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NEW THIS ISSUEGaspars Cult Following p. 18 Craigs Brickell & Downtown p. 64 November 2012 www.BiscayneTimes.com Volume 10 Issue 9 YOU CAN BET ON ITTHE BATTLE TO BRING CASINOS TO MIAMI DIDNT GO AWAY, IT JUST WENT UNDERGROUNDPG. 36

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KNIGHT CONCERT HALL K C Z CARNIVAL STUDIO THEATERZIFF BALLET OPERA HOUSE P PARKER AND VANN THOMSON PLAZA rfntbn ntn bfrrrrrtrfrfr r f C C Z K rf ntbt n t n rf r fnftntbt n bn nf nnn Z n ntbt n rfnt btfrt Zntbt n rnt bf rfnt tt trrtt bnf fnfrnr rfrn rf rntb ft C n ntbt n bnf t bnf t n nnn fbnf rn b nrr bnf rnn nfnrnb C fb t bbfbnf C K n bnf n nrrtb C Kn n rnnf n fbnf C Kbnf fbf nnf rnr nn ftf C Kbnf fr nn f C Z bnf rb b btb trbrbbbnf n nn nnfrn nnbnf fnfrnr rfrn rf rntb ft n ffr trr bnf C C K P C C K C K Z Z C C K Z K ntbb n nf f rr br f f

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COVER STORY 36 You Can Bet on It COMMENTARY 12 Feedback: Letters 18 Gaspars Cult Following 22 Jac k King: Voter Fraud That Works 26 Christian Ci priani: Sunbirds Vacation OUR SPONSORS 30 BizBuzz COMMUNITY NEWS 50 Fra ming Success 50 A Naked Grab at Haulover? 51 Sou l Survivor: The Road at 100 NEIGHBORHOOD CORRESPONDENTS 64 Craig Chest er Covers Brickell and downtown 66 Jay Beskin on the Other Side of the Tracks 68 Jen Up Close and Personal with a Fox 70 Frank Cant Stand that Neon Blue 72 Mark Cant Believe the People Won 74 Wendy Is Not a Hoarder ART & CULTURE 76 Anne Tschida: Chinese exile artist Ma Desheng 78 Melissa Wallen: Galleries + Museums 81 Events Calendar POLICE REPORTS 82 Derek McCanns Biscayne Crime Beat PARK PATROL 84 Jim W. Harper : A Little Gem in NMB COLUMNISTS 86 Pawsitively Pets: Crime and Punishment 88 Picture Story: Idyllic Miami 89 Your Garden: Ackee, Rice, Saltfish Are Nice 90 Going Green: $12 Billion Plumbing Problem 91 Kids and the City: Does Mom Get a Break? 92 Vino: Gobs of Turkey Day Bottles 93 Dish: Miami Long, Strange Trip DINING GUIDE 96 Re staurant Listings: 304 Biscayne Corridor Restaurants 305-538-8835 | www.miamibeachhealth.org | Healthcare made easy.Serving the medical needs of the Miami Beach community for more than 35 yearsMiami Beach Community Health Center North | 11645 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 103-104, Miami, FL, 33181 PUBLISHER & EDITOR r CONTRIBUTORS fntrnSenior Writer nrnr bArts Editor r tnrt t tr rr n nnrr rnrn BUSINESS M anager ANAGER rrr rrrr ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES r r tr rr A rt RT director DIRECTOR rn r A dvertising DVERTISING design DESIGN rrr CIRCULATION rrr PRINTING rCONTENTSPO Box 370566, Miami, FL 33137 www.biscaynetimes.com rfnftbfrfft nbb F orOR A dvertisingDVERTISING informationINFORMATION callCALL 305-756-6200 18 51 64Serving communities along the Biscayne Corridor: Arch Creek East, Aventura, Bay Point, Bayside, Biscayne Park, Belle Meade, Buena Vista, Coventry, Design District, Downtown, Eastern Shores, Edgewater, El Portal, Enchanted Lake, Hibiscus Island, Highland Lakes, Keystone Point, Miami Shores, Morningside, North Greynolds, North Bay Island, North Miami, North Miami Beach, Oak Forest, Oakland Grove, Palm Grove, Palm Island, Sans Souci, Shorecrest, Sky Lake, Sparling Lake, Star Island, Wynwood, and Venetian Islands NEW NEW

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Art by God, Fire by FateI am so glad Wendy Doscher-Smith wrote about Art by God (Lions and Tigers and Bears, October 2012). That store has been one of my favorite haunts for years. Im constantly recommending it to friends and always include it among the tourist stops when Im hosting visitors from out of town. Art by God owner Gene Harris is so sweet and sincere and patient. Hell gra ciously spend a half-hour with you if youre curious about some dinosaur or other fossil, explaining it in detail. Its almost like a col lege tutorial in archaeology. So you can imagine my horror when I learned that Art by Gods big wareafter Biscayne Times came out. From and eventually cool down. What a shame. What bad luck. What a lousy ending to a happy moment when its owner deserve. Melinda Sachs MiamiYes, I Still Go to Wynwood for the Art, but Never on SaturdayI dont feel the same way about Wynwoods Second Saturday Art Walk as Craig Chester does (Taking It to the Streets, October). To him it is a worthwhile public event, a legitimate social gathering bringing together people from all over Miami. To me it has been warped into a mindless food-and-beer fest that has nothing at all to do with art. Dont take my word for it. Why do you think so many of the best galleries (Dorsch and Snitzer among them) no longer hold their exhibition receptions on those second Saturdays? To avoid clogging their galleries with clueless partygoers who care more about the refreshments than the art, theyre now having receptions on Friday nights or at other times. So Craig Chester and I could not be farther apart on appreciating Art Walk. But we do agree on one thing: The streets and sidewalks have become so congested that its only a matter of time before there is a very bad car-pedestrian confrontation. (Cars always win those.) So if the crowds are going to be there for food and drink and fun, something must be done to correct that dangerous situation. Chesters proposal to close a portion of NW 2nd Avenue to vehicles is a great idea. Lets hope he and others who still care about Art Walk can get the City of Miami to do something creative to solve the problem. As for me, I still go gallery-hopping in Wynwood, but never on the second Saturday evening of the month. William Ortega Downtown MiamiWhat Would Gaspar Have Said?Regarding Gaspar Gonzlezs most recent Novel Truth, October 2012), its appro priate to thank him for his many columns illuminating our Village of Biscayne Park. While a select few may not have liked his assessment of some aspects of our gem us appreciated his humor, accuracy, and clarity of thinking on local issues that, as Gaspar wrote in that last column, dont get discussed much outside the monthly commission meetings. Jay Beskins Aventura column (Separated at Birth, October 2012) discussing local election dates was also illuminating, given that on our November 6 ballot, theres a Biscayne Park charter amendment to change the election date from our traditional December in odd years to even-year Novembers so as to coincide with national and state elections. If passed, the measure would also increase the current term of two commissioners most recently elected. The idea is that this change would save money and increase voter turnout, both reasonable concepts. There are also some not-so-good things that can come of a change like this less of a focus on village issues amid an avalanche of other state and national concerns, and a tendency to turn our nonpartisan race into one tied to political parties via presidential signs in the yards of candidates and supporter. Whats disappointing is that an issue like this would get put on a ballot with no serious public discussion of the facts. Most cities dont place charter amendments on a ballot without a full charter review because of the complexities involved. We have. As a result, many questions were never asked, such as: How many cities in South Florida have changed their election dates to coincide with state and national elections, and how much did they save? How does our current voting turnout compare to other Commentary: LETTERS Continued on page 14

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BRIAN CARTER, P. A. BROKER ASSOCIATE cell 305 582 2424 | btcarter@majesticproperties.com UNDER CONTRACT

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cities? What percentage of our budget will we save? Whats even more disappointing is that, as of the writing of this letter, the village has put out no information about this charter amendment. No village blast with details about the proposed changes. Theres also been no newspaper article, so how will people know what they are voting on, and why? My own research indicates that only 13 out of 35 Miami-Dade cities have local elections that coincide with state and national elections, and Broward and Monroe have an even lower percentage, the minority. The Village already has a consistently higher turnout than most stand-alone cities, even though our Village does virtually nothing to encourage turnout (those Vote This Tuesday signs youve seen for years were all done privately). As for savings, Aventura saved $80,000 (and the City of Miami might save $1 million if it passes), but its estimated our change will save the village only $4600 per year out of a $ 2,337,132 budget. Thats 0.2 percent. Do we simply want more voters even if theyre less informed and less focused? Must our candidates compete with unlimited ads to gain your attention? Shall it be quantity over quality? As much as I have been working toward greater voter turnout for years, Ill take quality every time. Please vote No on this charter amendment. Im sure Gaspar could have written this much better, and there are many Biscayne Park residents who will be sorry to see him go. In any event, those of us who have appreciated his words look forward to reading future Biscayne Times contributions from him. Steve Bernard Village of Biscayne ParkAfter 128 Hours in Publishing Purgatory, Free Monthly Mercifully DispatchedIn May of this year, Gaspar Gonzlez reported (Well Shut My Mouth) a promise from the publisher of Bis cayne Times This promise pertained to a request polled in Biscayne Park, to the effect that they did not want the BT delivered to individual homes, where it sits on properties looking bad and signaling the possibility or likelihood that no one was home, and the house could be considered easy pickings. The promise was that 48 hours after deposit of the BT on yards and swales, any copies uncollected by the resident would be collected by a crew sent by the publisher of the BT It took until September for me to take the risk of testing this promise. I left the BT in my driveway and did not obscure or drive over it, for about 128 hours. Thats 80 hours more than promised. I then had someone pick it up for me, since I was out of town. I have to assume the publisher would in fact never have collected the BT from my driveway, where he dumped it. Is there some amended or follow-up proposal from the BT ? Or is it business as usual? Fred Jonas Biscayne ParkA Rising Tide Lifts All Readers, East Coast or West Lost in a Rising Sea (September 2012) fast enough. I immediately wanted to learn all the information about rising sea levels. What an eye-opener. If South awakened by this article, nothings going to get through their heads. It disgusts me that all the builders care about is money in their pockets. Im this is such a huge global issue. Im embarrassed to say that, living in Southern California, I have not thought about the rising sea.. My eyes sky and Biscayne Times What a great in-depth article! Mary Jane Reynolds San Diego CountyA Gift Named HarperI continue to pick up Biscayne Times hoping to read at least one article on our ecology by Jim W. Harper. Thank you, BT and even bigger kudos to Harper for caring and sharing his concerns with the rest of us. He is a gift to South Florida. Steven Leidner, D.V.M. EdgewaterCommentary: LETTERS LettersContinued from page 12 Arts & Craft Fair Saturday, November 10 11 am 8 pm rfnt fbffffff ffftfffff fft ffffffffff fff Bring in this ad for a free soda.

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Commentary: CULT FOLLOWINGCurtain CallRemembering Paquito Hechavarra, 1939-2012By Gaspar Gonzlez BT ContributorI in the lobby bar of the Deauville Hotel in Miami Beach. Id gone there tuned ear told me the man was one of the best piano players hed ever heard. When I arrived, I found him entertaining an audience of two. The couple would soon call it a night, leaving only Paquito and me in the otherwise empty bar. I introduced myself and pulled up a chair. Paquito asked if I had a request. I told him to play whatever he liked. So for the next hour, he ran through various American standards, popular Cuban tunes from the 1940s and 1950s, even the James Bond theme, all in his signature style a kind of Cuban swing, highly rhythmic and distinctly percussive. I quickly realized my new acquaintance was not your typical lounge lizard. Paquito (a nickname for Francisco) had been a child prodigy in Cuba. By the time he was 16, in 1955, he was the feaa popular band on the island. That was followed by a stint with the renowned Orquesta Riverside. With those groups, Paquito played the Capri, the Tropicana, and virtually every hot spot in Havana. By his early 20s, he had made his way to Miami courtesy of the revolution and had landed at the Fontainebleau. There, during the days of Frank and Sammy and Judy, Paquito presided over the hotels famed Boom Boom Room. In the 1970s, he moved to Las Vegas to play with Pupi Campos orchestra. After a couple of years, he got homesick and returned to Miami, where he worked local clubs and also became an in-demand session musician, cutting records with, among others, Carlos Santana, Macy Gray, and Miami Sound Machine (along the way authoring one of the most recognizable pop-music hooks of the last 40 years: the piano intro to Conga). night, in between songs and drags from the cigarette holder he always used. He was friendly and funny and supremely talented. By the end of the evening, we were friends. We stayed friends until this past September, when I got the call that Paquito had died unexpectedly at age 73. His passing was noted in the Spanish-language El Nuevo Herald and a few days later, somewhat belatedly, on the Website of the Miami Herald which referred to him as a Cuban music legend. Paquito probably would have gotten a chuckle out of that, not because the accolade wasnt deserved it was but because, as much as anyone, he knew Miami isnt always kind to its legends. From the time we met, I made it a point to go see Paquito wherever he might be playing. The occasional show at the Van Dyke or Jackie Gleason notwithstanding, the gig would usually be in some out-of-the-way bar or restaurant where the owners expected him to pull in customers, even when they had done nothing to advertise the night. If the crowds didnt materialize, theyd replace him with a DJ the following week or scrap music altogether. More than once, they forgot to pay him. More than once, he mentioned to me how grateful he was to have the little bit of money his musicians union pension brought in every month. would rediscover him, like the actor bassist Israel Cachao Lpez. (It wasnt so farfetched a notion when you consider that Paquito and Cachao used to play together around Miami in the 1980s.) Of course, it didnt happen, at least not the way Paquito envisioned it. Nevertheless, in his last years, he did get to do a couple great he was. In 2009 the distinguished music producer Nat Chediak invited him to make an album of Sinatra standards in the Cuban style. The resulting CD, titled Frankly is nothing short of brilliant. Paquito is the only guy who could play those songs that way, Chediak told me at the time. Brett OBourke and I made Hecho a Mano: Creativity in Exile a documentary that featured Paquito, along with three other Cuban artists living in Miami. It try and won an Emmy. a part of it. He was wonderful in it, telling stories and playing the music he loved. He never said so, but I suspect he also apgave him the last say. His words now take on an unintended poignancy. Y como qued, qued , he declares, the credits roll. The way it is, is the way it ends. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Photo courtesy of Richard Patterson rfntbf305.603.8540rrwww.CleanStartMiami.com10% OFFAll ProductsFREEYoga ClassFirst Time Students $16 Value $20 OFFColon HydrotherapyRegular Price $100 By Appointment Only b50% OFFIonic Foot DetoxPull Toxins From Your Body Out Of Your Feet. Regular $25 b$30 OFFSignature Detox Facial With PeelRegular Price $125 b NEW!

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22 Commentary: MIAMIS KING By Jack King BT ContributorIts really too bad the presidential elec tion has overshadowed so many state and local contests. Part of the problem is there are fewer news outlets to cover local politics than a decade ago, so we simply dont learn about some elections. Couple that with a ballot that will be 12 isnt enough manpower to go around. For instance, how much have you heard about Floridas U.S. Senate race between incumbent Bill Nelson and Connie Mack? Not much. And what about the local congressional race between Joe Garcia, whose opponent, Rep. David Rivera, calls Garcia the most corrupt politician in South Florida. Funny, I thought Rivera had already been crowned Most Corrupt Politician in South Florida. The list goes on and on, through many races youll never hear about, being won by people youve never heard of, who will then be in a position to make a differ ence in your life for better or worse. Another for instance: The billionaire, right-wing, nut-case Koch brothers have decided the Florida Supreme Court is much too liberal, so they want to get rid of three theyve spent more to oust the three sitting Too much money in politics? Nah Add to all this the 11 proposed amendments to the Florida Constitution spelled out in deadening legalistic useless and should be voted down and we have one of the worst election cycles in many years. But wait! It gets worse. As we all know, absentee voting doesnt work very well in Florida, unless youre a Republican who knows how to game the system. (And boy, do they!) Hows it done? You start off by heading to Hialeah and contacting some ballot brokers, who seem to be on every street corner. It certainly wasnt hard for current Republican stars Gov. Rick Scott and point: Scott got 75,000 absentee votes in his successful run against Alex Sink, who garnered 25,000. Without the absentee ballots, Sink would have very nearly won the governors race. Which leads us to another part of the discussion. If in-person voter fraud the kind involving illegal immigrants, rampant in Florida (even though no one do something about absentee voter fraud, The answer is that Republicans own the voter fraud that works (absentee ballots). Their efforts to curtail nonexistent in-person voter fraud are really designed to suppress voter turnout. Absentee voter fraud works because the state legislature decriminalized it years ago. Miami-Dade County has made it a misdemeanor, but in reality no one gets charged, even if theyre caught red-handed with hundreds of absentee ballots. So much for law-and-order Republicans. So is there a better way to vote? I think there is, and thats by mail. It has been used for a dozen years in Washington state and Oregon. You might think its no dif ferent from absentee ballots, but it is quite different. Here, you call up and ask for a sends it to you. There, they send you the ballot because you are on the voter rolls and you return it by mail. Period. Here, absentee ballots are picked up by ballot brokers, who can then do anything they want with them. There, voter fraud is serious business. Oregon mailed out 15 million ballots between 2000 to 2010, investigated thousands of Here, our illustrious Governor Scott has investigated thousands of voter-fraud claims and found nothing. But if he were to investigate absentee voter fraud, hed ecuted because there are no penalties. When you mail in ballots, you also have another layer of security: The feds take a dim view of mail tampering. Would a system like this work in Florida? It should, as it has more safeguards than the current system, which is without doubt broken. Youd think it would be a no-brainer to adopt a system that works, saves millions of dollars in taxpayer money (no poll workers because there would no polls) and saves voters time and money because they dont have to drive anywhere. Until the mentality in Tallahassee changes such that the best interests of probably wont happen. Phil Keisling, the former Oregon secretary of state who shepherded voteby-mail through the initiative process, put it best when he cited political cowardice and calculation as obstacles, along with the craven fear of that has been demonstrated on both sides of the aisle that this is bad for their side. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Voter Fraud That WorksState lawmakers love absentee ballots so much, they decriminalized criminal conduct

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26 Commentary: URBANIA By Christian Cipriani BT ContributorNearly every working adults year is built around the prospect of getting out of town, and for many of them, the words vacation and beach are interchangeable. But what does vacation mean when you live in one of the worlds warmest and most desirable beach destinations? A change of pace. In a word, cool the prospect of vacationing in a cool climate, I know Ive staked my claim as a Miamian. I visit Pennsylvania to see family and friends for Thanksgiving and some grim reality into my cold-weather romanticism. Five days also happens to be that sweet spot where many families go from great to see you to lets get ready to rumble. gether about six months when I splurged on an eight-day trip to Barcelona in the spring of last year. It turned out to be the last time we could afford something like months of semi-employment. In September we decided it was time to get away again for a few days. We began looking for non-Miami weather and terrain. There was only one part of the U.S. I had never visited but wanted to: New England. She had never seen autumn leaves. Never an autumn leaf? Facts like that blow my mind. Heres another one Ive heard on many occasions: Weve never seen snow. How can you reach your 30s having never experienced our planets four basic seasons? (Autumn is the season I really miss.) I didnt know a thing about New England outside of books, pictures, and some time spent in Boston. We tossed around a lot of idyllic scenarios: applepicking on a Vermont farm on the edge drive through New Hampshires White Mountain National Forest, where the leaves along the Kancamagus Scenic Byway are supposedly some of New We eventually settled on Nantucket. This appealed to us for a few reasons. It was remote a fair consolation prize eastern tip of St. Johns, Newfoundland. ing from Boston all the way down Route 3 to Hyannis. More than anything, though, Nantucket spoke to my inner WASP. I love Latin culture, but Im a northern white boy at heart. My cardigans dont get much action down here. The high-speed ferry across Nansengers. We were arriving two weeks past high season, after everyone took their last dip before the winter. For 30 miles we felt the ferry buck in the murky, choppy sound, spraying our windows port as dusk approached. On this Sunday, the island was a ghost town. We looked up from silent, pitch-black streets to admire the stars, a sight so foreign in Miami that we dont even miss it. Their number and clarity were astonishing to take in, and phone apps helped us pick out the planets and constellations within view. Rain clouds threatened in the morn ing, but they burned away as we pulled out of Youngs Bike Shop, founded in 1931, on a pair of beach cruisers. We headed to one of Nantuckets many his toric lighthouses, where I learned that you cant take a bad photo of a lighthouse. It was 67 and sunny. I refused to take off my sweater and continued to sweat. Each time we pedaled around a corner, we came upon another street of perfect homes, each one larger and more rustic than the last. The houses were empty save for workmen prepping them for winter, and all of them were ished cedar shingles that, within a year, turn a coarse, weather-beaten gray. Its a look that matched well with a belt I picked up at Murray Toggery Shop, featuring tiny cartoon whales. Murrays is the kind of store that makes me look forward to a time in my life when I can wear lobster-print seersucker pants without a trace of irony. A few pieces of salmon and a dozen oysters later, and we were back on the ferry. Truth be told, there is nothing to do in Nantucket but ride bikes and eat, which is perfect for two days. I was happy to look down from the plane and see the black ocean cut off by a coast full of city lights. Finally I peeled my suitcase, and stepped out into the last dog days of Magic City summer. Our vacation was over, but now that its high season in Miami, we get to be part of someone elses. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Sunbirds VacationWhere do you go when your backyard is a warm, tropical playground?BT photo by Christian Cipriani

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Our Sponsors: N ovemberOVEMBER 2 012By Pamela Robin Brandt BT ContributorAt last! By this months end, hurricane season will be over. But those other seasonal storms that blow in each year as regular as clockwork will have commenced the deluge of visiting friends and relatives from the frozen north, craving our warm weather (plus, of course, our hottest entertainment and eats). Step one is getting your home dressed to impress, as BT advertisers vember news from furniture, accessories, and construction companies. Last month, in preparation for the years busiest sales season, Dave Widdas of 360 Furniture Consignments (18340 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-627-3148) suggested that it was a perfect time for folks to bring in their high-quality furniture for consignment sale. Boy, did he ever get what he asked for. The consignor list is now huge. His November deal is a blow out sale of 30-50% off 360s gently used stock to make room for all the new stuff. At Herval Furniture (2650 NE 189th St., 305-935-4545), one big piece of news is that the company is now entirely located in Aventura and the downtown Biscayne showroom is no more. But the drive north will be well worth it this month for downtowners. Mention the BT striking stock of modern furniture: sofas and sectionals, wall units, dining tables, patio sets whatever you need to furnish your place, inside or out. Modern Home 2 Go (270 NE 39 St., 305-572-1222) is, this month, holding everywhere indoor contemporary furniture, but on exactly what people want during winter in Miami: outdoor dining and lounging sets. The sets are all-weather and eco-friendly. We welcome new advertiser Omega Dcor (3300 N. Miami Ave., 305-631-2077), a modern furniture and accessories up, whether you need a whole dining room and bedroom set or Omega will give BT readers a free lamp with a $1500 purchase. Swarovski Crystal Palace Collection Casino Royal chandelier installation at Farreys Lighting & Bath (1850 NE 146th St., 305-947-5451), we thought that this Lenny Kravitz-designed piece must be connected to Art Basel. But although Farreys is the only Florida showroom to Casino Royal can light up your pad. If leaks, collapsing walls, and so on have caused you to suspect that your home call to new advertiser GMG Construction Consulting (6006 NW 6th St., 305-9750965). Guillermo Mendozas licensed and The owner of Piper Companies (1885 NE 149th St., 305-940-2030), Evan Scott Piper, has a story that makes you wonder why it hasnt been made into a reality show. He started in the automotive business at age 13, developed Piper Automotive & Marine Services while in high school, and went into the construction industry at 17, eventually developing Piper Construction. Since a 2001 plane crash, hes been wheelchair-bound, although bound hardly seems the right word. In fact he has another company, Piper Medical, Mobility & Accessibility, which, among other things, customizes motor vehicles to enable disabled people to live independently. For some seniors perhaps your independently as possible means some class experience at Vi Living (19333 W. Country Club Dr., 888-697-6125), where the focus is on whole person wellness. Spacious homes come in several different sizes, and different levels of care are of fered, depending on individual needs. winters, youll want to spend some time be much fun if its been invaded by those nasty iguanas. Call new advertiser Blue Iguana Pest Control (855-525-5656), whose full range of preventative services ensure that your property doesnt look like a lizards party invitation. Would you prefer a new abode? Contact new BT advertiser and real estate agent Robbie Bell (901 S. Miami Ave. #215, 305-528-8557). This San Francisco homes where they can live, work, and play within walking distance, so they The problem with having a perfectly put-together home is your own imperfect self can start feeling out of place in it. But Tamayo Medical Center & Urgent Care (9037 Biscayne Blvd., 305-835-2797) can BT readers: laser body contouring and skin tight be your belly, inner thighs, outer thighs, upper arms, knees, face, or neck. If youre more of an exercise person, then heres some news for you. Real estate broker Brian Carter merger of Steel Gym Miami and NY with Continued on page 32BizBuzzSales, special events, and more from the people who make Biscayne Times possible

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Soulfully elegant. Essence of cool.CASINO ROYALE Crystal Palace Collection: SWAROVSKI 2012 SINCE 1924 |

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Our Sponsors: N ovember OVEMBER 2 012Island City Health and Fitness in Fort Lauderdale. The news for Miamians, and that your Steel membership now works in NY, Miami, and Fort Lauderdale. At this point your dog, who no doubt goodie for them with their snazzy improve ments. What about me ? Treat the mutt to a makeover at new advertiser Salon Poochini 1944), a pet-grooming spa and boutique busy working owners: early opening (8:00 a.m.), and a pick-up and delivery option. Top it off with a visit to Legitimutt (192 NW 36th St., 305-438-4385), where No vembers featured products are waterproof, odor-proof, and mildew-proof Sunshower collars, leashes, and harnesses, in 11 fashion colors. Readers who buy a leash with a collar or harness this month get 20% off. Bonus: Post your funniest dog pic on Legitimutts Facebook page to receive 20% off any item. Dont forget the kids. Are they getting a well-rounded education? Monsignor Edward Pace High School (15600 NW 32nd Ave., 305-623-7223, x342 for an appointment) is holding two open-house sessions on Saturday, November 10. Each session (8:30 and 10:00 a.m.) runs for two hours. Pace offers its students a futuristic and dynamic learning experience via fea tures like its new one-on-one iPad initiative. Even if your kids are between the ages of 0 (newborn) and 10, its not too early to get them going green at new advertiser Atlantis Natural (1717 N. Bayshore Dr. #218, 305-379-2722), a childrens enrichment and wellness education center and organic store that carries everything from organic cotton kiddie party such as reusable banners, and fair-trade snacks. How about picking up your guests from the airport in your 2013 Cadillac? As if, eh? But new advertiser Ocean Cadillac (1000 Kane Concourse, 305864-2271) says such luxury can be yours lease or $33,990. No dealer fees, and scheduled maintenance is included. Whew. Exhausted yet? After arranging all those improvements to your home, kids, pets, kids, senior relatives, car, and self, we sure could use some sustenance. Many restaurants close for Turkey Day, but not the Upper Eastsides longtime home-away-from-home, Soyka (5556 NE 4th Ct., 305-759-3117), which will open at 5:00 p.m. on Thanksgiving. If youd rather eat in your real home, let Soyka or 10-12 people, and pretend you did it yourself. Pre-order by November 19. For a traditional meal with tasty Ital ian-American touches, order your holiday feast from Laurenzos Market (16385 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-945-6381). Get a 14-16 lb. bird for $49.95 or $64.95 with stuff ing and gravy. Or go large with a 20-22 and gravy. Order before November 20. David Cohen of Bagels and Compa ny (11064 Biscayne Blvd., 305-892-2435) is offering a complete turkey feast for ten at $175. Order now! Thanksgiving din ourselves, except for dessert. Fortunately Midtowns new Acme Bakery (3451 NE 1st. Ave., 786507-5799) does old-fashioned American cakes, pies, and pastries that are better than those in your dreams. Youll also want to pick up some Midtown Sourdough for turkey sandwiches later. For many, the ideal night-beforeChinese. After all, who wants to cook the day before cooking for an army? Try 3 Chefs (1800 Biscayne Blvd. #105, 305Chinese-American favorites that make your car smell so tantalizing on the drive home, but Vietnamese dishes as well. If youre a healthy sort who believes that the turkey-and-starch fest must it at new advertiser Aarons Farmers Market (2250 NE 163rd St., 305-9479242). This recently opened place has fresher produce than your average supermarket and better prices, too. Aarons is also now a BT distributor, so you can pick up the pub with your peppers. location of Smoothie King is scheduled to open later this month at 18185 Biscayne Blvd. Drink a welcoming toast in more than Down, Build Up, Snack Right, and more. For football fans, snacking right means, nated, grilled beauties at Sports Grill (2995 NE 163rd St., 305-944-4552), a new location in a mini chain thats a Miami institution. Inevitably, out-of-town visitors want to sample Miamis Latin American eats, BizBuzzContinued from page 30

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but being unaware that Latin American isnt one giant generic food group, wont know what they want. Make it easy for them with a visit to new advertiser Sabor Latin Restaurant & Caf (1880 79th St. Cswy., 305-741-2020). This family-run spot specializes in Colombian favorites, but also serves typical Peruvian, Mexican, and Cuban dishes. Since its opening, new advertiser BagelWorks (18729 Biscayne Blvd., 305937-7727) has proved particularly popular with younger Jewish deli mavens, owing its modernized menu. All the traditional faves are here, but so are lighter choices. Will it be an old-fashioned pastrami on rye or a pastrami panini? Just in time for Art Basel, and in the right Design District locale, too: Watch the lot at NE 38th Street and Biscayne Boulevard for Miamis newest and artsiest pop-up, Orchid at the Pleasure Garden As well as a food and beverage program curated by homegrrrl star chef Michelle Bernstein, the tents entertain ment experience will feature song, dance, burlesque, and aerial acrobatics. For spiritually minded folks, First United Methodist Church (400 Biscayne Blvd., 305-371-4706) will be offering Harvest Festival Sunday on November 18. Started in the 1980s by a small group of members, this celebration is patterned American countries every fall. After all the holiday food excesses, a visit to new advertiser Clean Start (6901 Biscayne Blvd., 305-603-8540) could be a wise move. The company does body using natural products, colon hydrotherapy, detox massage, yoga, and more. Entertainment options this month abound, including an event that, till very recently, was the only reason many Miam ians went downtown all year: Miami Book Fair International (www.miamibookfair. com for a map, but you cant miss it). The event, running November 11-18 (street fair November 16-18), features hundreds of ditionally, for those who want to be one of those authors someday, MDCs Center for Literature (305-237-3023 or www.TheCen terMDC.org) is presenting The Miami Writers Institute November 14-16. Inten sive workshops (some in Spanish) cover both the professions artistic side (writing) and the business side (publishing). At the fair, incidentally, try to get an autograph from C.C. Radoff, author of The Big Split manual for living in a future-Florida run by gun nuts. You might have a hard time locating Radoff as the names a pseudonym for a well-known local writer who wants to avoid getting shot. If movies are more your thing, the City of Miami Beachs SoundScape series day at 8:00 p.m., on a very big wall outside the New World Center (500 17th St.). Bring a blanket and stretch out. sponsor Treece Financial Group is a November 27 screening of Gen Smart an unusually thought-provoking, critically ac claimed documentary that asks the question: Do LGBT seniors need to go back in the nation in retirement communities, will be shown at Miami Theater Center (9806 NE 2nd Ave., 305-573-6477) at 7:30 p.m. Live music fans wont want to miss Yemen Blues, a nine-piece Israeli-American group whose fusion of Arabian and West African sounds with contemporary grooves, from funk to mambo, has taken the world-music scene by storm. Part of Miami-Dade Colleges Live Arts series the concert is scheduled for 9:00 p.m. on November 10 at Grand Central (697 N. Miami Ave.) For more info and tix: 305-237-3030. Broadway show lovers are in luck also. On November 9 at 8:00 p.m., the Aventura Arts & Cultural Center (3385 NE 188th St., 877-311-7469) presents The Broadway Tenors featuring not one but three well-known Broadway leading men singing some of the Great White Ways most beautiful songs. At O Cinema (90 NW 29th St., 305571-9970), actually a multi-media center, Novembers featured exhibit is Swim ming Upstream a mixed-media show that explores the struggle of female artists through an aquatic focus thats not with out humor and considerable weirdness. Some advertisers are looking ahead, like KB Christmas Trees (11400 Biscayne Blvd., 305-899-1955), an advertiser who has been in business for three decades. Finally, a warm welcome to new advertiser Douglas Gardens Community Mental Health Center serving Miami Beach since 1979, on the grand opening of its second location at 1150 NE 125th St. No, were not suggesting that this seasons visiting relatives and friends will trigger a need for therapy. But if they do, 305-5315341 is the number to call for appointments. Something special coming up at your busi ness? Send info to bizbuzz@biscaynetimes. com. For BT advertisers only.

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36 YOU CAN BET ON ITWITH BILLIONS OF DOLLARS AT STAKE, GENTIN gG AND OTHER CASINO OPERATORS w W I LL NEVER EVER gG IVE UP BB y E E rik B B ojnansky

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More than a year ago, executives from the Genting Group, a Malaysian-based multinational company headed by K.T. Lim that opertheir plans to build a gigantic, $3 billion resort casino complex where the Miami Herald building now stands. Designed by Arquitectonica, Resorts World Miami was to include 5200 hotel rooms, more than 1000 condominium units, 50-plus restaurants and bars, a rooftop lagoon, a sandy beach, and 700,000 square feet of convention space and gambling areas large enough to hold up to 8500 slot machines and other Las Vegas-style games. Resorts World Miami is now in limbo, but its far from dead. In fact, Genting has already spent at least $236 million on the project, and may spend millions more even before major construction commences. The reason Genting is concentrating on Florida is two-fold, says John Kindt, a business professor at the of casino gambling. One, they think they can do it, that Florida will succumb to the onslaught of money theyre bringing to the table. The other reason is that Florida is a plum to be picked, with billions of dollars in tourist money that Genting can take out of the state forever. The vast majority of money Genting has spent so far, about $500 million, according to media reports, was used to buy 30 acres of land on both sides of Biscayne Boulevard near the Adrienne Arsht Center. Those properties include 14 acres of land, the Herald building, and the historic Boulevard Shops that Genting bought from McClatchy Newspapers for $239 million in May of last year. Genting also purchased the largely vacant Omni Mall, its parking garage, and the adjoining 527-room Hilton Hotel. Price tag: around $215 million. In an effort to legalize gambling at its future resort, Genting has also spent more than $1 million lobbying the state legislature and governor, according records. Among the 32 lobbyists Genting hired in Tallahassee are former congressman Lincoln Diaz-Balart and school board member Carlos Curbelo. (Curbelo withdrew as a lobbyist this past June. Diaz-Balart did so in August.) Another $2 million-plus was invested in campaign contributions to statewide committees, political parties, and legislative candidates. In Miami-Dade County, Genting funneled $63,000 to countywide candidates and local political groups, including $10,000 to a committee set up by county Mayor Carlos Gimenez; $6000 to four incumbent county commissioners who faced challengers in the August prijudge candidates, four of whom challenged incumbents that same month.In spite of the millions spent, a ninemonth push by Gentings army of lobby ists ended in failure this past February, when a bill that would have allowed the company to apply for a gaming license died in committee (it had been sponsored by State Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff of Fort Lauder dale and State Rep. Erik Fresen of Miami). Lobbying against the resort concept was an alliance of religious groups, restaurant and hotel business groups, Disney World, and existing gambling interests ranging from racinos such as Magic City Casino and Gulfstream Park to the Seminoles and Miccosukee. These interests have also spent millions on lobbying and campaign contributions. A month after the bill died, Genting distributed a press release stating its intention to build a luxury where the Herald building now stands, including an 800-foot-long promenade along the bay. Those plans have now been chal lenged. On October 22, Miamis Historic and Environmental Preservation Board (HEP Board) narrowly approved a resolu tion to study whether the 770,000-squarefoot Miami Herald building, constructed in 1963, is worthy of being protected as an historic structure. preservation group, is seeking the historic designation, arguing that the building and those who worked inside it had a huge impact on the region. The group also argues that the building can be adapted to suit Gentings needs. Gentings architects, including Arquitectonica principal Bernardo FortBrescia and former Dade Heritage Trust president Richard Heisenbottle, argue that the building is ugly and only worthy of the wrecking ball. One of Gentings local attorneys, Vicky Garcia-Toledo, insists that Genting would never have purchased the property if theyd believed the city might designate it as historic and prevent its demolition. Once the historic preservation staff prepares the report, the HEP Board will appealed to the city commission.) When On November 6, the HEP Board will get a report on when the big report might be ready. William Thompson, Resorts World Miamis senior vice president of development, nervously whispered into the ear of Garcia-Toledo as she tried to get a date certain so her client could prepare. The HEP Board refused to give her one. The report, its members argued, must be a detailed one, and so staff shouldnt be forced to rush it. Garcia-Toledo called the ruling a tremendous burden for Genting and a waste of taxpayer money. What theyve decided is that even though it doesnt meet the criteria, they need more information, and theyre going on to the next step, she told the BT after the meeting. Gentings Thompson would not discuss the boards decision, which is in keeping with the companys new phi losophy. Once chatty with its promises to bring rich whales from Asia to Miami and create thousands of jobs, Genting now speaks sparingly to the press. The only comment to the BT was this e-mailed statement: Over the past months, we have continued to meet with many stakehold ers to evaluate the needs of the state and local community. Resorts World Miamis efforts are future-focused and we continue Continued on page 38 The Miami Herald building is being considered for historic designation, meaning Genting could not demolish it, BT photo by Silvia Ros

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to keep an open mind as plans are mapped out moving forward. Our commitment to Florida remains as we work to be a produc tive and valued corporate citizen in the state for many years to come. maintain if Genting pursues a statewide referendum on a Florida constitutional amendment in 2014 or 2016 that would ask voters if county residents, or just those living in Miami-Dade County, should be allowed to decide if they want casinos. So far Genting has poured $936,500 into its own political action committee called New Jobs and Revenues for Florida (NJRF), which is currently studying ballot language for a statewide referen dum. Such a task wont be easy. Without the help of the legislature, NJRF will need to gather 700,000 signatures to put a referendum on the ballot. To get that ref erendum passed, state law now requires approval by 60 percent of Florida voters. To assist in their quest, NJRF has also hired two former associates of Gov. Rick Scott: former spokesman Brian Hughes and pollster Tony Fabrizio. Another option for Genting: Persuade state legislators to legalize a limited number of new casinos in Florida, or in Miami-Dade County alone. Or persuade the legislature to let Miami-Dade residents decide if they want casino gambling. Perhaps in an effort to gain Tallahassees cooperation (or elect people who will see things their way), Genting has spent $133,000 on contributions to state political campaigns since July. They have enough money to do one track, two tracks or even a three track approach, Kindt says. If money is any clue, however, the campaign contributions might be a hedge. Theyre giving the legislators another chance to pass something, reasons Steve Geller, a former state senator and current lobbyist who is also representing a company interested in building a casino in South Florida whom he declines to name. If not, theyll fund a petition for a constitutional amendment. But Peter Zalewski, a real estate analyst and founder of Condo Vultures, doesnt think Genting has a lot of time. There are so many developers who are coming forward at a rapid pace that it could be a situation that, the longer you Bet on ItContinued from page 37 &f Republican Party of Miami-Dade: $30,000 &f Co mmon Sense Now (supporting Mayor Carlos Gim enez): $10,000 &f G et It Done (supporting mayoral candidate Joe Martinez): $10,000 &f M iami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez: $500 &f M iami-Dade County Commissioner Bruno Barreiro: $2000 &f Mi ami-Dade County Commissioner Barbara Jordan: $1500 &f M iami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey Edmonson: $1500 &f M iami-Dade County Commissioner Dennis Moss: $1000 &f C andidate for county court judge Tanya Brin kley: $500 &f C andidate for county court judge Johnny Rodri guez: $500 &f C andidate for county court judge Michelle Alva rez Barakat: $500 &f C andidate for county court judge Frank Hernan dez: $500 &f C andidate for county court judge Greer ElaineWallace: $500 &f Ci rcuit Court Judge Antonio Arzola: $500 &f Ci rcuit Court Judge Gisela Cardonne Ely: $500 &f New Jobs and Revenues for Florida: $936,500 (Funded entirely by the Genting Group) &f R epublican Party of Florida: $556,045 &f F lorida Democratic Party: $310,916.76 &f F lorida Conservative Action Committee: $60,000 (Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart) &f A lliance for a Strong Economy: $45,000 (Sen. J.D. Alexander, R-Sebring; Sen. Lizbeth Benacquisto, R-Ft. Myers; Sen. Mike Bennett, R-Bradenton; Sen. Mike Ha ridopolos, R-Melbourne; Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart) &f F lorida Leadership Fund: $40,700 (Sen. Jack Latvala, R-St. Petersburg) &f Ci tizens for an Enterprising Democracy: $31,000 (Rep. Chris Dorworth, R-Fort Lauderdale; Rep. Jason Bro deur, R-Sanford) &f Co mmittee for a Prosperous Florida: $15,000 (Sen. Jeremy Ring, D-Margate; Rep. Jeff Clemens, D-Lake Worth) &f N ature Coast Conservative Coalition: $15,000 (Sen. Charles Dean, R-Inverness) &f Co mmittee for a Prosperous Florida: $15,000 (Rep. Perry Thurston, D-Fort Lauderdale) &f T axpayers for Integrity in Government: $15,000 (Rep. Joseph Abruzzo, D-Wellington; Rep. Alan Williams, D-Tallahassee) &f F oundation for Conservative Values: $10,000 (Sen. Miguel Diaz de la Portilla, R-Miami) &f Ci tizens for Commons Sense: $10,000 (Rep. Daryl Rouson, D-St. Petersburg) &f A lliance for Better Representation: $7500 (Rep. Perry Thurston, D-Fort Lauderdale) &f V eterans for Conservative Principles: $5000 (Rep. Frank Artiles, R-Miami) &f P rotecting Leadership Principles: $5000 (Rep. Eddy Gonzalez, R-Hialeah) &f F lorida For Strong Families: $5000 (Rep. Gary Siplin, D-Orlando) &f Co mmon Sense in Florida: $1000 (Rep. Geraldine Thompson, D-Orlando) &f Ch oosing Right for Floridas Economy: $5000 (Rep. Steve Precourt, R-Orlando) &f F lorida Freedom Fund: $5000 (Rep. Dorothy Hurkill, R-Port Orange) &f Co alition for Conservative Leadership (CCE): $5000 (Venice accountant Eric Robinson) &f Ci tizens for a Progressive Florida (CCE): $5000 (Sen. Nan Rich, D-Sunrise) &f F loridians for Efficiency in Government: $2500 (Democratic fundraiser Benjamin Pollara) &f T he Future Is Now: $5000 (Miami City Commissioner Francis Suarez) &f I nitiative for Floridas Future: $25,000 (Tallhasee at torney Mark Herron) &f A lliance for Progressive Representation: $12,500 (Tal lahassee lawyer Mark Herron) &f T he American People Committee, Inc: $5000 (Talla hassee political consultant Keyna Cory) &f P eople in Need of Government Accountability: $10,000 (Tallahassee webmaster Pedro Buigas) &f P rotect Floridas Economic Freedom: $25,000 (GOP fundraiser Nancy Powers) &f F lorida First: $4500 (GOP fundraiser Nancy Powers) &f Co nservative Leadership Coalition: $20,000 (Coral Gables political consultant Jos Riesco) &f T he Democracy Project, Inc: $5000 (Miami political consultant Keith Donner) &f Ci tizens First: $20,000 (Genting lobbyist John French) &f S en. Eleanor Sobel, D-Hollywood: $2000 &f S en. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale: $1500 &f S en. Jack Latvala, D-St. Petersburg: $1500 &f R ep. Daphne Campbell, D-Miami Shores: $1000 &f R ep. Ana Rivas Logan, D-Kendall: $1000 &f Rep. Joseph Abruzzo, D-Wellington: $1000 Casino Money: Spreading It AroundPublic records show that the Genting Group has given at least $2.3 million to numerous political commit tees and PACs, state political parties, and specific state politicians. Individuals affiliated with committees and PACs are shown in parentheses. This is a sampling, and includes only cash and in-kind contributions of $1000 or more.Casino Money: Keeping It LocalGenting Groups subsidiaries and employees have contributed at least $63,000 to political groups and candidates in Miami-Dade County. Below is an sampling of the total. The figures come from public records. Continued on page 40

