custom-cooked
by Chinese chefs, starters (like soy/garlic-coated edamame),
salads, and have-it-your-way stir-fries, fried rice, or noodle
bowls burst with bold, fresh flavor The proof a startlingly
savory miso beef salad, with sesame/ginger/scallion dressing
Bubble tea, tool $$
Zuma
270 Biscayne Blvd. Way, 305-577-0277
This Miami River restolounge has a London parent on San
Pellegrino's list of the world's best restaurants, and a similar
menu of world-class, Izakaya-style smallish plates (robata-
grilled items, sushi, much more) meant for sharing over
drinks Suffice to say that it would take maybe a dozen visits
to work your way through the voluminous menu, which offers
ample temptations for vegetarians as well as carnivores
Our favorite is the melt-in-your-mouth pork belly with yuzu/
mustard miso dip, but even the exquisitely-garnished tofu
rocks $$$$

Midtown / Wynwood / Design District
3 Chefs Chinese Restaurant
1800 Biscayne Blvd. #105, 305-373-2688
Until this eatery opened in late 2010, the solid Chinese
restaurants in this neighborhood could be counted on
the fingers of no hands So it's not surprising that most
people concentrate on Chinese and Chinese/American fare
The real surprise is the remarkably tasty, budget-priced,
Vietnamese fare Try pho, 12 varieties of full-flavored beef/
rice noodle soup (including our favorite, with well-done
flank steak and flash-cooked eye round) All can be custom-
ized with sprouts and fresh herbs Also impressive Noodle
combination plates with sauteed meats, salad, and spring
rolls $$


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Thanksgiving

Packages 3451 HE I MIDTOWN MIAMI, 786,507,99



WE USE ONLY LOCAL LAKE MEADOW NATURALS EGGS, FLORIDA MILK, KING ARTHUR UNBLEACHED UNBROMATED FLOURS- REAL INGREDIENTS, REAL GOOD


MIAMI


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


December 2012