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Ocean Drive with Water View 301 OCEAN DR # 204 1 Bed / 1 Bath / $549k Gary Hennes 305 281 6551 BALI South Beach 1520 Michigan Avenue, #1 2 Beds / 2 Baths / $975k Gary Hennes 305 281 6551

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40 wait, the more likely youll miss this new development wave, he says. When that happens, developing anything at that site Genting may also risk having to deal with more competitors. Three Las Vegas-based casino companies already have lobbyists in Tallahassee: Las Vegas Sands, MGM Grand, and Caesars Entertainment. Of the three, Las Vegas Sands may be Gentings most potent adversary. The company already has three lobbyTallahassee and one in Miami, the Coral Gables-based Barreto Group, headed by longtime county insider Rodney Barreto. According to media reports, Las Vegas Sands is looking at two possible sites for its casino: Watson Island, where a stalled mega-yacht marina and the cated; and Miami Worldcenter, a 25-acre area bounded by NE 2nd Avenue and N. Miami Avenue (east-west), and NE 6th Street and NE 11th Street (south-north). Last year representatives from both Las Vegas Sands and Miami Worldcenagreement was reached. Then last month one of the main investors in Miami Worldcenter, Art Falcone, bought the adjacent four-acre site of the former Miami Arena for $35 million. Falcone did not return phone calls from the BT but Geller, whose client list includes Falcone, describes Miami Worldcenter as a superb location for a casino resort. Not that he knows what Bet on ItContinued from page 38 Continued on page 42 BT photo by Silvia Ros

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WWW.LAPLAYA-PROPERTIES.COM FOR SALE $289,000La Playa Properties Group, Inc. 2275 Biscayne Blvd. Ste 1, Miami, FL 33137 LaPlaya@LaPlaya-Properties.comNow Recruiting Real Estate Professionals305-672-0773LaPlayaMiami La Playa Properties Group @LaPlayaMiami FOR SALE $299,900 500 BRICKELL55 SE 6 St # 2100, BRICKELLThe exclusive 1800 Club spectacular 33rd floor view. Floor to ceiling windows, stainless steel appliances. Water, high speed internet and basic cable are included. Amenities include gym, pool, sauna, 24hr security and valet.1800 CLUB1800 N BAYSHORE DR #3302, EDGEWATER PH: 305.672.0773 FOR SALE $359,000Amazing 1 Bed / 1 Bath + DEN. Largest 1bedroom unit in the building! quartz / granite counter tops, stainless steel appliances and very Spacious layout with den. Building includes: pool, gym and much more.WIND BY NEO350 S MIAMI AV #3403, BRICKELLBeautiful condo with amazing views of the Downtown Miami skyline & bay. Nolte designed kitchen. 200 Sq.Ft. balcony, washer and dryer inside unit. Building offers a pool, spa, sauna, sports room, library, children's play room and 24 hour concierge. FOR SALE $289,000Fabulous 1bed / 1bath condo with amazing water views. Stainless steel appliances, wood cabinets, tile and carpet. Building has excellent amenities and hi-tech security with restaurant on premises. Walk to Brickell, American Airlines Arena and Bayside.ONE MIAMI EAST335 S BISCAYNE BL # 2302, DOWNTOWN MIAMILinette GuerraBroker 305-915-0148 FOR SALE $575,000Live in this luxury east bay view 3bed / 2bath condo at One Miami where the Miami River meets the Bay! Enjoy direct access to the Miami Riverwalk and a river-front Cafe. Only minutes from South Beach and short walk to Bayside and the American Airlines Arena.ONE MIAMI WEST325 S BISCAYNE BL # 2026, DOWNTOWN MIAMILinette GuerraBroker 305-915-0148 Jordan LedermanRealtor Associate 248-701-5200 Cem TurkRealtor Associate 305-515-9512 Linette GuerraBroker 305-915-0148 FOR SALE $240,000Incredible opportunity to own a remodeled duplex close to Miami Shores. Two units with 2 bed / 2 bath each. Both units have separate living and dining areas, tile floors throughout and are freshly painted. SUTTER SUB380 NE 113 St, MIAMIChristin ElorteguiRealtor Associate 305-987-9997 900 BISCAYNE BAY900 BISCAYNE BLVD #3710, DOWNTOWN MIAMILinette GuerraBroker 305-915-0148Luxurious 1 + den / 2 full bath unit with breathtaking direct bay views, Italian imported cabinetry and stainless steel appliances. State of the art fitness center, spa, 24 hour concierge and valet. Walk to the American Airlines Arena.FOR SALE $415,000 FOR SALE $475,000Spectacular Bay and Miami Beach views. Large 1 bed + den / 2 full baths condo. Exceptional amenities include 2 pools, spa, conference center, club room and movie theater. Located minutes from South Beach and Performing Arts Center.900 BISCAYNE BAY900 BISCAYNE BLVD #2203, DOWNTOWN MIAMILinette GuerraBroker 305-915-0148

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42 Falcone intends to do with the land. All I know is what I read in the papers, Geller professes.Las Vegas Sands and Genting are already competitors. They both have two giant casino resorts in Singapore. Las Vegas Sands is also trying to open a casino in New York City despite resistance from Genting, which already operates an $800 million casino near JFK airport. In fact, Las Vegas Sands expressed an interest in building a casino somewhere in Florida long before Genting arrived on the scene. Andy Abboud, Las Vegas Sandss vice president for government relations, told state legislators back in March 2010 that his company wanted to build a casino in Tampa or somewhere in South Florida under certain conditions. Sheldon Adelson, CEO of Las Vas Sands, has also criticized Gentings deci sion to back a proposal allowing three mega-casinos in the state. Floridas market, Adelson asserts, can only handle one. Adelson has gained notoriety for pumping millions of dollars into this Newt Gingrich, then to Mitt Romney. His main lobbyist in Tallahassee, Nick Iarossi, told Miami Today last month they favor stopping all gambling efforts until statewide hearings on the issue take place. Such hearings are being proposed by state Sen. Don Gaetz of Niceville and state Rep. Will Weatherford. If reelected, as expected, they may get their way. Gaetz is slated to become the next Senate president and Weatherford the next speaker of the House. Bet on ItContinued from page 40 LIVE THE CITY LIFE Continued on page 44

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44 The legislature would prefer to measure twice and cut once, says Rep. Matt Gaetz, Senator Gaetzs son. If its possible, wed like to have time to collect data and really study the lasting impacts of gambling. The Bogdanoff-Fresen bill died last year in large part because of opposition from most Miami-Dade legislators, who were uneasy about expanding gambling here. Genting had high hopes that they would have casino licenses issued in Miami-Dade County, but the driving force behind blocking the issuance of these licenses has been the Miami-Dade legislative delegation, Matt Gaetz notes. Gentings arrogant attitude didnt help matters, says Bob Jarvis, a professor of casino law at Nova Southeastern Univer sity. Genting pissed off a lot of people and made a very bad impression in Tal lahassee, Jarvis tells the BT They came in and acted like they owned the place. Indeed, given that Genting didnt even have its gaming license yet, its initial pub licity campaign and over-the-top promises were very unusual. Normally the way the gambling guys operate is that they hold their cards close to their vest, observes John Sowinski, president of No Casinos, Inc. and an Orlando political consultant. When Genting came on the scene, they made a big splash and released those grandiose drawings. While the splash cre soon had to deal with plenty of criticism when people began looking at the details, Sowinski says. Professor Kindt of the University of Illinois believes the stumble was the result of cultural differences between the United States and Asia. The big public ity approach for future casinos works he says. That is Gentings home base, so ing details a strategy Genting now ap pears to be following the company will need to put together the broadest coali tion in order to get a 60-percent victory in a statewide vote, suggests Steve Geller. A referendum that paves the way for a resort casino in South Florida, but forever bans gaming elsewhere in the state might appeal to voters living in north Floridas Bible Belt, Geller says. Thus far, however, the only broad coalition that seems to be forming is the one opposing Genting. Sowinski, for example, sees casinos as a cancerous growth that metastasizes every time a new gambling venue is allowed to open. Even gambling proponents like Izzy Havenick, vice president of Magic City Casino (formerly Flagler Greyhound Track), have fought Genting. Havenick wont accept any legislation that gives destination resorts an unfair advantage over pari-mutuels like Magic City. Everyone should be treated the same, Havenick insists. Bet on ItContinued from page 42 Continued on page 46

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46 Another arch critic of Genting also doesnt appear to be budging: Disney World, a company that has contributed more than $2 million to campaigns since 2011. We oppose the expansion of casino gambling in our state for many reasons, including the fact that it is inconsistent with Floridas brand as a family-friendly destination and with efforts to diversify Floridas economy, a Disney spokesman says in an e-mail to the BT .Of course, Genting does have its supporters. During the Historic and Environmental Preservation Board meeting last month, opponents of Dade Heritage Trusts efforts to preserve the Miami Herald building outnumbered supporters nearly two-to-one. Among those who advocated for demolition were members of the construction industry, Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts Foundation chairman Mike Eidson, Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce president Bill Diggs, Omni Community Redevelopment Agency director Pieter Bockweg, and several people who owned units at the Grand, a venerable bayside high-rise condo just north of Herald building. The last time we chased somebody away from here it was Walt Disney; we ran him out of town in the late 60s and early 70s, says Fred Joseph, a board member of the Grand homeowners association and a real estate broker. As far as Joseph is concerned, even Gentings controversial designs by Arquitectonica would be preferable to an ugly box blocking access to the bay. It has never been neighborhood friendly, Joseph says. Bet on ItContinued from page 44 Continued on page 48

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Josephs attitude is not shared by the Venetian Causeway Neighborhood Alliance, which approved a resolution unanimously opposing Resorts World Miami last year. For one thing, the groups members are against the further expansion of gambling in Florida, explains Jack Hartog, president of the Alliance. For another, they felt that the project was just too big. The size and scope of the Genting project was so huge the concern was that no matter how they try an adverse effect, Hartog says. The Alliance has yet to take any position on the Miami Herald building, Hartog adds, nor has it been presented with any revised plans to judge. Though it might seem counterintuitive, Genting might be able to count other casino operators, including Las Vegas Sands, as their allies if only temporarily, says Jarvis of Nova Southare probably helping each other even now, despite the rhetoric of Las Vegas Sands executives. I have no doubt theyre helping; its in their interest, Jarvis says. Theyll try to open up the then theyll become competitors. Still, Jarvis doesnt expect resort casinos to be legalized for at least the next two years. There are too many pitfalls for any legislators to support it, especially outside of South Florida. If youre a north Florida legislator and you make any kind of deal expanding gambling, youve made a deal with the devil, he says. In central Florida, if you allow gambling, Disney will make sure you wont win re-election. But Jarvis does see some pos sibility of legalized casinos in the comfort of your own home. The U.S. Department of Justice issued an opinion late last year that allows states to license online gam bling, such as poker, so long as the sites have nothing to do with sports betting. Jarvis asserts that state of to issue licenses for online gaming operations in Florida. He suspects north Florida politicians might be able to back it: At least you wont have coming into your neighborhood. Jarvis also believes that with the low overhead of online gaming, and the convenience for the consumer, old-fashioned brick-and-motor casinos might go the way of the Dodo bird. With the Dodo factor in mind, might Genting consider yet another possibility: Giving up? Grant Stern, president of Morningside Mortgage, says if Genting were to build something similar to the Epic Hotel and Residences in downtown Miami, it could make a fortune even without a casino. Its on the water, its convenient to mass transit, its in an area where people want to live, work and play, Stern notes. Professor Kindt, however, doubts that Genting will ever give up on building a casino along the Biscayne Corridor. If Genting ever announces such a surrender, Kindt warns that itll likely be a red herring, that whatever project Genting builds, it will be designed with the expectation that Gentings casino goal eventually will be realized. Says Kindt: Theyll put in all kinds of electrical sockets in anticipation of hooking up slot machines. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Bet on ItContinued from page 46 Nous parlons FranaisVisit our new Morningside storefront at 5781 Biscayne Boulevard Paramount Bay Luxury Rental now $4100/monthRarely available in Miamis hippest building! Never lived-in 1800 sq ft 2be+den, 2ba with endless bay and ocean views. Ceramic oors throughout and huge balcony. Private elevator lobby.William Harbour, Broker 786 247 1185Venetian Island Waterfront $2,995,0001940s two-story home with pool on 11,000 sq ft + waterfront lot. 4be/4b, just under 3500sq f+ Garage and dock. Great location just minutes from Lincoln Road. South Florida at its best!Marie-Charlotte Piro 305 495 6539los on the Bay 2be/2ba rental at $3000/monthCutting edge corner Lanai residence in boutique condo located right on Biscayne Bay. 1398 sq ft + 768 sq ft of terraces. Private elevator lobby, High ceilings, top of the line kitchen. 2 covered parking spaces. Building offers a superb bay front pool, gym and concierge. Only 43 unit in building.William Harbour, Broker 786 247 1185 Villa Rosada CondoBrickell $67,000Incredible turn-key investment opportunity! Completely remodeled 1-bed condo in Spanish Revival building in Brickell area close to Calle Ocho. Ideal investment or starter home. Low HOA at $125/month. Alexander Burkhardt 305 904 1608Get Off That Fence!With mortgage rates at an all-time low and prices on the rise, it is time to get off the fence and snap that South Florida property! Check out our powerful FREE property search tool at www.mc2realty.com or contact us directly to start your smartest move of the decade!William Harbour, Broker 786 247 1185 Little Havanna 10-unit Multifamily $745,000Recently renovated and located few Blocks from the exclusive Brickell Area, in quiet neighborhood of Little Havana with supermarkets and convenience stores nearby and signicant ongoing street improvements due to the proximity to the new Marlins Stadium. Fully rented, cap rate 7.55%Marie-Charlotte Piro 305 495 6539 rf ntbtb rf nrtfb nrt rfnt btb

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50 Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDORFraming SuccessBroadway Arts Ken Beck has done more than just hang around the Biscayne Corridor for 20 years hes helped transform it BT ContributorThe Biscayne Corridor has seen many dramatic changes, some good and some bad. But one of the seemingly smallest changes in years reveals just how much the Upper Eastside has transformed itself in the past two decades. Broadway Art and Framing has 1990. That is, until this summer, when it moved from its most recent location, at 7226 Biscayne Blvd., a couple miles north to the Shores Square shopping center. (Across the Boulevard from the The man behind Broadway Art is Ken Beck. Along with his partner in business and love, George Cohen, Beck is one of the architects of the Biscayne Corridor renaissance, chipping away the neighborhoods Wild West image and helping to transform it into one of the most alluring areas in the city. Growing up in Hollywood, Florida, Beck had never really visited Miami until he answered an ad for an art salesman in the early 1980s, eventually going to work for then-famous Tip Freemans Painting and Art Gallery on 79th Street. There, Beck not only learned his trade, he grew to love the area. By 1990 he felt ready to strike out on his own and, for $1000 purchased a fram ing business. Beck had hoped the new enterprise would pay the bills and allow him to earn $8.50 an hour, what hed been making at Tip Freemans. Instead the Back in the early, early days when business, Beck recalls. I was sitting alone on Biscayne Boulevard with the hookers and the pimps and the crime. A lot of people related to it as the combat zone. But I took such great pride in my work, and I was so available to customers, they kept coming back. Its no secret that prostitution was rampant on the Boulevard back then; at times the streetwalkers seemed to outnumber the streetlights. Beck recalls the hookers would doll themselves up in Broadway Arts Boulevard-facing window, then, if the police dove by, run inside and hide in the bathroom. Beck eventually put a stop to that when, on several occasions, what Beck thought was crack smoke. Crime on the Boulevard wasnt limited store with an antique; neither he nor the piece was seen again. Another time burglars removed the stores A/C unit and climbed in through the hole it left. Con artists would visit the store, too, relaying some cockamamie story about broken-down cars or saying that so-andso sent them. Peddlers would drop in labeled as electronic gear. Selling fake jewelry was a popular swindle in those days, as well. An amused Beck refers to it all as good shenanigans now, even though he got taken a couple of times. Some of it still goes on, he says. occurred in the early 1990s, during a demonstration that brought the Haitian community out to the Boulevard. A tense confrontation between AfricanAmericans and Haitians at nearby Biscayne Plaza sparked the incident. I remember the Haitians, with signs, were protesting, says Beck. Id never seen a mob of people. I was scared that maybe violence would occur. Thats when the storeowner engaged in some quick thinking: I opened the shop. I gave them sticks and stapled all the matte board to it, and let them make signs. The activists returned the favor by cluing Beck into Haitian art. An avid collector, he now owns more than 4000 pieces. Continued on page 56 Continued on page 54 BT Senior WriterThroughout much of the 1980s, a band of South Floridians advo cated for a place to enjoy sun and water without the restrictions of a bathing suit. In 1991, their dream became as clothing-optional a 2000-foot-long stretch of sand along the northern area of Haulover Beach. More than 20 years later this beach attracts naturists those who enjoy communal nudity and nude sunbathers from all over the world. This month, the same group of activists who established Haulovers nude beach is preparing to prevent Westrec Marina from building a large boatstorage facility just west of a parking lot used by naturists. Richard Mason, president of South Florida Free Beaches, fears the enclosed 508-boat facility slated to include a convenience store, a bait-and-tackle shop, and new docks visit the north end of the beach. Worse, and Westrec Marina are defying the law. All we are asking the county to do is live up to the charter, he says. The people who wrote the charter said there should be no abuse of public land, and for convenience. Mason will ask Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez to put the boat facility up for a countywide vote, as required by the charter regarding development in county parks. Mason also will ask that the stor age facility be built farther south, where the current 265-boat Haulover Marine Center now operates, as called for by Haulovers 2001 master plan. (The county Maria Nardi, chief of planning and research for Miami-Dade Parks and Recreation, says building a new facility on that spot would interfere with the Park. Additionally, she says, building at the current marine center would have reenvironmental impacts. She also asserts that the charter does not require a county referendum. Boat Beach Park when Article 7 was adopted, the county charter dealing with public parks and aquatic preserves. Nardi adds that facilities for marinas, sightseeing Mason disagrees. Article 7, he insists, requires a public hearing and a referendum A Naked Grab?Activists fear the countys plans to develop Haulover Beach Park threaten the clothing-optional crowd

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Soul SurvivorTales from Tobacco Road on its 100th anniversary BT Senior Writer Laura Hirata knows how to pour a Guinness beer. Very slowly She juggling drink and food orders. Yet the tattooed bartender has an Achilles heel: handling remote controls. I hate technology, she mutters while trying have a VCR. I have a couple of porno tapes, but I dont have a VHS, a customer declares, quickly adding: Just kidding! A few seats away, the conversation is more somber. Jimbos is gone. Its history! one patron groans, referring to that operated at Virginia Key from 1954 until last year. People sitting on either side of him rattle off other Magic City bars and hang outs that have shut down in recent years. Theres nowhere left! one man gripes. Im with you, mumbles a stocky drinker sitting to his left. The cluster of people at the bar then makes a toast, to Miamis lost haunts and to the good times theyve had at Tobacco Road. Located at 626 S. Miami Ave., Tobacco Road is renowned for its drink specials, comfort food, and live music. When Miami-Dade State Attorney Janet Reno was appointed U.S. Attor ney General in 1993, Tobacco Road was the scene of the celebration. When the cinematic version of Miami Vice was being Tobacco Road during his off-time. He enjoyed the jalapeo-rich Death Burger, drank with cops who served as consultants female bartender. When celebrity chef Emeril Lagasse is in town, you might catch him playing drums with one of the bands. do enjoy the Road, as longtime patrons call it, so do construction works, waiters, and various local characters. Most places you go, they tend to attract a certain type of person, says Mark Weiser, who has booked music acts at Tobacco Road for more than 30 years. But every kind of person goes to the Road at the same time. Its pretty cool like that. Tobacco Road is not only cool, its its 100th anniversary. During much of the 20th Century the bar has operated under different names and owners as a speakeasy, a gambling den, a gay bar, a dive bar, a strip joint, a theater house, and a music club. It has survived prohibition, military boycotts, city-sanctioned homophobia, dramatic demographic changes, police raids, violent crime, urban renewal, and broken friendships. And along with that long life are plenty of stories. Patrons and owners from the early years are gone, their tales taken with them to the grave. But the past three decades, under the ownership of Patrick Gleber and Kevin Rusk, have produced a long string of memorable moments. Theres the time a naked man tried to get inside the Road but the doorman wouldnt let him in. We have a dress code, he informed him. Theres the time when a couple were when Rusks relatives were visiting the Road. Theres the time when 60 Minutes cor respondent Ed Bradley jumped on stage with a tambourine during a blues performance. Theres the time when Cindy Crawford was turned away for not having an ID. There are the times when Jimmy Buffet, Lenny Kravitz, Jefferson Airplane, the Romantics, and other big names in the music world, after watching local acts, decided to join the jam session. And there are plenty of stories surrounding the late Willie Bell, also known fond of saying thats what she said, and hid a large knife and gun beneath his clothes, either of which he could pull out at the blink of any eye if he felt the bar was threatened. The Roads past is certainly colorful. The future, however, is anything but certain: Its unclear if the place will outlive Brickells latest development boom. Much of the surrounding area has been transformed into the birthing grounds of Brickell CitiCentre, a mas condos, hotels, and retail being built by Swire Properties, the Hong Kong-based company that developed Brickell Key. When Swire announced the project, people came out of the woodwork looking to buy our property, says Gleber, co-owner of Tobacco Road since 1982. This past April, Gleber and his partners sold the two-story building for $941,600 to Tobacco Road Property Hold ings, Inc. Fabio Faerman, commercial division director for Fortune International Realty, brokered the deal and represents the new owner, but wont say who con trols Tobacco Road Property Holdings. However, according to the Daily Business Review the company is headed by Carlos Mattos, president of Hyundai Co lombia Automotriz, who has been investing in land throughout Miami-Dade County. The 3800-square-foot Tobacco Road parcel was just a small part of a $12.5 million land deal between Tobacco Road Property Holdings and various companies connected to real estate investor Michael Latterner, Gleber, or Rusk. The transac tion gave Tobacco Road Property Hold ings ownership of 49,950 square feet of land that includes parking lots along SW 7th Street as well as restaurant, retail, and located a few doors south of the Road, can continue operating in their current Continued on page 52

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When we bought this land, it was as a real estate investment, so it was always for sale, Gleber says with a sigh. But the business itself wasnt and isnt for sale. Gleber continues to run Tobacco Road, although the restaurant is now a mere tenant. And if the Road is unable to endure at 626 S. Miami Ave., Gleber says hell just move it somewhere else. I think the Road has value, and the name has value, he says. Mark Weiser believes the bars long history adds value to the land and, hence, is sure it wont be demolished anytime soon. If I were a developer, itd be a plus to have the oldest cabaret in Miami on my property, he says. So Im not too worried. Indeed the new landlord, who put down another $28.2 million to buy 2.5 acres of nearby vacant land, is reportedly in no rush to demolish anything, content with rental income, which will increase over time, according to Faerman. The location is incredible, he says. Miami Avenues going to be a major street thatll compete with Brickell Avenue.According to several newspaper reports published since 1982, the business later known as Tobacco Road was opened in 1912. When Dade County went dry and prohibited alcohol a year later, a bakery and sandwich shop served as a front while an illegal speakeasy Between the 1920s and 1930s, the licit casino. Among the guests was Al Capone, who lived part-time on Palm Island in Miami Beach. At least thats the legend. The farther back one goes, the harder it is to verify elements of Tobacco Roads past. Ive heard stories, says Paul George, a local College. Theyre murky. According to county property appraisers records, Tobacco Roads current building was constructed in 1915, although an employee of that department acknowledges that records are sometimes inaccurate for such old buildings. Gleber and Rusk are convinced that Tobacco Road was founded 100 years ago and operated illegally during the dry years at that very spot. While renovating the bar, they found the secret passageway hidden by a bookshelf that led those in the know from the bakery and sandwich Locals, including a previous owner and elderly former patrons, have also told them the Road was a speakeasy. Gleber remembers an incident 15 years ago when a white-haired little old lady asked to see the upstairs lounge, now called the Cabaret Stage, one last time before she moved from Miami. room looked like in the 1920s, replete with bird cages, roulette wheels, and gambling tables. She goes: We used to have such a great time here, Gleber remembers her saying. Wed gamble and drink when it wasnt allowed. By the 1940s, the bar was called Tobacco Road. For a period of time it was a gay bar that featured male strippers as part of its entertainment and transvestites as part of its customer base. Jack Bell, a Miami Herald columnist during that decade, wrote that Tobacco Road was as queer as a nine-dollar bill, according to a Herald article by Leonard Pitts, Jr. The rest of the newspaper back then the military had banned its personnel from visiting the Road. Later that same year the citys morals squad shut down the bar for lewdness, according to the Herald It was reopened in 1946 under the name Chanticleer Bar, and probably continued to operate as a gay bar, in spite of Miami leaders obsession with City. Prodded by the Herald and the Miami News whose reporters and editors bars in 1954. Among the establishments hit was the Shanticleer Bar, according to a Miami News article, likely a misspelled reference to the Chanticleer. By the early 1970s, the place was just a neighborhood bar. I was in there in 1975 when I was a college student, remembers historian Paul George. It was a Sunday afternoon. There were hard-core drinkers, lots of smoke in the place, and pinball machines. reclaimed the Tobacco Road moniker when he bought the building in 1977 for $80,000. Much of his efforts were spent renovating the upstairs lounge, which he called the Speakeasy at Tobacco Road. His decorating choices can still be seen: photographs of old Miami, quirky lamps, and a painting of a topless woman. Why that painting? Katzman turned it into a strip bar, Gleber answers. He tried to make it a topless club, corrects Weiser, who at the time was manager of the Fat Chance Blues Band, which later renamed itself Iko-Iko. That failed. So they brought us in. Katzman turned to blues and jazz for entertainment (along environment in Southside, as the area owners. It was rows and rows of crack houses, remembers Jack Pakonis, a bartender at Tobacco Road for 30 years ed the Road under Katzmans ownership after working his shift at a Coconut Grove club. Unless you were already really drunk, people were afraid to go to that neighborhood. Gram Wood Drout says the tough neighborhood actually enabled him to become a professional musician. The wife of the Fat Chance Blues Bands original lead singer wouldnt let him work there. The hours were 11:00 p.m. to 4:00 in the morning, and the Road was notoriously rough, he remembers. The rest of the band asked Drout, then a budding musi cian, to take the singers place. He did, Continued on page 60 Tobacco RoadContinued from page 51

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54 The rich and famous could also be seen visiting Becks store. Julio Iglesias, Gianni Versace, Sophia Loren, Donald Trump, and Mel Brooks all walked through the doors at Broadway Art and Framing at one time or another. Becks memories of one particular celebrity client are perhaps more amusing than the rest. He recounts how Hedy Lamarr walked into the store oozing of know who the 1930s glamour goddess was. After another customer recognized Lamarr, Beck looked her up. She went on to become a great customer. Beck, however, didnt just want to become part of the local scenery. He set out to transform the Boulevard. I always believed the Boulevard was going to come into its own someday, he says. I believed in the power in it its the cant road. So he put money into the business and, in turn, the Boulevard. By beautifying Broadway Arts faade with bright new colors, he hoped he would attract more businesses to the area. He did. Beck credits not only his customers for sticking with him despite the dilapidated surroundings, but he also gives kudos to the gay community for leaving its mark on the Upper Eastside and surrounding neighborhoods. The gay community got it, he says. The gay community is responsible, to this day, not only in Biscayne Boulevard but also in all the empowerment zones all over the world, for starting trends and fads and making notorious locations into artistic venues. Im going to give them a plug, not because Im a gay man, but because thats the way it is. levards resurrection for Beck, though, was when Soyka Restaurant opened in 1999. That was the turning point, he says. It was a real happening. The establishment of an upscale restaurant in what was still a somewhat raw neighborhood proved to Beck that the movers and shakers in town shared his vision. Soon developers also showed interest. The memories of that early wave, how ever, also annoy Beck. He grumbles about the missed opportunities when certain neighborhoods groups fought many of the proposed changes to the area. Every time somebody had an idea, people went out of their way to do everything they could to sabotage the progress, he says. A lot of those developers with big ideas could have the Upper Eastside. Instead its at a stand still again, especially since the economy has taken such big turns. And thats a shame. There used to be electricity in the Boulevard, has dimmed down. say the area is in much better shape than it was 20 years ago. Real estate values are a good metric. Four years after establish ing Broadway Art and Framing, Beck purchased the buildings 7500-square-foot lot for $85,000. This past March, he sold it for $800,000. Beck had hoped to use the windfall and work on his many personal projects. However, his clients persuaded him to continue in business. was speaking of his devoted customers, two walked into the new store, almost on queue. Ann and Sarah Simpson are long time clients. They were in to have Beck frame a photo of family patriarch Ernest Williams. Now deceased, Ernest and his wife Edith belonged to one of the pioneer families of the Upper Eastside. They were lowing him from Tip Freemans place to Broadway Art. Now the Simpsons have followed Beck 20 blocks north, to the recently refurbished Shores Square, where the eye-catching colors of Broadway Arts previous location have been traded for a larger workspace, plenty of storage, better parking, and even a security guard. Beck is thrilled with the move. Ever an advocate for progress, he muses: Thats a problem with a lot of places they dont want to change. They are so worried about everything. Change is what makes things work and grow. If a plant never changed, then it wouldnt be growing. It wouldnt give fruit. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Broadway ArtContinued from page 50

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56 prior to building anything larger than 1500 square feet on the shoreline of a county park. (The proposed facility is 600 feet long by Access to the beach is a primary concern for Mason. To get to Haulovers beaches, visitors must park their vehicles on the west side of Collins Avenue and then walk east through underground passageways. Clothing-optional beach patrons use the north lot, which includes 498 paved spaces and a grassy area the weekends, the paved parking spaces are the grassy area as well. With the parking lot immediately south reserved for boat trailers (and ries that naturists will be forced to drag their coolers, umbrellas, and beach chairs more than a half-mile to reach the Naked Grab?Continued from page 50 Continued on page 58

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clothing-optional northern end. But just because a giant boat-storage facility is being built on top of the nude parking will be taken away, Nardi counters. As part of the countys 2010 agreement with the company, Westrec, a national cor poration operating marinas in eight states (including the Haulover Marine Center million in the project, money Nardi says would go toward creating enough parking for beachgoers and boaters: The beach goer parking will remain at 498 spaces and an additional 103 spaces will be used for Westrec customers. The new boat facility is just one of many changes envisioned in Haulovers general plan, which the county commission has yet to approve in its entirety. Along the west side, the parks department anticipates the construction of a new conservation center, a parking theater, a picnic pavilion, and two new restaurants (one of them being a Seasons a few years ago. sion stands along with mangroves relocated from the construction site of the new facility will replace the current marine center. Some naturists think the real reason age facility behind the north lot is to leave room in the central portion of the western park for the construction of even more res taurants and retail operations in the future. My personal opinion is that there is money to be made [by putting] this boathouse here, says Norma Mitchell, vice president of South Florida Free Beaches. Nardi maintains that future commer cial ventures at Haulover are limited to what is outlined within the general plan. But she acknowledges that her department is seeking new revenue sources to keep county parks open and maintained. This is a time when budgets are getting cut, she says. According to a July 2010 memo, the county will receive at least $21.6 million from Westrec over a 25-year period. But Mason points out that the clothing-optional beach is already a moneymaker for the county, with most of the $1.2 million in annual parking revenue from Haulover coming from naturists. from the estimated 1.3 million people who visit the clothing-optional beach each year, many of whom live outside of Miami-Dade. This is bigger than the Marlins, Dolphins, and Heat, as far as being a tourist attraction he says. Why would you build a boathouse on the parking lot of a major tourist destination? Despite the beachs popularity, the county has been slow to make improvements at Haulover, naturists tell the BT make the beach passageways compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Nardi concedes the county may have ignored naturists in the past, but she says that among the countys immediate plans are adding wheelchair ramps for two of the passageways leading to the beach, as beach by another 350 feet. Moving the fence is easy, she says, referring to the wooden structure marking the clothing-optional beachs southern boundary. We dont need a lot of money to do that. half-mile walk for naturists forced to park in the central lots, but Mason doubts the proved by the county commission in 2001, on the parks department building a dune What really infuriates Mason is group they wanted to build the boat facility on the grassy lot. Weve been good caretakers of the beach for 21 years, he says. We kept it from deteriorating by keeping it clean and patrolling it. Yet two years ago, without even asking or bringing us into the loop, they sign an agreement with Westrec. He adds that the county wouldnt treat the Vizcayans or the Miami-Dade also support county institutions, the way they treat South Florida Free Beaches. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Naked Grab?Continued from page 56 The Pleasure Garden Miami Design District rrfnfnrftbfnn r fbftff

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60 and remains the lead singer for Iko-Iko. We were there right after the Mariel boatlift, Drout continues. For much of the gees, many of whom wanted to try their hand at playing the drums. When things got too crazy inside the bar, Katzman would pull out his shotgun. Says Drout: It was click click and hed just hold it. It was law enforcement, not rowdy patrons, who ended Katzmans reign. Under Gov. Bob Grahams direct orders, state agents and local cops raided the Road and nine other Miami establish ments for drugs in 1981. The charges against Katzman didnt stick, but he was determined to sell all his properties, so he hired real estate broker Michael Latterner. When it came time to sell Tobacco Road, nobody would touch it, Gleber says. (Katzman, who is supposedly for comment. Latterner also couldnt be So in 1982, Latterner himself bought the Roads building for $150,000 and asked Gleber to become his partner in running the bar. At the time, Gleber was a 22-year-old recent graduate of Florida International Universitys hospitality program who ran the Vine Wine Bar at The Falls shopping center. As he likes to tell it, Gleber visited the Road for the rabbits foot talisman in the gutter, and heard the song Tobacco Road play on the radio while he was driving home. That was enough for me, he says. But Gleber couldnt do it alone. After being rejected by at least one prospective partner, Gleber turned to Kevin Rusk, a fellow FIU hospitality graduate who also worked at the Vine Wine Bar. As Rusk recounts: He said something along the lines of, Hey, Im doing this thing about buying this place. This guy really needs to get rid of it and its a horrible rundown bar thats poorly managed. When Rusk visited the Road, it was love is great. Lets do it!After Gleber and Rusk bought a stake in the Road, Rusk pretended to be a trainee bartender in being run. There were a lot of seedy things going on, Rusk recalls. instructed Rusk not to hassle a particular drug dealer, a few prostitutes (several of whom lived in rooming houses across and some drink proceeds were kept separate from the cash register. When Rusk revealed himself as one of the new owners, the old staffers knew it was time to go. Most of them were gone when they found out we were really making changes, Rusk says. They wanted nothing to do with it. activity (There were some really interest owners had to contend with lots of vio so many barroom brawls that Gleber often had to use the brass knuckles and a roll of was fatally stabbed in the bar. There were also drive-by shootings outside. When the health department threatened to intervene, Gleber and Rusk shut down the Road for several months and invested $60,000 renovating the buildkitchen (the old Road was content with shortened the main bar, changed the seating, and turned a garbage strewn rear lot into an outdoor patio bar. They hired their culinary friends as chefs and cooks and created a decent lunch and dinner menu. Because choices were more limited in downtown Miami back then, Tobacco Road was a hit, especially with Miamis legal community, in particu Tobacco RoadContinued from page 52 Continued on page 62 click click

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were nearby on the north side of the Miami River. There werent that many restau rants in downtown Miami back then, Weiser says. So Tobacco Road became very popular for lunch, or happy hour, or dinner. You had judges and you had law yers from both sides of important cases. When the Road reopened in 1983, it still had to contend with the Florida Department of Transportation, which was ripping apart the street as they built a new Miami Avenue bridge. Several businesses closed down as a result of the disruptive construction. Among the casualties was Lucky Strike Bar. Established in 1932 at 524 S. Miami Ave., Lucky Strikes bartendordering a cocktail (even a screwdriver suggesting they order a drink at Todemolished it, and built the ramp to the new drawbridge right over it. The Road had another trick up its sleeve: music. We tried a lot of differ ent things: reggae, jazz, Rusk says. As much as people liked jazz, the jazz people would just sip a glass of wine. But if you get a good blues band, they down glasses of beer at three times the rate. Besides bringing Fat Chance Blues Band back to the Road (they left after just three also attracted superstars of the blues world and American roots genre. John Hammond, James Cotton, John Lee Hooker, Koko Taylor, and Albert Collins are just some of the blues giants who have performed at the Road. Thats really what started to build our reputation all over the world, Weiser says. Not even the roadblocks that were present during the Miami Avenue bridges construc tion were a deterrent for the blues crowd. It was part of the fun, Weiser says. It almost made it like a secret place. house band, performing there almost every week for 15 years. But after the mid-1990s, the Road was booking fewer blues acts in favor of other genres like jam bands, rock, and heavy metal. As time went on, Iko-Ikos appearances became increasingly sporadic. We play up north in Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach, says Drout, who still performs solo at the Road on Tuesdays. Thats where our audience moved to. In the years that followed, Latterner, Gleber, and Rusk increased their real estate holdings along S. Miami Avenue. Gleber and Rusk also started other restau rant ventures, including Fishbone Grille, which operated in the space now occupied But by 1996, Rusk walked away from managing the Road. Rusk, who went on to open the successful Titanic Restaurant and Brewery in Coral Gables, feels he was forced out by Gleber and Latterner. It was a shock that two people I admired and I thought of as family would stick a knife in my back, he says today. I couldve sued them, but thats not my thing. I was more hurt than anything else. There was a disagreement about how things should be run, replies Gleber, who owns a stake in Pegasus Thruster Inc., a company that makes underwater propulsion gear for divers. Kevin is a talented restaurateur. We just have different theories. Still, Rusk plans to make an appearance at the Road during the 100th anniversary, along with many friends. I love Tobacco Road and everything about it, Rusk says. Id love to see it live for another hundred years, but Im a realist, and I do understand the business aspect. Rusk doubts a developer would be willing to invest the money needed to address the buildings quirks, includasbestos in a building, then the cost to repair anything increases. Gleber credits Rusk, Weiser, Pakonis, and several other employees and partners, past and present, with making Tobacco Road a success. But he insists the Road isnt done yet. Were constantly working on different ideas, he says. Its always a work in progress. You slow down, you die. Historian Paul George, has frequented the Road in recent years, isnt sure itll be the same if it isnt at 626 S. Miami Ave. A different building has a different ambiance, I dont care what they do, he says. I hope theyre planning the 100th in a big way because it might not be around much longer. Tobacco Roads 100th anniversary takes place on November 17 from 6:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. Musical acts include Big Sams Funky Nation, Heavy Pets, Iko-Iko, Spam Allstars, Locos Por Juana, and www.tobacco-road.com. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com AventurAjewelry & coin,Inc. www.aventurajewelry .com 19275 Biscayne Blvd., Booth #22 Aventura | FL 33180 305.933.2646 rfntWatchesb f Rare Coinsnr r r nf Gold Platinum Silver INSTANT CASH Paying Top Dollarr REWARD b Michael Freiman, CPNr t Tobacco RoadContinued from page 60

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64 Neighborhood Correspondents: BRICKELL / DOWNTOWNNo Place to PartyWill another round of development put Brickells festival culture on the skids?By Craig Chester BT ContributorOnly a few short years ago, if you asked a Miamian what there was to do for fun in Brickell, the answer was probably not much. As the Brickell was characterized by little more banks, parking lots, and garages. Anyone whos set foot in the area over the past few years knows that image of Brickell is ancient history. The condo boom added tens of thousands of new residents to the neighborhood, which, in turn, attracted a growing cluster of restaurants, bars, shopping, and other services. The neighborhood is rapidly becoming not just a local hub of activity, but a regional entertainment district as well. While during the week, youre likely to ers and locals, weekend evenings bring a distinctly more regional crowd, with throngs of vehicles descending upon Brickell from throughout the county, their occupants ready to party until the wee hours. Amid all the development and exto emerge: Brickell is the new place to party, and the place for festivals. Recently, local businesses and promotional agencies have organized a variety of festival-style events that have attracted thousands of people, primarily using the few remaining vacant, undeveloped lots in the area as a venue. Over the past 18 months, these lots have played host to such well-attended events as Taste of Brickell, Cinco de Mayo, Oktoberfest, St. Patricks Day, Brickell Farmers Market, and the Brickell InDpenDanz Festival. In addition, the Miami Circle Park, next to the Icon Brickell complex along the Miami River, hosted its own Oktoberfest event this year, as well as the Brickell Beer, Burgers, and Balls (Meatballs) Festival back in August. And of course, theres always the old-fashioned block party. Over the past two years, portions of S. Miami Avenue opened to people for World Cup viewing parties, Miami Heat playoff parties, a St. Patricks Day event, and Bike Miami Days, not to mention the ING Marathon and the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. According to the 2010 census, Brickell has 37,622 people per square mile, making it one of the densest residential neighborhoods in the United States. The primary demographic of young urban Photo by Michael Sponaugle NEW!

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professionals and the increasingly regional appeal of the neighborhood, combined with Miamis insatiable appetite for partying, provide the perfect conditions for this festival culture in Brickell. But there is another important factor enabling the neighborhoods party reputation: the availability of open lots where these events are held. This is also the factor that most threatens the continuation of the areas party scene. Even after the unfettered development boom of the early 2000s, when new condo towers sprouted like fungi after a spring rain, Brickell still has a few remaining undeveloped parcels that provide an ideal setting for large, festivalstyle events. But now that the construction cranes are back for another building bonanza (seven new towers are currently under construction, including the mammoth Brickell CitiCentre), many of these vacant lots are either active construction sites or will be shortly. The centrally located parking lot at 1001 S. Miami Ave., which has played host to the majority of Brickells recent festivals, is perhaps the most immediately threatened. At a recent meeting of Miamis Planning and Zoning Board, a representa tive for developer and property owner Mal lory Kauderer said Mr. Kauderer wants to build a 46-story tower on the site. This would not only mean the end of accessible festival space in the heart of the neighborhood, but also for popular bar and restaurant Baru Urbano, as well as small Allen Morris Park. The latter would be the casualty of a questionable land-swap scheme in which Kauderer would give the City of Miami additional park space on an adjacent property in exchange for the existing park. Another two-and-a-half-acre lot at 1201 Brickell Bay Dr., home to the popu lar Taste of Brickell event for the past two years, was recently put up for sale by its owner, Tibor Hollos Florida East Coast Realty. The site is currently zoned for an 80-story residential tower. While there are no immediate development plans, the propertys prime waterfront location and the resurgent condo market are on a colli sion course that will have the cranes and bulldozers back in no time. This latest bout of development fever is casting a spotlight on a frequent criticism of Brickell: the districts lack of public gathering spaces. With no signature park or plaza in the neighborhood, where are the popular festivals going to be held? Will they continue? Its quite possible that Brickells emerging reputation for popular gatherings Street festivals are possible, but theyre more complicated than setting up tents on an empty lot. They require trafovertime, and permitting requirements, not to mention the physical limitations of a 30-foot-wide pavement corridor. With the number of new condo buildings under way, and the expected increase from local residents and business owners to frequently close streets could prove to The situation reminds me of the party analogy coined by urban philoso pher Ian Rasmussen: Observant party tends to make the party better arriving with snacks, another six-pack, some new music, and so on. But then, once the party becomes crowded enough, additional guests usually end up making the party worse overcrowding it, straining the refreshment supply, and potentially upset ting the neighbors with excessive noise. (Students of economics may recognize Rasmussens formulation as a variation on the classic tragedy of the commons scenario, in which individuals, acting in their own best interest, deplete a shared resource, despite their knowledge that doing so is to the detriment of all in the long term.) I see this same idea playing out in regard to the urbanization of Brickell. The the neighborhood. Each new resident and occupied condo increased the demand for new businesses for dry cleaners, shoe repair shops, restaurants, and corner stores. development without accompanying public space going to make the party worse? I certainly believe that responsible de velopment is an enhancement over parking lots and vacant land. However, without any Brickell could wind up like being trapped inside a party with no back door to sneak out and grab a breath of fresh air. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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66 Neighborhood Correspondents: AVENTUR aA Other Side of the TT r acksThree good reasons why Aventura should annex its western neighborhoodsBy Jay Beskin BT ContributorLets say youre a resident of Aventura and you were to take a leisurely drive west of the FEC railroad tracks. What might you notice? A not-small number of business establishments with the word Aventura in their names. Theres Aventura Honda, Aventura Professional Suites, and Aventura Beauty Supply, all located in North Miami Beach. Then theres Aventura Collision, Aventura Kids, Aventura Travel Professionals, and many more located in unincorporated Miami-Dade County. The one church that shepherds city residents calls itself the Church at Aventura, but its west of the city limits. A posh housing complex being built in the California Club area is to be crowned Aventura Isles. for this phenomenon. And no, its not because a name like Unincorporated Miami-Dade County Deli and Bakery is laughable which it is. Its that these business owners and residential developers west of the tracks hope the stardust emanating from our fair city will drift down on them, blessing everyone it touches with status and higher home values a kind of commercial benediction. Our city founders would have enjoyed watching this. They adamantly decreed that Aventuras western boundary extend no farther than the centerline of the FEC railroad tracks. Aventuras drop beyond the middle of the Intracoastal Waterway. They would have no industrial ware us from the west, or seedy motels and tacky tourist shops coming at us from the east. They wanted clear and defensible borders to preserve the Aventura lifestyle. Indeed, when then unincorporated Sunny Isles started calling itself Aventura Beach in a play for annexation by our city, Mayor Arthur Snyder summarily killed the effort by vowing that Aventura would never, ever hitch up with a place as shabby as Sunny Isles. A chorus from our shores shouted, Drop dead, Sunny Isles! But over the course of the past decade, something astonishing has happened in the east. It can be captured in this one startling prospect: Because of high-end development and redevelopment, by the year 2015, the total property-valuation tax base of Sunny Isles Beach may very well surpass that of Aventura. This from a city with half the popu lation and without the major economic TheCenteratMDC.org | 305.237.3023 | 305.237.3258 | DOWNTOWN MIAMI flcenterlitarts.com The Miami Writers Institute@Miami Book Fair InternationalWednesday, Nov. 14 Friday, Nov. 16 rfWritingCreate YOU and Unleash Your JOY:rf How to Convert Your Ideas Into Novels and Storiesrrn The Novelette: Science Fictions Little Jewel tftnb Master Class on Dialogue nnb Cmo escribir (y leer!) textos narrativosn Vivir de escribirnnnPublishingHow to Get Published nnbn Buzz Your Book: Publicity Strategiesn The Future of Publishingbnn One-on-one manuscript consults by appointment.ntfnrnnnfnnnbnrnn

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the mainstay of Aventuras revenue stream. In unexpected ways, that prospect should direct our attention to the west Twice in the past 15 years, leaders of the unincorporated Highland LakesSkylake communities have approached Aventura to inquire about the possibility of our city annexing those areas. Perhaps they came with some of that Aventura stardust in their eyes. Or maybe their motivation was the same as that which impelled our founders to incorporate: more and better community services at a much lower tax rate. To the credit of Aventuras leaders, they did not yell Drop dead! at our neighbors west of the tracks. Rather they commissioned feasibility studies. The studies came back negative. The annual cost of providing police and community services to the west, together with enormously expensive investments required to bring their infra structure up to Aventura standards, would exceed tax revenues generated from that area by at least a million dollars. In other words, Highland LakesSkylake couldnt pay for themselves. That analysis, along with a county-imposed moratorium on annexations of unincorpo rated areas, effectively quashed the pos sibility of Aventura expanding westward. Or did it? A number of months back, the county lifted the moratorium, and now word has it that the leaders of Highland Lakes-Skylake may take one more swing at annexation before they pursue their own incorporation effort. (See the BT s Highland Lakes to County: We Want Out! May 2012.) It would be perfectly understandheads No In a time of shrinking property values, its highly unlikely the results of new feasibility studies would change in favor of annexation. In fact the cost/ revenue analysis might look worse. Even so, there are reasons the City of Aventura may want to re-examine its position. Remember about nine years ago, when Turnberry purchased a large tract of land along the east side of Dixie Highway, with plans for a large discount shopping center? The only way the new center could be economically viable would be to create a new crossing over the railroad tracks at 199th Street. signal cycles for a driver to exit west on slowed considerably on Biscayne Boule vard, a result of westerly turns across the tracks and into the new shopping center. this proposed development. Because the city didnt control anything west of the We know the city eventually prevailed, but the whole thing could have been avoided had the city controlled zoning to the west. So wouldnt it be better for Aventura residents if the city annexed the west? Here are three reasons the answer is Yes : First, zoning. Today the W. Dixie Highway corridor is ripe for redevelopment, embraces the tenets of New Urbanism mixed-use developments of shops, restau in Aventuras best interest to ensure that the Second, recent and tragic events at Michael Krop High School have prompted some Aventura parents to seek a charter high school within Aventura city limits. The same issues could apply to the elementary and middle schools in that area. Hundreds of Aventura children attend those schools. Wouldnt it be a good idea for those schools to be under the protection of the Aventura Police Department, which could continually patrol and quickly respond to emergencies? Third, our main east-west corridors Miami Gardens Drive and Ives Dairy Road run through Highland Lakes/Skylake. As anyone who drives these streets knows, they are maddeningly congested. Wouldnt it be great if our city stepped in and improved the ment? Its certainly worth a look. While annexation may cost Aventura some money in the short term, the city has enough in reserves to do it without raising property tax rates. And who knows? With proper redevelopment, the area to the west may not only be able to sustain itself, it actu ally might contribute positively to Aventuras tax base. Just look at Sunny Isles Beach. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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68 Neighborhood Correspondents: MIA mM I SHORE sSAA Fox TaleIt all started when my husband wanted a different kind of pet By Jen Karetnick BT ContributorWe called her Olympia. I posted the picture of her sweet, silvery snout and curious, upright ears on Facebook the moment we brought her home, and the response from friends mir rored my own. What a beauty! some wrote. Did you rescue her? Lucky girl that she gets to live with you. Then there were those, closer to me, who know that my husband has long enforced a ban: What? I thought you werent allowed to bring home any more animals! Naturally, a curious few wanted to know her breed. I called her our Rus sian catdog. A couple of people took me at my word. I didnt know there was such a thing.... There isnt, of course, unless you live in a world sponsored by Nickelodeon. But I didnt yet know the legalities of keeping a Soviet relative of Vulpes vulpes in the Shores. See, Olympia is, in short, a Russian silver fox. Domesticated, with doglike qualities that include whimpering, barking, licking her owners to show affection, and wagging her tail, Olympia is a particularly successful result of a program introduced in Russia 50 years ago. Many of the descendants of this selective project also exhibit these good traits, which, of course, was the aim. But their tails became curly, or their coats piebald. Olympias tail is a straight, full brush, and her coat an unrelenting mass of burnished pewter. If there were a Westminster for foxes, Olympia would win best in show. Still, no matter how much I admired her, I wasnt the one to introduce her to our household (an intro that came with an involuntary explosion of highly odorous fox urine every time our dachshund and dachshund-beagle mutt snarled at her). It was all Jons fault. My husband is a good man. He is certainly better than I deserve. He works harder than most people I know. He shoulders more than his share of housework, errands, and parenting classicalsouthorida.orgClassical Music. Its In Our Nature.Just like all of us, classical music lives and breathes. Make it part of your lifestyle. Tune to Classical South Florida on the radio or online. Its in your nature.

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responsibilities. And when it came time for his midlife crisis, not only was he right on schedule at the age of 44, he was considerate. Rather than forfeiting the women, he tried to bring home things I would like, too: exotic animals. It began with caracals. He heard about them from a friend, a nurse in one of the hospitals where he works as a neurologist. Caracals are 50-pound fe lines from southern Africa and southern Asia that have dun-colored coats, long tails, and black-tufted ears. Theyre related to servals but look a lot more like lynxes. On the pet market these days, you caracals: purebred and hybrids (crossed with Abyssinians and called caracats, or crossed with servals and called caravals). Jons friend owns both, a caracal and a caraval, and while the former is a doll, sleeping in bed with her and enjoying visitors, the latter is somewhat surly. Either way, though, the pizza delivery guy is pretty sure hes encountering a cougar and a bobcat when he rings the doorbell at her house. Its thanks to these caracals that thought caracals were a good idea. When the dogs pass away, these are the next animals I want, he said. I remained skeptical, which turned out to be a wise move. (Im more the rescue type, preferring to pick up an animal that needs help rather than pay a bunch of money to a breeder.) After he met his friends big cats, he thought twice about owning animals that could, potentially, kill him in his sleep. I also had the sense to say no when he e-mailed me early one morning with: Hey, do you want a marmoset? My friend knows a breeder whose marmoset just had three babies. She could get us a really good deal. A marmoset ? Had the man lost his mind? Jon had gone to great lengths to make sure we wouldnt have a third child, but he was willing to buy me a mini monkey that would never grow beyond the size of an infant, that would have the mental and emotional capabilities of a toddler, that would sleep in bed with us and wear diapers and travel with us all for the next 30 years. Jons third strike came in the form of rabbits. We had long ago agreed to stand She wanted baby bunnies, but we already had their natural enemies, dachshunds, in the house. Smore and Rolo are lovely doggies who lick children up and down, but they cant help their instincts. In order to pacify her, we named a cat Baby Bunny (BeBe for short). Weve also called a cat Monkey for the same reason, after an animal we should never own. Still, Jon proved susceptible a few months ago and brought home two adorable bundles of fur. They lasted a week before a com bination of Monkeys machinations (he knows how to open doors) and the dogs determination ended the bunnies chances of survival for good. All this predisposed me to say yes to Olympia, who was living uneasily with the caracals at the time. Caracals are highly territorial, and Jons friend thought they might kill her. So while she loved Olympia, having gotten her from a woman whose kid went to col lege shortly after acquiring the fox, she had to give her up. worry about getting Olympia a license because, after only 48 hours of chaos, we passed her on to the science teacher at my school. Her boyfriend, a trapper by trade, had been removing foxes from Barry University there are still plenty of wild red foxes in the Shores, including two males that live at Miami Country Day School and coincidentally, had been looking for an abandoned baby Vulpes vulpes to raise as his own. Olympia was perfect for him. I hear from time to time how happy she is with him down south, where hes built her a huge pen in his backyard. My son was distressed to see Olympia go. But he also remembers when we had chickens for six months before resigned to the unpredictability of our familys pet situation. Its hard to know what creature will roost with us next on its journey to its forever home, but now that this drama is over, I might just let his father back in the house. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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70 Neighborhood Correspondents: BELLE MEADE AA Case of the BluesThe citys new recycling bins have brought a splash of color to Belle Meade but not in a good wayBy Frank Rollason BT ContributorLittle boxes on the hillside, Little boxes made of ticky tacky, Little boxes on the hillside, Little boxes all the same. Theres a green one and a pink one And a blue one and a yellow one, And theyre all made out of ticky tacky And they all look just the same. I am sure this Pete Seeger song brings back some distant memories for many of us. The lyrics and music were written and composed by Malvina Reynolds back in 1962 as she and her husband were on their way from where they lived in Berkeley, through San Francisco, and down the peninsula to La Honda, where she was to sing at a meeting of the Friends Committee on Legislation, a public-interest lobby in California. (Tiny La Honda, in the Santa Cruz mountains, was also home base for author Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters.) As she drove through Daly City, she said to her husband: Bud, take the wheel. I feel a song coming on. The result was this cult classic, Little Boxes, which was recorded by Seeger and is still utilized today to epitomize our frustrated attempts at individuality; the more we try to be different, the more we are the same. (Ticky tacky is a reference to the use of cheap building materials in house after house, creating a oneness that, while perhaps functional, is obscenely obnoxious.) And this introduction brings us to my latest rant on the neon-blue recycling bins that were distributed throughout the Upper Eastside over the past few weeks, and throughout the entire city over the past couple of months. As I look out my window while writing this column, I can see down several blocks of homes, and what catches ones eye are these damn neon-blue containers. At this point, a little history on the changeover from manual garbage collection to automated pickup. Years ago all A New Aveda Concept Salonwww.SevenSeasSpaSalon.com Receive...30 Minute Massage 30 Minute Facial Maninicure and Pedicure Complimentary Valet Complimentary Champagne Access to Tiki Hut on the beachALL forDAY Mon-Thurs 16701 Collins AvenueLocated at the Sunny Isles Beach inside the Newport Beachside Hotel & Resort

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kinds of garbage containers, individually purchased by homeowners, had to be physically emptied into heavy aluminum totes, as they were called. These totes, in turn, were hefted onto the shoulders of toters, as the workers were called, and when full, were carried to the back of a garbage truck, where the contents would be dumped. The toters suffered all types of injuries as a result of this heavy lifting, from back and muscle strains to actual infestations of worms in the shoulders on which they rested their totes while making the rounds. (The liquid in the garbage would leak from the totes into open wounds on the toters shoulders and maggots would begin to incubate within these cuts; not a very pretty picture is it?) So back in 2001, then director of solid waste management Clarance Patterson proposed to city manager Carlos Gimenez (now the mayor of MiamiDade County) that Miami convert to an automated garbage collection system that tive, and would curtail the numerous on-the-job injuries that were becoming quite expensive for the city. Of course, the initial outlay for the new trucks with the automatic pick-up arm (referred to as one-arm bandits) and the required containers the city would have to provide to every singlefamily home and duplex would be sigwould be saved by not having to hire as many workers as the current system required, and by not having to cover as many injuries to workers. The manager was intrigued enough by the proposal to request that Mr. Pat terson set up a demonstration project so could view the system in actual operation. on a narrow street with lots of trees and relatively low-hanging power lines, so that we could test whether these worst-case conditions would present a problem. While at the demonstration we were using black containers and casually asked Clarance if we would be using black containers when we went to this system. His answer was immediate. No, he said, because many of the homeowners will keep these bins in Saint Martha Yamaha2012-2013 Concert SeriesPaul Posnak, Founding Artistic Director RED PRIEST A CARNIVAL OF BACH AND VIVALDI Englands Red Priest, led by the worlds reigning recorder virtuoso Piers Adams (Washington Post), returns to present their extraordinary interpretations of selections from Johann Sebastian Bach and the entire by Antonio Vivaldi. red-hot virtuosic adaptation of the involving swirling snowstorms, thunderclaps and the mime of an entire stag hunt. (THE TIMES) The original Red Priest [Vivaldi] should be dancing in his grave! (BBC MUSIC MAGAZINE ) The difference is clear: Red Priest have much more fun! (THE EVENING STANDARD)Sunday, November 11, 2012 at 3:00 p.m.RED PRIEST TO PURCHASE TICKETS visit www.stmartha.tix.com or call 1-800-595-4849 or 305-751-0005 or purchase at church office or at door.Meet the artists at our after-concert reception in the Atrium, included with your tickets. their front or side yards, where theyll be visible from the street, so the best color to make them [so theyll blend in] him think of that, and his reply was also immediate. Garbage is my business, he said, and that includes how the neighborhoods look as a result of my actions. And that, my friends, brings us back to my rant on the newly delivered, ugly, neighborhood-degrading, neon-blue re cycling containers. Why would someone make the decision to select a color that stands out like the proverbial sore thumb? As you drives down the streets of Belle Meade and other neighborhoods, youre greeted with blue containers everywhere. as the city has, that a more neutral color, such as a dark brown or tan, would have ible with the surroundings in which they will probably sit in between their short stints on the street every other week for collection. Suppose someone in one of the citys historic districts requested to paint their front wall or garage door a similar shade of neon blue. Do you think the historic preservation board would approve of but when the city decided to embark upon this form of recycling collection ever think of the unintended impact of such a garishly colored bin being placed in front of every home? Apparently not. Oh, where was the wisdom and experience of Clarance Patterson when makes little difference, next collection day, containers standing near a green garbage container. The green one would probably never have caught your eye, but the blue one, truly a thing of beauty, makes both bins more noticeable. What an eyesore to have foisted upon our neighborhood! Thank you, city leaders, for yet another well-conceived idea. Perhaps a trial program would have allowed this issue to surface before the city expended the funds citywide? Little boxes on the hillside, Little boxes made of ticky tacky, Little boxes on the hillside, Little boxes all the same! Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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72 Neighborhood Correspondents: NORTH MIAMIScore One for the People Disaffected residents crowd the mike at a North Miami City Council meeting and surprise! the council listensBy Mark Sell BT ContributorCouncilman Scott Galvin packed em in the evening of October 18 at the Alaska Coffee Roasting Company in North Miami. The subject: What to do with the $17.5 million in Swerdlow money from the Biscayne Landing project that had just dropped through the chimney, suddenly making the city solvent. The consensus: Be careful. Be very careful. In fact, many in the crowd, including Galvin, wanted to sit on the money, treat it as an endowment, get ag gressive with grants, spend only the inter est, and say that before the microphone at the October 23 city council meeting. And guess what? It worked for the most part. Councilman and mayoral candidate Jean Marcellus, who will need eastside votes in the future, turned the tide. To raucous applause from the audience, the council voted 3-2 for Marcelluss motion to use the Swerdlow money to raise the citys reserve from $5 million to $15 million, plus $2.5 million for capital improvements such as police cars and the library. This is a great day for the city, said Councilman Michael Blynn, who voted with Galvin and Marcellus. Even Mayor Andre Pierre who voted against the measure along with Councilwoman Marie Steril applauded, if perhaps in jest. The message from Galvin and frus trated citizens across the city: Start going to council meetings and speaking up. vote amid public pressure. In September hed cast the deciding vote not to donate $150,000 worth of garbage trucks to Haiti, after citizens objected. (The alternative was to sell them.) If there are enough people, there can be a difference, Galvin had told the crowd at Alaska Coffee. There have been victories. The only thing I can guarantee you is that, if you are not in the To touch upon the dynamics at work recently: The budget: Without the Swerdlow money, the city has an operating budget of just less than $50 million, of which 64 percent goes to personnel, including salaries, pensions, and overtime; 20 percent goes to operating costs; 8 percent to internal services, such as general benthe rest to bond payments and grants. City manager Stephen Johnson worked cit. He and the council avoided repeating BT photo by Silvia Ros rfntbrfbt rfbt yevgeniya kats, diana garle, and emily batsford in three sIsters/photo by mitchell zachs

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with Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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74 Neighborhood Correspondents: MIA mM I AT LARGEHoly Heaps of AA r t! Sure, a hoarders house may seem like its lled with junk, but look againBy Wendy Doscher-Smith BT ContributorHoarding is the new black. No, really, Im serious. Im so serious that as I type this I am concurrently contemplating if the halfrusted yet still shiny enough to manipulate hubcap I saw R.I.P. (Resting in Piles) is still by the curb down my street. I really hope it is, because then I can strap some unfortunate and possibly already decapitated Barbies, Skippers, Kens, or other dolls made to resemble perfectly propor crisscrossed shapes and make something. I make things. In some circles these things are called art. But I dont like saying I am an artist. See? Oh. I guess you cant see it, but I just cringed. The word artist has always rung pompous and hollow to me, partly because overly sensitive, arrogant, alcoholic, drug addicted, insecure, petty, and self-righ teous. Of course, Im describing musicians, too! And writers! (But not journalists, as they are a bunch of heartless pricks.) Miami is on the verge of Art Basel and all that comes with it: VIP parties, tending to know more and be more than they are. And hoarding. Not all artists or self-proclaimed art ists require material objects to create their art. But many do, and while they may be brilliant, witty, creative, insufferable, and broke, many of them are also closet hoarders. Thankfully, Im not one of them. Hi. My name is Wendy and I am an er, ahhrtist and borderline hoarder. Or hoarder by trade. But I dont have a problem. Not really. I mean, I need all my crap. ment. Just kidding. Or not. Point is: This buying impulse is strong I may not use the purchase immedi ately, though. So it sits and occupies space until that golden hour could be the next day, could be ten years from now when it is required to construct the instal lation called Fruit Loop and Lego Forest Utopia of Elves Youre wondering: Huh? BT photo by Wendy Doscher-Smith  

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Its an ahhrt thing. Youre not sophisti cated enough to understand. There are terms for people like me and, no doubt, many of the Art Basel artists. Hoarder is just one of them. If items are discovered outside of a shop, including roadside, in a Dumpster (hence the term Dumpster diving), in Grannys attic, or wherever, and you did not pay for them, they are considered found objects. There is an entire art genre based on found objects. Did you know that? Its called found object. Im a fan of found objects (photograph them for purposes yet unknown) because of their diversity and histories. Something new that just rolled off the conveyor belt simply smells too plastic to inspire. I suppose I should get on the wagon. Maybe throw some of my items away. Let me think about that. No, never My items are not merely objects. Many have names and histories and meaning! (Note: Projecting meaning onto pomorphism. Theres your word of the day. Dont you dare say you never learn anything from my column.) Anyway, assigning meaning to on the Are you a hoarder? checklist on the Mayo Clinic website. But as we all know, those quacks just make that stuff up to pad their egos, so never mind. All visual artists require some items to create their work. These items may include drawing paper, sketchpads, canvasses, easels, paints, pencils, and live models. But those are called art supplies. (Even the people. Sorry.) And that is where the Artist as Hoarder problem comes into play. See, we, the AAH, need much more than some fancy crayons and a naked woman. We require props. Props is an umbrella term encompassing costumes, books, magazines, scores of empty prescription medicine bottles, animal skeletons, shoes (did I say shoes?), and crotchless undergarments that a dog had fun eating, to name only a few examples. The problems resulting from being any type of hoarder are many one being, at least in my case, that there are no more surfaces in our house. The surfaces still technically exist. But they have been trans formed. They are no longer surfaces, but piles. And a room that should be used for other purposes, such as a spare bedroom, becomes a Crap Room, as it is referred to in my house. It is sneaky, this materials need that I and, Im sure, many other borderline hoarders/ ahhrtists have. While Im on the subject: I dont think you can be a hoarder without being a collector. But you can be a collector without being a hoarder. Quick! Someone draw me a Venn diagram. It doesnt matter if the material is a corroded bottle cap or a vintage ball gown. What it is, isnt important. The point is that, while these objects masquerade as hubcaps, rocks, mannequins, records, scraps of paper, discarded toys, fabrics, and even larger items such as doors, glass panels, tires, and the occasional baby carriage or bassinet, they are downright alive to the hoarder. As grim as this all may sound, I am thrilled to see that I have done my part for this country, as well as for ahhrt and have stayed current with mental illness trends. Back in the 1990s, the Sex and the City days, depression was all the rage. Well, I had (and have) that one, too! Hoarding is tres trendy right now. The A&E network series Hoarders is among the highest-rated programs on cable television. The popularity of that show is probably what caused another cable network, the Syfy (formerly Sci-Fi) Channel, to start its own series on hoarding, this one focused on collectors as hoarders ( Collection Intervention ). These poor souls and their stuff are paraded on camera each week, accompanied by furrow-browed, concerned family members and friends, and a wellmeaning (and likely well-paid) pseudo psychologist. All of these people want to help the hoarder. Oftentimes, however, the hoarder does not want to be helped. Well, I say: Let the lunatic be! Last time I checked, this was a free country and people are allowed to literally suffocate in piles of so choose. Some may even slap a $120,000 price tag on it and call it ahhrt Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Monsignor Edward Pace High School We are Pace... Partners Academics Catholic Empowerment The Tradition of Excellence Continues! Open HouseSat., November 10, 2012 Two Sessions: 8:30 am or 10:00 am (session lasts approximately 2 hours) www.PaceHS.com to get the enrollment process started.

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76 Culture: THE ARTSA Chinese Artist Comes HomeMa Desheng will show his work and his gratitude to the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis at this years Art Miami By Anne Tschida BT Arts EditorThe artist Ma Deshengs path through life has not been an easy one. But it has cut a swath that has left a profound impact on both aesthetic creation and on people, from China to France to the This incredible road is documented in a photograph from 1979, as China was just emerging from the traumatic years of the Cultural Revolution and Mao Zedongs rule. Ma and several other artists are pictured in the black-and-white photo, still wearing the drab Mao uniforms that almost every Chinese citizen wore back then. Ma stands out. He is the one lean ing on a wooden crutch, evidence of his childhood polio. This was a photo groups in the country, called the Stars, or XingXing a group that also included the now internationally famous and provocative Ai Weiwei, among others. Although China has an artistic tradition spanning thousands of years, the as individual expression was looked down upon, even violently suppressed. But the Stars began to push boundaries, opening up the Middle Kingdom to modernist and post-modernist trends that had been absent from China. Back then, Ma was working in woodcuts, and could be called an outsider artist, as he had no formal train ing. There were no real private art galleries, so this new generation of artists would show their works on walls in Beijing. For a time, the new government in China allowed development.) But the opening came to a close a decade later, with the clampdown of Tiananmen Square. Thats when Ma left China for Paris, never to return. His decision to leave China, says Ma, speaking from his home and studio in Paris, was a necessary one: China did not have space for the development of modern art; modern art originated in the West. In 1992 Ma was vacationing in the Florida Keys when he was involved in a terrible car accident. His girlfriend was killed in the crash, and Ma spent two years in rehabilitation at the Miami Proj ect to Cure Paralysis. There he confronted yet another challenge: While polio had always limited his movement somewhat, the car accident left him a quadriplegic. In the midst of this tragedy, the artist also found comfort, as the Miami Project founded by Dr. Barth Green of the University of Miami allowed Ma to forge a powerful connection to South Florida and its people. Artistically, Ma moved from woodcuts to painting. Using irregular illustrations of stone, he began to on canvas. He literally took the idea of building blocks embodied by stones and rocks and ran with it. Initially his paintings resembled his woodcuts; they were black and white, monotone, somber in feeling. Recently, though, Ma has turned to a wider range of color, on increasingly bigger canvases. outlook on life. The ink wash paintings, even the woodcuts, are no longer

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possible with his limited mobility. He needs help with his large paintings now, and he has moved to acrylic, which allows for more versatility when creating the works. It also allows for more color. Sitting in their architecturally stun ning house from the 1930s in Miami Beach, Hank and Margarita Courtney talk enthusiastically about Ma Desheng. Hank, a lawyer, handled Mas court case after the car accident, and he and his wife became huge fans of the artists work and an even bigger fan of the man himself. Ma is the most generous, wonderful person you can meet, says Hank. For someone who survived polio and the Cultural Revolution, who was intentionally denied an education, who helped open up art in China only to be crushed again, who was then almost entirely crippled, he has a beautiful spirit that cant be contained, says Margarita. He is also a poet, so there is so much inside. Although Ma does have some use of his arms, physical movement is not easy. Nev ertheless he will get on a plane for Miami next month. At the art fair Art Miami (held during Art Basel Miami Beach in early December), Ma will show his works, mostly from the stone series, at a booth. But not just any booth. This one will be sponsored by the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis. Proceeds from every painting sold will be donated to the Miami Project. Miami is a paradise on earth, says Ma, whose two-year stay here, though dif tive and, we can say now, a cultural center. More than 30 years after Ma and the Stars attempted to shake up the Chinese cultural landscape, that country has undergone profound changes. A Mao suit may be worn to a nightclub as a sign of retro chic, but no one today would don less in Shanghai. And contem porary Chinese art has become some of the most coveted and expensive art on the market; work from students straight out of the major universities in Beijing and Shanghai sell for astronomical sums. Ma and his colleagues from the as well. Their works sell for big money at auctions and fairs internationally. And while China still has a nasty streak of cracking down on dissidents, the economy has been given a freer rein. Mas art shows up with regularity these days in galleries across China. Not so with the artist himself. I left mainland China 27 years ago, he says, and I will never go back. He will, whenever possible, return to Miami. That says a lot about how far we have come cultur ally, and where we might yet be able to go. Art Miami opens Wednesday, December 5, and run through Sunday, December 9, from 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.; 3101 NE 1st Ave., Midtown Miami. Cost is $20. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Ma Desheng: Miami is a paradise

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78 Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS GALLERIES 101 NE 40th St., Miami 305-573-2101 www.101exhibit.com Through November 26: Urban Narrative with Claudio Ethos and Ruben Ubiera 233 NW 36th St., Miami 305-576-4278 Through November 15: Lama Norlha by Robert Miller Through November 17: An Unborn Child Leaves a Shadow on the Soul by Debra Holt 4949 NE 2nd Ave., Miami 305-751-8367 www.acnd.net November 10 through January 18: Art from Within with Yunier Cervino Oliver and Jos Ramirez 2630 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-438-0220 www.alejandravonhartz.net Through November 24: Other Impertinences by Ana Tiscornia Evidence Multigrade Light by Juan Pablo Garza, curated by Ruth Auerbach 1 NE 40th St., Miami 305-573-5730 www.artfusiongallery.com Through December 17: Fusion IX: Seducing the Globe with various artists 348 NW 29th St., Miami 305-573-4661 www.artnouveaugaleria.com November 29 through January 30: Rafael Barrios 2441 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-571-9410 www.ascasogallery.com Call gallery for exhibition information 561 NW 32nd St., Miami 305-576-2828 Through November 2: R4 Recycled, Reclaimed, Reused, and Reinterpreted with various artists Jack Me In, Jack Me On, Jack Me Off by Kim Litch 2248 NW 1st Pl., Miami 786-999-9735 www.blacksquaregallery.com November 10 through January 5: Scribes House by Pablo Lehmann 100 NE 38th St., Miami 305-491-1526 www.borinquenhealth.org Call gallery for exhibition information 12425 NE 13th Ave. #5, North Miami 305-978-4856 www.bridgeredstudios.com Through November 11: Robert Flynn, Paintings and Drawings by Robert Flynn 8351 NE 8th Ct., Miami 305-754-2093 www.susannacaldwell.com November 1 through June 1: Mahogany Sculptures and Sculptural Offering Bowls carved from Florida Hardwoods by Susanna Caldwell 158 NW 91st St., Miami Shores 305-490-6906 www .cjazzart.com By appointment: carol@cjazzart. com Through December 9: Byways by Robert Huff 758 NE 125th St., North Miami 786-202-5554 www.caridigallery.com November 15 through December 15: Aguaviva by Cecilia Sanchez Vegas 250 NW 23rd St., Miami 305-292-0411 www.charestweinberg.com Call gallery for exhibition information 2234 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-573-8110 www.davidcastillogallery.com November 8 through December 31: Dark Flow Lurking with various artists 2043 N. Miami Ave., Miami 305-576-1804 Through November 21: A Veces Me Asaltan Las Dudas Celestes by Cecilia Paredes Lagan by Caroline Lathan-Stiefel 3938 N. Miami Ave., Miami 786-536-7801 www.diasporavibe.net Call gallery for exhibition information 100 NE 11th St., Miami 305-607-5527 www.dimensionsvariable.net November 9 through January 2: Paper Folding by Odalis Valdivieso 2620 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 786-486-7248 www.dinamitranigallery.com Through November 2: Light in the Shadows with William Maguire and Roberto Riverti November 10 through January 11: Paris by Willy Ronis 151 NW 24th St., Miami 305-576-1278 www.dorschgallery.com Call gallery for exhibition information 51 NW 36th St., Miami 305-573-9994 Through November 12: Languade of Silence by Lydia Azout Repossessed by Guillermo Riveros 2145 NW 2nd Ave., Miami www.durbansegnini.com Through November 29: Celebrating the Curve by Beto de Volder 46 NW 36th St., Miami 754-422-5942 www.elitearteditions.com Call gallery for exhibition information 50 NE 40th St., Miami 305-438-4383 November 10 through December 7: Retrospective by Mario Velez 2247 NW 1st Pl., Miami 305-448-8976 www.snitzer.com Through November 24: Jon Pylypchuk 125 NW 23rd St., Miami 305-582-6067 www.galeriehelenelamarque.com Call gallery for exhibition information 2085 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 786-266-2445 www.galleryschuster.com Call gallery for exhibition information 2407 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 786-431-1957 www.gallery212miami.com Through January 1: Art Basel 2012 with Pedro Zubizarreta, Sergey Ashkeev, Irina Davydova, Agata Agatowska, Florian Fausch, and Maxim Wakultschik 174 NW 23rd St., Miami 305-571-2288 www.gallerydiet.com Through November 24: The Us and the It by Fabienne Lasserre November 30 through December 31: The Working Day by Ohad Meromi 62 NE 27th St., Miami 305-576-0256 www .garynader.com Through November 30: Multiverse by Soraya Abu Naba Le Petit Parisien FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH of Miami DowntownExperience L.I.F.E. Downtown:Living, Inclusive, Faithful, EmergingWORSHIP TIMESSUNDAY Informal 8:30am Traditional 11:00am WEDNESDAY Bible Study 6:30pm400 Biscayne Blvd, Miami, FL 33132r frrnt brrtr rt305-371-4706info@fumcmiami.comACROSS FROM BAYSIDE FREE PARKING ON 5th St.NURSERY AVAILABLE FOR 11:00am WORSHIPVisit us on the web anytime!www.FUMCmiami.com /FUMCmiami/FUMCmiami Harvest Sunday November 18th11:00am A S EA SO N OF THANK SG IVIN G Join with us in the tradition of sharing the bounty SUNDAY brr O N FO Visitusonthew

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GENERAL AUDIENCE PRESENTS 769 NE 125th St., North Miami 786-467-0941 www.generalaudiencepresents.com Through November 10: Architectural Archetypes by Derrick Adams HARDCORE ARTS CONTEMPORARY SPACE 3326 N. Miami Ave., Miami 305-576-1645 www.hardcoreartmiami.com Through November 10: nd MADA New Media Festival with Gaston Ugalde, Gavin Benjamin, John Fitzgerald, and Misael Soto HAROLD GOLEN GALLERY 2294 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-989-3359 www.haroldgolengallery.com Call gallery for exhibition information IDEOBOX ARTSPACE 2417 N. Miami Ave., Miami 305-576-9878 www.ideobox.com Call gallery for exhibition information JACQUELINE FALCONE BED AND BREAKFAST 1040 NE 82nd St., Miami By appointment: jacqueline.falcone@gmail.com Through December 12: Marriage, Blood, and Adaptation with Dogan Arslanoglu, Kevin Arrow, P. Scott Cunningham, Sinisa Kukec, Ragnar Kjartansson, Kenton Parker KABE CONTEMPORARY 123 NW 23rd St., Miami 305-573-8142 www.kabecontemporary.com Through November 30: Ups and Downs Landscape by Nadav Weissman KAVACHNINA CONTEMPORARY 46 NW 36th St., Miami 305-448-2060 www.kavachnina.com Call gallery for exhibition information KELLEY ROY GALLERY 50 NE 29th St., Miami 305-447-3888 www.kelleyroygallery.com Call gallery for exhibition information KIWI GALLERY 48 NW 29th St., Miami 305-200-3047 www.kiwiartsgroup.com Ongoing: William John Kennedys Fine Art Photography Collection of Early Pop Artists LELIA MORDOCH GALLERY 2300 N. Miami Ave., Miami 786-431-1506 www.galerieleliamordoch.com Call gallery for exhibition information LOCUST PROJECTS 3852 N. Miami Ave., Miami 305-576-8570 www.locustprojects.org November 10 through December 12: Soul Manufacturing Corporation by Theaster Gates Wound, Bound, Tied and Knottedem by Jacin Giordano MIAMI-DADE COLLEGE, CENTRE GALLERY 300 NE 2nd Ave., Miami Bldg. 1, Room 1365 305-237-3696 www.mdc.edu Through December 21: Sweat with various artists MIAMI-DADE COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART AND DESIGN Freedom Tower 600 Biscayne Blvd., Miami 305-237-7700 www.mdc.edu Through December 14: CINTAS Foundation Fellows Competition Exhibition with various artists November 9 through February 2: Toledo/Toledo Full Circle by Isabel and Ruben Toledo November 16 through February 2: Where Ideas Are Born: A Jugglers Notebooks by Manuel Estrada MIAMI-DADE COLLEGE, GALLERY NORTH 11380 NW 27th Ave., Miami 305-237-1532 www.mdc.edu November 9 through January 11: Passages and Other Exploratory Journeys with Victor Gomez and Alena Fresquet Reception November 8, noon MICHAEL JON GALLERY 20 NE 41st St., Suite 2, Miami 305-760-9030 www.michaeljongallery.com Through December 1: Crocuta Crocuta by Kristen VanDeventer MYRA GALLERIES 177 NW 23rd St., Miami 631-704-3476 www.myragalleries.com Call gallery for exhibition information NEW WORLD GALLERY New World School of the Arts 25 NE 2nd St., Miami 305-237-3597 Call gallery for exhibition information NINA TORRES FINE ART 1800 N. Bayshore Dr., Miami 305-395-3599 November 2 through 24: November Contemporary with various artists 2600 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-571-9036 www.oascaniogallery.com Through November 7: Concrete Perspective by Hester OM GALLERY 8650 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 21, Miami 305-458-5085 Through December 31: Animals by Hausey Leplat and Julien Garcia ONCE ARTS GALLERY 170-C NW 24th St., Miami 786-333-8404 www.oncearts.com Ongoing: Pablo Gentile, Jaime Montana, Jaime Apraez, and Patricia Chaparro OXENBERG FINE ART 50 NE 29th St., Miami 305-854-7104 www.oxenbergart.com Through November 10: Drawings and Sculpture by Humberto Castro November 10 through January 3: The Paintings of Ashley Collins by Ashley Collins PAN AMERICAN ART PROJECTS 2450 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-573-2400 www.panamericanart.com November 10 through January 5: Un Pas, una Ilusin (A Country, an Illusion) by Abel Barroso PRIMARY PROJECTS 4141 NE 2nd Ave., Suite 104, Miami www.primaryprojectspace.com Call gallery for exhibition information SAMMER GALLERY 82 NE 29th St., Miami 305-441-2005 www.artnet.com/sammergallery.html Through November 5: Equivocal Space with various artists SPINELLO PROJECTS 2930 NW 7th Ave., Miami 786-271-4223 www.spinelloprojects.com November 10 through January 5: Abby Double, Agustina Woodgate, Ana Mendez, Antonia Wright, Federico Nessi, Ingrid Lee, Manny Prieres, Naama Tsabar, Reeve Schumacher, Robert Montgomery, Rowan Smith, Ruben Millares, Sinisa Kukec, and TYPOE THE LUNCH BOX GALLERY 310 NW 24th St., Miami 305-407-8131 www.thelunchboxgallery.com Through November 24: A Visual Diary of Jaime Ferreyros by Jaime Ferreyros UNDER THE BRIDGE 12425 NE 13th Ave., North Miami 305-978-4437 Through November 11: Interventions by Karen Rifas UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI GALLERY 2750 NW 3rd Ave., Suite 4, Miami 305-284-3161 www.as.miami.edu/art November 9 through 23: Here and There with Lamia Khorshid and Alex Adams UNIX FINE ART GALLERY 2219 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-496-0621 Ongoing: Alexis Torres WALTMAN ORTEGA FINE ART 2233 NW 2nd Ave., Miami 305-576-5335 www.waltmanortega.com Through November 6: Graphic Nature by Joe Segal How Meaning Changes Over T ime Through the Degradation of Speakers / Ayesaba Amagwala (Dubula Ibunu) 8 speakers, speaker

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80 NW 2nd Avenue between 25th and 26th streets 305-573-0658 www.thewynwoodwalls.com Ongoing: Wynwood Walls with Retna, How & Nosm, Roa, b., The Date Farmers, Saner, Sego, Liqen, Neuzz, Faile, Vhils, Interesni Kazki, Kenny Scharf, Nunca, Shepard Fairey, Aiko, Ryan McGinness, Stelios Faitakis, and avaf 250 NW 23rd St., Unit 306, Miami 954-235-4758 www.yeelenart.com Call gallery for exhibition information 2534 N. Miami Ave., Miami 305-438-3737 www.zadokgallery.com Through December 2: Tapestries? with Chuck Close, William T. Wiley, Hung Liu, Doug Hall, Enrique Chagoya, Deborah Oropallo, Guy Diehl, and Mesami Teraoka 800 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 305-674-8278 www .artcentersf.org Through November 11: Dresses by Adriana Carvalho 2100 Collin s Ave., Miami Beach 305-673-7530 www.bassmuseum.org Through November 4: UNNATURAL with Boaz Aharonovitch, Einat ArifGalanti, Aziz + Cucher, Cleste Boursier-Mougenot and Ariane Michel, Blane De St. Croix, Rose-Lynn Fisher, Ori Gersht, Meirav Heiman and Yossi Ben Shoshan, Hilja Keading, Freddy Shachar Kislev, Sigalit Landau, Dana Levy, Tobias Madison, Richard Mosse, Gilad Ratman, Samantha Salzinger, Tomer Sapir, Yehudit Sasportas, Michal Shamir, Uri Shapira, Jennifer Steinkamp, Gal Weinstein, Wendy Wischer, and Guy Zagursky, curated by Tami Katz-Freiman 1018 N. Miami Ave., Miami 305-455-3380 www.cifo.org Through November 4: Not Me: Subject to Change with Eduardo Abaroa, Francisca Aninat, Julieta Aranda, Tamar Guimaraes, Glexis Novoa, Daniela Ortiz, Marta Maria Perez Bravo, and Marisa Rubio 23 NE 41st St., Miami 305-576-6112 www.delacruzcollection.org Ongoing: Works from the Collection of Rosa and Carlos de la Cruz with various artists 10975 SW 17th St., Miami 305-348-2890 Through December 9: Material and Meaning: Earthenware, Stoneware, and Porcelain from the WolfsonianFIU Collection with various artists Fragile Nature: The Florida Artist Series by Mark Messersmith Through February 24: To Beauty: A Tribute to Mike Kelley with various artists Through May 20: American Sculpture in the Tropics with John Henry, Albert Paley, Dennis Oppenheim, Chakaia Booker, and Verina Baxter November 17 through January 13: various artists, curated by Annette B. Fromm November 17 through January 13: Fluorescent Light Sculptures by Ivan Navarro 1035 N. Miami Ave., Suite 200, Miami www.legalartmiami.org Call gallery for exhibition information 1301 Stanford Dr., Coral Gables 305-284-3535 www.lowemuseum.org November 10 through January 13: Prints and Objects by Christo and Jeanne-Claude Through February 10: Saintly Blessings: A Gift of Mexican Retablos from Joseph and Janet Shein with various artists Through April 21: Adapting and Adopting: Waves of Change as East Encounters West, Modern and Contemporary Japanese Art with various artists 101 W. Flagler St., Miami 305-375-3000 www.miamiartmuseum.org Ongoing: Between Here and There: Modern and Contemporary Art from the Permanent Collection Through November 4: Message to Our Folks by Rashid Johnson November 21 through May 12: New Work Miami 2013 with various artists 770 NE 125th St., North Miami 305-893-621 1 www.mocanomi.org Through November 11: Trading Places II with Dona Altemus, Onajide Shabaka, Magnus Sigurdarson, Rick Ulysse, Antonia Wright 591 NW 27th St., Miami 305-576-1051 www.margulieswarehouse.com Through April 28: Anselm Kiefer, Richard Long, William Tucker, Simryn Gill, Doug Aitken, David Ellis, Roberto Lange, Kader Attia, Nathalie Djurberg, Leandro Erlich, Sabelo Mlangeni, Barbara Probst, and Wael Shawky, curated by Katherine Hinds 95 NW 29th St., Miami 305-573-6090, http://rfc.museum Call gallery for exhibition information Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection 170 NW 23rd St., Miami 305-438-9908 www.worldclassboxing.org November 10 through February 28: Raga For Fishwife by Aaron Angell Compiled by Melissa Wallen Send listings, jpeg images, and events information to art@biscaynetimes.com Untitled

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Broadway Comes SouthThe names of the Broadway Tenors are not as well known as those of the Three Tenors once were, but you may be familiar with their roles and voices: Brent Barrett starred in Chicago Ron Bohmer in The Phantom of the Opera (and in Ragtime ), and Matt Cavenaugh was in the recent revival of West Side Story At the Aventura Arts and Cultural Center (3385 NE 188th St.) on Friday, Novem ber 9 at 8:00 p.m., these three top tenors will sing the songs of Sondheim, Lloyd Webber, and others, in a night of Broadway hits. Tickets are $40 and $45. Go to www.aventuracenter.org.Nature Biking in the GroveWhile we all know the Biscayne Corridor is the place to be, its also nice to remem ber we live amid some of the most amazing vegetation in the nation, particularly down in the Grove. But dont just drive through the botanical treasures of that tropical oasis. Bike through them. Courtesy of His toryMiami, on Saturday, November 10 from 10:00 a.m. until noon, historian Frank Schena will lead you through not just the the area. The Vizcaya to North Grove Eco-Bike Tour costs $25 for members ($35 for nonmembers) and includes all-day admission to Vizcaya and its gardens. Go to www.historymiami.org.Wrapped Up in ArtOnce upon a time, the acclaimed art duo Christo and Jeanne-Claude came to town and turned our islands pink. They literally wrapped islands in Biscayne Bay in fuchsia cloth, one of their most monumental and memorable projects. On Saturday, November 10 the Lowe Art Museum at the University of Miami (1301 Stanford Dr., Coral Gables) is premiering Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Prints and Objects The exhibit will include drawings and renderings of projects such as the encased Sydney Opera House, The Gates of Central Park and smaller works dating to the 1950s, as well as images of the completed productions. Go to www.miami.edu/lowe.Take Me to the RiverIts time to take back our waterfronts as public places, especially downtown, where access has been too limited for too Downtown Miami Riverfront Festival which wraps around both the river and the bay downtown (one block south of the Bayfront Park Metromover station). On Saturday, November 10 there will be bands, featured artists, strolling musicians, food booths, a mess of childrens activities, and a boat parade. And its free. This year the festival features the culture of Jamaica. The fest runs from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. For more information, visit www.miamiriverwalkfestival.com.Going for Baroque formance should be staid and boring is just the-top expressiveness in art, architecture, and music. Take, for example, Red Priest an English ensemble that plays with heart, soul, and some swashbuckling stage presence. At St. Marthas Church (9301 Biscayne Blvd.) on Sunday, November 11 at 3:00 p.m., this The latter holds special resonance for the group, which took the red-haired com own. Tickets cost $10 to $20. Go to www. saintmartha.tix.com.Make Mine Mahler Classical composers, like painters, have a way of falling into and out of fashion. Gustav Mahler, though, has remained a perennial favorite for smart conductors and smart audiences, so no surprise that the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra will kick off its residency season at the Arsht Center for the Performing Arts on Friday, November 16, and Saturday, November 17 with Mahlers Third Symphony. With Franz Welser-Mst holding the baton, the Austrians longest work will be in good hands. Shows are 8:00 p.m. both nights. Tickets range from $35 to $165. For details go to www.arshtcenter.org.Shorter is BetterMiami really does have something for from one of the biggest international the Miami Short Film Festival which long as the running time is 20 minutes or less). Started back in 2002 with 50 chairs and a projector, it has grown into a festival that will screen shorts at Paragon Grove 13, with special showings at the Miami Childrens Museum and the North Beach Bandshell. The shorts roll from Saturday, November 24, through Saturday, December 1 Go to www. Compiled by BT arts editor Anne Tschida. Please send information and images to calendar@biscaynetimes.com.Culture: EVENTS CALENDAR Books for the People!The cover of Carolina Garcia-Aguileras latest book depicts a g-string and jockstrap. That should be a dead giveaway, as the novel is about a sports groupie/geisha who services elite male athletes. GarciaAguilera, best known for her Lupe Solano mystery series, will be just one of the tons of authors from around the world at Miami Book Fair International held at Miami-Dade Colleges downtown campus from Sunday, November 11, through Sunday, November 18 Highlights ings, screenings of the documentary Tom Wolfe Gets Back to Blood about the authors new Miami novel, and, of course, the street fair. Check www.miamibookfair.com. Its a Teen ThingThe Arsht Center for the Performing Arts and the University of Miamis theater department are joining up again for the production of Girls vs. Boys Its a great collaborative idea, Federico Garca Lorcas The House of Bernarda Alba This play is just as edgy, but contemporary. To a score of punk and metal-band music, a brother and sister enter the world of adolescence, with traumatic results. At the Arsht Center (1300 Biscayne Blvd.) through Sunday, November 18 Tickets are $35. Go to www.arshtcenter.org. Fusion in the BloodJames Blood Ulmer was born 70 years ago in rural South Carolina, where his dad gave him a guitar at age four, and gospel music was the sustenance of life. But then rock and roll, jazz, and the blues crept into Ulmers soul. He made his way north to Detroit, where he hung with innovators of funk, and then to New York, where he began playing with legendary jazzman Ornette Coleman. The end coln Rd., Miami Beach) on Saturday, November 17 at 8:30 p.m., courtesy of Tigertail Productions. Tickets range from $25 (for students) to $50. Go to www.tigertail.org.

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82 Columnists: POLICE REPORTSBiscayne Crime BeatCompiled by Derek McCannFriendly Gesture Back res1700 Block of Biscayne Boulevard Because of the heat in these parts, we tend to have a laidback culture when it comes to meeting new people. A twosome hung out on a bench, shooting the breeze. The future victim even let his new chat partner borrow his cell phone. Why not? If he can talk eloquently about the Marlins, he must be trustworthy. With that, the victim went to use the Burger King restroom. When he returned, his his bicycle. With no bike and no phone, the hapless victim is now resigned to talking to himself while sitting on the bus bench, like so many others.Cabbie Taken for a Ride, Again3500 Block of Biscayne Boulevard Cab drivers should know better by now. tive passengers is on the cane, keep going. This cabbie picked up his female passenger at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport and drove her to Miami. Once the vehicle hit the Biscayne hood, the passenger exited fare. The cab driver tailed her until she disappeared into one of the famous Boulevard motels. The cabbie managed to park his vehicle and enter the motel, but employees there had no knowledge of the womans whereabouts. Our Crooks Believe in Change800 Block of NE 72nd Street For a criminal to go through the trouble of a break-in, youd think the goal would be obtaining something of great value. But sometimes our criminal slime settle for what they can get. This victim had his laundry room broken into. What was stolen? Some loose change in a jar. The change to clean his dirty laundry. This coin crime ring is still on the loose, so remember, Miamians: Keep your change in your pockets!At Least He Didnt Go on the Carpet7800 Block of NE 2nd Avenue Some landlords require additional deposits for pets. Maybe they need to extend that policy to boyfriends. This boyfriend, the day after his girlfriend had the audacity to end their dysfunctional relationship, came back to get his television. The victim refused to give it to him. He reacted to her stubbornness by breaking down the door and punching holes in the walls. He then left the scene. Victim was later told by her landlord that she would be responsible for all the damages. We think a cat would have been a for this victim.

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Snooze Over Shoes, You Loose401 Biscayne Blvd. A tourist, visiting from Dorothys home a Clarks shoe store. Victim was deterketing campaign of Fabulous Fall Style is accurate. It may very well be, but you still have to pay for the shoes. Her purse went missing immediately; it contained cards. Victim will have to be happy with her summer best, or perhaps even gasp recycle last years fashions.Those Little Rascals1501 Biscayne Blvd. A teacher at Miami International University of Art and Design stepped out of the class room to use a vending machine. Thinking it was safe to do so after all, these were her students she left her purse on the desk. Later that evening, when she arrived home, she discovered her wallet was missing. Internet purchases were later made with her credit card. We would suggest an hour of detention for the whole class, but someone would probably steal the clock.Woman Suffers Ultimate Identity Crisis13800 Block of NE 12th Avenue Victim parked her car in front of a laundromat and went inside to wash her clothes. She made a conscious decision to not lock her car doors. While she watched her clothes enter the spin cycle, someone entered her car and stole her backpack from the back seat. This was no ordinary backpack. According to the victim, it contained her drivers license, her Social Security card, her childrens Social Security cards, her checkbooks (from two different banks), her passport, her CPR There are no suspects in the case. Or rather, there are too many to count.New Appliance Store to Open in North Miami600 Block of NE 129th Street Speaking of laundry a theme this month a residence was ransacked by an unknown intruder. The perpetrator stole a television and, for good measure, the homes washer and dryer. We guess he wants to watch television while he washes his dirty clothes. Makes sense to us. If only these criminals could put their ambition to more positive use.Heres a Tip: Steer Clear of Anyone Offering Help in Miami NE 11th Street and 1st Avenue Victim tried to parallel park her vehicle next to the curb, but was not having much success, so a man offered to help her. She said okay, and was delighted with the outcome. However, when the man demanded a tip for his artful maneuver ing, she refused. He then grabbed her cell phone from her lap, jumped out of the vehicle, and ran westbound. No arrests have been made. A sad case of yet another creep masquerading as a Good Samaritan and another bad Miami tipper.Theres a Reason They Call It a Locker1801 NE 123rd St. No better way to get those endorphins pumping than a good day spent at L.A. Fitness, which is now a North Miami staple. There is also no better crash than having your wallet stolen. This so-called victim left her wallet inside a gym bag she placed in a locker a locker she neglected to lock. Weve got an idea. Next time the victim, or anyone inclined to put so much blind faith in their fellow humans, heads to the gym in North Miami, they should make a quick stop at the Starbucks on 135th Street and order a venti cup of the Wake the Hell Up blend of the day. A Criminal with Real Drive14290 W. Dixie Hwy. While we have encountered endless reports of people leaving their car doors open or their purses in full view while pumping gas, we have never quite seen his tank with gas when a man jumped into the vehicle (the keys were still in the ignition), started the car and drove off! Fortunately, the victim had been accompanied to the gas station by a friend driving another car. As a result, they were able to follow the thief for approximately ten blocks. While he managed to get away, the thief did leave behind a useful piece of evidence: He dropped his cell phone in the victims vehicle. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Specializing in Stress & Anxiety Management, Phobias, Family, Marital & Sexual Therapy, Depression & Bereavement Spiritual Psychics, Tarot Card Readings, Palm Readings, Crystal Rock Readings, Tea Leaf and Crystal Ball Readings Helping you with any and all of Lifes problems. Can suggest which reading best suits your needs....An advisor known for her Honesty and IntegrityBY APPOINTMENT ONLY (786) 284.8203 (917) 804.7784CHAKRA AWARENESS GUIDEUnderstanding & Activating the Bodys Seven Main Energy CentersCrown Chakra Brow Chakra Throat Chakra Heart Chakra Solar Plexus Chakra Navel Chakra Root or Base Chakra

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84 Columnists: PARK PATROLKeeping It SimpleBarry Silverman Park may not look like much, but more communities could use a green space just like itBy Jim W. Harper BT ContributorReal estate around New Yorks Central Park is extremely valuable, persuasive evidence that the park effect is real. The closer you are and the better your view, the higher the price. Here in South Florida, the beaches and waterfront offer the same concept: If you want to have great views of nature within a city, youre going to pay for it. Nearby green or blue space makes real estate more valuable. Does that mean parks and waterways are for rich people, not meant for the 99 percent? Or even the 47 percent? In New York, Central Park is so large that it extends nearly into Harlem, where real estate is obviously much cheaper than near the Plaza Hotel, on the parks southern boundary. But here in South Florida, our urban parks are typically small. (An exception is Oleta River State Park, which is the states largest urban park, actually larger in acreage than Central Park.) As for the typical little neighborhood park, does it raise the value of surrounding real estate? Your real estate agent has the answer to that one. My guess is that green is good and blue is better, which is why, even though we call them public parks, they serve many private interests. Put another way: Wealthy people pay the majority of taxes that support parks, and near them. Enter a neighborhood park in North Miami Beach. The surrounding real estate ranges from shoddy to palatable, from storage facilities to multi-story apartment complexes to single family homes. Its a mix of lowerto middleclass offerings very close to the urban core of 163rd Street. Not exactly prime real estate. (No water in sight.) This small parcel of green space in a modest neighborhood may bring a slight boost to surrounding real estate values, but it clearly offers greater value community service. Whats more, this little park provides an interesting model of Dr. Barry J. Silverman, a retired physician, donated the land to the City of North Miami Beach. It cost $222,539 to create the park, which opened in 2006, according to a commemorative plaque found there. The relatively low cost of this approximately two-acre park demonstrates that neighborhood parks need be neither expensive nor elaborate. The modest offerings in this park echo the real estate market. Of course, getting the land donated probably saved a cool million. Was this property a real estate investment gone bad, or was Dr. Silverman simply concerned for his community? He did not return my calls for comment. Silverman Park serves children with its tot lot, so there are some immediate improvements that need to be made. While chain-link fencing surrounds the park, its entrances lack gates. Therefore, a child in the playground could easily bolt for the street. And if you know children, you know they love nothing more than running. Within the park, another gate is needed to cover the utility station. Strangely, the station is surrounded by fencing, but a doorsize space remains open. Again, any child on the run could easily go inside and start climbing the electric meter. On the positive side, youve got your tot lot for the under-eight crowd, and youve got your open space surrounded by a walking path for older folks. Inside the path are two exercise options: a set of monkey-bar contraptions, and two yes, count them, two beachstyle volleyball courts. One volleyball court lacks a net altogether, while the second courts net sags in a sad arc. My guess is that not many children from the nearby elementary school are interested in volleyball. Throw in some plastic shovels and call it a giant sandbox and youd get somewhere. The monkey-bar contraptions are not upscale, Vita-course style machines. No, these come from the Sears and Roebuck catalogue, circa 1962, and they are packed into a tight box with a mulch the ground. The tot lot skews more modern and Ikea-esque. The best feature resembles a waterfall frozen in green plastic, and it can be scaled down or up to enter a fortlike center of slides and other escapes. One enclosed gray slide gets futuristic on the way down, with a sky window. Nifty. Across the mulch, a second, smaller fort offers opportunities for success to the four-and-under crowd. BT photos by Jim W. Harper BARRY SILVERMAN PARKNE 161st Street and 19th Place North Miami Beach 305-948-2957 Hours: Sunrise to sunset Picnic tables: No Barbecues: No Picnic pavilions: No Tennis courts: No No Night lighting: Yes Swimming pool: No Playground: YesPark Rating SOUTH MIAMI AVEBRICKELL AVE S W 13TH ST Dolphin ExpwyNE 19th PlNE 163rd St NE 162nd St NE 161st St West Dixie HwyNE 160th St NE 159th St

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One maintenance question surrounds this six-year old park: Are its fences public or private? The green chain-link fences are clearly on public property, but half of the park abuts private residences, where the dividing wall is composed of white clapboards. Its sections are in various states of disrepair. holes in these fences? It would appear that residents have placed plywood across some of the larger openings, but it also could have been the city. (In last months column, I wrote about North Miami Beach placing plywood over dilapidated plastic playground equipment in Victory Park. Call it their recessionary One small but noteworthy item in this park: a recycling bin! Of the nearly 100 parks in South Florida that I have visited, only a few offer recycling. On the downside, one of the trashcans in Silverman Park was lying on its side. Overall, Silverman Park offers a pleasant break from the surrounding con is a strength, because theres little that needs to be maintained, and visitors can This type of park needs to be multiplied 100 times in every lowerto middle-class neighborhood across South Florida. It may not raise real estate values very much, but it does give area children and adults a place to gather. Nothing could be more valuable than that. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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86 Columnists: PAWSITIVELY PETSCrime and Punishment: AA Do gs T T a lePositive training works, but its still a negative world out thereBy Lisa Hartman BT ContributorA few weeks ago I received a call from a BT reader asking for help with his dog. His rather large female terrier mix, which hed adopted two months earlier, was very reactive when encountering other dogs. He had been working her but was growing more angry, frustrated, and embarrassed as his corrections and use of a choke chain were not effective. This was leading him to avoid walking the dog altogether. Although a reader of this column, he didnt fully understand science-based, positive methods or how they can work with out-of-control dogs. In fact most people wrongly believe that dog-friendly methods are for pets with sweet dispositions and that he thought, the choke chain makes sense: Dont like a behavior? Punish it. But after consulting training books and working by himself to no avail, he decided to give me a call. Hi, Lisa, he said. I guess Im like most people in that Im skeptical the positive thing can work. Well, yes, and no. Many people seek Others, like this gentleman, have been conditioned over a lifetime to believe punishment is the way to go. No surprise that this line of thinking is prevalent. We ourselves live in a punitive society and are consistently punished for bad be havior. Certainly no cop has ever pulled anyone over to give them a reward for driving safely. But lets for a minute try to imagine a world in which the opposite is true. people over for going the speed limit and then gave them a hundred bucks? What if your insurance premiums were drastically lowered as a result? Ill bet

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most people would be driving the speed limit. What if someone handed you a up after your dog? Im pretty sure that behavior would increase as well. Several years ago positive became the catch phrase, and trainers everywhere began to claim they were positive, when in fact most were still punishmentbased trainers. After all, how would punishment-based trainers advertise? (Our motto: Dont complain. Jerk the chain!) Not very dog-friendly. So they came up with more marketable terms such as natural and balanced. Some trainers need to feel they are in control by physically dominating a small domesticated animal (which rewards the trainer with feelings of power). Others believe they are positive when they arent. Most dont keep up with their education and only know whatever techniques their mentor taught them years ago. Interest Training is equal parts art, science, and mechanics. You have to be able to juggle the dog, the leash, and other necessities while walking in public and giving feedback to the dog (mechanics). You have to understand cognitive theory how dogs learn, what to do with them and why, what not to do and why (science). The art of it comes in knowing how to adapt when life throws curve balls, being able to modify your Certainly all teachers arent the same. This is not to say that punishment cant work. It can. But administering punishment correctly and effectively ever succeeds. The punishment must be every time, be severe enough the dog wouldnt think of doing that again, and must not be equated with you. couple times you use it, its simply not working. Heres an example: A former client was squirting her little dog with a water spray bottle for barking and growl ing. She actually brought the bottle with her and blasted it in public! She had done it hundreds of times. The dog was obviously still barking or she wouldnt be carrying the bottle. But she would see the dog stop barking when she sprayed it (behavior suppression). However, she didnt seem to realize its failure when her dog barked again minutes later. This routine was ruin ing her relationship with her pet. One reason positive training is not the norm is that some people feel there is a stigma attached to using food rewards. (Oddly, these same people often see no stigma attached to punishment.) Another reason is that positive training is not considered sexy. Yes, there is very little grandstanding in dog-friendly training, but when I see a great trainer change the behavior of a dog, human, dolphin, or chimpanzee in a subtle way well, it doesnt get sexier than that. There is one undeniable side effect of positive training: the affection that grows between student and trainer working as a team. It is great to see dogs held high, and owners loving their dogs, for the proud dog who stops mid-training to kiss the trainer in happiness and love not supplication. So how is my new client doing with his terrier mix? Very well thus far. In the behavior. I also showed the dog that when Im around, great things happen. After explaining to the owner what new things we were going to do and what old practices we were no longer going to do, we took the dog outside. Right away an enemy dog appeared. Our canine student did nothing but wag her tail. The owner was amazed as she didnt bark or lunge at all. In our second lesson, we took the dog off-leash in a park and practiced go off on her own. She wanted to be with us and learn more. In lesson three, I brought my dogs. After 15 minutes, the terrier was walking around the park with in the least. Now her tail wags with every lesson, and I leave each session covered in doggy kisses! That is the power of the positive thing. Lisa Hartman, visiting Long Island, was forced to evacuate ahead of Hurricane December 2009. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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88 Columnists: PICTURE STORYIdyllic Miami and the Royal Palm HotelA view of our past from the archives of HistoryMiamiBy Paul S. George Special to the BTAs seen in this hand-colored pho tograph, taken circa 1900, early Miami was an Edenic paradise. Looming above everything was Henry M. An agreement between Flagler, the oil and railroad baron, and Julia Tuttle, a widow determined to transform a wilderness into a progressive city, birthed Miami in 1896. As part of their agreement, Flagler, in return for hundreds of acres of prime land received from Tuttle and Mary Brickell, whose family controlled todays Brickell Avenue neighborhood, brought his Florida and agreed to build a great hotel. The hotel opened in 1897 and quickly became a magnet for many of Americas Gilded Age princes. It operated for just 30 years. it, remained pristine in the early years of the city, before it began hosting tourist vessels and commercial ships. Beyond the mouth of the river are the quiescent waters of Biscayne Bay, with none of todays built environment obstructing views of a forlorn peninsula that is todays Miami Beach. Near the left corner of the photograph, beyond the palm trees, stands the home of Julia Tuttle, a building that once served as a slave owners house and Dallas occupied the site in the middle of the Nineteenth Century. In the lower right corner is the undeveloped south bank of the river. Today the area hosts tall condominiums and commercial buildings. What a difference a century makes! To order a copy of this photo, please contact HistoryMiami archives manager Dawn Hugh at 305-375-1623, dhugh@historymiami.org. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Photo courtesy of HistoryMiami, #1990-506-28 COMPLETE BUSINESS SERVICES 12555 Biscayne Blvd. North Miami, FL 33181-2597 Tel: 305-895-6974 | Fax: 305-891-2045 Email: ppspost@earthlink.net T.M.Est. 1980

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Ackee, Rice, Saltsh Are Nice A favorite Jamaican dish can be made with fruit found right hereBy Jeff Shimonski BT ContributorWhile driving home from work every day, I pass by one of the less common tree species in our local landscape, Harpullia pen dula or tulipwood. This attractive tree normally has dark green, glossy leaves, but what really makes it an interesting landscape specimen is its fruit, which is normally seen this time of year. The fruit is bright red, about the size of a quarter, and, when ripe, splits open to reveal one or two shiny black seeds. These trees seem to tolerate neglect very well. The one I drive by every day has been hit by cars and savaged by Weed Eaters and still keeps growing its lush canopy of foliage. Another tree in bloom this time of year comes from the same family, the Sapindaceae sometimes called soapberry. The golden rain tree, Koelreuteria elegans can be covered with yellow eventually turning brown or copper colored. This is a striking tree when in bloom, and Im surprised its not used in more landscapes. This plant family is commonly called the soapberry family because the fruit contain saponins, which are a natural surfactant and have been used as soap by native peoples around the world. We have a native plant called Florida soapberry, or Sapindus saponaria It can grow into a nice size tree and is very drought tolerant once established in the landscape. The orange fruit are quite noticeable and attractive. I planted three small seedlings at Jungle Island a couple of years ago and they are now about six feet tall. They havent produced fruit yet, but once they do, Im interested in seeing if the fruit makes for good soap. We also know other trees in this family. The lychee, Litchi chiensis is not uncommon in the yards of older homes in our area. Mamoncillo chino as our His panic friends call it, is also a distinctive tree in the landscape, with a nice canopy of dark green leaves. Individual trees pro duce delicious red fruit every other year. Still another tree in this family that is well known to our friends from south of the border is mamoncillo, Melicoc cus bijugatus We see this small, round, edible, green fruit being sold on street corners throughout our area. This past year I wrote a column on another fruiting tree in the soapberry family: ackee, or Blighia sapida It originally hails from Africa and found its way to England and eventually the Caribbean via Captain William Bligh of Mutiny on the Bounty fame. This is not an uncommon tree in our residential landscapes. You can sometimes see them full of attractive red fruit and, even though this tree is commercially cultivated for its fruit (you can buy it canned), you must be very careful when picking it for eating. It is a very toxic fruit, with only one part being edible after it ripens. with the ackee fruit. Ive eaten it numerous times and always enjoyed it, so recently I challenged my favorite cook, Monica, to prepare the dish. Monica collected ripe fruit from a neighbors tree (with permission, of course) and very carefully extracted and cleaned the edible part. She then boiled it a strainer to drain out the water. In a heated skillet she added grape seed oil, yellow onions, green peppers, orange peppers, half a Scotch bonnet pepper, garlic cloves, salt and pepper, and cooked, she carefully added the ackee. (Apparently, stirring the ingredients too much can cause the ackee to fall apart.) this dish, it was delicious. (Well, maybe with a little less of the hot Scotch bonnet pepper next time.) There was enough for two days of lunches and each day the dish tasted better. Monica is now going to try ackee in different dishes, including a vegetarian recipe. I cant wait to taste them. You can see two ripe ackee fruit in the photo that accompanies this article. three dark things you see in each fruit are seeds, which are surrounded by spongy, yellowy-white stuff. This is called the aril and its what is eaten after the fruit has been cleaned really well and then boiled. I think were really lucky here in South Florida to be able to grow so many differ ent species of plants and trees, especially those that produce edible fruit, foliage, or roots. When we plant and cultivate our urban forest and landscapes, we should not only consider aesthetics, but the culinary opportunities available to us as well. ipal arborist, director of horticulture at Jungle Island, and principal of Tropical Designs of Florida. Contact him at jeff@ tropicaldesigns.com. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com BT photo by Jeff Shimonski

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90 Our $12 Billion Plumbing ProblemMiami-Dades water and sewage pipes are long overdue for replacementW By Jim W. Harper BT ContributorYour toilet is crying. Listen to it mourn. It feels pain every time system at $12 billion (over 15 years). Send your tips and clever ideas to: goinggreen@biscaynetimes.com. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Boutique practice in a cozy & warm atmosphereLOCATED IN THE MIAMI DESIGN DISTRICT NEAR MIDTOWNMargaret Okonkwo, MD, FAAP 4112 Northeast 1st Ave, Miami FL 33137 Phone: 305-576-KIDS (5437) Fax: 305-576-5120 www.KidstownPediatrics.com GMG Construction Consulting Inc.For All Your Construction NeedsGuillermo Mendoza305.975.0965 or 305.759.2947Residential & Commercial

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Columnists: KIDS AND THE CITYWhen DD oes Mom Get a Break?Juggling kids, family, and career leaves little time for well, almost anything else By Crystal Brewe BT ContributorI am exhausted. No, really. I am Lindsay-Lohan-got-hauled-off-torehab-for-exhaustion exhausted. (And seriously, Lindsay, walk a mile in my shoes, you pansy!) All the moms I know are busy. We hold that candle up high and let the wax drip from both ends. USA Today recently reported that more than 71 percent of mothers with children under the age of 18 are working; many of them single moth ers. (I do not relay this statistic to dispar age stay-at-home moms. Stay-at-home moms work hard. Working moms work ments. Staying at home just isnt for me.) Its clich, but I often get asked how I do it. Juggling a demanding job, board meetings, Girl Scouts, and writing this riveting column have not earned me any Mother-of-the-Year awards, but at mid night, when Im answering the last of that days e-mails, I often feel like Superwom an. This feeling doesnt always resonate as a positive, though. It oftentimes comes At the end of the day, I walk into my home, hang up my cape, and there are my husband and kids, and even my dog, all of Why do we do it all? I do it because Im attempting balance. I want to bal ance my need for a meaningful career with being a powerful and positive role model in the community. I want my kids to see that extracurricular activi ties and interests are important even into adulthood, and that volunteering your time in the community is vital. I pull everything off but the balance part. (Insert irony here.) That part tends to get a little tricky, and what suffers are the things no one else sees sleep, diet, hygiene. (Extended time in the shower to shave my legs is a small victory.) In a recent marathon catch-up ses sion, I sent a late-night e-mail to about 20 parents regarding an upcoming project. I received 11 responses back within ten minutes, all from moms. Why were these moms responding at this hour? Last spring Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg astonished working mothers everywhere by admitting that she leaves Then she followed this up by saying she gets her laptop out and works some more once she has tucked her kids into bed. Well, then. There it is! Susan, a fellow working mom, recently shared that she cant muster the courage to leave her desk in time to pick up her kids from school. She makes her husband do it because its more acceptable for him to visiting Target.com on her lunch break to order kids socks and refuses to even take time out of her day to make a gynecologist guilt. She feels it signals that she isnt get ting her job done, not just to her higher-ups, but to her peers and staff. She knows its ridiculous, but now that everyone has 24-hour access to everyone, she wants to rise above the rest. Is it right to perpetuate the expectation that we answer e-mails from the moment we wake up to the moment our heads hit the pillow? It seems like an unsustainable example to be setting for our children, peers, and staffs. Addiction to connectivity has added a whole new level to the working moms dilemma. Remember undivided atten tion? I wonder if our kids do. If we dont take time to periodically look up from our iPhone, the things that matter most will pass us by in the blink of atweet? Post? Just when we have a tender, workfree, family moment, we snap a picture and upload it to Facebook, or go on Twitter or Instagram. Next thing we know, we are in the social-media vortex, spending time liking 11 pictures of cupcakes and a post that our high-school sweetheart is having a boozy brunch. Newly appointed Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayers recent announcement that she would not slow down after the birth of her son ignited a national debate over the state of the glass ceiling. Herein lies you do and youre damned if you dont. My friend Kate works in the music industry. None of the executives in her women. There is no empathy when she is home with one of her kids who has the parent-teacher conference. The e-mails On her birthday, when she blew out the candles on her cake, I asked her what she For my boss to have some babies, already! Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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92 By Bill Citara BT ContributorOkay, quick quiz. The original Thanksgiving celebration in 1621 was: A. A party to commemorate a bountiful harvest. B. A cynical grab of the fruits (and meats and vegetables) of others. The Pilgrims who put on that original celebration were: A. Simple people land. B. Anal-retentive hypocrites with a violent streak as long as a hose. Our current Thanksgiving celebration is about: A. Giving thanks for all the good things life has brought us. B. Ped dling hormone-addled turkeys and other crap from the holiday-industrial complex. The typical Thanksgiving meal is: A. A heartwarming compilation of iconic American comfort foods. B. A calorieand cholesterol-ridden mlange of dishes we wouldnt think of eating at any other time of year. The best beverage to pair with the typical Thanksgiving meal is: A. Wines of balance and restraint, generally with lower alcohol, a bit of fruit, and good acidity. B. Beer, or if weird old Uncle Henry is at the table, vodka. Whether you are more inclined to choose A or B depends, I guess, on whether you see the glass of life half-full of Dom Perignon or raw sewage. Since ick, yuck, and blech, this space will go with A, at least when it comes to what to drink with our annual fall orgy of turkey, and really bad football by teams that couldnt beat their own grandmothers. The age-old problem of Thanksgiving, beyond whether to get drunk and ignore Uncle Henry or stuff a sock in his ing wines that play well with the various and disparate dishes of the day, which generally means avoiding the Axis of Ubiquity that is Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Merlot. White wine varietals that balance bright fruit and crisp acidity, like Viognier and Riesling. As for reds, Pinot Noir goes with everything, and ross are pretty versatile, too. That makes the 2011 Domaine Hour chart Ctes de Provence as good a place to start as any. Its a classic Provencal ros, medium-bodied and well balanced, its strawberry and raspberry fruit tempered by bracing citrus acidity and a pronounced earthy-mineral tang. Its the kind of easyto-drink wine that should appeal to just about anybody, and would be an especially good partner with Thanksgiving ham. But on Thanksgiving, were mostly talking turkey, so lets look at a pair of whites and a pair of reds that help build a better bird. Torrontes, the poor mans Viognier, is both an underappreciated varietal and an excellent value. For example, theres the Elm Tree 2011 Torrontes (Mendoza, equally bracing acidity, and at two bottles for $12, the value is remarkable. That same blend of sensuous fruit and sensible acidity marks the 2010 Clean Slate Riesling This German import, at only 10.5 percent alcohol, is ideal for all-day sipping, yet delivers a mouthful of silky peach and apricot fruit riding atop a sturdy lemon-lime backbone, making it an excellent companion to the usual T-Day bird and even a big platter of stone crabs. You dont have to be a fat bastard (or a skinny bitch) to appreciate Thierry & Guys 2010 Fat Bastard Pinot Noir Just kick back and enjoy the surprising nuances of this light-bodied French product, from its bright, fresh strawberry-raspberry aromas with hints of black olive to the lean Nor do you have to be a loon, smoking or otherwise, to enjoy the 2011 Smoking Loon Pinot Noir Its ripe strawberry fruit with hints of nutmeg and citrus show off its California heritard, it still maintains a welcome balance. If you want something with a little more weight, perhaps to complement a standing rib roast or leg of lamb, you could do far worse than Famille Perrins 2010 Ctes du Rhone Reserve It delivers a ry fruit, nicely restrained by soft tannins and acidity, and will leave you with the not-at-all-unappealing choice of: A. Finishing the bottle. B. Opening another one. (This time, actually, well take B.) Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com Gobs of Turkey Day BottlesRed, white, and you: Agreeable wine for $12 or less

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Long, Strange TripFood news we know you can use www.santassingers.comPRESENTSFOR RATES AND AVAILABILITY CALL 305-757-6500 OR EMAIL singers@missjanesmusic.com Santas SingersAN ADULT A CAPPELLA GROUP SINGING TRADITIONAL CAROLS AND POPULAR HOLIDAY SONGSPerfect for ofce parties, private functions Photo Radius-TWC FilmsBy Pamela Robin Brandt BT ContributorUntil last months release of Butter a movie centered on buttersculpting competitions, wed have agreed with Paula Deen that you cant get enough of the fabulous fat. Too Still, a major motion picture featuring Jennifer Garner carving JFKs fatal few years ago? The same could be said of last months many intriguing restaurant openings in Biscayne Times territory which was, only a short while ago, hardly a major dining draw. How far weve come. OPENINGS South Street Restaurant & Bar (4000 ies from restaurateur Amir Ben-Zion in this historic space originally the This neo-soul spot, featuring Philly chef Amaris Joness lightened versions of family recipes, is no exception. As for the concept of healthier soul food: Are grilled green tomatoes a substitute ing and a lot more tomatoes. The accompanying basil cream aioli, though, cheddar grits with good ol Carolinas country gravy. Machiya Ramen Noodle House instant noodles that got you through college cross your mind. They bear as much resemblance to charmingly chewy real ramen as instant Nescaf does to the artimuch resemblance to 35 cents, either. gives diners a whole extra serving of The Hoxton Santiago Rodriguez, this casual-chic attached eateries/lounges scheduled to attest to British inspiration; bluepoint oysters say Hamptons. But the menu mostly features upscaled versions of lobster roll, on brioche roll rather than frites snazzed-up with Vermont cheddar, Buddha Sushi Bar (1071 NE 79th months newly added Dining Guide its not responsible to rush right in and write about a restaurant minutes after it has opened. But as an admirer of the wouldnt be the typical novelty act with Top Burger (109 NE 1st St., 305theres no surprise about the specialty. And as at a number of other better burger joints these days, ingredients beef; fresh, hand-cut fries; old-fashioned fancy, chef-driven garnishes and sides featured at celeb chef burger bars, but is picture-perfect 1950s soda shop; one Jughead at the next table. Laboca Grill Caf except dcor, centered on amusing streetart renditions of life in Buenos Airess features Argentinas familiar favorite Vapiano arent words that normally go together. But they do at this fashionable fastcasual Euro-caf chain (113 branches ties include made-to-order pastas and pizzas. Stand in a series of lines to supervise chefs; grab a vino at the bar; garnish your dish with basil growing on the tables. Frenetic for sure, but fun. If the high-ceilinged, two-story space scary vacant lots, construction sites, strange trip its been. restaurants@biscaynetimes.com. Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com

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94 MIAMIBrickell / DowntownAijo1331 Brickell Bay Dr., 786-452-1637 Hidden within Jade condo, this sleek Japanese fusion resto lounge (whose name means love) is also a jewel. Foodloving Venezuelan owner Rene Buroz encourages innovation, and his chefs (including four from Zuma) respond with beau tifully plated items as fun as they are flavorful. Dont miss the layered croquante (a sort of Asian croqueta: mouthwatering crispy rice, subtly smoked salmon, and creamy crab), Aijo kani (king crab legs with citrus foam clouds and rich emulsified butter dip), or creative cocktails from a mixologist who also juggles and plays with fire. Area 31270 Biscayne Boulevard Way, 305-424-5234Not that the sleek interior of this seafood restaurant (named for fishing area 31, stretching from the Carolinas to South America) isnt a glamorous dining setting. But wed eat outside. From the expansive terrace of the Epic condo and hotel on the Miami River, the views of Brickells high-rises actually make Miami look like a real city. Its hard to decide whether the eats or drinks are the most impressive. The food is impeccably fresh regional fish, prepared in a clean Mediterranean-influenced style. The cocktails are genuinely creative. Luckily you dont have to choose one or the other. $$$-$$$$Azul500 Brickell Key Dr., 305-913-8254Floor-to-ceiling windows showcase Biscayne Bay. But diners prefer ogling the raw-bar-fronted open kitchen, where glo betrotting chef Joel Huff crafts imaginative, often multi-part dishes -some Asian-inspired (like oysters with fresh wasabi, hibiscus granita, and Asian pear), as one would expect from the Mandarin Orientals top eatery. But most of Huffs dishes are strongly European-influenced, primarily by New Spanish cuisine. Elegant, playfully molecular gastronomy-accented almond gazpacho with foie gras snow, or eggs, bacon & toast (suckling pig, tempura duck egg, truffled potato, and speck air) tell the story. $$$$$Balans901 S. Miami Ave., (Mary Brickell Village), 305-534-9191Open until 4:00 a.m. on weekends, this London import (Miamis second Balans) offers a sleeker setting than its perennially popular Lincoln Road progenitor, but the same simple yet sophisticated global menu. The indoor space can get mighty loud, but lounging on the dog-friendly outdoor terrace, over a rich croque monsieur (which comes with an alluringly sweet/sour citrus-dressed side salad), a lobster club on onion toast, some surprisingly solid Asian fusion items, and a cocktail is one of Miamis more relaxing experiences. $$-$$$Bali Caf109 NE 2nd Ave., 305-358-5751While Indonesian food isnt easy to find in Miami, downtown has secret stashes small joints catering to cruise-ship and construction workers. This cute, exotically decorated caf has survived and thrived for good reason. The homey cooking is delicious, and the friendly family feel encourages even the timid of palate to try something new. Novices will want Indonesias signature rijsttafel, a mix-and-match collection of small dishes and condiments to be heaped on rice. Note: bring cash. No plastic accepted here. $-$$Banana & Leaf234 NE 3rd St., 786-431-5548Ever get tempted by the convenience of supermarket sushi boxes, but feel uneasy about freshness and disgruntled about sparseness of fillings? In the grab-and-go containers here, raw fish glistens and makis like a plump snow crab roll have a satisfying seafood-to-rice ratio. If youd rather, dishes on the larger custom menu arrive almost as fast. There is also limited, tasty Southeast Asian fare. Most unbelievable: Prices beat supermarket sushi by far. $The Bar at Level 25 (Conrad Hotel) 1395 Brickell Ave., 305-503-6500On the Conrads 25th floor, The Bars picture-windowed space is not just a watering hole with panoramic views. At lunch its an elegant sandwich bar; at night its a raw bar (with pristine coldwater oysters) and (best) a tapas bar serving pintxos. Thats just the Basque word for tapas, but here theres nothing mere about the generously portioned small plates. They range from traditional items like cod fish equixada and saffron-sauted Spanish artichokes to inventive inspirations like foie gras and goat cheese-stuffed empanadas. $$$Bento Sushi & Chinese801 Brickell Bay Dr., 305-603-8904Hidden in the Four Ambassadors Towers, this tiny spot (which specializes in sushi plus Japanese small plates, but also serves limited Chinese and Thai-inspired dishes of the mixand-match, pick-your-protein-then-preparation sort) has been mostly an insiders secret delivery joint for Brickell residents. But its actually a pleasant place to relax outside, enjoying a bay view and budget bento box specials that include miso Restaurant ListingsThe Biscayne Corridors most comprehensive restaurant guide. Total this month: 304.rf ntbnfnt tnft ntf f t tf fnf fff 1800 Biscayne Blvd, #105 (Located at 1800 Biscayne Plaza) WWW.3CHEFS-MIA.COM Specializing in Chinese & Vietnamese Cuisine *Free Medium Pizza*with $25 purchase or more. With this ad.Now open at Noon on Sundays 10% off Catering Menu18228 W Dixie Hwy. N Miami Beach | PH:305.792.9455 MIAMI Brother Jimmys BBQ900 S. Miami Ave. #135, 786-360-3650The South is supposed to be the source of barbecue. But Bro J evidently didnt hear about that. His signature North Carolina pork cue comes from NYC, where the first Brother Jimmys opened more than 20 years ago. Miamis location is actually the first south of the Mason-Dixon line. But the slow-smoked pulled pork butt tastes righteous -no interfering glop, just hot sauce-spiked vinegar to balance the fab fattiness. Theres other cue, too, including big (not baby back) ribs, and respectable brisket. $$-$$$Pizzarium69 E. Flagler St., 305-381-6025Roman-style rectangular pizzas, served in square slices, have been available in the Miami area since the mid1990s. But the familiar squares and Pizzariums are similar only in shape. Main difference: dough, here allowed to rise for four days. The resulting crusts are astonishingly airy, as authentic Roman slices, intended as light street snacks, should be. Toppings, a rotating selection of nearly 30 combinations, are highlighted by quality imported ingredients -not to mention a healthy imagination, as the zucca gialla attests: pumpkin cream, pancetta, smoked scamorza cheese. $ TIKL Raw Bar & Grill1450 Brickell Ave. #110, 305-372-0620From restaurateur Claudio Giordano and chef Simon Stojanovic, the team behind longtime South Beach seafood favorite Altamare, this eatery is similar in food genre (contemporary American), though more global influences, especially from Asia, are evident here. Additionally, rather than serving conventional three-course meals, TIKLs menu focuses on small plates: creative crudos (like hamachi with yuzu, wasabi, and olive oil powder), plus robata-grilled and otherwise cooked items. Standouts: garlic/citrus-spiked local white shrimp with sweet shishito peppers; Thai curried mussels with crisped sushi rice; sinful bacon toast. $$$-$$$$ Acme Bakery & Coffee3451 NE 1st Ave. #103, 786-507-5799From Pious Pig Restaurant Group (whose other ventures include Vietnamese pop-up Phuc Yea! and the creative/ rustic Federal Food, Drink & Provisions), this cozy bakery/ caf is, again, just what its neighborhood needed. The specialty is homemade artisan breads, from Colonial-era Sally Lunn to crusty sourdough made with wild midtown Miami yeasts; these honest loaves make the places breakfasts, served all day, and lunchtimes sandwiches (like meatloaf and cheddar with onion marmalade) supe rior. Coffee is single-origin stuff from Wynwoods Panther. Also available: gift baskets featuring housemade pre serves and pickles. $$ Buddha Sushi Bar1071 NE 79th St., 305-677-3633While the setting is still more low-rent/high-speed cause way than restaurant row, this stylish, much-more-thansushi spot definitely brings the street giant steps toward destination-dining status. The invention and skill shown in makis like the Fruity (shrimp, salmon, tuna, whitefish, roe, asparagus, and peaches, dressed with creamy mustard sauce), or small plates like shrimp crullers with a red wine reduction, isnt surprising considering the crafter is Michael Asalie, original chef at downtowns Little Lotus. Order from the menu or grab something from the circulating sushi river, whatever floats your boat. $$$ 8 Oz. Burger Bar14815 Biscayne Blvd., 305-830-1988Celebrity chef Govind Armstrongs first 8 Oz., in South Beach, almost singlehandedly started Miamis burger craze, and when Armstrong severed ties with the Alton Road original, this location became his standard-bearer. Burgers are far from bargain-priced, but ingredients like grass-fed Wagyu beef, Niman Ranch lamb, and Humboldt Fog goat cheese, plus garnishes shining with chef-driven creativity (charred escarole, unctuous short rib, fried caper tartar sauce) justify the extra bucks. Kobe corn dogs, grilled artichokes with herb aioli, and stout-battered onions rings are also highly recommended. $$-$$$

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Business Hours: 12pm-3am Every Day 305-947-00643881 NE 163rd Street, North Miami Beach, Fl(Intracoastal 163rd Street Mall) www.yakko-san.comNot affiliated with Hiros Restaurant on 163rd St. YAKKO-SANAuthentic Japanese Cuisine Specializing in regional Japanese cuisinefocusing on small tapas-like plates you will not find anywhere else.Full Bar -Hiros17040-46 W. Dixie Highway 305-949-0776 or 305-949-4685Mon-Fri 11amam/Sat & Sun 1pm-12amClick your online order & get delivery right to your door www.sushiexpress.com(Also located in South Beach 305-531-6068 and Oakland Park 954-772-0555) DINE-IN TAKE OUT DELIVERY CATERING Sushi Express

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96 soup, ginger-dressed salad, California roll, and fresh orange sections, plus two mini-entres (the nigiri assortment sushi and lacy-battered tempura especially recommended). Bubble tea, too! $$-$$$ Bon Fromage500 Brickell Ave. #106, 786-329-5632Though independently owned instead of a chain cog, this cheese and wine caf/shop is like a pint-size version of Midtown Miamis Cheese Course, right down to being officially self-service. But it is staffed by accommodating employees who, unofficially, do their best to double as servers for eat-in diners. The cheese (plus charcuterie) menu of garnished platters, salads, and crusty baguette sandwiches features numerous high-quality, imported favorites, but dont miss more unusual domestic treasures like Wisconsin bread, a cooked cheese that, like halloumi, doesnt melt but tantalizingly softens when heated. $$ Bryan in the Kitchen104 NE 2nd Ave., 305-371-7777This quirky caf-markets chef/owner is a former smoothieswilling model who is now into fresh whole foods, and though his eclectic green gourmet menu does uniformly reflect his dedication to ecological consciousness, it otherwise could only be described as intensely personal. Offerings are an odd but appealing saint/sinner mix, ranging from healthy pasta/ grain salads and homemade-from-scratch snacks (beef jerky, granola) to unique cupcakes featuring not-too-sweet adult flavors and irresistible sticky buns. If we had to choose just one category, wed sin. But luckily, you can have it all. $-$$ Caf Bastille248 SE 1st St., 786-425-3575Breakfasting on a ham-egg-cheese crepe at this very Frenchfeeling -and tasting -caf is a most civilized way to start the day. Formerly breakfast and lunch only, the caf is now open for dinner, too. And while the crepes (both savory and sweet) are tempting and varied enough to eat all day, dinner choices like homemade foie gras (with onion jam and Guerande salt), salmon with lentils and fennel salsa, or a very affordable skirt steak au poivre make it possible to resist. $-$$$Caf Sambal500 Brickell Key Dr., 305-913-8358Though the Mandarin Oriental Hotel describes this space as its casual hotel restaurant, many consider it a more spectacular dining setting than the upscale Azul, upstairs, owing to the option of dining outdoors on a covered terrace directly on the waterfront. The food is Asian-inspired, with a few Latin and Mediterranean accents. For the health-conscious, the menu includes low-cal choices. For hedonists theres a big selection of artisan sakes. $$$-$$$$$Cavas Wine Tasting Room900 S. Miami Ave. #180, 305-372-8027Like South Miamis predecessor (now closed), this Cavas is mainly an upscale, high-tech tasting lounge for the winecurious. Patrons buy prepaid cards to sample ounce, halfglass, or full-glass portions from more than 50 self-service dispensing machines. But theres an extensive selection of tapas/pintxos small plates, flatbread pizzas, sandwiches, plus fully garnished charcuterie and cheese platters specially selected to pair well with vino. Additionally, more substantial dishes have been added, including a daily three-course lunch special and some tasty, bargain-priced soups (carrot cream with Gouda particularly recommended). $$-$$$ Chophouse Miami300 S. Biscayne Blvd., 305-938-9000Formerly Mannys Steakhouse, Miamis Chophouse retains basically everything but the famed name (from the original Mannys in Minneapolis), and remains Miamis most intentionally masculine steakhouse. Here, ensconced in your black leather booth, everything is humongous: dry-aged choice-grade steaks like the Bludgeon of Beef (a boldly flavor ful 40-ounce bone-in ribeye, described as part meat, part weapon); king crab legs that dwarf the plate; cocktail shrimp that could swallow the Loch Ness monster whole; two-fisted cocktails that would fell a T-Rex. Not for the frail. $$$$$ The Corner1035 N. Miami Ave., 305-961-7887 With a Zuma alum in the kitchen, a Gigi alum crafting classic or creative cocktails, a warm pub feel, and hours extending from lunch to nearly breakfast the next morning, The Corner is transforming a desolate downtown corner into a neighborhood hangout. The nicely priced menu of sandwiches, salads, snacks, and sweets (the latter from Om Nom Noms cookie queen Anthea Ponsetti) ranges from 100-percent homemade ice cream sandwiches to the Crazy Madame, Frances elaborate Croque Madame (a bchamel sauce-topped grilled cheese/ham/fried egg sandwich) plus bacon and caramelized onion. $-$$ Crazy About You1155 Brickell Bay Dr. #101, 305-377-4442The owners, and budget-friendly formula, are the same here as at older Dolores, But You Can Call Me Lolita: Buy an entre (all under $20) from a sizable list of Mediterranean, Latin, American, or Asian-influenced choices (like Thai-marinated churrasco with crispy shoestring fries) and get an appetizer for free, including substantial stuff like a Chihuahua cheese casserole with chorizo and pesto. The difference: This place, housed in the former location of short-lived La Broche, has an even more upscale ambiance than Dolores -including a million-dollar water view. $$$ Cvi.che 105105 NE 3rd Ave., 305-577-3454Fusion food -a modern invention? Not in Peru, where native and Euro-Asian influences have mixed for more than a century. But chef Juan Chipoco gives the ceviches and tiraditos served at this hot spot his own unique spin. Specialties include flash-marinated raw seafood creations, such as tiradito a la crema de rocoto (sliced fish in citrus-spiked chili/ cream sauce). But traditional fusion dishes like ChinesePeruvian Chaufa fried rice (packed with jumbo shrimp, mussels, and calamari) are also fun, as well as surprisingly affordable. $$ db Bistro Moderne345 Avenue of the Americas, 305-421-8800Just two words -- Daniel Boulud -should be enough for foodies craving creative French/American comfort cuisine to run, not walk, to this restaurant. If they can find it. (Hint: The mysterious Avenue of the Americas is really Biscayne Boulevard Way. Dont ask.) Downtowns db is an absentee celeb chef outpost, but on-site kitchen wizard Jarrod Verbiak flawlessly executes dishes ranging from the original NYC db Bistros signature foie gras/short rib/black truffle-stuffed burger to local market-driven dishes like crusted pompano with garlic/parsley veloute. $$$-$$$$ The Democratic Republic of Beer255 NE 14th St., 305-372-4161The food here? Beer is food! The DRB serves 400 beers from 55 countries, ranging from $2 Pabst Blue Ribbon to $40 DeuS (an 11.5% alcohol Belgian mthode Champenoise brew). But for those favoring solid snacks, tasty global smallish plates include fried fresh zucchini with dip (cheese recommended); chorizo with homemade cilantro Mayo; or steak tacos, served Mexican-style with onions, cilantro, and spicy salsa. Sadly for breakfast-brew enthusiasts, the DRB isnt open that early. But it is open late -till 5:00 a.m. $$D-Dog House50 SW 10th St., 305-381-7770While it has become increasingly common to find servers at upscale restaurants utilizing computerized POS (point of service) systems to take orders, this high-tech hole-in-the-wall trumps them by replacing servers -and in-house entertainment, too -with iPads that accept not just food orders and credit cards but music requests. You can web surf or game, too, while waiting for your choice of the house specialty: supersized hot dogs, most overloaded with internationally inspired toppings. To accompany, hand-cut fries are a must. And have a cocktail. Theres a full liquor bar. $-$$ Dolores, But You Can Call Me Lolita1000 S. Miami Ave., 305-403-3103From the stylish setting in Miamis historic Firehouse No. 4, one would expect a mighty pricy meal. But entres, which range from Nuevo Latino-style ginger/orange-glazed pork tenderloin to a platter of Kobe mini-burgers, all cost either $18 or $23. And the price includes an appetizer -no lowrent crapola, either, but treats like Serrano ham croquetas, a spinach/leek tart with Portobello mushroom sauce, or shrimp-topped eggplant timbales. The best seats are on the glam rooftop patio. $$$Dominique Bistro-Club1451 S. Miami Ave., 305-371-8859At typical restolounges, the resto part often gets the short end of the stick. But not at this chic but friendly spot, where Gerardo Barrera, an alumn of Pariss Le Cordon Bleu, plus his wife Dominque and her brother Jos Sigona, welcome diners with Frances best-known bistro classics: coquilles St. Jacques (tender scallops in mushroom/white wine sauce); a precision-cooked entrecte rib-eye with Bearnaise or complex Caf de Paris butter; crme brle (from scratch) or macaron cookies (from heaven). No velvet ropes, and club music isnt cranked till 11:00 p.m. $$$ Edge, Steak & Bar1435 Brickell Ave., 305-358-3535Replacing the Four Seasons formal fine dining spot Acqua, Edge offers a more kick-back casual welcoming vibe. And in its fare theres a particularly warm welcome for noncarnivores. Chef-driven seafood items (several inventive and unusually subtle ceviches and tartares; a layered construction of corvina encrusted in a jewel-bright green pesto crust, atop red piquillo sauce stripes and salad; lobster corn soup packed with sweet lobster meat; more) and a farm-to-table produce emphasis make this one steakhouse where those who dont eat beef have no beef. $$$$-$$$$$ Elwoods Gastro Pub188 NE 3rd Ave., 305-358-5222Cordial English owners, classic rock music (sometimes live), and updated classic pub fare make this hangout a home. Made from scratch with artisan ingredients, traditional Brit bites like fish and chips cant be beat -thick pieces of crisply beer-battered moist cod, served with hand-cut fries and mushy [mashed] peas, plus housemade tartar sauce and ketchup. All desserts are also made in-house, including a deliriously rich (but worth it) sticky date pudding with toffee sauce. Tie down your dental implants. Theyre in for a wild ride. $$Eos485 Brickell Ave. (Viceroy Hotel), 305-503-0373Originally opened by Michelin-starred New Aegean chef Michael Psilakis, Eos changed upon the chefs departure into a more familiar Mediterranean resort eatery, minus Greekinspired innovations. Now inspiration comes mainly from Spain and Italy, with nods to Morocco and Latin America. Best bets include a tasting platter of Spanish cheeses and cured meats; a pistachio-garnished salad featuring Serrano ham, figs, and arugula; crispy parmesan risotto balls with prosciutto and smoked tomato dip; and olive/smoked paprika-rubbed roast chicken. At lunch burgers and upscale sandwiches are added. $$$-$$$$

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Eternity Coffee Roasters117 SE 2nd Ave., 305-609-4981Normally we list only full restaurants, but even a (not so) simple cuppa joe from Chris Johnson and Cristina Garcess sleek micro-roastery will convince anyone possessing taste buds that fine coffee can be as complex as fine wine, and as satisfying as solid food. A changing selection of superior single-origin beans (many varieties from the Garces familys Colombian farm; most others from Ethiopia and Kenya), roasted in-house, produces slow-pour regular brews with amazing nuances of fruits, chocolate, and more. The espresso is so smooth sugar isnt necessary. Other treats: flaky chocolate-stuffed cigars and other locally baked pastries. Free parking. $ Fado Irish Pub900 S. Miami Ave. #200, 786-924-0972Unlike most Miami Irish pubs, which serve mostly American bar food, rarely foraying past fish and chips or shepherds pie, Fado (pronounced fdoe) has a menu reflecting the pub grub found today in Ireland, including solid standards. But most intriguing are dishes mixing classic and contempo rary influences, particularly those featuring boxty, a grated/ mashed potato pancake. Try corned beef rolls (boxty wraps, with creamy mustard sauce and cabbage slaw), or smoked salmon on mini-boxty blini, with capers and horseradish sauce. Theres a seasonal menu, too. $$Finnegans River401 SW 3rd Ave., 305-285-3030Pool tables are expected in a sports bar and grill. But an actual pool? And a Jacuzzi? This Miami River hideaway has other surprises, too, on its extensive outdoor deck, including a boat dock and a large array of umbrella tables and lounge chairs where its easy to while away many happy hours. The menu is the same array of bar bites served by South Beachs older Finnegans, but angus burgers are big and tasty, and zingy jalapeo-studded smoked-fish dip is a satisfying tablesnack choice. $$ First Hong Kong Caf117 SE 2nd St., 305-808-6665Old Hong Kong saying: If it walks, swims, crawls, or flies, its edible. And nowhere is this truer than in this historically international trade ports cafs -meaning fast-food restaurants. Typical menus present hundreds of items that are local interpretations of dishes from all China, and most other nations. So believe us: At this caf, whose head chef is from HK, the Indian-style curries, sambal-spiked Indonesian chow fun, even the borscht (a tomato/beef, not beet-based version of the Russian soup) are as authentic as the kung pao whatever, and as tasty. $$ Fratelli Milano213 SE 1st St., 305-373-2300Downtown isnt yet a 24/7 urban center, but its experiencing a mini explosion of eateries open at night. That includes this family-owned ristorante, where even newcomers feel at home. At lunch its almost impossible to resist panini, served on foccacia or crunchy ciabatta; even the vegetarian version bursts with complex and complementary flavors. During weekday dinners, try generous plates of risotto with shrimp and grilled asparagus; homemade pastas like seafoodpacked fettuccine al scoglio; or delicate Vitello alla Milanese on arugula. $$-$$$Garcias Seafood Grille and Fish Market398 NW N. River Dr., 305-375-0765Run by a fishing family for a couple of generations, this venerable Florida fish shack is the real thing. No worries about the seafoods freshness; on their way to the dining deck overlooking the Miami River, diners can view the retail fish market. Best preparations are the simplest. When stone crabs are in season, Garcias claws are as good as Joes but considerably cheaper. The local fish sandwich is most popular grouper, yellowtail snapper, or mahi mahi. $-$$Giovana Caffe154 SE 1st Ave.305-374-1024If the menu at this charming downtown hideaway contained only one item -pear and gorgonzola ravioli dressed, not drowned, in sage-spiced cream sauce -wed be happy. But the caf, formerly lunch-only but now serving weekday dinners, is also justly famed for meal-size salads like grilled skirt steak atop sweetly balsamic-dressed spinach (with spinach, tomatoes, bacon, hard-boiled eggs, blue cheese, and almonds), or an especially lavish chicken salad with pine nuts, golden raisins, apples, and basil, an Italian twist. $$Grimpa Steakhouse901 Brickell Plaza, 305-455-4757This expansive indoor/outdoor Brazilian eatery is sleekly contemporary, but no worries. The classic sword-wielding gau chos are here, serving a mind-reeling assortment of skewered beef, chicken, lamb, pork, sausages, and fish. And included in the price (dinner $47, lunch $34) is the traditional bellybusting buffet of hot and cold prepared foods, salad, cold cuts, and cheeses. A pleasant, nontraditional surprise: unusual sauces like sweet/tart passion fruit or mint, tomatobased BBQ, and mango chutney, along with the ubiquitous chimichurri. $$$$-$$$$$Half Moon Empanadas192 SE 1st Ave., 305-379-2525As with South Beachs original Half Moon, you can get wraps or salads. But its this snackerys unique take on Argentinestyle empanadas that makes it seem a natural for national franchising. The soft-crusted, doughy crescents -baked, not fried, so relatively guilt-free -are amply stuffed with fillings both classic (beef and chicken, either mild or spicy) and creative: the bacon cheeseburger, the pancetta/mozzarella/ plum-filled Americana, and several vegetarian options. At just over two bucks apiece, theyre a money-saving moveable feast. $Hawa Jade1331 Brickell Bay Dr., 305-905-5523When thinking fusion cuisines, Japanese and Lebanese dont instantly spring to mind. But taking the medieval Spice Route connection as inspiration, the Hawa family makes the mix work at both its original Coral Gables Hawa and this new location in the Jade Residences. Golden Pockets (tofu crpes encasing macadamias, avocado, and tuna, crab, shrimp, or Kobe-style beef) are musts. Plus there are unique combos containing makis plus substantial salads, like crunchy tuna enoki rolls with falafel salad -not the usual green garnish. Housemade desserts with a French twist are also a pleasant surprise. $$ Hibachi Grill45 NE 3rd Ave., 305-374-2223Imagine a mini-express Benihana. This place specializes in teppanyaki cuisine -minus the thrilling (or terrifying) tableside knife theatrics, true, but the one-plate meals of seasoned steak slices, chicken, shrimp, or salmon plus dipping sauces, fried rice, and an onion/zucchini mix come at bargain prices. There are also hefty soups or Japanese, Thai, and Singapore-style noodle and rice bowls loaded with veggies and choice of protein (including tofu). The limited sides are Japanese (shumai, plump chicken gyoza) and Chinese (various egg rolls). Fancy? No, but satisfying. $-$$ Il Gabbiano335 S. Biscayne Blvd., 305-373-0063Its location at the mouth of the Miami River makes this ultra-upscale Italian spot (especially the outdoor terrace) the perfect power lunch/business dinner alternative to steakhouses. And the culinary experience goes way beyond the typical meat market, thanks in part to the flood of freebies thats a trademark of Manhattans Il Mulino, originally run by Il Gabbianos owners. The rest of the food? Pricy, but portions are mammoth. And the champagne-cream-sauced house made ravioli with black truffles? Worth every penny. $$$$$Indigo / Table 40100 Chopin Plaza, 305-577-1000Long known for its power-lunch buffet -including hot entres, carving station, custom pastas, packed-to-the-gills salad, sushi, and dessert stations -the InterContinental Hotels Indigo restaurant now has a hip offspring intended for private dining: Table 40. The charming, glassed-in wine cellar (actu ally in the kitchen) enables 12-14 diners to watch the action in heat-shielded, soundproofed comfort while eating creations by veteran chef Alexander Feher, combining Continental technique with local seasonal ingredients. Highlights: tender house-smoked, stout-braised short ribs; lavish lobster salad with grilled mango; and a seductive fresh corn gazpacho. $$$-$$$$$ Jackson Soul Food950 NW 3rd Ave., 305-377-6710]With a recently refurbished exterior to match its classy/ comfy retro interior, this 65-year-old Overtown soul food breakfast institution now has only one drawback: It closes at 1:00 p.m. Never mind, night owls. If youre a first-timer here, order the astonishingly fluffy pancakes with juicy beef sausage, and youll set multiple alarm clocks to return. Classic drop biscuits (preferably with gravy) are also musthaves. And hearty Southern breakfast staples like smothered chicken wings or fried fish do make breakfast seem like lunch, too. $ Jamn, Jamn, Jamn, 10 SW South River Dr., 305-324-1111From the outside, you know youre walking into the ground floor of a new condo building. But once inside the charmingly rustic room, youd swear youre in Spain. Obviously Spains famous cured hams are a specialty, as are other pork products on the weekly changing menu, from a roast suckling pig entre to a fried chorizo and chickpea tapa. But seafood is also terrific. Dont miss bacalao-filled piquillo peppers, or two of Miamis best rice dishes: seafood paella and arroz negro (with squid and its ink). $$-$$$Kork Wine & Cheese Bar2 S. Miami Ave., 305-377-8899From the owner of Transit Lounge, a hip hangout long before the downtown/Brickell revival, this more upscale-cool venue is worth checking out for its almost medieval dimly lit dcor alone, including a subterranean wine cellar/party room, formerly a WW II-era bomb shelter. Comestibles are limited to wine and cheese plus accompaniments. Both are available to go. Kork is as much market as lounge. But with a stock of roughly 5000 bottles, and a selection of roughly two dozen perfectly ripe artisanal cheeses -curated by a cheese sommelier wholl create perfect pairings -who needs more? $$Largo Bar & Grill401 Biscayne Blvd., 305-374-9706Sure, Bayside Marketplace is touristy. But it can be fun to spend a day playing visitor in your own city. If you do, this waterfront place overlooking Miamarina is a superior food choice. Expect nothing cutting edge, just tasty, familiar favorites solidly prepared. You wont go wrong with stone crab claws and Cajun mustard dip; inauthentic but delicious fish tacos in hard blue corn tortillas with two sauces (cilantro and chipotle), generously portioned fish sandwiches (grouper, mahi, snapper, or daily catch), and festive cocktails. $$-$$$

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98 La Loggia Ristorante and Lounge68 W. Flagler St., 305-373-4800This luxuriantly neo-classical yet warm Italian restaurant was unquestionably a pioneer in revitalizing downtown. With alternatives like amaretto-tinged pumpkin agnolloti in sage butter sauce and cilantro-spiced white bean/vegetable salad dressed with truffle oil, proprietors Jennifer Porciello and Horatio Oliveira continue to draw a lunch crowd that returns for dinner, or perhaps just stays on through the afternoon, fueled by the Lawyers Liquid Lunch, a vodka martini spiked with sweetened espresso. $$$La Moon 144 SW 8th St., 305-860-6209At four in the morning, nothing quells the munchies like a Crazy Burger, a Colombian take on a truckers burger: beef patty, bacon, ham, mozzarella, lettuce, tomato, and a fried egg, with an arepa corn pancake bun. While this tiny places late hours (till 6:00 a.m. Friday and Saturday) are surprising, the daytime menu is more so. In addition to Colombian classics, theres a salad Nicoise with grilled fresh tuna, seared salmon with mango salsa, and other yuppie favorites. $-$$ La Provence1064 Brickell Ave. 786-425-9003Great baguettes in the bread basket, many believe, indicate a great meal to come. But when Miamians encounter such bread -crackling crust outside; moist, aromatic, aerated interior -its likely not from a restaurants own kitchen, but from La Provence. Buttery croissants and party-perfect pastries are legend too. Not so familiar is the bakerys caf component, whose sandwich/salad menu reflects local eclectic tastes. But French items like pan bagnats (essentially salade Nioise on artisan bread) will truly transport diners to co-owner David Thaus Provenal homeland. $$La Sandwicherie34 SW 8th St., 305-374-9852This second location of the open-air diner that is South Beachs favorite aprs-club eatery (since 1988) closes earlier (midnight Sunday-Thursday, 5:00 a.m. Friday and Saturday), but the smoothies, salads, and superb Parisian sandwiches are the same: ultra-crusty baguette stuffed with evocative charcuterie and cheeses (saucisson sec, country pt, camembert, etc.) and choice of salad veggies plus salty/tart cornichons and Sandwicheries incomparable Dijon mustard vinaigrette. Additionally the larger branch has an interior, with a kitchen enabling hot foods (quiches and croques), plus A/C. $-$$Le Boudoir Brickell188 SE 12th Terr., 305-372-233At this French bakery/caf, mornings start seriously, with choices ranging from quality cheese, charcuterie/ pt, or smoked salmon platters to chic Continental and complete American breakfasts. At lunch, generously salad-garnished, open-faced tartines are irresistible. But sophisticated salads and homemade soups make the choice tough. And do not skip dessert. Superb sweets include rich almond/fresh raspberry or properly tangy lemon tarts, traditional Madeleines, airy layered mousses, and addictive mini-macaroon sandwich cookies with daily-changing fillings. $-$$Lime Fresh Mexican Grill1 W. Flagler St., Suite 7, 305-789-9929 (See Midtown / Wynwood / Design District listing.)Little Lotus25 N. Miami Ave. #107, 305-533-2700Secreted inside the International Jewelry Exchange, this eatery (owned by stealth super-foodie Sari Maharani -paralegal by day, restaurateur by night) is tough to find but seems destined to become one of our towns toughest tables to book. Two talented chefs, whose credits include Morimoto (NYC) and hometown fave Yakko-san, create Japanese, Indonesian, and fusion small plates that look remarkably artful and taste like theyre about ready to take on Iron Chef Morimoto himself. Saucing, often with multiple but balanced potions, is especially noteworthy. The prices? A steal. $-$$ LouLou Le Petit Bistro638 S. Miami Ave., 305-379-1404When Indochines owner, Jacques Ardisson, closed his Asian spot to open this charming French eatery in the same space, it was a return to his roots. He and his daughter, for whom the place is named, come from Nice. Youll be transported, too, by dishes like lamb shank with flageolets (known as the caviar of beans), duck leg confit on a bed of mouthwatering green lentils from Le Puy, a classic moules/frites, a shared charcuterie platter with a bottle from the savvy wine list, and, of course, salade nioise. $$-$$$Martini 28146 SE 1st Ave., 305-577-4414This stylish little lunch-only spot, a labor of love from a husband-wife chef team, serves what might well be the most impressive meal deal in town. From an ambitious, daily-changing menu of fare thats geographically eclectic but prepared with solid classic technique, diners get a choice of about ten entres (substantial stuff like steak au poivre with Madeira cream sauce and roasted potatoes, or pignoliacrusted salmon with Dijon mustard sauce, potatoes, and veggies), plus soup or salad and housemade dessert. For just $9.99. Told ya. $ Miami Art Caf 364 SE 1st St., 305-374-5117For businessfolk on the go, this breakfast/lunch-only French caf serves up evocative baguette sandwiches (like camembert) loaded, if you like, with greens, olives, and more. For those with time to sit, wed recommend the savory crpes, garnished with perfectly dressed salad, or sweet crpe like the Bonne Maman (whose sugar/salted butter stuffing brings Brittany to downtown). And quiches are nicely custardy. But there are surprises here, too, including just a few full entres, with correctly made traditional sauces one wouldnt expect at a luncheonette -except, perhaps, in Paris. $-$$Miamis Finest Caribbean Restaurant236 NE 1st Ave., 305-381-9254Originally from Jamaica, proprietor Miss Pat has been serving her traditional homemade island specialties to downtown office workers and college students since the early 1990s. Most popular item here might be the weekday lunch special of jerk chicken with festival (sweet-fried cornmeal bread patties), but even vegetarians are well served with dishes like a tofu, carrot, and chayote curry. All entres come with rice and peas, fried plantains, and salad, so no one leaves hungry. $Mint Leaf1063 SE 1st Ave., 305-358-5050Part of Londons famous Woodlands Group, this stylish spot, like its Coral Gables parent, serves the sort of upscale Indian food rarely found outside Great Britain or India. More interestingly, the menu includes not just the familiar northern Indian Mughlai fare served in most of Americas Indian restaurants, but refined versions of south Indias scrum ptious street food. Weve happily assembled whole meals of the vegetarian chaat (snacks) alone. And dosai (lacy rice/lentil crepes rolled around fillings ranging from traditional onion/ potato to lamb masala or spicy chicken) are so addictive they oughta be illegal. $$$-$$$$Miss Yip Chinese Caf900 Biscayne Blvd., 305-358-0088Fans of the South Beach original will find the dcor different. Most notably, theres an outdoor lounge, and more generally a nightclub atmosphere. But the menu of Hong Kong-style Chinese food, prepared by imported Chinese cooks, is familiar. Simple yet sophisticated Cantonese seafood dishes rock (try the lightly battered salt-and-pepper shrimp), as does orange peel chicken, spicy/tangy rather than overly sweet. And a single two-course Peking duck (skin in crepes, stir-fried meat and veggies with lettuce cups) makes mouthwatering finger food, shared among friends. $-$$$ Naoe661 Brickell Key Dr., 305-947-6263 Chances are youve never had anything like the $85 prixfixe Japanese dinners at chef Kevin Corys tiny but nationally acclaimed oasis, transplanted from its original Sunny Isles space with its supreme serenity intact. By reservation only, in two dinner seatings of just eight people each, and omakase (chefs choice) only, meals include a seasonal soup, a four-course bento box, eight pieces of sushi, and three desserts. Cory personally does everything for you, even applying the perfect amount of housemade artisan soy sauce mix and fresh-grated wasabi to each mindreelingly fresh nigiri. Few eating experiences on earth are more luxuriant. $$$$$ neMesis Urban Bistro1035 N. Miami Ave., 305-415-9911Truly original restaurants are hard to find here, and harder to describe in standard sound bites. But they often are the attention-grabbing people-magnets that spark revivals of iffy neighborhoods. Thats our prediction for this quirkily deco rated bistro, where the kitchen is helmed by Top Chef contestant Micah Edelstein. The intensely personal menu of creative dishes inspired by her global travels (plus her fascination with unfamiliar ingredients) changes constantly, but scrumptious signatures include South African smoked veal bobotie, and Peruvian pinoli pancakes with housemade chicken/apple sausage, hibiscus syrup, and maple granules. $$$-$$$$Novecento1414 Brickell Ave., 305-403-0900For those who think Argentine cuisine is a synonym for beef and more beef, this popular eaterys wide range of more cosmopolitan contemporary Argentine fare will be a revelation. Classic parrilla-grilled steaks are here for traditionalists, but the menu is dominated by creative Nuevo Latino items like a new-style ceviche de chernia (lightly lime-marinated grouper with jalapeos, basil, and the refreshing sweet counterpoint of watermelon), or crab ravioli with creamy saffron sauce. Especially notable are the entre salads. $$-$$$Oceanaire Seafood Room900 S. Miami Ave., 305-372-8862With a dozen branches nationwide, Oceanaire May seem more All-American seafood empire than Florida fish shack, but menus vary significantly according to regional tastes and fish. Here in Miami, chef Sean Bernal supplements signature starters like lump crab cakes with his own lightly marinated, Peruvian-style grouper ceviche. The daily-changing, 15-20 specimen seafood selection includes local fish seldom seen on local menus: pompano, parrot fish, amberjack. But even flown-in fish (and the raw bars cold-water oysters) are ultrafresh. $$$$Ozzi Sushi200 SE 1st St., 786-704-8003Since its 1958 invention, conveyor-belt sushi has been the most fun form of Japanese fast food, but problematic. Who knew how long plates had been circulating on the sushi-goround? Happily, this sushi-boat spot avoids sanitation issues with clear plastic covers, and as for freshness, low prices ensure a steady stream of diners grabbing makis, nigiri, and more as they float by. Highlights include glistening ikura (salmon roe) in a thin-sliced cucumber cup, a sweet-sauced mango/guava/crab roll, and a festively frosted strawberry Nutella dessert maki. $-$$Pashas1414 Brickell Ave., 305-416-5116The original branch on Lincoln Road was instantly popular, and the same healthy Middle Eastern fast food is served at several newer outlets. The prices are low enough that you might suspect Pashas was a tax write-off rather than a Harvard Business School project, which it was by founders Antonio Ellek and Nicolas Cortes. Dishes range from falafel and gyros to more unusual items like muhammara (tangy walnut spread) and silky labneh yogurt cheese. Everything from pitas to lemonade is made fresh, from scratch, daily. $-$$Pega Grill15 E. Flagler St., 305-808-6666From Thanasios Barlos, a Greek native who formerly owned North Beachs Ariston, this small spot is more casually contemporary and less ethnic-kitschy in ambiance, but serves equally authentic, full-flavored Greek food. Mixed lamb/beef gyros (chicken is also an option), topped with tangy yogurt sauce and wrapped, with greens and tomatoes, in fat warm pita bread, are specialties. But even more irresistible is the taramasalata (particularly velvety and light carp roe dip), available alone or on an olive/pita-garnished mixed meze platter. $$ Peoples Bar-B-Que360 NW 8th St., 305-373-8080Oak-smoked, falling-off-the-bone tender barbecued ribs (enhanced with a secret sauce whose recipe goes back several generations) are the main draw at this Overtown institution. But the chicken is also a winner, plus theres a full menu of soul food entres, including what many aficionados consider our towns tastiest souse. And it would be unthinkable to call it quits without homemade sweet potato pie or banana pudding, plus a bracing flop half iced tea, half lemonade. $-$$ Perricones15 SE 10th St., 305-374-9449Housed in a Revolutionary-era barn (moved from Vermont), this market/caf was one of the Brickell areas first gentrified amenities. At lunch chicken salad is a favorite; dinners strong suit is the pasta list, ranging from Grandma Jennies old-fashioned lasagna to chichi fiocchi purses filled with fresh pear and gorgonzola. And Sundays $15.95 brunch buffet ($9.95 for kids) featuring an omelet station, waffles, smoked salmon and bagels, salads, and more remains one of our towns most civilized all-you-can-eat deals. $$Pieducks1451 S. Miami Ave., 305-808-7888If you can overlook a name as unenlightening as most injokes (it evidently refers to a favorite character of owner Claudio Nuness kids -we assume the Pokemon Psyduck), youll experience pretty perfect pizza. Sadly, not all brick ovens turn out perfectly char-blistered crusts, crisp outside and airy/chewy inside, but thats what youll consistently find here and a newer take-out/delivery-only Midtown branch. And unlike many artisan pizzerias, Pieducks doesnt get cheesy with cheese quantity (though we like that extra cheese is an option). Elaborate salads complete the menu. $$Pier 9494 SE 1st St., 305-379-5652Tucked into The Village, a collection of courtyard eateries far from any waterfront, this ceviche bar specializes in fresh seafood dishes from chef/owner Alex Del Corrals native Peru, but also features famous Peruvian meat and poultry dishes (including a refined aji de gallina, chicken in aji pepper-spiced cream sauce). Emphasis is particu larly strong on Perus penchant for fusion food, including traditional Chifa (Chinese-Peruvian) rice or noodle stir-fries. But the chef also fuses classic and creative influences. Try contemporary causas, combining Perus favorite starch, potatoes, with unique new sauces. $$ Pollos & Jarras115 NE 3rd Ave., 786-567-4940From Juan Chipoco, Peruvian chef/co-owner of seafoodcentric Cvi.Che 105, this stylish but affordable two-level restaurant is centered around pollo a la brasa, as a huge rotisserie oven attests. Grilled steaks, unique sandwiches, anticuchos, and varied starters and sides are also served, but the must-not-miss is rotisserie chicken, marinated in roughly a dozen-and-a-half seasonings before a self-basting spin on the spit cooks it to incomparable juiciness. Its served with crisp fries and a substantial salad. Meals also come with a complimentary cup of aguadito -assertively cilantro-spiked chicken rice soup. $$ PreludeAdrienne Arsht Center 1300 Biscayne Blvd., 305-949-6722Though the opening of Barton G.s elegant performing arts center eatery did feature a live giraffe, the foods actually more grown-up than at his original SoBe spot. The concept is prix fixe: Any three courses on the menu (meaning three entres if you want) for $39. Highlights include silky, tarragon-inflected corn/bacon chowder, beautifully plated beef carpaccio with horseradish/mustard and shallot olive oil dipping sauces; and over-the-top playhouse desserts, one with a luscious crme fraiche ice cream pop. $$$$ Free Glass of WineWith Every Dinner Order. Limit one per customer. 305-754-0014 7281 Biscayne Blvd Miami Breakfast Lunch Dinner305-705-243417070 West Dixie Hwy North Miami Beach, FL 3316020% OFF Traditional Pizza 20% OFF Traditional PizzaAventura West Caf ExpressItalian Pizzeria YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD SPORTS BAR & RESTAURANT555 NE 15th Street, 9th Floor, Miami, FL305-374-5731 WWW.MIKESVENETIA.COMDirect TV NFL Sunday Ticket Espn Game Plan Direct TV NFL Sunday Ticket Espn Game Plan

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Rajas Indian Cuisine33 NE 2nd Ave., 305-539-9551Despite its small size and dcor best described as none, this place is an institution thanks to south Indian specialties rarely found in Miamis basically north Indian restaurants. The steam-tabled curries are fine (and nicely priced), but be sure to try the custom-made dosai (lacy rice crepes with a variety of savory fillings) and uttapam, thicker pancakes, layered with onions and chilis, both served with sambar and chutney. $$The River Oyster Bar650 S. Miami Ave., 305-530-1915This casually cool jewel is a full-service seafood spot, as evidenced by tempting menu selections like soft-shell crabs with grilled vegetables, corn relish, and remoulade. There are even a few dishes to please meat-and-potatoes diners, like short ribs with macaroni and cheese. But oyster fans will find it difficult to resist stuffing themselves silly on the unusually large selection, especially since oysters are served both raw and cooked fire-roasted with sofrito butter, chorizo, and manchego. Theres also a thoughtful wine list and numerous artisan beers on tap. $$$Rosa Mexicano900 S. Miami Ave., 786-425-1001This expansive indoor/outdoor space offers a dining experience thats haute in everything but price. Few entres top $20. The dcor is both date-worthy and family-friendly festive but not kitschy. And nonsophisticates neednt fear; though nachos arent available, there is nothing scary about zarape de pato (roast duck between freshly made, soft corn tortillas, topped with yellow-and-habanero-pepper cream sauce), or Rosas signature guacamole en molcajete, made tableside. A few pomegranate margaritas ensure no worries. $$$Scalina315 S. Biscayne Blvd., 305-789-9933Comparisons between this new Tom Billante venture and the other (slightly pricier) Italian eatery in the same building are inevitable, especially considering similarities like key personnel from NYCs Il Mulino, Mulino-style abundant free appetizers, and a power-dining crowd. But why focus on competitive nonsense when you can relax on the river-view terrace enjoying chef Enrico Giraldos specialties, including an elaborate take on Venices famed fegato (calfs liver and onions), upscaled with Lucanica sausage and a balsamic reduction. Or maybe an even more evocative Roman ice cream tartufo? Mangia! $$$$Soi Asian Bistro134 NE 2nd Ave., 305-523-3643From the owners of Calle Ochos hip Mr. Yum and 2B Asian Bistro, Soi sports similar casual-chic ambiance and eclectic Thai/Japanese cuisine. Traditional Thai curries and familiar sushi rolls are prepared with solid skill and style. But most intriguing are new inventions adding Peruvian fusion flair to the Asian mix, such as a spicy, tangy tangle of crisp-fried yellow noodles with sauted shrimp plus slivered peppers and onions -mod mee krob, with jalea-like tart heat replacing the cloying sweetness. $$ Soya & Pomodoro120 NE 1st St., 305-381-9511Life is complicated. Food should be simple. Thats owner Armando Alfanos philosophy, which is stated above the entry to his atmospheric downtown eatery. And since its also the formula for the truest traditional Italian food (Alfano hails from Pompeii), its fitting that the menu is dominated by authentically straightforward yet sophisticated Italian entres. There are salads and sandwiches, too. The most enjoyable place to dine is the secret, open-air courtyard. Alfano serves dinner on Thursdays only to accompany local musicians and artists. $-$$Sparkys Roadside Restaurant & Bar204 NE 1st St., 305-377-2877This cowboy-cute eaterys chefs/owners (one CIA-trained, both BBQ fanatics nicknamed Sparky) eschew regional pur ism, instead utilizing a hickory/apple-wood-stoked rotisserie smoker to turn out their personalized style of slow-cooked, complexly dry-rub fusion: ribs, chopped pork, brisket, and chicken. Diners can customize their orders with mix-andmatch housemade sauces: sweet/tangy tomato-based, Carolinas-inspired vinegar/mustard, pan-Asian hoisin with lemongrass and ginger, tropical guava/habanero. Authenticity aside, the quality of the food is as good as much higherpriced barbecue outfits. $-$$ Sushi Maki1000 S. Miami Ave., 305-415-9779Fans of the popular parent Sushi Maki in the Gables will find many familiar favorites on this Brickell branchs menu. But the must-haves are some inventive new dishes introduced to honor the eaterys tenth anniversary and Miami multiculturalism: sushi tacos (fried gyoza skins with fusion fillings like raw salmon, miso, chili-garlic sauce, and sour cream), three tasty flash-marinated Asian/Latin tiraditos; addictive rock shrimp tempura with creamy/spicy dip. Also irresistible: four festive new sake cocktails. $$-$$$ SuViche49 SW 11th St., 305-960-7097 This small Japanese-Peruvian place serves food influenced by each nation distinctly, plus intriguing fusion items with added Caribbean touches. Cooked entres, all Peruvian, include an elegant aji de gallina (walnut-garnished chicken and potatoes in peppery cream sauce). But the emphasis is on contemporary ceviches/tiraditos (those with velvety aji amarillo chili sauce particularly), plus huge exotic sushi rolls, which get pretty wild. When was the last time you encountered a tempura-battered tuna, avocado, and scallion maki topped with Perus traditional potato garnish, huancaina cheese sauce? $$Tobacco Road626 S. Miami Ave., 305-374-1198Prohibition-era speakeasy (reputedly a fave of Al Capone), gay bar, strip club. Previously all these, this gritty spot has been best known since 1982 as a venue for live music, primarily blues. But it also offers food from lunchtime to late night (on weekends till 4:00 a.m.). The kitchen is especially known for its chili, budget-priced steaks, and burgers. Theres also surprisingly elegant fare, though, like a Norwegian salmon club with lemon aioli. A meat-smoker in back turns out tasty ribs. $$Trapiche Room1109 Brickell Ave., 305-329-3656With multiple Marriott hotels in Brickell and downtown, one of them housing high-profile db Bistro, its not surprising that this small, second-floor restaurant is something of a best kept secret. But it deserves discovery. Chef Maria Tobar hasnt Daniel Bouluds fame, but she does have classic Europeantype technical skills, combined with contemporary creativity that turns even ultimately old-fashioned items, like a pork/ cabbage strudel, into 21st century fine-dining fare. Both dcor and service, similarly, are swelegant, not stuffy, and the rooms intimacy makes it a romantic spot for special occasions. $$$$Tre Italian Bistro270 E. Flagler St., 305-373-3303Bistro actually sounds too Old World for this cool hangout, from the owners of downtown old-timer La Loggia, but resto lounge sounds too glitzy. Think of it as a neighborhood bistrolounge. The food is mostly modernized Italian, with Latin and Asian accents: a prosciutto-and-fig pizza with Brazilian catupiry cheese; gnocchi served either as finger food (fried, with calamata olive/truffle aioli), or plated with orange-ginger sauce. But there are tomato-sauced meatballs with rigawt for Grandpa Vinnie, too. $$-$$$Trulucks Seafood, Steak, and Crabhouse777 Brickell Ave., 305-579-0035Compared to other restaurants with such an upscale powerlunch/dinner setting, most prices are quite affordable here, especially if you stick to the Miami Spice-priced date-dinner menu, or happy hour, when seafood items like crab-cake sliders are half price. Most impressive, though, are seasonal stone crabs (from Trulucks own fisheries, and way less expensive than Joes) and other seafood that, during several visits, never tasted less than impeccably fresh, plus that greatest of Miami restau rant rarities: informed and gracious service. $$$-$$$$Tu yo415 NE 2nd St., 305-237-3200Atop the revolutionary Miami Culinary Institute, this upscale eatery, unlike the caf downstairs, isnt studentrun. Rather its designed to showcase school ideals -including sustainability as well as definitive Miami cuisine. The changing menu, from a culinary Dream Team headed by New World Cuisine inventor/MCI instructor Norman Van Aken (plus former protgs Jeffrey Brana and Travis Starwalt), mixes citrus-inflected creamy conch chowder and other pioneering signatures with new inventions like mind-reelingly multidimensional oyster pan stew, or tartare of tuna and burstingly ripe tomato topped with a delicate sous vide egg. $$$$$Waxy OConnors690 SW 1st Ct., 786-871-7660While the menu of this casually craic (Gaelic for fun) Irish pub will be familiar to fans of the South Beach Waxys, the location is far superior -on the Miami River, with waterfront deck. And none of Miamis Irish eateries offers as much authentic traditional fare. Especially evocative: imported oak-smoked Irish salmon with housemade brown bread; puffpastry-wrapped Irish sausage rolls; lunchtimes imported Irish bacon or banger butty sandwiches on crusty baguettes, served with hand-cut fries, the latter particularly terrific dipped in Waxys curry sauce. $$Wok Town119 SE 1st Ave., 305-371-9993Judging from the takeout window, the minimalist dcor (with communal seating), and predominance of American veggies on the menu, this Asian fast-food eatery, owned by Shai Ben-Ami (a Miss Yip and Domo Japones veteran) May initially seem akin to those airport Oriental steam tables. Wrong. Custom-cooked by Chinese chefs, starters (like soy/ garlic-coated edamame), salads, and have-it-your-way stirfries, fried rice, or noodle bowls burst with bold, fresh flavor. The proof: a startlingly savory miso beef salad, with sesame/ ginger/scallion dressing. Bubble tea, too! $$ Zuma270 Biscayne Blvd. Way, 305-577-0277This Miami River restolounge has a London parent on San Pellegrinos list of the worlds best restaurants, and a similar menu of world-class, Izakaya-style smallish plates (robatagrilled items, sushi, much more) meant for sharing over drinks. Suffice to say that it would take maybe a dozen visits to work your way through the voluminous menu, which offers ample temptations for vegetarians as well as carnivores. Our favorite is the melt-in-your-mouth pork belly with yuzu/ mustard miso dip, but even the exquisitely-garnished tofu rocks. $$$$ Miamis Artisan Bakery! Made from Scratch, fresh breads daily! Acmes got Fall: Ask us about our Thanksgiving Packages

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Midtown / Wynwood / Design District3 Chefs Chinese Restaurant1800 Biscayne Blvd. #105, 305-373-2688Until this eatery opened in late 2010, the solid Chinese restaurants in this neighborhood could be counted on the fingers of no hands. So its not surprising that most people concentrate on Chinese and Chinese/American fare. The real surprise is the remarkably tasty, budget-priced, Vietnamese fare. Try pho, 12 varieties of full-flavored beef/rice noodle soup (including our favorite, with well-done flank steak and flash-cooked eye round). All can be customized with sprouts and fresh herbs. Also impressive: Noodle combination plates with sauted meats, salad, and spring rolls. $$ Adelitas Caf 2699 Biscayne Blvd., 305-576-1262From the street (which is actually NE 26th, not Biscayne) this Honduran restaurant seems unpromising, but inside its bigger, better, and busier than it looks. Unlike many Latin American eateries, this one sticks close to the source and proves a crowd-pleaser. On weekends especially, the dining rooms are packed with families enjoying authentic fare like baleadas (thick corn tacos), tajadas (Hondurass take on tostones), rich meal-in-a-bowl soups packed with seafood or meat and veggies, and more. $Basanis3221 NE 2nd Ave., 786-925-0911Despite this tiny places modern dcor, the family-run ambiance and Italian-American comfort food evoke the neighborhood red-sauce joints that were our favored hangouts growing up in NJs Sopranos territory. And low prices make it possible to hang out here frequently. Pizzas with hand-tossed crusts, not wood-oven but resembling honest bread, for less than fast food pizzeria prices? Its an offer you dont refuse. Dont refuse garlic rolls, either, or sinful zeppole (fried dough) for dessert. Theres more complex fare, like chicken la Francese, too. And they deliver. $$Bengal2010 Biscayne Blvd., 305-403-1976At this Indian eatery the dcor is cool and contemporary: muted gray and earth-tone walls, tasteful burgundy banquettes. And the menu touts Modern Indian Cuisine to match the look. Classicists, however, neednt worry. Americas favorite familiar north Indian flavors are here, though dishes are generally more mildly spiced and presented with modern flair. All meats are certified halal, Islams version of kosher which doesnt mean that observant orthodox Jews can eat here, but Muslims can. $$$Best Friends4770 Biscayne Blvd., 786-439-3999On a restaurant-starved stretch of Biscayne Boulevard, this spot serves the same sort of simple but satisfying Italian fare (antipasti, soups, salads, pizzas) as its older sibling, South Miamis Blu Pizzeria, plus burgers. The thin-crust, pliable pizzas, though lacking burn blisters, are brick-oven cooked, as are blues, unusual calzones (like the blu oceano, fatly filled with mozzarella, prosciutto crudo, arugula, and fresh tomatoes). Hefty half-pound burgers come similarly stuffed rather than topped. A sheltered patio and full bar make the place a pleasant neighborhood lounge, too. $$ Bin No. 181800 Biscayne Blvd., 786-235-7575At this wine bar/caf, the dcor is a stylish mix of contemporary (high loft ceilings) and Old World (tables made from wine barrels). Cuisine is similarly geared to the areas smart new residents: creative sandwiches and salads at lunch, tapas and larger inter nationally themed Spanish, Italian, or French charcuterie platters at night. Though the place is small and family-run friendly, chef Alfredo Patino offers sophisticated snacks like the figciutto: aru gula, gorgonzola dolce, caramelized onions, pine nuts, fresh figs, and prosciutto. Free parking behind the building. $$Blue Piano4600 NE 2nd Ave., 305-576-7919The address suggests a street-corner location, but this casually cool wine bar/bistro is actually hidden midblock. Its well worth the hunt, thanks to the passionate, very personally handson involvement of its four owners, whose individual areas of expertise encompass food, wine, and live entertainment, melding all seamlessly. The music is muted, encouraging conversation; wines are largely small-production gems, sold at comparatively low mark-ups. And the small-plates menu features delectably different dishes like the McLuvvin, a meld of savory Spanish sausage and chicharrones, topped with a quail egg and chipotle cream -supremely satisfying. $$ Buena Vista Bistro 4582 NE 2nd Ave., 305-456-5909If a neighborhood eatery like this one which serves supremely satisfying bistro food were within walking distance of every Miami resident, wed be a helluva hip food town. Like true Parisian bistros, its open continuously, every day, with prices so low that you can drop in anytime for authentic rillettes (a rustic pt) with a crusty baguette, steak with from-scratch frites, salmon atop ratatouille, or many changing blackboard specials. Portions are plentiful. So is free parking. $$Buena Vista Deli4590 NE 2nd Ave., 305-576-3945At this casual caf/bakery, co-owned by Buena Vista Bistros Claude Postel, the day starts in authentic French fashion, with fresh breakfast breads, chocolate almond croissants, and other delights. At lunch cornichon-garnished baguette sandwiches (containing housemade pts, sinfully rich pork rillettes, superb salami, and other charcuterie classics) are irresistible, and a buttery-crusted, custardy quiche plus perfectly dressed salad costs little more than a fast-food combo meal. As for Postels homemade French sweets, if you grab the last Paris-Brest, a praline butter-cream-filled puff pastry, we may have to kill you. $-$$ Cafeina297 NW 23rd St., 305-438-0792This elegantly comfortable multi-room indoor/outdoor venue is described as an art gallery/lounge, and some do come just for cocktails like the hefty caf con leche martinis. But dont overlook chef Guily Booths 12-item menu of very tasty tapas. The signature item is a truly jumbo-lump crab cake with no discernable binder. At one South Beach Wine & Food Festival, Martha Stewart proclaimed it the best shed ever had. Our own prime pick: melt-in-your-mouth ginger sea bass anticuchos, so buttery-rich we nearly passed out with pleasure. $$ Catch Grill & Bar1633 N. Bayshore Dr., 305-536-6414A location within easy walking distance of the Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, in the extensively renovated Marriott Biscayne Bay, makes this casual-chic eatery, whose specialty is local and sustainable seafood, a great option for preshow bites. Then again, enjoying lures like sweet-glazed crispy shrimp with friends on the outdoor, bayfront terrace is entertainment enough. Its worth calling to ask if the daily catch is wreckfish, a sustainable local that tastes like a cross between grouper and sea bass. Bonus: With validation, valet parking is free. $$$-$$$$ Cerviceria 100 Montaditos3252 NE 1st Ave. #104, 305-921-4373Student budget prices, indeed. A first-graders allowance would cover a meal at this first U.S. branch of a popular Spanish chain. The 100 mini sandwiches (on crusty, olive oil-drizzled baguettes) vary from $1 to $2.50, depending not on ingredient quality but complexity. A buck scores genuine Serrano ham, while top-ticket fillings add imported Iberico cheese, pulled pork, and tomato to the cured-ham slivers. Other options revolve around pts, smoked salmon, shrimp, and similar elegant stuff. Theres cheap draft beer, too, plus nonsandwich snacks. $$City Hall the Restaurant2004 Biscayne Blvd., 305-764-3130After 30+ years spent guiding other owners restaurants to success, Miami Spice program creator Steve Haas has opened his own expansive, two-floor place, on a stretch of Biscayne Boulevard thats suddenly looking fashionable. The vibe is a mix of power-dining destination and comfie neighborhood hangout, and chef Tom Azar (ex-Emerils) has designed a varied menu to match. Highlights: an astonishingly thin/crunchy-crusted pizza topped with duck confit, wild mushrooms, port wine syrup, and subtly truffled bchamel; crispy calamari (rings and legs) with light, lemony tomato emulsion; and tuna tartar that is refreshingly free of sesame oil. Big portions and a full bar to boot. $$-$$$$The Cheese Course3451 NE 1st Ave., 786-220-6681Not so much a restaurant as an artisanal cheese shop with complimentary prepared foods, this places self-service caf component nevertheless became an instant hit. Impeccable ingredients and inspired combinations make even the simplest salads and sandwiches unique -like bacon and egg, elevated by hand-crafted cream cheese, roasted red peppers, avocado, and chipotle Mayo. Cheese platters are exceptional, and customized for flavor preference from mild to bold, and accompanied by appropriate fruits, veggies, nuts, olives, pre pared spreads, and breads. $$Clives Caf2818 N. Miami Ave., 305-576-0277Some still come for the inexpensive, hearty American breakfasts and lunches that this homey hole-in-the-wall has served for more than 30 years. Since about 1990, though, when owner Pearline Murray (Ms. Pearl to regulars) and cook Gloria Chin began emphasizing their native Jamaican specialties, the intensely spiced grilled jerk chicken has been the main item here. Other favorites: savory rice and pigeon peas; eye-opening onion/vinegar-flavored escovitch fish; sweet plantains; and cabbage that redefines the vegetable. $Crumb on Parchment3930 NE 2nd Ave., 305-572-9444Though located in a difficult spot (the Melin Buildings central atrium, invisible from the street), Michelle Bernsteins bakery/caf packs em in, partly due to Bernsteins mom Martha, who makes irresistible old-school cakes: German chocolate with walnuts, lemon curd with buttercream frosting, more. Lunch fare includes inspired sandwiches like seared rare tuna with spicy Asian pickles and kimchi aioli. And for morning people, the savory chicken sausage, melted cheddar, kale, and shallot sandwich on challah will convince you that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. $-$$ The Daily Creative Food Co.2001 Biscayne Blvd., 305-573-4535While the food formula of this contemporary caf is familiar sandwiches, salads, soups, breakfast food, and pastries, plus coffee and fruit drinks a creative concept differentiates the place. Signature sandwiches are named after national and local newspapers, including Biscayne Times, giving diners something to chat about. Sandwiches and salads can also be do-it-yourself projects, with an unusually wide choice of main ingredients, garnishes, breads, and condiments for the creatively minded. $El Bajareque278 NW 36th St., 305-576-5170Dozens of little Latin American eateries, all looking almost identically iffy, line 36th Street. But this family-owned bajareque (shack) is one where you definitely want to stop for some of Miamis most tasty, and inexpensive, Puerto Rican home cooking, from mondongo (an allegedly hangover-curing soup) to mofongo, a plantain/chicharron mash with varied toppings plus garlicky mojo. Housemade snacks are irresistible, too, and great take-out party fare: pork-studded pasteles, similar to Cuban tamals but with a tuber rather than corn masa dough, or empanadas with savory shrimp stuffing. $ Egg & Dart4029 N. Miami Ave., 786-431-1022While co-owners Costa Grillas (from Marias, a Coral Gables staple) and Niko Theodorou (whose family members have several Greek islands restaurants) describe their cuisine as rustic Greek, there is surprising sophistication in some dishes: an especially delicate taramasalata (cod roe dip); precisely crisp-fried smelts (like a freshwater sardine); galactobourico, an often heavy and cloyingly vanilla-saturated dessert, here custardy and enlivened by orange flavor. Extensive lists of mezze (snacks) and creative cocktails make the expansive, invitingly decorated space ideal for large gatherings of friends who enjoy sharing. $$$ Egyptian Pizza KitchenShops at Midtown Miami Buena Vista Avenue, 305-571-9050Pizza, pita -hey, theyre both flatbreads. So while many pizzas do indeed, as this halal places name suggests, have initially weird-seeming Middle Eastern toppings, its really not surprising that the Giza (topped with marinated lamb, feta, olives, peppers, and pungently spiced cumin sauce) works at least as well as Italian classics. Additionally the menu includes interesting Middle Eastern fare like foul, a hummus-like but lighter Egyptian dish of favas, tahini, garlic, lemon juice, and olive oil. A brick oven makes both pizzas and homemade pitas superior. $$18th Street Caf210 NE 18th St., 305-381-8006Most seating in this cool, pioneering neighborhood caf is in a giant bay window, backed with banquettes, that makes the small space feel expansive -fitting, since the menu keeps expanding, too. Originally breakfast/lunch only, the caf, though closed weekends, now serves dinner till 10:00 p.m., with comfort food entres like secret-recipe meatloaf joining old favorites: daily-changing homemade soups, varied burgers, layered international salads, inspired sandwiches (like roast beef and provolone with creamy horseradish). Beer and wine is available, and now so is delivery. $$The Federal Food, Drink & Provisions5132 Biscayne Blvd., 305-758-9559At the Fed, expect what locals know to expect from sommelier/ chef team Aniece Meinhold and Cesar Zapata, whose previous restaurant concepts have included Blue Piano (gourmet stoner snacks) and Vietnamese pop-up Phuc Yea. That is, expect the unexpected. The Fed is an updated tavern featuring creative, from-scratch takes on traditional American regional dishes: flaky Southern biscuits with sausage gravy (and crisp-coated sweetbreads, if desired); Northeastern-inspired pig wings (pork drummettes with homemade Buffalo sauce, blue cheese mousse, and pickled veggies). Desserts, from third partner Alejandro Ortiz, include sinful sticky buns. $$-$$$Five Guys Famous Burger and FriesShops at Midtown Miami Buena Vista Ave., 305-571-8341No green-leaf faux health food here. You get what the name says, period, with three adds: kosher dogs, veggie burgers, and free peanuts while you wait. Which you will, just a bit, since burgers are made fresh upon order. Available in double or one-patty sizes, theyre well-done but spurtingly juicy, and after loading with your choice of free garnishes, even a little burger makes a major meal. Fries (regular or Cajun-spiced) are also superior, hand-cut in-house from sourced potatoes. $ COUPON$5.50Special 12 Sub Sandwich with a Free Orange Juice. With this ad.

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Gigi3470 N. Miami Ave., 305-573-1520As befits its location in artful, working-class Wynwood, Gigi has minimalist modern diner ambiance paired with truly creative contemporary Asian-influenced comfort food from Top Chef contender Jeff McInnis (formerly of the South Beach Ritz-Carlton) at surprisingly low prices. From a menu encompassing noodle and rice bowls, steam-bun ssams, grilled goodies, and raw items, highlights include pillowy-light roast pork-stuffed buns, and possibly the worlds best BLT, featuring Asian bun toast, thick pork belly slices rather than bacon, and housemade pickles. Theres $2 beer, too. $-$$ Harrys Pizzeria3918 N. Miami Ave., 786-275-4963In this humble space (formerly Pizza Volante) are many key components from Michaels Genuine Food & Drink two blocks east -local/sustainable produce and artisan products; woodoven cooking; homemade everything (including the ketchup accompanying crisp-outside, custardy-inside polenta fries, a circa 1995 Michael Schwartz signature snack from Nemo). Beautifully blistered, ultra-thin-crusted pizzas range from classic Margheritas to pies with house-smoked bacon, trugole (a subtly flavorful -fruity, not funky -Alpine cheese), and other unique toppings. Rounding things out: simple but ingenious salads, ultimate zeppoles, and Florida craft beers. $$Hurricane Grill & Wings Shops at Midtown MiamiBuena Vista Avenue, 305-576-7133This Florida fast/casual chain became an instant hit in Midtown Miami owing to a winning concept: more than 35 heat-coded sauces and dry rubs meant for custom-tossing with wings and other things (including white-meat boneless wings, really wingshaped chicken breast pieces), accompanied by ranch or classic blue-cheese dip and celery. It would be silly to not pair your main with garlic/herb-butter parmesan fries. There are many other items, too, including salads. But hey, celery is salad, right? $$ Jean Pauls House2426 NE 2nd Ave., 305-573-7373Jean Paul Desmaison, original chef/co-owner of La Cofradia in Coral Gables, has chosen a decidedly less tony, more transitional neighborhood for this venture. But inside his renovated bungalow, ambiance is stylishly cozy, and the creative contemporary North/South American fusion cuisine is as elegant as ever. Best bets are dishes influenced by Desmaisons native Peru, including crispy pork belly braised in pisco with silky sweet potato pure, and a beautifully balanced nikkei (Japanese/Peruvian) salmon sashimi that does the impossible: tame leche de tigre, Perus infamous tigers milk marinade. $$$-$$$$ Jimmyz Kitchen2700 N. Miami Ave. #5, 305-573-1505No need to trek to South Beach for what many consider Miamis best classic Puerto Rican mofongo (fried green plantains mashed with fresh garlic, olive oil, and pork cracklings, surrounded by chicken or shrimp in zesty criollo sauce). This new location is bigger and better than the original, plus the mofongo is served every day, not just on weekends. But dont ignore the meal-size salads or high-quality sandwiches, including a pressed tripleta containing roast pork, bacon, Black Forest ham, provolone, and caramelized onions. $$Joeys Italian Caf2506 NW 2nd Ave., 305-438-0488The first new restaurant in the Wynwood Caf District, this stylish indoor/outdoor Italian hangout is as casually cool as one would hope and as affordable. Theres a five-buck half-serving of spaghetti al pomodoro and respectable vino for under $30. And few can resist delicately thin, crunchycrusted pizzas like the creative Dolce e Piccante or orgasmic Carbonara. Pastas are fresh; produce is largely local; the mosaic-centered dcor is minimalist but inviting. And no need to be wary of the warehouse district at night: Valet parking is free. $$-$$$La Latina3509 NE 2nd Ave., 305-571-9655At last, an authentic Venezuelan arepera (purveyor of homemade arepas, with a variety of meat, cheese, and veggie fillings) that isnt out in the boonies -and decidedly isnt a dive. With colorful dcor concocted from recycled objects, this space, though small, has truly eclectic, Midtown style. The signature corn cakes, crisped outside and fluffy inside, put sodden supermarket specimens to shame. And cachapas (softer, sweeter corn pancakes folded around mozzarella-like fresh cheese) or bollarepitas (cheese-stuffed deep-fried corn cakes, with tangy nata dip) may be even tastier. $-$$La Provence2200 Biscayne Blvd., 305-576-8002(See Brickell / Downtown listing.)Latin Caf 20002501 Biscayne Blvd., 305-576-3838The menu is similar to that at many of our towns Latin cafs, largely classic Cuban entres and sandwiches, with a smattering of touches from elsewhere in Latin America, such as a Peruvian jalea mixta (marinated mixed seafood), or paella Valenciana from Spain, which many Miami eateries consider a Latin country. What justifies the new millennium moniker is the more modern, yuppified/yucafied ambiance, encouraged by an expansive, rustic wooden deck. $$Lemoni Caf4600 NE 2nd Ave., 305-571-5080The menu here reads like your standard sandwiches/salads/ starters primer. What it doesnt convey is the freshness of the ingredients and the care that goes into their use. Entresize salads range from an elegant spinach (goat cheese, pears, walnuts, raisins) to chunky homemade chicken salad on a bed of mixed greens. Sandwiches (cold baguette subs, hot pressed paninis, or wraps, all accompanied by side salads) include a respectable Cuban and a veggie wrap with a deceptively rich-tasting light salad cream. $-$$Lime Fresh Mexican GrillShops at Midtown Miami Buena Vista Avenue, 305-576-5463Like its South Beach predecessor, this Lime was an instant hit, as much for being a hip new Midtown hangout as for its carefully crafted Tex-Mex food. The concept is fast casual rather than fast food meaning nice enough for a night out. It also means ingredients are always fresh. Seafood tacos are about as exotic as the menu gets, but the mahi mahi for fish tacos comes from a local supplier, and salsas are housemade daily. Niceties include low-carb tortillas and many Mexican beers. $Limn y Sabor3045 Biscayne Blvd., 786-431-5739In this dramatically renovated space, the room is now light and open, and the food is authentic Peruvian, with seafood a specialty. Portions are huge, prices low, quality high. Especially good are their versions of pescado a lo macho (fish fillet topped with mixed seafood in a creamy, zesty sauce); jalea (breaded and deep-fried fish, mixed seafood, and yuca, topped with onion/pepper/lime salsa), and yuca in hot yet fruity rocoto chili cream sauce. $$Lost & Found Saloon185 NW 36th St., 305-576-1008Theres an artsy/alternative feel to this casual and friendly Wynwood eatery, which, since opening as a weekday-only breakfast and lunch joint in 2005, has grown with its neighborhood. Its now open for dinner six nights a week, serving Southwestern-style fare at rock-bottom prices. Dishes like pion and pepita-crusted salmon, chipotle-drizzled endive stuffed with lump crab, or customizable tacos average $5-$8. Also available: big breakfasts and salads, hearty soups, housemade pastries like lemon-crusted wild berry pie, and a hip beer and wine list. $Mandolin Aegean Bistro4312 NE 2nd Ave., 305-576-6066Inside this converted 1940s homes blue-and-white dining room -or even more atmospherically, its tree-sheltered garden -diners feast on authentic rustic fare from both Greece and Turkey. Make a meal of multinational mezes: a Greek sampler of creamy tzatziki yogurt dip, smoky eggplant pure, and airy tarama caviar spread; and a Turkish sampler of hummus, fava pure, and rich tomato-walnut dip. The meze of mussels in lemony wine broth is, with Mandolins fresh-baked flatbread, almost a full meal in itself. $$-$$$ Mercadito Midtown3252 NE 1st Ave., 786-369-0423Some people frequent this fashionable restolounge, festooned with graffiti-style murals designed to evoke a bustling Mexican street market, just for the dangerously smooth margaritas. But the main must-haves here are tacos, encased in a rarity: genuinely made-from-scratch corn tortillas, small but fatly-stuffed. Of 11 varieties, our favorite is the carnitas (juicy braised pork, spicy chili de arbol slaw, toasted peanuts). A close second: the hongos, intensely flavorful huitlacoche and wild mushrooms, with manchego and salsa verde -a reminder that vegetarian food need not be bland. $$-$$$Michaels Genuine Food and Drink130 NE 40th St., 305-573-5550An instant smash hit, this truly neighborhood-oriented restaurant from chef Michael Schwartz offers down-to-earth fun food in a comfortable, casually stylish indoor/outdoor setting. Fresh, organic ingredients are emphasized, but dishes range from cutting-edge (crispy beef cheeks with whipped celeriac, celery salad, and chocolate reduction) to simple comfort food: deviled eggs, homemade potato chips with pan-fried onion dip, or a whole wood-roasted chicken. Theres also a broad range of prices and portion sizes to encourage frequent visits. Michaels Genuine also features an eclectic, affordable wine list and a full bar. $$-$$$$Ming Yuan3006 NW 2nd Ave., 305-576-6466What this tiny (three booths plus counter seats) Wynwood place serves isnt authentic Chinese cuisine. Its Chinese immigrant cooking: Americas original Cantonese-based chop sueys and egg foo youngs plus later, spicier but also Americanized Szechuan/Hunan-inspired 1970s inventions like Mongolian beef and General Tsos this-or-that. But all the above (ordered extra-spicy if you like heat), plus crab rangoons and treat-packed special fried rice, are truly tasty. And since almost everything on the menu comes in several sizes, with even small being substantial, prices are unbeatable. $-$$

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Mikes at Venetia555 NE 15th St., 9th floor, 305-374-5731This family-owned Irish pub, on the pool deck of the Venetia condo, for more than 15 years has been a popular lunch and dinner hang-out for local journalists and others who appreciate honest cheap eats and drinks. Regulars know daily spe cials are the way to go. Depending on the day, fish, churrasco, or roast turkey with all the trimmings are all prepared fresh. Big burgers and steak dinners are always good. A limited late-night menu provides pizza, wings, ribs, and salad till 3:00 a.m. $-$$Morgans Restaurant28 NE 29th St., 305-573-9678Housed in a beautifully refurbished 1930s private home, Morgans serves eclectic, sometimes internationally influ enced contemporary American cuisine compelling enough to attract hordes. Dishes are basically comfort food, but ultimate comfort food: the most custardy, fluffy French toast imaginable; shoestring frites that rival Belgiums best; mouthwatering maple-basted bacon; miraculously terrific tofu (crisply panko-crusted and apricot/soy-glazed); even a voluptuous grilled cheese sandwich -definitely a dont ask, dont tell your cardiologist item. $$-$$$NoVe Kitchen & Bar1750 N. Bayshore Dr., 305-503-1000At NoVe, the restolounge at the Opera Tower condo in NoVe (new nickname for the bayfront neighborhood north of the Venetian Causeway), the food is East-West. Meaning you can get burgers, pasta, and so on, or try the inventive Asian small plates and sushi specialties Hiro Terada originated at his past posts, Doraku and Moshi Moshi: the Atlantis roll (tempura conch with asparagus, avocado, scallions, and curry sauce); spicy, crunchy fried tofu atop kimchi salad; much more. Open 6:00 a.m. for breakfast to 3:00 a.m., it is kid-friendly and dog-friendly, too. $$-$$$Orange Caf + Art2 NE 40th St., 305-571-4070The paintings hanging in this tiny, glass-enclosed caf are for sale. And for those who dont have thousands of dollars to shell out for the local art on the walls, less than ten bucks will get you art on a plate, including a Picasso: chorizo, prosciutto, manchego cheese, baby spinach, and basil on a crusty baguette. Other artfully named and crafted edibles include salads, daily soups, several pastas (like the Matisse, fiocchi pouches filled with pears and cheese), and house-baked pastries. $ Pashas 3801 N. Miami Ave., 305-573-0201(See Brickell/Downtown listing)Pasta FoliesShops at Midtown Miami3252 NE 1st Ave. #118, 786-382-0205In France the word folie can mean extravagant. More often it means madness. Its the latter translation that first comes to mind when perusing the menu of this French Rivera pasta/pizza fast-casual chain, whose concept is pastas, plus pizzas, from around the world -even Italy. Dont expect authenticity from the more exotic toppings; they basically contain one typical ingredient (along with a generic onions/peppers/veg assortment): bean sprouts in Thailands spaghetti, pineapple in Balis, curry sauce on Indias. Do expect super-fresh sauces, made daily. Friendly staffers and fun. $$Pieducks3500 N. Miami Ave., 305-576-5550(See Brickell / Downtown listing)Primos1717 N. Bayshore Dr., 305-371-9055The imposing, cavernous lobby of the Grand doesnt have that do drop in locals hangout vibe. But this lively Italian spot is actually a great addition to the neighborhood. The pizzas alone brick-oven specimens with toppings ranging from classic pepperoni to prosciutto/arugula would be draw enough. But pastas also please: diners choice of starch, with mix-and-match sauces and extras. And the price is right, with few entres topping $20. The capper: Its open past midnight every day but Sunday. $$Primo Pizza Miami3451 NE 1st Ave., 305-535-2555Just a few years ago, chain pizza joints were dominant most everywhere. Today many places now offer authentic Italian or delicate designer pizzas. But a satisfying Brookyn-style street slice? Fuhgedit. Thankfully thats the speciality of this indoor/outdoor pizzeria: big slices with chewy crusts (made from imported NY tap water) that arent ultra-thin and crisp, but flexible enough to fold lengthwise, and medium-thick -sturdy enough to support toppings applied with generous all-American abandon. Take-out warning: Picking up a whole pie? Better bring the SUV, not the Morris Mini.Sakaya KitchenShops at Midtown Miami, Buena Vista Avenue 305-576-8096This chef-driven, fast-casual Asian eatery is more an izakaya (in Japan, a pub with food) than a sakaya (sake shop). But why quibble about words with so many more intriguing things to wrap your mouth around? The concept takes on street-food favorites from all over Asia, housemade daily from quality fresh ingredients. French Culinary Institute-trained Richard Hales does change his menu, so wed advise immediately grabbing some crispy Korean chicken wings and Chinese-inspired, open-faced roast pork buns with sweet chili sauce and homemade pickles. $$ Sake Room 275 NE 18th St., 305-755-0122Sake takes a back seat to sushi and sophisticated dcor at this small but sleek restolounge. Among the seafood offerings, you wont find exotica or local catches, but all the usual sushi/ sashimi favorites, though in more interesting form, thanks to sauces that go beyond standard soy spicy sriracha, garlic/ ponzu oil, and many more. Especially recommended: the yuzu hamachi roll, the lobster tempura maki, and panko-coated spicy shrimp with hot-and-sour Mayo and a salad. $$-$$$Salad Creations2001 Biscayne Blvd., 305-576-5333At this fast-casual restaurant, diners can enjoy a wide variety ofchef-created salads and wraps, or go the DIY route, choosing from one of four greens options; four dozen add-ons (fresh, dried, or pickled veggies and fruits, plus cheeses and slightly sinful pleasures like candied pecans or wonton strips); a protein (seafood or poultry); and two dozen dressings, ranging from classic (Thousand Island, bleu cheese) to creative contemporary (spicy Asian peanut, cucumber wasabi, blueberry pomegranate). Additionally, the place creates lovely catering platters, plus individual lunchboxes -perfect picnic or plane food. $-$$ Salumeria 1043451 NE 1st Ave. #104, 305-424-9588In Italy, salumerias started, like American delicatessens, as shops selling salumi (cured meats), but evolved into the equivalent of eat-in deli/restaurants that also serve cold and hot prepared foods. At this modern Midtown salumeria, the soups-to-salads-to-sweets range of fare is the same. Customsliced imported cold cuts are a main focus, especially for those who enjoy taste-testing a plate pairing Italys two most famous prosciuttos: Parma and San Daniele. But homemade pastas are also impressive, as are hard-to-find regional entres like fegato alla Veneziana, which will turn liver-haters into lovers. $$-$$$ Salsa Fiesta2929 Biscayne Blvd., 305-400-8245The first stateside offshoot of a popular Venezuelan mini chain, this urban Mexican grill serves health-conscious, made-fresh-daily fare similar in concept to some fast-casual competitors. But there are indeed differences here, notably pan-Latin options: black beans as well as red; thin, delightfully crunchy tostones (available as a side or as the base for a uniquely tasty take on normal nachos). Other pluses include weekday happy hours with two-for-one beers -and free parking. $-$$ S & S Diner1757 NE 2nd Ave., 305-373-4291Some things never change, or so it seems at this classic diner. Open since 1938, people still line up on Saturday mornings, waiting for a seat at the counter and enormous breakfasts: corned beef hash or crab cakes and eggs with grits; fluffy pancakes; homemade biscuits with gravy and Georgia sausage everything from oatmeal to eggs Benedict. The lunch menu is a roll call of the usual suspects, but most regulars ignore the menu and go for the daily blackboard specials. $-$$Shokudo World Resource Caf 4740 NE 2nd Ave., 305-758-7782At its former Lincoln Road location, World Resources caf was better known for people-watching than for its standard sushi/Thai menu. But as the new name signals, this relocation is a reinvention. The indoor/outdoor space is charming, but creative takes on popular pan-Asian street foods are the real draw. Travel from Japan and Thailand through Korea, Vietnam, China, the Philippines, and beyond via light housemade momo, curried potato-stuffed Tibetan/Nepalese steamed dumplings; savory pulled pork buns with kimchi and crisped onions. Noodle dishes, hot or chilled, are especially appealing. $$-$$$ Sugarcane Raw Bar Grill3250 NE 1st Ave.,786-369-0353This chic indoor/outdoor space is an offspring of Lincoln Roads SushiSamba Dromo and a sibling of Sugarcane lounges in NYC and Las Vegas, but more informal than the former and more food-oriented than the latter, as three kitchens -normal, raw bar, and robata charcoal grill -make clear. Chef Timon Balloos LatAsian small plates range from subtle orange/fennel-marinated salmon crudo to intensely smoky-rich short ribs. At the daily happy hour, select dishes (like steamed pork buns with apple kimchi) are discounted. $$-$$$Tapas y Tintos3535 NE 2nd Ave., 305-392-0506With about 50 different generously sized traditional tapas plates, from simple (imported Spanish cheeses and cured meats; varied croquetas, including beautifully smooth spinach) to sophisticated (crisp-fried soft-shell crab with aioli dip; the witty Popeye y Olivia, garlicky wine-sauced chickpeas with spinach and olive oil) plus complex salads, paellas, and charbroiled meat and seafood entres, all add up to entertaining eating even without this tapas/wine bars live entertainment. This second T&T feels less nightclub and more neighborhood than the South Beach original. Great for dates, business lunches, or very happy hours. $$$Tony Chans Water Club1717 N. Bayshore Dr., 305-374-8888The dcor at this upscale place, located in the Grand, looks too glitzy to serve anything but politely Americanized Chinese food. But the American dumbing-down is minimal. Many dishes are far more authentic and skillfully prepared than those found elsewhere in Miami, like delicate but flavorful yu pan quail. Moist sea bass fillet has a beautifully balanced topping of scallion, ginger, cilantro, and subtly sweet/salty sauce. And Peking duck is served as three traditional courses: crpewrapped crispy skin, meat sauted with crisp veggies, savory soup to finish. $$-$$$Vintage Liquor & Wine Bar3301 NE 1st Ave. #105, 305-514-0307Gentrified ambiance, a remarkably knowledgeable staff, and a hip stock (including global beers as well as liquor and wine, plus gourmet packaged foods to accompany), and self-service wine dispensers for sampling make this an enjoyable retail shop. A wine/cocktail/tapas bar, open from 4:00 p.m. daily, makes it an enjoyable neighborhood hangout, too. Tapas include beef carpaccio, bruschetta cones, varied salads and empanadas, a daily ceviche, and fresh-made sandwiches. And remember to ask about special events: karaoke Thursdays, monthly wine dinners, tastings, more. $-$$ Wine Vault MiamiShops at Midtown Miami Fountain Circle #105, 786-691-2000From a Wine Vault press release: Over 1300 square feet of pure decadence. In fact, the soaring, two-story space, complete with glass elevator, has a look that lives up to the hype. But the most decadent thing inside is a nibble from its tapas list: chocolate-covered bacon. Go ahead and make a meal of it. We grown-ups can eat what we want. More substantial plates to accompany the roughly four dozen wines, artisan beers, or cocktails include chorizo with new potatoes, and sweetly piquant piquillo peppers stuffed with shredded tuna. Happy-hour wine prices are so low wed better not mention them. $$-$$$ Wynwood Kitchen & Bar2550 NW 2nd Ave., 305-722-8959The exterior is eye-popping enough, with murals from worldfamous outdoor artists, but its the interior that grabs you. Colorful and exotic work by Shepard Fairey, Christian Awe, and other acclaimed artists makes it one of the most striking restaurant spaces anywhere. As for food, the original menu has been replaced with Spanish/Latin/Mediterraneaninspired favorites from chef Miguel Aguilar (formerly of Alma de Cuba): gazpacho or black bean soups; shredded chicken ropa vieja empanadas with cilantro crema; grilled octopus skewers with tapenade; plus fingerling potato-chorizo hash and other seasonal farm-to-table veg dishes. $$-$$$ Upper EastsideAndiamo5600 Biscayne Blvd. 305-762-5751With brick-oven pizzerias popping up all over town the past few years, its difficult to remember the dark days when this part of Mark Soykas 55th Street Station complex was mainland Miamis sole source of open-flame-cooked pies. But the pizzas still hold up against the newbie pack, especially since exec chef Frank Crupi has upped the ante with uniqueto-Miami offerings like a white (tomato-free) New Haven clam pie. Also available: salads, panini, and a tasty meatball appetizer with ricotta. Theres a respectable wine and beer list, too. $$Balans Biscayne6789 Biscayne Blvd., 305-534-9191It took longer than expected, but this Brit imports third Miami venue finally opened, and rather quietly -which has an upside. Its easier to get a table here (and to park, thanks to the free lot on 68th Street) than at Lincoln Road or Brickell. This, along with the venues relatively large, open-to-the-street outdoor area, contributes to a more relaxed, neighborhoodfocused vibe. The fun menu of global comfort food is the same (ranging from a creamy-centered cheese souffl through savory Asian potstickers and, at breakfast, fluffy pecan/maple-garnished pancakes) and prepared as reliably well. $$-$$$

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Dining Guide: RESTAU rR ANT S Dining Guide: RESTAU rR ANT S Blue Collar6730 Biscayne Blvd., 305-756-0366Like its predecessor in this space (Michael Bloises American Noodle Bar), this working-class-themed eatery is helmed by a former fine-dining chef, Daniel Serfer, a Chef Allens vet who now crafts casual, creative fare at prices all can afford. Dishes are eclectic. The roughly dozen veggie dishes alone range from curried cauliflower pure to maduros to bleu cheese roasted asparagus. Shrimp and grits compete with any in Charleston; pork and beans, topped with a perfectly runny fried egg, beats Bostons best. $-$$Boteco916 NE 79th St., 305-757-7735This strip of 79th Street is rapidly becoming a cool alt-culture enclave thanks to inviting hangouts like this rustic indoor/ outdoor Brazilian restaurant and bar. Especially bustling on nights featuring live music, its even more fun on Sundays, when the fenced backyard hosts an informal fair and the menu includes Brazils national dish, feijoada, a savory stew of beans plus fresh and cured meats. But the everyday menu, ranging from unique, tapas-like pasteis to hefty Brazilian entres, is also appealing and budget-priced. $$Chef Creole200 NW 54th St., 305-754-2223Sparkling fresh Creole-style food is the star at chef/owner Wilkinson Sejours two tiny but popular establishments. While some meatier Haitian classics like griot (fried pork chunks) and oxtail stew are also available and a $3.99 roast chicken special seafood is the specialty here: crevette en sauce (steamed shrimp with Creole butter sauce), lambi fri (perfectly tenderized fried conch), poisson gros sel (local snapper in a spicy butter sauce), garlic or Creole crabs. The Miami branch has outdoor tiki-hut dining. $-$$DeVitas7251 Biscayne Blvd., 305-754-8282This Italian/Argentine pizzeria, housed in a charming bungalow and featuring a breezy patio, covers multicultural bases. If the Old World Rucola pizza (a classic Margherita topped with arugula, prosciutto, and shredded parmesan) doesnt do the trick, the New World Especial (a Latin pie with hearts of palm and boiled eggs) just might. Also available are pastas, salads, sandwiches, dinner entres (eggplant parmigiana with spaghetti, lomito steak with Argentinean potato salad), and desserts (tiramisu or flan). $ Dogma Grill7030 Biscayne Blvd. 305-759-3433Since Frankie and Priscilla Crupi took over this hot dog stand, the menu has changed significantly, with some items eliminated (any vegetarian hot dogs, salads, chichi toppings like avocado). But choices have expanded to include new dog choices (brats, Italian sausage, more) plus burgers and other classic eastern U.S. regional urban street foods: New England lobster rolls, New Orleans poboys, Jersey shore cheese Taylors (pork roll), Baltimore crab cake sandwiches, and naturally, Phillys of all sorts -cheese steak and beyond. $-$$ East Side Pizza731 NE 79th St., 305-758-5351Minestrone, sure. But a pizzeria menu with carrot ginger soup? Similarly many Italian-American pizzerias offer entres like spaghetti and meatballs, but East Side also has pumpkin ravioli in brown butter/sage sauce, wild mushroom ravioli, and other surprisingly upscale choices, including imported Peroni beer. As for the pizza, they are classic pies, available whole or by the slice, made with fresh plum tomato sauce and Grande mozzarella (considered the top American pizza cheese). Best seating for eating is at the sheltered outdoor picnic tables. $Garden of Eatin136 NW 62nd St., 305-754-8050Housed in a yellow building thats nearly invisible from the street, the Garden has the comfortable feel of a beach bar, and generous servings of inexpensive Afro-Caribbean vegan food. Large or small plates, with salad and fried sweet plantains (plus free soup for eat-in lunchers), are served for five or seven bucks. Also available are snacks like vegetarian blue corn tacos, desserts like sweet potato pie, and a breakfast menu featuring organic blueberry waffles with soy sausage patties. $Go To Sushi5140 Biscayne Blvd., 305-759-0914This friendly, family-run Japanese fast-food eatery offers original surprises like the Caribbean roll (a festively green parsley-coated maki stuffed with crispy fried shrimp, avocado, sweet plantain, and spicy Mayo), or a wonderfully healthful sesame-seasoned chicken soup with spinach, rice noodles, and sizable slices of poultry. Health ensured, you can the enjoy a guiltless pig-out on Fireballs: fried dumplings of chicken, cabbage, and egg, crusted with quills -really a delectable crunchy noodle mix. $Gourmet Station7601 Biscayne Blvd., 305-762-7229Home-meal replacement, geared to workaholics with no time to cook, has been popular for years. But the Gourmet Station has outlasted most of the competition. Main reason: deceptive healthiness. These are meals that are good for you, yet taste good enough to be bad for you. Favorite items include precision-grilled salmon with lemon-dill yogurt sauce, and lean turkey meatloaf with homemade BBQ sauce sin-free comfort food. Food is available la carte or grouped in multimeal plans customized for individual diners nutritional needs. $$Jimmys East Side Diner7201 Biscayne Blvd., 305-754-3692Open for more than 30 years, Jimmys respects the most important American diner tradition: breakfast at any hour. And now that the place is open for dinner, you can indulge your breakfast cravings for several more hours. There are blueberry hot cakes and pecan waffles; eggs any style, including omelets and open-face frittatas; and a full range of sides: biscuits and sausage gravy, grits, hash, hash browns, even hot oatmeal. And dont forget traditional diner entres like meat loaf, roast turkey, liver and onions, plus burgers, salad platters, and homemade chicken soup. $-$$La Cigale7281 Biscayne Blvd., 305-754-0014Bistro can mean almost anything these days, but with owners who are a husband/wife team recently arrived from Marseille, its not surprising that this neighborhood wine bistro is the classic kind found in France -a home away from home where the contemporary but cozy space is matched by the southern French comfort food coming from the open kitchen. Drop in for drinks and snacks such as artisan cheeses and charcuterie, or enjoy full meals ranging from classic (wine-poached mussels; a boldly sauced steak/frites) to creative (Parma ham-wrapped tuna loin). $$-$$$ Lo De Lea7001 Biscayne Blvd., 305-456-3218 In Casa Toscanas former space, this cute, contemporary parillada is proof that you can have an Argentinean meal and a cholesterol test in the same month. While traditional parillada dishes are tasty, theyre meat/fat-heavy, basically heaps of grilled beef. Here the grill is also used for vegetables (an unusually imaginative assortment, including bok choi, endive, and fennel), two of which are paired with your protein of choice. You can indulge in a mouthwateringly succulent vacio (flank steak), and walk out without feeling like youre the cow. $$-$$$Magnum Lounge709 NE 79th St., 305-757-3368Its a restaurant. Its a lounge. But its decidedly not a typical Miami restolounge, or like anything else in Miami. Forbidding from the outside, on the inside its like a time-trip to a cabaret in pre-WWII Berlin: bordello-red dcor, romantically dim lighting, show-tune live piano bar entertainment, and to match the ambiance, elegantly updated retro food served with style and a smile. For those feeling flush, home-style fried chicken is just like mom used to make in her wildest dreams. $$$Metro Organic Bistro 7010 Biscayne Blvd., 305-751-8756 Big changes have come to Karma the car wash, the first being a separate new name for the revamped restaurant: Metro Organic Bistro, an all-organic fine-dining restaurant where simple preparations reveal and enhance natural flavors. An entirely new menu places emphasis on grilled organic meat and fish dishes. Try the steak frites organic, grass-fed skirt steak with organic chimichurri and fresh-cut fries. Vegetarians will love the organic portabella foccacia. Dine either inside the architectdesigned restaurant or outdoors on the patio. Beer and wine. $-$$$ Michys6927 Biscayne Blvd., 305-759-2001Dont even ask why Michele Bernstein, with a top-chef rsum, not to mention regular Food Network appearances, opened a homey restaurant in an emerging but far from fully gentrified neighborhood. Just be glad she did, as you dine on white almond gazpacho or impossibly creamy ham and blue cheese croquetas. Though most full entres also come in half-size portions (at almost halved prices), the tab can add up fast. The star herself is usually in the kitchen. Parking in the rear off 69th Street. $$$-$$$$ Mi Vida Caf7244 Biscayne Blvd., 305-759-6020At this indoor/outdoor vegetarian and raw-food vegan caf, culinary-school-trained chef/owner Daniela Lagamma produces purist produce-oriented dishes that are easy to understand, like sparkling-fresh salads and smoothies, plus more technique-intensive mock meat or cheese items, based on soy proteins, that satisfy even confirmed carnivores. Particularly impressive on the regular menu: a supe rior Sloppy Joe made with mushroom confit, braised home made seitan, spinach, and rich almond romescu sauce; and cannelloni de verdura, homemade crepes stuffed with spinach and cashew ricotta. Do check the daily specials, too. $$-$$$Moonchine7100 Biscayne Blvd., 305-759-3999Like its Brickell-area sibling Indochine, this friendly Asian bistro serves fare from three nations: Japan, Thailand, and Vietnam. Menus are also similar, split between traditional dishes like pad Thai and East/West fusion creations like the Vampire sushi roll (shrimp tempura, tomato, cilantro, roasted garlic). But it also carves out its own identity with original creations, including yellow curry-spiced fried rice. Nearly everything is low in sodium, fat, and calories. A large rear patio is inviting for dining and entertainment. $$-$$$

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Dining Guide: RESTAU rR ANT SMoshi Moshi 7232 Biscayne Blvd., 786-220-9404This offspring of South Beach old-timer Moshi Moshi is a cross between a sushi bar and an izakaya (Japanese tapas bar). Even more striking than the hip dcor is the foods unusually upscale quality. Sushi ranges from pristine individ ual nigiri to over-the-top maki rolls. Tapas are intriguing, like arabiki sausage, a sweet-savory pork fingerling frank; rarely found in restaurants even in Japan, theyre popular Japanese home-cooking items. And rice-based plates like Japanese curry (richer/sweeter than Indian types) satisfy even the biggest appetites. $-$$$Namaste7420 Biscayne Blvd., 786-536-9050With food served from steam-table-type stations, plus plastic utensils and plates, this neighborhood Indian place is definitely no frills. But its also excellent value for the money, especially if you go for the all-day $8.99 special, which includes two entre items plus sides for which most Indian restaurants charge extra: rice, choice of bread (garlic naan recommended), and refreshing raita. Invest some of your savings in BhelPapri chat, a savory snack featuring crisp chips topped with cilantro-spiked chickpeas, onions, potatoes, yogurt, and piquant tamarind sauce. $-$$News Lounge5582 NE 4th Ct., 305-758-9932Mark Soykas new News is, as its name suggests, more a friendly neighborhood hangout and watering hole than a full-fledged eatery. Nevertheless the menu of light bites is along with other lures like an inviting outdoor patio and rest rooms that resemble eclectic art galleries part of the reason visitors stay for hours. Especially recommended are fat mini-burgers with chipotle ketchup; a brie, turkey, and mango chutney sandwich on crusty baguette; and what many feel is the original cafs Greatest Hit: creamy hummus with warm pita. $Ni.Do. Caffe & Mozzarella Bar7295 Biscayne Blvd., 305-960-7022Dont let this little cafs easily overlooked strip-mall location, or its informal interior, fool you. The warm welcome is authentically Italian, as are cleverly crafted antipasti, simple but full-flavored pastas, and homemade pastries (from rosemary breadsticks to fruit-topped dessert tortas) that will transport your taste buds to Tuscany. And the housemade mozzarella or burrata cheeses -truly milk elevated to royalty -will transport you to heaven. A small market area provides Italian staples, plus superb salumi and the magnificent mozz, to go. $$-$$$Red Light7700 Biscayne Blvd.,305-757-7773From the rustic al fresco deck of chef Kris Wessels intentionally downwardly mobile retro-cool riverfront restaurant, you can enjoy regional wildlife like manatees while enjoying eclectic regional dishes that range from cutting-edge (sour-orangemarinated, sous-vide-cooked Florida lobster with sweet corn sauce) to comfort (crispy-breaded Old South fried green tomatoes). Not surprisingly, the chef-driven menu is limited, but several signature specialties, if available, are not to be missed: BBQ shrimp in a tangy Worcestershire and cayennespiked butter/wine sauce, irresistible mini conch fritters, and homemade ice cream. $$-$$$Royal Bavarian Schnitzel Haus1085 NE 79th St., 305-754-8002With Christmas lights perpetually twinkling and party noises emanating from a new outdoor biergarten, this German restaurant is owner Alex Richters one-man gentrification project, transforming a formerly uninviting stretch of 79th Street one pils at a time. The fare includes housemade sausages (mild veal bratwurst, hearty mixed beef/pork bauernwurst, spicy garlicwurst) with homemade mustard and catsup; savory yet near-greaseless potato pancakes; and, naturally, schnitzels, a choice of delicate pounded pork, chicken, or veal patties served with a half-dozen different sauces. $$-$$$Siam Rice7941 Biscayne Blvd., 305-758-0516Youll find all the familiar favorite Thai and Japanese items here, and prices for curries and noodle dishes (all customizable regarding choice of protein, preparation, and heat level) are especially good at lunch. But dont overlook somewhat pricier specialties like a deep-fried yet near-greaseless bone less half duck with veggies in red curry sauce. Theres also an unusually extensive list of salads, some with inventive fusion touches, like a grilled shrimp/soba salad featuring traditional Thai flavors (sriracha chiles, fish sauce, lime) and Japanese green tea noodles. $-$$$ Soyka5556 NE 4th Court, 305-759-3117Since opening in 1999, Soyka has often been credited with sparking the Upper Eastsides revival. But the 2010 arrival of three Joe Allen veterans as executive chef, pastry chef, and sommelier signaled a culinary revival for the restolounge, always a neighborhood focal point, now more food-focused. The contemporary comfort food menu ranges from fun small plates (deviled eggs with smoked salmon and dill, crisp-fried fiocchi pockets with gorgonzola sauce, oysters Rockefeller) to heftier items like burgers and steak au poivre. And dont miss the sticky date/toffee pudding. $$-$$$ Sushi Siam5582 NE 4th Ct., 305-751-7818On the menu of sushi-bar specialties plus a small selection of Thai and Japanese cooked dishes, there are a few surprises, such as a unique lobster maki thats admittedly huge in price ($25.95), but also in size: six ounces of crisp-fried lobster chunks, plus asparagus, avocado, lettuce, tobiko (flying fish), masago (smelt) roes, and special sauces. Thai dishes come with a choice of more than a dozen sauces, ranging from traditional red or green curries to the inventive, such as an unconventional honey sauce. $$$Uvas6900 Biscayne Blvd., 305-754-9022Formerly UVA 69, this casual-chic caf/lounge, a MiMo neighborhood pioneer, has changed its name and original owners, but remains an all-day-to-late-night hangout. And menu strong points also remain, from fresh-baked pastries and breads to elegant cross-cultural sandwiches (particularly two Latin-inspired upgrades: a classic Cuban with French ham, cornichons, and a baguette; and la minuta, a beer-battered fish fillet on focaccia with cilantro aioli). Whether diners opt for full entres or make a meal of small plates, the subtle global blending makes fusion make sense. $$-$$$Yiyas Gourmet Cuban Bakery646 NE 79th St., 305-754-3337A true community jewel, this bakery is also a most welcoming caf, serving lunch specials from chef Delsa Bernardo (who co-owns the place with attorney Abbie Cuellar) that are homemade right down to the herbs grown on the bakerys window sills. Bernardos pan con lechon sandwiches and flaky-crusted Cuban pastries are legend. But she also crafts treats not found at average Cuban bakeries, like pizzas using housemade Indian naan bread. Additionally Bernardo carries unique treats produced by a few friends: candies, cupcakes, and exotically flavored flans. $ The Crab House1551 79th St. Causeway, 305-868-7085Established in 1975, this Miami fish house was acquired by Landrys in 1996 and is now part of a chain. But the classic dcor (knotty pine walls, tile floors, booths, outdoor waterfront deck) still evokes the good old days. Though the all-you-can-eat seafood/salad buffet ($20 lunch, $30 dinner) is a signature, freshness fanatics will be happiest sticking to la carte favorites like the All-American fishermans platters, or global specials like Szechuan shrimp, that change seasonally. $$$-$$$$Japanese Market and Sushi Deli1412 79th St. Causeway, 305-861-0143Inside a small market that is widely considered Miamis premier source of Japanese foodstuffs, the Sushi Deli restaurant component is nothing more than a lunch counter. But chef Michio Kushi serves up some sushi found nowhere else in town. Example: traditional Osaka-style sushi layers of rice, seasoned seaweed, and marinated fresh mackerel, pressed into a square box, then cut into lovely one-bite sandwich squares. While raw fish is always impeccable here, some unusual vegetarian sushi creations also tempt, as do daily entres. $Oggi Caffe1666 79th St. Causeway, 305-866-1238This cozy, romantic spot started back in 1989 as a pasta factory (supplying numerous high-profile restaurants) as well as a neighborhood eatery. And the wide range of budget-friendly, homemade pastas, made daily, remains the main draw for its large and loyal clientele. Choices range from homey, meaty lasagna to luxuriant crab ravioli with creamy lobster sauce, with occasional forays into creative exotica such as seaweed spaghettini, with sea scallops, shitakes, and fresh tomatoes. $$-$$$Shuckers Bar & Grill1819 79th St. Causeway, 305-866-1570Cheap eats and a million-dollar view is the sound bite manager Philip Conklin uses to describe this outdoor beach bar, hidden in back of a bayfront motel. The joint dates from South Beachs late 1980s revival, but the kick-off-your-shoes vibe couldnt be farther from SoBe glitz. The food ranges from classic bar favorites (char-grilled wings, conch fritters, raw or steamed shellfish) to full dinners featuring steak, homemade pasta, or fresh, not frozen, fish. $-$$Sushi Siam1524 NE 79th St. Causeway, 305-864-7638(See Miami / Upper Eastside listing)Trio on the Bay1601 79th St. Causeway, 305-866-1234Several ventures have failed in this expansive indoor/outdoor waterfront space, but thats hard to imagine once youve experienced this stunning incarnation as an exciting yet affordable restaurant/nightclub where food definitely doesnt play second fiddle to entertainment. Former Crystal Caf chef Klime Kovaceski created the original menu, and among his dishes still available is the filet mignon atop surprisingly pistachio-studded barnaise sauce. Now there is a range of Mediterranean offerings as well, from grilled calamari steaks to mahi picatta. $$$ Caf Prima Pasta 414 71st St., 305-867-0106Who says old dogs cant learn new tricks? Opened in 1993 (with 28 seats), the Cea familys now-sprawling trattoria has added inventive chef Carlos Belon and modern menu items, including fiocchi rapera (pear/cheese-filled pasta purses with

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Dining Guide: RESTAU rR ANT S truffled prosciutto cream sauce), an unlikely (soy sauce and parmesan cheese?) but luscious Italian/Japanese fusion tuna carpaccio, and fresh-fruit sorbets. But traditionalists neednt worry. All the old favorites, from the cafs famed beef car paccio to eggplant parm and pastas sauced with ArgentineItalian indulgence, are still here and still satisfying. $$$-$$$$ KChapas1130 Normandy Dr., 305864-8872Formerly the Peruvian restaurant Pachamama, this space is now both Peruvian and Venezuelan -but not fusion. The Venezuelan sisters who run the place keep dishes true to country. Most Big Food comes from Peru: fresh ceviches, classic cooked entres. But its the Venezuelan breakfast/ snack items that keep us coming, especially signature cachapas, somewhat similar to arepas but harder to find in restaurants. These moist pancakes, made from ground corn kernels instead of just corn meal, are folded over salty white cheese for a uniquely bold balance of sweetness and savor. $-$$Lous Beer Garden7337 Harding Ave., 305-704-7879Beer garden conjures up an image of Bavarian bratwurst, lederhosen, and oompah bands -none of which youll find here. Its actually a hip hideaway in the New Hotels poolpatio area, a locals hangout with interesting eclectic fare and a perennial party atmosphere. Especially recommended: delicately pan-fried mini-crab cakes served with several house made sauces; hefty bleu cheese burgers with Belgian-style double-cooked fries; blackened angry shrimp with sweet/ sour sauce; fried fresh sardines. And of course much beer, a changing list of craft brews. $$-$$$Rouge CineCafe908 71st St., 305-865-5955 This friendly cafs dcor is indeed playfully red, and the cine refers to vintage films projected unobtrusively on a wall. But the main attraction is the French and Moroccan food, both genres as authentically homey as youll find in the homes of those cuisines. For hearty eaters, exotically spiced tagine stews, like lamb with prunes, are the way to go. Grazers will find Rouges bocaditos (evocatively French saucisson sec, or Moroccan merguez sausage with grilled onions and hot harissa sauce, both on crusty Boulart bread) irresistible -as are housemade desserts. $$-$$$ Tamarind Thai 946 Normandy Dr., 305-861-6222When an eaterys executive chef is best-selling Thai cookbook author Vatcharin Bhumichitr, youd expect major media hype, fancy South Beach prices, and a fancy SoBe address. Instead Bhumichitr joined forces with Day Longsomboon (an old Thai school pal whod moved to Miami) at this unpretentious, authentic (no sushi) neighborhood place. Some standout dishes here are featured in the chefs latest tome, but with Tamarinds very affordable prices, you might as well let the mans impeccably trained kitchen staff do the work for you. $$-$$$The Wine Market908 71st St., 305-865-6465This rustic-chic wine shop, tapas bar, and restaurant is the sort of place that every emerging neighborhood needs. The wine stock isnt huge but the selection is thoughtful, with many bottles priced from $10 to $20. Take it home or pay a small corkage fee and drink on-premises over a meal centered on typical Parisian bistro entres like steak or moules frites (the latter regularly available all-you-can-eat). If youd prefer going the tapas bar route, highlights include a silky cognac/truffle chicken liver mousse and battered shrimp with remoulade sauce to make your own poboy crostinis. $$-$$$ Cte Gourmet9999 NE 2nd Ave., #112, 305-754-9012If only every Miami neighborhood could have a neighborhood restaurant like this low-priced little French jewel. The menu is mostly simple stuff: breakfast croissants, crpe, soups, sandwiches, salads, sweets, and a few more substantial spe cials like a Tunisian-style brik (buttery phyllo pastry stuffed with tuna, onions, potatoes, and tomatoes) with a mesclun side salad. But everything is homemade, including all breads, and prepared with impeccable ingredients, classic French technique, and meticulous attention to detail, down to the stylish plaid ribbons that hold together the cafs baguette sandwiches. $-$$ Iron Sushi 9432 NE 2nd Ave., 305-754-0311With three Biscayne Corridor outlets (plus several branches elsewhere in town), this mostly take-out mini chain is fast becoming the Sushi Joint That Ate Miami. And why do Miamians eat here? Not ambiance. There isnt any. But when friends from the Pacific Northwest, where foodies know their fish, tout the seafoods freshness, we listen. There are some surprisingly imaginative makis, like the Maharaja, featuring fried shrimp and drizzles of curry Mayo. And where else will you find a stacked sushi (five assorted makis) birthday cake? $-$$ Miami Shores Country Club10000 Biscayne Blvd., 305-795-2363Formerly members-only, the restaurant/lounge facilities of this classy 1939 club are now open to the public always, lunch and dinner. Not surprisingly, ambiance is retro and relaxed, with golf course views from both bar and indoor/ outdoor dining room. The surprise is the food some classic (steaks, club sandwiches) but other dishes quite contemporary: an Asian ahi tuna tower; a lavish candied-walnut, poached-pear, grilled chicken salad; and fresh pasta specials. Prices are phenomenal, with dinner entres $9 to $17; drinks average $3 to $4. $$ PizzaFiore9540 NE 2nd Ave., 305-754-1924Owned by Arcoub Abderrahim, who opened South Beachs original PizzaFiore way back in 1996, this caf serves the kind of nostalgic, medium-thin crusted, oozing-with-gooey-cheese pizzas reminiscent of our childhood pies in northern NJ Sopranos territory, except now there are options for todays toppings -sundried tomatoes, buffalo mozzarella, etc. But theres also a full menu of Italian-American classics, including antipasto salads, subs, and particularly popular, pastas. Garlic rolls are a must, but we didnt have to tell you that. $-$$ Alaska Coffee Roasting Co.13130 Biscayne Blvd., 786-332-4254When people speak of the West Coast as the USAs quality coffeehouse pioneer territory, theyre thinking Seattle -and then south through coastal California. North to Alaska? Not so much. But owner Michael Gesser did indeed open this hip places parent in Fairbanks back in 1993, after years of traveling through every coffee-growing country in the world. Brews like signature smooth yet exotic Ethiopian Yirgacheffe dont even need cream or sugar, much less frappe frou-frou. All beans are house-roasted. Theres solid food, too: brickoven pizzas, salads, sandwiches, and pastries. $-$$ Bagel Bar East1990 NE 123rd St., 305-895-7022Crusty outside (even without toasting) and substantially chewy inside, the bagels here are the sort homesick ex-New Yorkers always moan are impossible to find in Miami. For those who prefer puffed-up, pillowy bagels? Forget it. Have a nice onion pocket. Theres also a full menu of authentic Jewish deli specialties, including especially delicious, customcut -not pre-sliced -nova or lox. Super size sandwiches easily serve two, and theyll even improvise a real NJ Sloppy Joe (two meats, Swiss, coleslaw, and Russian dressing on rye) if you ask nice. $$Bagels & Co.11064 Biscayne Blvd., 305-892-2435While this place is often referred to as Guns & Bagels, one cant actually buy a gun here. The nickname refers to its location next to a firearms shop. But theres a lot of other stuff aside from bagels here, including a full range of sandwiches and wraps. Breakfast time is busy time, with banana-walnut pancakes especially popular. But whats most important is that this is one of the areas few sources of the real, New York-style water bagel: crunchy outside, challengingly chewy inside. $Bulldog Barbecue/Bulldog Burger15400 Biscayne Blvd., 305-940-9655These adjacent restaurants are really one place with two dining areas, since they connect and diners can order from either menu. They also share a BBQ/burger master: Top Chef contender Howie Kleinberg, whose indoor electric smoker produces mild-tasting cue ranging from the expected pulled pork, ribs, brisket, and chicken to more unusual items like hot-smoked salmon. As for burgers, many feature unique ingredients such as mayo flavored like red-eye gravy, with strong coffee, or the bun of the infamous Luther: a sweetglazed mock (holeless) Krispy Kreme donut. Costs are comparatively high, but such is the price of fame. $$-$$$Cane Sucre899 NE 125th St.,305-891-0123From the Vega brothers (who pioneered the Design and MiMo districts with, respectively, the original Cane A Sucre and UVA 69), this charming artisanal sandwich bar is the perfect breakfast/lunch stop before or after ingesting visual arts at nearby MOMA. Actually, creations like El Fig (fig confit, gorgonzola cheese, walnuts, and honey on an authentically French crisp-crusted fresh-baked baguette) are art in their own right. Inventive, substantial salads, sides, daily soups, and homemade sweets (including mouthwateringly buttery croissants) complete the menu. $-$$ Captain Jims Seafood12950 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-892-2812This market/restaurant was garnering critical acclaim even when eat-in dining was confined to a few Formica tables in front of the fish counter, owing to the freshness of its seafood, much of it from Capt. Jim Hansons own fishing boats, which supply many top restaurants. Now theres a casual but pleasantly nautical side dining room with booths. Whether its garlicky scampi, smoked-fish dip, grilled yellowtail or hog or mutton snapper, perfectly tenderized cracked conch or conch fritters, everything is deftly prepared and bargain-priced. $$ Casa Mia Trattoria 1950 NE 123rd St., 305-899-2770Tucked away, off to the side on the approach to the Broad Causeway and the beaches, this charming indoor/outdoor trattoria seems to attract mostly neighborhood regulars. But even newcomers feel like regulars after a few minutes, thanks to the staffs Italian ebullience. Menu offerings are mostly classic comfort foods with some contemporary items as well. Housemade pastas are good enough that low-carb dieters should take a break, especially for the tender gnocchi with pesto or better yet, delicate fagottini beggars purses stuffed with pears and cheese. $$

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Chen-huyae15400 Biscayne Blvd., 305-956-2808Diners can get some Tex-Mex dishes here, if they must. But the specialty is Mayan-rooted Yucatan cuisine. So why blow bucks on burritos when one can sample Caribbean Mexicos most typical dish: cochinita pibil? Chens authentically succulent version of the pickle-onion-topped marinated pork dish is earthily aromatic from achiote, tangy from bitter oranges, and meltingly tender from slow cooking in a banana leaf wrap. To accompany, try a lime/ soy/chili-spiced michelada, also authentically Mexican, and possibly the best thing that ever happened to dark beer. $$-$$$Chef Creole13105 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-893-4246(See Miami listing)Flip Burger Bar1699 NE 123rd St.,305-741-3547 Casual-chic burger bars, everywhere in South Beach, are still rare farther north. One reason this easy-to-miss venue is a must-not-miss for North Miami locals: The hefty half-pounders on fresh brioche buns include a scrumptious patty with Gruyere, mushrooms, and onion marmalade. The Fireman is a jalapeo/chipotle scorcher. There are even turkey and veggie variations. Other draws are hand-cut fries, beer-battered onion rings, a top-drawer beer list, budget-priced combo specials, conversation-friendly acoustics, and a South Beach rarity: free parking. $-$$Giraffas1821 NE 123rd St., 786-866-9007Festooned with eye-poppingly colored panels and giraffes -subtler but everywhere -this first North American branch of a wildly popular, 30-year-old Brazilian fast/casual chain is the flagship of a planned 4000 U.S. Giraffas. Given that the steaks, especially the tender, flavorful picanha, rival those at the most upscale rodizio joints -and beat the sword-wielding grandstanders for custom cooking (because staff asks your preference) -wed bet on giraffe domination. Overstuffed grilled sandwiches, salads, even tasty veggie options are all here, too. The cheese bread is a must. $$Happy Sushi & Thai2224 NE 123rd St.,305-895-0165Grab a booth at this cozy eatery, which serves all the expected Thai and sushi bar standards, including weekday lunch specials. But there are also delightful surprises, like grilled kawahagi (triggerfish) with seasoned Japanese mayonnaise. This intensely savory/sweet Japanese home cooking treat satisfies the same yen as beef jerky, except without pulling out your teeth. Accompanied by a bowl of rice, its a superb lunch. For raw-fish fans, spicy, creamy salmon tartare (accompanied by hiyashi wakame seaweed) is a winner. $$-$$$ Here Comes the Sun2188 NE 123rd St., 305-893-5711At this friendly natural foods establishment, one of Miamis first, theres a full stock of vitamins and nutritional supplements. But the places hearty soups, large variety of entres (including fresh fish and chicken as well as vegetarian selections), lighter bites like miso burgers with secret sun sauce (which would probably make old sneakers taste good), and daily specials are a tastier way to get healthy. An under-tenbuck early-bird dinner is popular with the former long-hair, now blue-hair, crowd. Frozen yogurt, fresh juices, and smoothies complete the menu. $-$$Il Piccolo Caf2112 NE 123rd St., 305-893-6538Talk about a neighborhood institution. The owners of this longtime Italian eatery remember frequent visits from Miami native Michelle Bernstein and her parents -when the celebrity chef was a kid. The place is still child-friendly, and though the piccolo space is indeed small, portions are prodigious. Most dishes will evoke nostalgia, including our own favorite white-wine-sauce-drenched sin -lemony egg-battered veal piccata with capers and artichokes. But there are surprises not found at most old school red-sauce joints, too, like lunchtimes surprisingly tasty Cuban sandwich. $$Le Griot de Madame John975 NE 125th St., 305-892-9333When Madame moved her base of operations from her Little Haiti home to a real restaurant (though a very informal one, and still mostly take-out), she began offering numerous traditional Haitian dishes, including jerked beef or goat tassot and an impressive poisson gros sel (a whole fish rubbed with salt before poaching with various veggies and spices). But the dish that still packs the place is the griot: marinated pork chunks simmered and then fried till theyre moistly tender inside, crisp and intensely flavored outside. $Little Havana 12727 Biscayne Blvd. 305-899-9069In addition to white-tablecoth ambiance, this place features live Latin entertainment and dancing, making it a good choice when diners want a night out, not just a meal. Its also a good choice for diners who dont speak Spanish, but dont worry about authenticity. Classic Cuban home-style dishes like mojo-marinated lechon asado, topped with onions, and juicy ropa vieja are translated on the menu, not the plate, and fancier creations like pork filet in tangy tamarind sauce seem universal crowd-pleasers. $$$Los Antojos11099 Biscayne Blvd., 305-892-1411If its Sunday, it must be sancocho de gallina, Colombias national dish. If its Saturday, it must be ajiaco. Both are thick chicken soups, full meals in a bowl. For Colombian-cuisine novices, a bandeja paisa (sampler including rice, beans, carne asada, chicharron, eggs, sauted sweet plantains, and an arepa corn cake) is available every day, as are antojitos little whims, smaller snacks like chorizo con arepa (a corn cake with Colombian sausage). And for noncarnivores there are several hefty seafood platters, made to order. $$Mama Jennies11720 NE 2nd Ave. 305-757-3627For more than 35 years this beloved red-sauce joint has been drawing students and other starvation-budget diners with prodigious portions of lasagna, spaghetti and meatballs (the latter savory yet light-textured), veal marsala topped with a mountain of mushrooms, and other Italian-American bellybusters. All pasta or meat entres come with oil-drenched garlic rolls and either soup (hearty minestrone) or a salad (mixed greens, tomatoes, cukes, brined olives, and pickled peppers) thats a dinner in itself. Rustic roadhouse ambiance, notably the red leatherette booths, add to Mamas charm. $-$$Pastry Is Art12591 Biscayne Blvd., 305-640-5045Given owner Jenny Rissones background as the Eden Rocs executive pastry chef, its not surprising that her cakes and other sweet treats (like creamy one-bite truffle lollipops) look as flawlessly sophisticated as they taste -perfect adult party fare. What the bakerys name doesnt reveal is that its also a breakfast and lunch caf, with unusual baking-oriented fare: a signature sandwich of chicken, brie, and caramelized peaches and pecans on housemade bread; quiches; pot pies; even a baked-to-order Grand Marnier souffl. The pecan sticky buns are irresistible. $$ Petit Rouge12409 Biscayne Blvd., 305-892-7676From the mid-1990s (with Neals Restaurant and later with Il Migliore), local chef Neal Coopers neighborhood-oriented Italian eateries have been crowd-pleasers. While this cute 32-seat charmer is French, its no exception, avoiding pre tense and winning fans with both classic and nouvelle bistro fare: frise salad with lardons, poached egg, and bacon vinaigrette; truite Grenobloise (trout with lemon/caper sauce); consomm with black truffles and foie gras, covered by a buttery puff pastry dome; perfect pommes frites, and equally perfect apple or lemon tarts for dessert. $$$Rice House of Kabob14480 Biscayne Blvd., 305-944-4899Since 2006, South Beachs original Rice House has been serving up mountainous platters of basmati rice and Greek salad topped with Persian-style marinated/char-grilled meat, poultry, seafood, or veggie kabobs -for very little money. This

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branch of what is now a growing chain has the same menu (which also features wraps, for lighter eaters) and the same policy of custom-cooking kabobs, so expect fresh, not fast, food. Sides of must-o-keyar and must-o-mooseer (thick yogurt dips with herbed cukes or shallots) are must-haves. $$ Smashburger14730 Biscayne Blvd., 786-406-6614Two things distinguish the griddled patties of this Denverbased chain, touted as the nations fastest-growing better burger restaurant, from other better burgers: a nod to local tastes (like toppings of fried chorizo and potato fritas), and the smashing technique, producing an appealing thickly crusted exterior. Got burger overkill? Substitute chicken, or have a salad. An added draw: unusual veggie sides, which go beyond regular and sweet potato fries to crisp onion strings, veggie frites (carrots, string beans), and an Old South fishcamp classic: fried pickles. $-$$Steves Pizza12101 Biscayne Blvd., 305-891-0202At the end of a debauched night of excess, some paper-thin designer pizza with wisps of smoked salmon (or similar fluff) doesnt do the trick. Open till 3:00 or 4:00 a.m., Steves has, since 1974, been serving the kind of comforting, retro pizzas people crave at that hour. As in Brooklyn, tomato sauce is sweet, with strong oregano flavor. Mozzarella is applied with abandon. Toppings are stuff that give strength: pepperoni, sausage, meatballs, onions, and peppers. $Tiny Thai House12953 Biscayne Blvd., 305-895-1646The space is tiny. The menu, which features Thai specialties but includes sushi plus Japanese appetizers and entres, is not. Despite the huge selection of sushi/Thai restaurant standards, though, dont overlook items harder to find in America, like floating noodle soup, a popular street food from Thailands boat-based market stalls; similar in savor to Vietnamese pho, the dish contains beef, bean sprouts, and noodles heaped in umami-rich beef broth. Among the nicely priced sushi selections, the Mylo roll (tuna, salmon, crab, avo cado, and cuke, topped with tempura fish and eel sauce) is a tasty pick. Dont miss sticky rice with mango for dessert. $Wongs Chinese Restaurant12420 Biscayne Blvd., 305-891-4313The menu reads like a textbook on how to please everyone, with food ranging from traditional Chinese to ChineseAmerican to just plain American. Appetizers include honey garlic chicken wings or Buffalo wings. A crab-claw starter comes with choice of pork fried rice or French fries. Seafood lovers can get shrimp chop suey, or salty pepper shrimp (authentically shell-on). And New Yorkers will find a number of dishes that are mainstays of Manhattan Szechuan menus but not common in Miami: cold sesame noodles, Hunan chicken, twice-cooked pork. $$Woodys Famous Steak Sandwich13105 Biscayne Blvd., 305-891-1451The griddle has been fired up since 1954 at this indie fastfood joint, and new owners have done little to change the time-tested formula except to stretch operating hours into the night and expand its classic menu to include a few healthconscious touches like Caesar salad, plus a note proclaiming their oils are free of trans fats. Otherwise the famous steak sandwich is still a traditional Philly. Drippin good burgers, too. And unlike MacChain addicts, patrons here can order a cold beer with the good grease. $-$$ Bamboo Garden1232 NE 163rd St., 305-945-1722Big enough for a banquet (up to 300 guests), this veteran is many diners favorite on the 163rd/167th Street Chinatown strip because of its superior dcor. But the menu also offers well-prepared, authentic dishes like peppery black bean clams, sauted mustard greens, and steamed whole fish with ginger and scallions, plus Chinese-American egg foo young. Default spicing is mild even in Szechuan dishes marked with red-chili icons, but dont worry; realizing some like it hot, the chefs will customize spiciness to heroic heat levels upon request. $$Blue Marlin Fish House 2500 NE 163rd St., 305-957-8822Located inside Oleta River State Park, this casual outdoor eatery is a rare surprise for nature lovers. The featured item is still the house-smoked fish this historic venue began pro ducing in 1938, available in three varieties: salmon, mahi mahi, and the signature blue marlin. But the smokehouse now also turns out ribs and delectable brisket. Other new additions include weekend fish fries. Entry is directly from 163rd Street, not through the main park entrance. No admission fee. $ Chipotle Mexican Grill14776 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-2779Proving that national fast-food chains dont have to be bad for either diners or the environment, Chipotle serves what the company calls food with integrity. The fare is simple, basically tacos and big burritos: soft flour or crisp corn to rtillas stuffed with chipotle-marinated steak or chicken chunks, bolder shredded beef barbacoa, or herb-scented pork carnitas. But these bites contain no evil ingredients (transfats, artificial color/flavor, antibiotics, growth hormones). And the food, while not the authentic Mex street stuff dreams are made of, is darned tasty, too. $Cholos Ceviche & Grill1127 NE 163rd St., 305-947-3338Dont be misled by the mini-mall location, or the relatively minimal prices (especially during lunch, when specials are under $6). Inside, the dcor is charming, and the Peruvian plates elegant in both preparation and presentation. Tops among ceviches/tiraditos is the signature Cholos, marinated octopus and fish in a refined rocoto chili sauce with overtones both fiery and fruity. And dont miss the molded causas, whipped potato rings stuffed with avocado-garnished crab salad -altogether lighter and lovelier than the tasty but oily mashed spud constructions more oft encountered in town. $-$$Christines Roti Shop16721 NE 6th Ave.,305-770-0434Wraps are for wimps. At this small shop run by Christine Gouvela, originally from British Guyana, the wrapper is a far more substantial and tasty roti, a Caribbean mega-crepe made from chickpea flour. Most popular filling for the flatbread is probably jerk chicken, bone-in pieces in a spiced stew of potatoes, cabbage, carrots, onions, and more chickpeas. But there are about a dozen other curries from which to choose. Take-out packages of plain roti are also available; they transform myriad leftovers into tasty, portable lunches. $ Duffys Sports Grill Intracoastal Mall3969 NE 163rd St., 305-760-2124Located in a sprawling indoor/outdoor space at the Intracoastal Mall, Duffys, part of a popular chain that identifies as the official sports grill of every major Miami team, features roughly a zillion TVs and an equally mega-size menu of accessibly Americanized, globally inspired dishes designed to please crowds: stuffed potato skins, crab Rangoon, coconut-crusted fish fingers with orange-ginger sauce, jumbo wings of many flavors. Imagine a sports-oriented Cheesecake Factory. What makes this particular Duffys different and better? Location, location, location -fronting the Intracoastal Waterway. Theres even a swimming pool with its own bar. $$-$$$ Empire Szechuan Gourmet of NY3427 NE 163rd St., 305-949-3318In the 1980s, Empire became the Chinese chain that swallowed Manhattan -and transformed public perceptions of Chinese food in the NY metropolitan area. Before: bland faux-Cantonese dishes. After: lighter, more fiery fare from Szechuan and other provinces. This Miami outpost does serve chop suey and other Americanized items, but dont worry. Stick with Szechuan crispy prawns, Empires Special Duck, cold sesame noodles, or similar pleasantly spicy spe cialties, and youll be a happy camper, especially if youre an ex-New Yorker. $$ rfntbrbrnfffnnfbnbrbr ORIGINALBAVARIANBIERGARTEN 899 NE 125th street 305-891-0123 -a Monday thru Saturday 9:00m9:00pmOpen Mon-Satbreakf ast lunch dinner brought to you by the Vega Brothers, creators of The original Cane A Sucre in the Design District and UVA 69 Restaurant and Lounge 1035 N. Miami Avenue, Miami, FL 33136 | 305-961-7887 www.TheCornerMiami.com | facebook.com/the.corner.miami.ave OPEN LATE

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El Gran Inka3155 NE 163rd St., 305-940-4910Though diners at this upscale Peruvian eatery will find ceviches, a hefty fried-seafood jalea, and Perus other expected traditional specialties, all presented far more elegantly than most in town, the contemporary Peruvian fusion creations are unique. Especially recommended are two dishes adapted from recipes by Perus influential nikkei (Japanese/Creole) chef Rosita Yimura: an exquisite, delicately sauced tiradito de corvina, and for those with no fear of cholesterol, pulpo de oliva (octopus topped with rich olive sauce). $$$-$$$$ Ginza Japanese Buffet16153 Biscayne Blvd., 305-944-2192Highlighting the lunch and dinners spreads at this all-youcan-eat Japanese buffet are a hibachi station (where chefs custom-cook diners choice of seafood or meat), plus many types of maki rolls and individual nigiri sushi, both featuring a larger variety of seafood than at many sushi bars -not just salmon and tuna but snapper, escolar, surf clam, snow crab, and more. But there are also steam-tabled hot Japanese and Chinese dishes; an array of cold shellfish and salads with mix-and-match sauces; and desserts. Selections vary, but value-for-money is a given. $$Green House Organic Food Restaurant3207 NE 163rd St., 305-594-6787The name sounds a bit healthfoody, but theres no crunchy granola here. Argentine-born, globally traveling chef Marcelo Marino, whos also an instructor at Le Cordon Bleu Miami, uses only organic and/or sustainable produce and proteins to serve upscale avant-garde fusion fare: halibut atop traditional French Nantua (creamy lobster) sauce, with lemongrass/saffron-infused faro risotto; octopus with delicate black radish tempura and coconut/pineapple/tea foam; and similar stuff requiring mad skills in both classic cooking and molecular gastronomy. Breads, cheeses, and cured meats are all made in-house, too. $$$ Hannas Gourmet Diner13951 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-2255When Sia and Nicole Hemmati bought the Gourmet Diner from retiring original owner Jean-Pierre Lejeune in the late 1990s, they added Hannas to the name, but changed little else about this retro-looking French/American diner, a north Miami-Dade institution since 1983. Customers can get a cheeseburger or garlicky escargots, meatloaf in tomato sauce or boeuf bourguignon in red wine sauce, iceberg lettuce and tomatoes, or a mushroom and squid salad with garlic dressing. For oysters Rockefeller/tuna-melt couples from Venus and Mars, it remains the ideal dinner date destination. $$-$$$ Hiro Japanese Restaurant3007 NE 163rd St., 305-948-3687One of Miamis first sushi restaurants, Hiro retains an amusing retro-glam feel, an extensive menu of both sushi and cooked Japanese food, and late hours that make it a perennially popular after-hours snack stop. The sushi menu has few surprises, but quality is reliable. Most exceptional are the nicely priced yakitori, skewers of succulently soy-glazed and grilled meat, fish, and vegetables; the unusually large variety available of the last makes this place a good choice for vegetarians. $$ Hiros Sushi Express17048 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-949-0776Tiny, true, but theres more than just sushi at this mostly take-out spin-off of the pioneering Hiro. Makis are the mainstay (standard stuff like California rolls, more complex creations like multi-veg futomaki, and a few unexpected treats like a spicy Crunch & Caliente maki), available la carte or in value-priced individual and party combo platters. But there are also bento boxes featuring tempura, yakitori skewers, teriyaki, stir-fried veggies, and udon noodles. Another branch is now open in Miamis Upper Eastside. $Heelsha1550 NE 164th St., 305-919-8393If unusual Bangladeshi dishes like fiery pumpkin patey (cooked with onion, green pepper, and pickled mango) or Heelsha curry (succulently spiced hilsa, Bangladeshs sweet-fleshed national fish) seem familiar, its because chef/ owner Bithi Begum and her husband Tipu Raman once served such fare at the critically acclaimed Renaisa. Their menus mix-and-match option allows diners to pair their choice of meat, poultry, fish, or vegetable with more than a dozen regional sauces, from familiar Indian styles to exotica like satkara, flavored with a Bangladeshi citrus reminiscent of sour orange. $$-$$$Jerusalem Market and Deli16275 Biscayne Blvd., 305-948-9080Specialties like shawarma, spinach pies, kebabs, hummus, and kibbeh (a savory mix of ground lamb and bulgur) are native to many Middle East countries, but when a Lebanese chef/owner, like this eaterys Sam Elzoor, is at the helm, you can expect extraordinary refinement. There are elaborate daily specials here, like lemon chicken or stuffed cabbage with a variety of sides, but even a common falafel sandwich is special when the pita is also stuffed with housemade cabbage and onion salads, plus unusually rich and tart tahina. $-$$Kabobji3055 NE 163rd St., 305-354-8484This place makes a very good tahini sauce. In fact that alone is reason enough to visit. We prefer ours with this bright, cheery eaterys delightfully oniony falafel or a veg-garnished wrap of thin-sliced marinated beef schwarma. They also do a beautifully spiced, and reassuringly fresh-tasting, raw kibbi naye (Middle Eastern steak tartare). Its hard to resist putting together a grazing meal of starters and wraps, but theres also a roster of full entres (with soup or salad plus starch), including tempting vegetarian and seafood meals for noncarnivores. $$Kebab Indian Restaurant514 NE 167th St., 305-940-6309Since the 1980s this restaurant, located in an unatmospheric mini strip mall but surprisingly romantic inside (especially if you grab one of the exotically draped booths) has been a popular destination for reasonably priced north Indian fare. Kormas are properly soothing and vindaloos are satisfactorily searing, but the kitchen will adjust seasonings upon request. They aim to please. Food arrives unusually fast for an Indian eatery, too. $$King Palace330 NE 167th St. 305-949-2339The specialties here are authentic Chinatown-style barbecue (whole ducks, roast pork strips, and more, displayed in a glass case by the door), and fresh seafood dishes, the best made with the live fish swimming in two tanks by the dining room entrance. Theres also a better-than-average selection of seasonal Chinese veggies. The menu is extensive, but the best ordering strategy, since the place is usually packed with Asians, is to see what looks good on nearby tables, and point. $$ Kings County Pizza18228 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-792-9455If your feelings about Brooklyn-style pizza have been formed by Dominos flopsy-crusted, ketchupy, cheesefoody pies, stop here to sample a slice of the real thing. Admittedly, the crusts are not those of the coal-fired classics from Brooklyns legendary Totonnos or Grimaldis, but theyre similarly mediumthin and crisp -though not like a cracker; you can fold them for neat street eating, and they taste like honest bread, not cardboard. A variety of toppings are available even on slices. There are also whole pies with varied toppings. The large is humongous. $-$$ KoneFood387 NE 167th St., 305-705-4485Cones contain ice cream. Kones, however, contain anything and everything edible -at least at this eatery, locally founded (though the original concept of ultimate portable convenience meals, in sealed flatbread cones, came from Italy). In their melting-pot American version, kone fillings range from breakfast items like huevos rancheros to Thai chicken, chicken curry, coconut shrimp, kones kon lechon (slow-roasted pork with mojo), various pizzas, BBQ, chicken Florentine, healthy green salads, more. There are even desserts like a flambed apple Kone la Normande. Authentic Belgian frites, too. $ Lime Fresh Mexican Grill14831 Biscayne Blvd., 305-949-8800(See Midtown / Wynwood / Design District listing)Laurenzos Market Caf16385 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-945-6381Its just a small area between the wines and the fridge counters no potted palms, and next-to-no service in this cafeteria-style space. But when negotiating this international gourmet markets packed shelves and crowds has depleted your energies, its a handy place to refuel with eggplant parmesan and similar Italian-American classics, housemade from old family recipes. Just a few spoonfuls of Wednesdays hearty pasta fagiole, one of the daily soup specials, could keep a person shopping for hours. And now that pizza master Carlo is manning the wood-fired oven, you can sample the thinnest, crispiest pies outside Napoli. $-$$Little Saigon16752 N. Miami Ave., 305-653-3377This is Miamis oldest traditional Vietnamese restaurant, but its still packed most weekend nights. So even the places biggest negative its hole-in-the-wall atmosphere, not encouraging of lingering visits becomes a plus since it ensures fast turnover. Chef/owner Lily Tao is typically in the kitchen, crafting green papaya salad, flavorful beef noodle pho (served with greens, herbs, and condiments that make it not just a soup but a whole ceremony), and many other Vietnamese classics. The menu is humongous. $-$$The Melting Pot15700 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-2228 For 1950s and 1960s college students, fondue pots were standard dorm accessories. These days, however, branches of this chain are generally the only places to go for this eating experience. Start with a wine-enriched four-cheese fondue; proceed to an entre with meat or seafood, plus choice of cooking potion (herbed wine, bouillon, or oil); finish with fruits and cakes dipped in melted chocolate. Fondue etiquette dictates that diners who drop a skewer in the pot must kiss all other table companions, so go with those you love. $$$New China Buffet940 North Miami Beach Blvd., 305-957-7266The venue (a former Bennigans) is clean, casual, and not kitschy. The all-you-can-eat fare is voluminous -scores of Chinese dishes (recommended: Mongolian pork, spicy garlic shrimp, and surprisingly authentic steamed fish with ginger and scallion); international oddities (pizza, plantains, pigs-in-blankets); plus sushi, salad, and pastry/ ice cream bars. And the price is sure right. Lunch is $6.75 ($7.75 Saturday and Sunday). Dinner features more seafood, $9.55. Theres an inexpensive take-out option, too, and reduced kids prices. $Oishi Thai14841 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-4338 At this stylish Thai/sushi spot, try the menu of specials, many of which clearly reflect the young chefs fanatical devotion to fresh fish, as well as the time he spent in the kitchen of Knob: broiled miso-marinated black cod; rock shrimp tempura with creamy sauce; even Nobu Matsuhisas new style sashimi (slightly surface-seared by drizzles of hot olive and sesame oil). The specials menu includes some Thai-inspired creations, too, such as veal massaman curry, Chilean sea bass curry, and sizzling filet mignon with basil sauce. $$$-$$$$Panya Thai520 NE 167th St., 305-945-8566Unlike authentic Chinese cuisine, theres no shortage of genuine Thai food in and around Miami. But Panyas chef/ owner, a Bangkok native, offers numerous regional and/ or rare dishes not found elsewhere. Plus he doesnt auto matically curtail the heat or sweetness levels to please Americans. Among the most intriguing: moo khem phad wan (chewy deep-fried seasoned pork strips with fiery tamarind dip, accompanied by crisp green papaya salad); broad rice noodles stir-fried with eye-opening chili/garlic sauce and fresh Thai basil; and chili-topped Diamond Duck in tangy tamarind sauce. $$-$$$ Paquitos16265 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-5027From the outside, this strip-mall Mexican eatery couldnt be easier to overlook. Inside, however, its festivity is impossible to resist. Every inch of wall space seems to be covered with South of the Border knickknacks. And if the kitschy dcor alone doesnt cheer you, the quickly arriving basket of fresh (not packaged) taco chips, or the mariachi band, or the knockout margaritas will. Food ranges from Tex-Mex burritos and a party-size fajita platter to authentic Mexican moles and harder-to-find traditional preparations like albndigas spicy, ultra-savory meatballs. $$-$$$Racks Soprano Caf & Italian Restaurant3933 NE 163rd St. (Intracoastal Mall), 305-917-7225Racks has a new owner and a new name. Italian chef Rocco Soprano is bringing his authentic Italian flavors and style to a lovely setting. Well have more details next month, but we know the specialties include Italian steaks, seafood, and an oyster bar. One thing that wont change: the coal-fired pizza oven, which reliably turns out an astonishingly light yet chewy crust that makes the pies a revelation. Especially enjoyable is the waterfront deck. $$Roasters & Toasters18515 NE 18th Ave., 305-830-3354Attention ex-New Yorkers: Is your idea of food porn one of the Carnegie Delis mile-high pastrami sandwiches? Well, Roasters will dwarf them. Consider the Carnegie-style monster containing, according to the menu, a full pound of succulent meat (really 1.4 pounds; we we ighed it), for a mere 15 bucks. All the other Jewish deli classics are here too, including perfectly sour pickles, silky hand-sliced nova or lox, truly red-rare roast beef, and the cutest two-bite mini-potato pancakes ever eight per order, served with sour cream and applesauce. $$Sangs Chinese Restaurant1925 NE 163rd St., 305-947-7076Sangs has three menus. The pink menu is Americanized Chinese food, from chop suey to honey garlic chicken. The white menu permits the chef to show off his authentic Chinese fare: salt and pepper prawns, rich beef/turnip casse role, tender salt-baked chicken, even esoterica like abalone with sea cucumber. The extensive third menu offers dim sum, served until 4:00 p.m. A live tank allows seasonal seafood dishes like lobster with ginger and scallion. Recently installed: a Chinese barbecue case, displaying savory items like crispy pork with crackling attached. $$$Shing Wang Vegetarian, Icee & Tea House 237 NE 167th St., 305-654-4008At this unique, mostly Taiwanese eatery, all seafood, poultry, and meats used to be skillfully crafted and delicious vegetarian imitations. These are still here, plus theres now a wider choice of dishes, some featuring real meat. Try the authentic-tasting Vietnamese banh mi sandwiches (available with a variety of meat and mock-meat fillings). Bubble tea is the must-not-miss drink. The cold, refreshing boba comes in numerous flavors, all supplemented with signature black tapioca balls that, sipped through straws, are a guaranteed giggle. $Siam Square54 NE 167th St., 305-944-9697Open until 1:00 a.m. every day except Sunday (when is closes at midnight), this relatively new addition to North Miami Beachs Chinatown strip has become a popular late-night gathering spot for chefs from other Asian restaurants. And why not? The food is fresh, nicely presented, and reasonably priced. The kitchen staff is willing to customize dishes upon request, and the serving staff is reliably fast. Perhaps most important, karaoke equipment is in place when the mood strikes. $-$$Slices Pizza & Pasta13750 Biscayne Blvd., 305-949-5684While pizza by the slice is common street food in every city in the USA, this informal Italian eatery offers a variation particu larly appropriate to Latin American-influenced Miami: slices served rodizio-style. Brazils traditional rodizio restaurants feature many different grilled meats, served tableside by a

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continuing parade of waiters till diners cry uncle. Here the concept is the same, with dozens of varieties of pizza (plus several pastas) replacing the beef. $$ Sushi House15911 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-6002In terms of dcor drama, this sushi spot seems to have taken its cue from Philippe Starck: sheer floor-to-ceiling drapes, for starters. The sushi list, too, is over the top, featuring monster makis like the Cubbie Comfort: spicy tuna, softshell crab, shrimp and eel tempura, plus avocado, jalapeos, and cilantro, topped with not one but three sauces: wasabi, teriyaki, and spicy Mayo. Hawaiian King Crab contains unprecedented ingredients like tomatoes, green peppers, and pineapple. Boutique wines, artisan sakes, and cocktails are as exotic as the cuisine. $$$-$$$$Sushi Sake13551 Biscayne Blvd., 305-947-4242Chic Asian-accented dcor, video screens, 99-cent drink deals, and late-night hours make this hip hangout not just a sushi bar but sort of a neighborhood bar, too. That said, the sushi is impressive, mainly because seafood is delivered daily and all except the shrimp is fresh, not frozen (as is customary at most Miami sushi places). Also notable: All sauces are housemade. Cooked makis like a crunch-topped Miami Heat are most popular, but its as sashimi that the fishs freshness truly shines. $$-$$$ Tanias Table18685 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-932-9425A location at the tail end of a tiny, tired-looking strip mall makes this weekday lunch-only kosher eatery easy to miss. But the cute bistro, an extension of chef Tania Sigals cater ing company, is well worth seeking for its unusually varied daily-changing menus -not just familiar Eastern Europeanderived dishes (chicken matzoh ball soup, blintzes, etc.) but numerous Latin American specialties (zesty ropa vieja), Asianinfluenced items (Thai chicken/noodle salad), lightened universal Ladies-Who-Lunch classics (custardy quiches, grilled trout with mustard sauce), and homemade baked goods. $$Tunas17850 W. Dixie Hwy., 305-932-0630 www.tunasrawbarandgrille.com The reincarnated Tunas has gained new owners, a new name, a dazzling outdoor bar and dining area, and a new chef, Rolf Fellhauer, who spent 28 years at the famed La Paloma. He has added his touch to the menu, with delicacies such as Oysters Moscow, mussels Chardonnay, and Grouper Brittany. Traditional house favorites remain, and the emphasis is still on fresh fish from local waters. Open daily till 2:00 a.m., the place can get rather festive after midnight, but since the kitchen is open till closing, Tunas draws a serious latenight dining crowd, too. $$-$$$ Vegetarian Restaurant by Hakin73 NE 167th St., 305-405-6346Too often purist vegetarian food is unskillfully crafted bland stuff, spiced with little but sanctimonious intent. Not at this modest-looking vegan (dairy-free vegetarian) restaurant and smoothie bar. Dishes from breakfasts blueberry-packed pancakes to Caribbean vegetable stews sparkle with vivid flavors. Especially impressive: mock meat (and fake fish) wheat-glu ten items that beat many carnivorous competitors. Skeptical? Rightly. But we taste-tested a Philly cheese steak sandwich on the toughest of critics -an inflexibly burger-crazy six yearold. She cleaned her plate. $$Yakko-San3881 NE 163rd. St. (Intracoastal Mall), 305-947-0064After sushi chefs close up their own restaurants for the night, many come here for a rare taste of Japanese home cooking, served in grazing portions. Try glistening-fresh strips of raw tuna can be had in maguro nuta mixed with scallions and dressed with habit-forming honey-miso mustard sauce. Other favorites include goma ae (wilted spinach, chilled and dressed in sesame sauce), garlic stem and beef (mild young shoots flash-fried with tender steak bits), or perhaps justcaught grouper with hot/sweet/tangy chili sauce. Open till around 3:00 a.m. $$ Yes, Pasta! Trattoria Italiana 14872 Biscayne Blvd., 305-944-1006At Roman-native Flaminia Morins casual, family-friendly eatery, the specialty is pasta yo ur way. Choose one of seven fresh or dried pastas (including gluten-free options), then one of 15 sauces ranging from traditional carbonara to inventions like Mozzarella Filante (creamy tomato sauce with melted cheese); la carte meat, seafood, or veg add-ons are also available. Build a full Italian feast with antipasti, salads, six secondi (entres), and desserts. Budget diner alert: Check out Monday-Friday lunch specials, two courses plus drink for $8. Asia Bay Bistro1007 Kane Concourse; 305-861-2222As in Japans most refined restaurants, artful presentation is stunning at this Japanese/Thai gem. And though the voluminous menu sports all the familiar favorites from both nations, the Japanese-inspired small plates will please diners seeking something different. Try jalapeo-sauced hamachi sashimi; toro with enoki mushrooms, bracing ooba (shiso), tobiko caviar, and a sauce almost like beurre blanc; rock shrimp/ shitake tempura with a delicate salad; elegant salmon tartare with a mix-in quail egg. And spicy, mayo-dressed tuna rock makis are universal crowd-pleasers. $$$ Caffe Da Vinci1009 Kane Concourse,305-861-8166After renovations in 2010, this old favorite (since 1989) reopened with a hip new lounge -but no fixes to what aint broke, notably handmade artisanal pastas sauced with high quality ingredients. Choose luxe stuffed models (like crab-filled ravioli with rich lobster sauce) or relatively pristine preparations like linguini with garlic, wine, and fresh little necks. Eating light? Make a meal of lavish salads or starters like true beef carpaccio -dressed, like the original from Venices Harrys Bar, with creamy mustard sauce rather than mere olive oil. $$$ L e Pine1052 Kane Concourse, 305-861-1059This upscale Lebanese restaurant serves dishes with the sort of understated sophistication that makes clear why Beirut was called the Paris of the East. Youll find familiar Middle Eastern favorites, but many have refinements that lift them above average: pita thats housemade, charmingly fluffy when warm from the oven; falafel incorporating flavorful fava beans with the usual ground chickpeas. Especially appealing are more uncommon items like crisp-fried cauliflower with tahini, fateh (a chickpea casserole iced with thick yogurt), and buttery cheese/herb-filled sambusak pastries. Finish exotically with a hookah. $$-$$$ Open Kitchen1071 95th St., 305-865-0090If we were on Death Row, choosing a last meal, this very chef-centered lunchroom/markets PBLT (a BLT sandwich with melt-in-your-mouth pork belly substituting for regular bacon) would be a strong contender. Co-owners Sandra Stefani (ex-Casa Toscana chef/owner) and Ines Chattas (exIcebox Caf GM) have combined their backgrounds to create a global gourmet oasis with a menu ranging from light quiches and imaginative salads to hefty balsamic/tomato-glazed shortribs or daily pasta specials (like wild boar-stuffed ravioli). Also featured: artisan grocery products, and Stefanis famous interactive cooking class/wine dinners. $$-$$$ The Palm9650 E. Bay Harbor Dr., 305-868-7256It was 1930s journalists, legend has it, who transformed NYCs original Palm from Italian restaurant to bastion of beef. Owners would run out to the butcher for huge steaks to satisfy the hardboiled scribes. So our perennial pick here is nostalgic: steak la stone -juicy, butter-doused slices on toast, topped with sauted onions and pimentos. This classic (whose carb components make it satisfying without la carte sides, and hence a relative bargain) isnt on the menu anymore, but cooks will prepare it on request. $$$$$ Anthonys Coal Fired Pizza17901 Biscayne Blvd., 305-830-2625When people rave about New York pizzas superiority, they dont just mean thin crusts. They mean the kind of airy, abundantly burn-bubbled, uniquely flavorful crusts that can only be consistently produced by a traditional coal (not wood) oven -like those at Anthonys, which began with one Fort Lauderdale pizzeria in 2002 and now has roughly 30 locations. Quality toppings, though limited, hit all the major food groups, from prosciutto to kalamata olives. There are salads, too, but the sausage and garlicsauted broccoli rabe pie is a tastier green vegetable. $$Bagel Cove Restaurant & Deli19003 Biscayne Blvd. 305-935-4029One word: flagels. And no, thats not a typo. Rather these crusty, flattened specimens (poppy seed or sesame seed) are the ultimate bagel/soft pretzel hybrid -and a specialty at this bustling Jewish bakery/deli, which, since 1988, opens at 6:30 a.m. -typically selling out of flagels in a couple of hours. Since youre up early anyway, sample elaborately garnished breakfast specials, including unusually flavorful homemade corned beef hash and eggs. For the rest of the day, multitudes of mavens devour every other delectable deli specialty known to humankind. $$BagelWorks18729 Biscayne Blvd., 305-937-7727Hard as it is for old-time NYC expats to believe, theres evidently a younger generation that doesnt equate the Jewish deli experience with loudmouthed servers and the smell of 75 years of fermenting pickle juice in the flooring. This cleanly contemporary place attracts this younger generation with the full range of classics, including many varieties of hand-sliced smoked fish, but also healthy options, most notably a wide array of substantial salads with grilled protein add-ons. Bagels, while machine-made rather than hand-rolled, are freshly baked all day. $$ Bella Luna19575 Biscayne Blvd., Aventura Mall, 305-792-9330 If the menu here looks familiar, it should. Its nearly identical to that at the Upper Eastsides Luna Caf and, with minor variations, at all the rest of Tom Billantes eateries (Rosalia, Villaggio, Carpaccio), right down to the typeface. But no argument from here. In a mall a setting more accustomed to food court dishes like carpaccio al salmone (crudo, with portobellos, capers, parmesan slices, and lemon/tomato dressing) and linguine carbonara (in creamy sauce with pancetta and shallots) are a breath of fresh, albeit familiar, air. $$-$$$Blu Sushi600 Silks Run Rod., 954-744-4398Even hard-core sushi-bar addicts must admit that many such establishments suffer from a certain sameness. Not Blu. At this restolounge in the Village at Gulfstream Park, part of a mini-chain originating in southwest Florida, the specialty makis are outdone in outrageousness only by extravagant cocktails. Yes, there are California rolls. But why be bored when you have an alternative like Kin-SO: tempura king crab salad, tuna, and avocado with scallions, smelt roe, and tempura flakes, plus mayo and sweet eel sauce. $$$ Bourbon Steak 19999 W. Country Club Dr., 786-279-0658 (Fairmont Hotel, Turnberry Resort)At Bourbon Steak, a venture in the exploding restaurant empire of chef Michael Mina, a multiple James Beard award winner, steakhouse fare is just where the fare starts. There are also Minas ingenious signature dishes, like an elegant deconstructed lobster/baby vegetable pot pie, a raw bar, and enough delectable vegetable/seafood starters and sides for noncarnivores to assemble a happy meal. But dont neglect the steak flavorful dry-aged Angus, 100-percent Wagyu American Kobe, swoonworthy grade A5 Japanese Kobe, and butter-poached prime rib, all cooked to perfection. $$$$$BurgerFi18139 Biscayne Blvd., 305-466-0350 Its not surprising that this Florida-based better burger franchise is one of Americas fastest-growing. With dcor thats relaxingly retro yet futuristically earth-friendly (think recycled Coke bottle chairs), beverages ranging from milkshakes to craft beers, and sourced hormone/antibiotic-free, grass-fed Angus burgers on branded buns, for prices rivaling those for fast-food junkburgers, whats not to love? There are also vegetarian quinoa burgers or Kobe dogs, plus accessories including hand-cut fries, killer crisp-battered onion rings, freshly made, all-natural frozen custard, and toppings galore. $ Cadillac RanchVillage at Gulfstream Park 921 Silks Run Rd. #1615, 954-456-1031Its hard to decide if the most fun interpretation of beef here is the weekend prime rib dinner special (with two sides and a meat hunk hefty enough for sandwiches the next day) or the mechanical bull. Party like its 1980 at this all-American restolounge/sports bar, which includes two outdoor patios with fire pits and, sometimes, live rootsy music. If you miss out on the roast beef (it goes fast), there are burgers, steaks, meal-size salads, and classic bar bites. $$-$$$ Caf Bistro @ Nordstrom19507 Biscayne Blvd. #15, 305-937-7267In the days before quick-bite food courts, upscale department stores had their own real restaurants, civilized oases where Ladies Who Lunch took leisurely respite from shopping. In todays Women Who Work times, those restaurants (and privileged ladies) are anachronisms, but this room, hidden on Nordstroms second floor, is a relaxing time-trip back. Enjoy creamy crab bisque, extravagant salads (shrimp with cilantro-lime dressing; pear, blue cheese, and candied walnuts with cherry balsamic vinaigrette), or a retro-modern club sandwich. Organic ingredients from local purveyors are emphasized. $$$Fresko19048 NE 29th Ave., 786-272-3737Forget thick, dough-wrapped potato knishes and blintzes slathered with sour cream. As its name suggests, this kosher dairy eatery eschews the starch/sugar-laden traditional tfavorites for salads, smoothies, and similar healthy fare as casual, clean, and contemporary as the restaurants dcor. Asian-influenced items, like wakame-topped tuna tartare with pineapple chutney, are particularly appealing, while those craving classic combinations like smoked salmon and cream cheese can enjoy them on a light-crusted designer pizza. To drink, smoothies are supplemented by refreshing herbal infu sions like green lemonade (with mint and basil). $$ rrfrntbrbrbrr ffrfrff btb ntt r Follow us on:

PAGE 110

Fuji Hana2775 NE 187th St., Suite #1, 305-932-8080A people-pleasing menu of typical Thai and Japanese dishes, plus some appealing contemporary creations (like the Spicy Crunchy Tuna Roll, an inside-out tuna/avocado/tempura maki, topped with more tuna and served with a luscious creamy cilantro sauce) has made this eatery a longtime favorite. But vegetarians -for whom seafood-based condiments can make Asian foods a minefield -might want to add the place to their worth a special drive list, thanks to chefs winning ways with tofu and all-around accommodation to vegonly diets. $$-$$$The Grill on the Alley19501 Biscayne Blvd. (Aventura Mall), 305-466-7195Ensconced in a leather booth, with dark hardwood everywhere and a massive bar dispensing two-fisted drinks, youd never know you were dining in a shopping mall -or in the new millennium. This upscale mini chain salutes Americas great grill restaurants of yesteryear, with prodigious portions of charbroiled meats and seafood, plus classics like creamy chicken pot pie. New retro dishes are added quarterly, but our favorite remains Sunday nights prime rib special: a $32 hunk of juicy beef thatll take care of Mondays meals too. $$$$$ Il Migliore2576 NE Miami Gardens Dr., 05-792-2902This attractive trattoria gets the food right, as well as the ambiance. As in Italy, dishes rely on impeccable ingredients and straightforward recipes that dont overcomplicate, cover up, or otherwise muck about with that perfection. Fresh fettuccine with white truffle oil and mixed wild mushrooms needs nothing else. Neither does the signature Pollo Al Mattone, marinated in herbs and cooked under a brick. And even low-carb dieters happily go to hell in a hand basket when faced with a mound of potatoes alla Toscana, herbsprinkled French fries. $$-$$$ Kampai3575 NE 207th St., 305-931-6410At this longtime neighborhood favorite Japanese/Thai restau rant, many come just for the slightly pricy but very generous sushi specialties. Most makis are cooked, but for raw-fish fans the tempura-flake-topped crunchy tuna/avocado roll with spicy mayo, and tuna both inside and out, is a peoplepleaser. Dont neglect Thai specialties, though, especially red and green curries customizable as to heat (mild, medium, hot, and authentic Thai hot). And for a bargain light lunch, try tonjiru, miso soup jazzed up with veggies and pork. $$-$$$La Estancia Argentina17870 Biscayne Blvd., 305-932-6477At this market/restaurant, theres a small but quality selection of Argentine grocery staples and wines, plus a butcher counter where backyard BBQers can find everything necessary for a parrillada party. Alternatively, grab a table and let La Estancia do the cooking -anything from tapas and elegant miga mini-tea sandwiches to hefty grilled parrillada plates. Most irresistible, though, are the savory and sweet baked goods, especially elaborately frosted layer cakes and delicately crusted empanadas plumply stuffed with hand-cut flank steak, mushrooms in onion sauce, much more. $-$$Luca B ella19088 NE 29th Ave., 305-792-2222In the space that once housed Chef Allens, this trattoria offers a crowd-pleasing combination: dcor with whitetablecloth elegance, yet the family-friendly feel of a classic checkered-tablecloth eatery -and Italian-American comfort food to match. Highlights: Mickeys Meatballs (named for owner Mickey Maltese), a meal-size marinara-sauced starter featuring whipped ricotta and creamy mascarpone; veal Bella Luca, mixing modern and traditional influences via a hefty breadcrumb-coated pan-fried chop with a topping of bracing balsamic reduction-dressed mesclun. $$$Mos Bagels & Deli2780 NE 187th St., 305-936-8555While the term old school is used a lot to describe this spacious (160-seat) establishment, it actually opened in 1995. It just so evokes the classic NY delis we left behind that it seems to have been here forever. Example: Lox and nova arent pallid, prepackaged fish, but custom-sliced from whole slabs. And bagels are hand-rolled, chewy champions, not those machine-made puffy poseurs. As complimentary pastry bites suggest, and the massive size of the succulent, sufficiently fatty pastrami sandwiches confirm, generous Jewish Mo(m) spirit shines here. $$Mr. Chefs Fine Chinese Cuisine & Bar18800 NE 29th Ave. #10, 786-787-9030Considering our countys dearth of authentic Chinese food, this stylish eatery is heaven-sent for Aventura residents. Owners Jin Xiang Chen and Shu Ming (a.k.a. Mr. Chef) come from Chinas southern seacoast province of Guangdong (Canton). But youll find no gloppily sauced, AmericanizedCantonese chop sueys here. Cooking is properly light-handed, and seafood specialties shine (try the spicy/crispy salt and pepper shrimp). For adventurers, theres a cold jellyfish starter. Even timid taste buds cant resist tender fried shrimp balls described this way: With crispy adorable fringy outfit. $$-$$$ Pilar20475 Biscayne Blvd. 305-937-2777Chef/owner Scott Fredel previously worked for Norman Van Aken and Mark Militello. He has been executive chef at Rumi, and cooked at NYCs James Beard House. Armed with those impressive credentials, Fredel and his wife launched Pilar (named for Hemingways boat) aiming to prove that top restaurants can be affordable. Consider it proven. Floribbeanstyle seafood is the specialty: fresh hearts of palm slaw and Caribbean curry sauce, rock shrimp spring rolls with sweet soy glaze, yellowtail snapper with tomato-herb vinaigrette. Forget its strip-mall location. The restaurant itself is elegant. $$-$$$Pizza Roma19090 NE 29th Ave. 305-937-4884Despite its name, this homey hidden eatery serves not Romes wood-cooked, crunchy-crusted pizzas but New Yorkstyle pies with medium-thick crusts pliable enough to fold in half for neat street eating. Unlike chains, though, this indie is accommodating, so if you want your crust thin and crisp, just ask. Also featured are Italian-American entres like baked manicotti (thats mani-goat, for those not from NJ) big enough to share, and sub sandwiches, here called bullets, to put you in a Sopranos frame of mind. $$Sushi Siam19575 Biscayne Blvd. 305-932-8955(See Miami / Upper Eastside listing) Chef Philip Ho16850 Collins Ave., 305-974-0338Deep-pocketed diners who ate at the Setai when Jonathan Wright was executive chef already know chef Hos work. His dazzling dim sum were the menus highlight. Now theyre affordable for all. Dumplings (chive and shrimp, green tea duck, truffle-spiked scallop, more) have skins delicate enough to see through; open shrimp dumplings with dried scallops are almost flower-like in appearance; steamed cheung fan (rice noodle crpes) rolled around Chinese crullers are simply sinful, as are flaky-crusted egg custard tarts. And the regular menu measures up to the small plates. $$-$$$Copper Chimney18090 Collins Ave., 305-974-0075At this family-owned (and kid-friendly), white-tablecloth Indian restaurant, prices are more upscale than average, but so is the foods elegant presentation -plus features like a full bar, live Bollywood/belly dancing on weekends, and, among familiar North Indian fare, dishes blending contemporary touches with traditional tastes. Especially enjoyable: starters inspired by street snacks, like bikaneri chaat (fried gram flour crisps, chickpeas, and yogurt) served with two chutneys; anything featuring paneer cheese, from classic spinach/cheese palak paneer to creative khazazs-e-lazzat (sundried tomato-stuffed paneer/potato dumplings in smooth cream sauce). $$$Epicure Gourmet Market & Caf17190 Collins Ave., 305-947-4581Who even knew that the late Rascal House had an ocean view? Diners may have to eat standing up to glimpse water over the dunes from the panoramic caf windows of the gour met market that replaced the Rascal, but you know youre on a tropical beach, not Brighton Beach. The big, bright cafs menu, more global diner than Jewish deli, includes daily spe cials ranging from spa-grilled chicken to homemade Italian sausage and peppers. But its worth seeking out items that made South Beachs original Epicure famous: sandwiches featuring housemade rare roast beef; shrimp or chunky smoked whitefish salads; fresh baked goods. $$$The H Restaurant17608 Collins Ave., 305-931-9106This friendly, family-owned bistro is the sort of homeaway-fromhome found every few blocks in France -here Gerard and Karin Herrison, plus chef son Julien, formerly had a restaurant -but theyre rarely found in South Florida. Burgers, et al., are available, but with garlicky escargots, a savory/sweet-dressed salad of duck confit atop frise, pan-seared foie gras with port/ raspberry sauce, fish with an impeccable lemon beurre blanc, and a satisfying steak/frites (with peppery cognac cream sauce). Wed leave the American stuff to the kids. $$$-$$$$Il Mulino New York17875 Collins Ave., 305-466-9191If too much is not enough for you, this majorly upscale ItalianAmerican place, an offshoot of the famed NYC original, is your restaurant. For starters, diners receive enough freebie food -fried zucchini coins, salami, bruschetta with varying toppings, a wedge of quality parmigiano, garlic bread -that ordering off the menu seems superfluous. But mushroom raviolis in truffle cream sauce are irresistible, and perfectly tenderized veal parmesan, the size of a large pizza, makes a great take-out dinnerfor the next week. $$$$-$$$$$Kitchen 30516701 Collins Ave., 305-749-2110Offering eclectic American fare, this resort restaurant room, despite its contemporary open kitchen, has the retro-glam look of a renovated discotheque -which is what it was. In fact, its still as much lounge as eatery, so its best to arrive early if you want a relatively DJ-free eating experience. A seductive mangopapaya BBQ sauce makes ribs a tasty choice any night, but most local diners in the know come on nights when the restaurant features irresistibly priced seasonal seafood specials (all-you-can-eat stone crabs one night, lobster on another). A spacious dining counter overlooking the cooks makes the Kitchen a comfortable spot for singles. $$$Piazzetta17875 Collins Ave., 305-918-6816You cant help feeling optimistic about a tourist towns food scene when its resort restaurants, which generally walk the middle of the road, get creative. And it doesnt get much more creative than this stylish restaurant and Italian market, which bills itself as a trip to an Italian-inspired little market square, but which, along with artisanal salumi plus pizzas and pastas, serves sushi. Particularly tasty: the native Neapolitan pizza chefs truffled taleggio and mushroom pies; meltingly tender braised short ribs; an impeccable marketdriven meat and cheese platter. $$$St. Petersburg Deli17080 Collins Ave., 305-947-9696Dont expect fancified stuff like menus, or the English language, at this informal market/cafe. If theres signage identifying the prepared foods behind the counters, its in Russian, and daily dishes are pretty much what the cooks feel like making. So look and point. Wed suggest pointing at cold yogurt-based soups like tangy okroshka (with cukes, egg, scallions, potatoes, and dill) or holodnik (similar, with beets added); eggplant roulades, stuffed with spiced shredded carrots, are also a refreshing summer dish. Hot choices include meatballs in rich cream sauce and chicken Kiev. $$ Timo17624 Collins Ave., 305-936-1008Since opening in 2003, the inventive yet clean and unfussy Italian/Mediterranean-inspired seasonal food at this hot spot, created by chef/owner Tim Andriola (at the time best known for his stints at Chef Allens and Marks South Beach), has been garnering local and national raves. Dont bother reading them. Andriolas dishes speak for themselves: a salad of crisp oysters atop frise, cannelloni bean, and pancetta; foie gras crostini with a subtle caramelized orange sauce; a blue crab raviolo with toasted pignolias and brown butter; or a wood-oven three-cheese white pizza. $$$-$$$$ Werner Staubs Peppermill350 Bayview Dr., 305-466-2016Itll likely be years until diners stop instinctively heading for the tropic-alpine chalet that formerly housed the Peppermill at the Waterways in Aventura. But this new indoor/outdoor spaces bay views are much more spectacular. And the food is the same unique old-school stuff. Seafood is featured, and while there are contemporary preparations, you cant resist hard-to-find retro dishes like imported Dover sole almondine, Swiss-style poached trout with champagne-shallot sauce, an elaborate steak tartar, and for dessert, peach Melba or strawberries Romanoff. $$$

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metro1 MIAMIS URBAN REAL ESTATE LEADER rfntbttbtfbrtffttbfttttPINECREST: 12351 ROCK GARDEN LN ft ntbtfft tfbftrbntft tntfbfttfrrtt ftfftttnftbbft Connie Doumenis | 305 725 9565 cdoumenis@metro1properties.com BISCAYNE CORRID OR: 3550 BISCAYNE BLVD rttfttftbtt ntftbttnttbfb fttttbfbnttbfbt tbfft rttt Tony Arellano | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com DESIGN DISTRICT: 3 925 NORTH MIAMI AVE ftt fttrtnfttb ntntfrnttbftbtrnt fbtfbtbt fttbttfrtrfftttbf Tony Arellano | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com MIDTOWN: 3470 E CO AST AVE ft ftt bnntftb bttbntbbfttbt bbtftfbnrf tftft Amy Aronson | 305.527.4769 aaronson@metro1properties.com LITTLE RIVER: 7201 NE 4 AVENUE ftfttf bfftfbftbtrnt bbbtfttttbttr trfftntbbtfbffb bfb Tony Cho | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com DESIGN DISTRICT: 4030 NORTH MIAMI AVE ftftt ftfttfttnttbfbtr tbfbrfnttn ttftbtbrtft ftrfbbtfbfnt Tony Cho | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com LITTLE HAVANA: 2147 SW 8 ST ft ttbnbtb ftbbntntfrtbtfb brtfttbftt fbt Tony Arellano | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com tfftftttb tftfttbMIAMI SHORES: 1200 NE 103 ST tt trtbftfbtbf bnttnttbttt bntnttttrftbnt tbftfffbb Irene Dakota | 305 972 8860 idakota@metro1properties.com UPPER EAST SIDE: 224 NE 59 ST ftttfbn btfbtnt fbtrtfttb fbnbtfttbbtnb tfbb Tony Cho | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com UPPER EAST SIDE: 243 NE 62 ST ftftbtt ftnttrftt ttttfnttftntrtft btttbbbftbtrf bbtbfbtn Irene Dakota | 305 972 8860 idakota@metro1properties.com MIAMI SHORES: 85 NW 102 ST ft tftbtntbnft ntftfnfbbtntbnfb ntfrnttbftbtntntbn tbfbtntfftfbfbtf Irene Dakota | 305 972 8860 idakota@metro1properties.com DESIGN DISTRICT: 3 711 NE 2 AVE ft ntbtfbntftn bbb tfrftttbb Tony Cho | 305.571.9991 info@metro1cre.com


Biscayne times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00099644/00073
 Material Information
Title: Biscayne times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Biscayne Media, LLC
Place of Publication: Miami, Florida
Creation Date: March 2012
Publication Date: 11-2012
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Full Text



BISCAYNE
November 2012 www.BiscayneTimes.com Volume 10 Issue 9


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Bal Harbour Village Exquisite renderings and Biscaya Island Traditional Chateau style home with a
detailed plans for last remaining waterfront lot in Bal modern twist.Oversized lot, great floor plan, 5bd/5.5ba,
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Surfside Newly built Mediterranean style residence
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NOVEM BER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS OF MIAMI-DADE COUNT




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CONTENTS

COVER STORY
36 You Can Bet on It
COMMENTARY
12 Feedback: Letters
NEW 18 Gaspar's "Cult Following"
22 Jack King: Voter Fraud That Works
26 Christian Cipriani: Sunbird's Vacation
OUR SPONSORS
30 BizBuzz
COMMUNITY NEWS
50 Framing Success
50 A Naked Grab at Haulover?
51 Soul Survivor: The Road at 100
NEIGHBORHOOD CORRESPONDENTS
NEW 64 Craig Chester Covers Brickell and downtown
66 Jay Beskin on the Other Side of the Tracks
68 Jen Up Close and Personal with a Fox
70 Frank Can't Stand that Neon Blue
72 Mark Can't Believe the People Won
74 Wendy Is Not a Hoarder
ART & CULTURE
76 Anne Tschida: Chinese exile artist Ma Desheng
78 Melissa Wallen: Galleries + Museums
81 Events Calendar
POLICE REPORTS
82 Derek McCann's Biscayne Crime Beat
PARK PATROL
84 Jim W. Harper: A Little Gem in NMB
COLUMNISTS
86 Pawsitively Pets: Crime and Punishment
88 Picture Story: Idyllic Miami
89 Your Garden: Ackee, Rice, Saltfish Are Nice
90 Going Green: $12 Billion Plumbing Problem
91 Kids and the City: Does Mom Get a Break?
92 Vino: Gobs of Turkey Day Bottles
93 Dish: Miami' Long, Strange Trip
DINING GUIDE
96 Restaurant Listings: 304 Biscayne Corridor Restaurants


BISCAYNEj


PO Box 370566, Miami, FL 33137 www.biscaynetimes.com
Serving communities along the Biscayne Corridor: Arch Creek East, Aventura, Bay Point, Bayside, Biscayne
Park, Belle Meade, Buena Vista, Coventry, Design District, Downtown, Eastern Shores, Edgewater, El Portal,
Enchanted Lake, Hibiscus Island, Highland Lakes, Keystone Point, Miami Shores, Morningside, North
Greynolds, North Bay Island, North Miami, North Miami Beach, Oak Forest, Oakland Grove, Palm Grove,
Palm Island, Sans Souci, Shorecrest, Sky Lake, Sparling Lake, Star Island, Wynwood, and Venetian Islands


PUBLISHER & EDITOR
Jim Mullin
jim.mullin@biscaynetimes.com
CONTRIBUTORS
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Commentary: LETTERS


/
-


Art by God, Fire by Fate
I am so glad Wendy Doscher-Smith
wrote about Art by God ("Lions and
Tigers and Bears," October 2012). That
store has been one of my favorite haunts
for years. I'm constantly recommending
it to friends and always include it among
the "tourist" stops when I'm hosting visi-
tors from out of town.
Art by God owner Gene Harris is so
sweet and sincere and patient. He'll gra-
ciously spend a half-hour with you if you're
curious about some dinosaur or other fossil,
explaining it in detail. It's almost like a col-
lege tutorial in archaeology.
So you can imagine my horror when
I learned that Art by God's big ware-
house in Wynwood caught fire just days
after Biscayne Times came out. From
what I heard, it was such a hot conflagra-
tion that firefighters could only let it burn
and eventually cool down.
What a shame. What bad luck. What
a lousy ending to a happy moment when
Art by God finally got the publicity it and
its owner deserve.
Melinda Sachs
Miami

Yes, I Still Go to Wynwood for
the Art, but Never on Saturday
I don't feel the same way about Wyn-
wood's Second Saturday Art Walk as
Craig Chester does ("Taking It to the
Streets," October). To him it is a worth-
while public event, a legitimate social
gathering bringing together people from
all over Miami.
To me it has been warped into a
mindless food-and-beer fest that has
nothing at all to do with art.
Don't take my word for it. Why do
you think so many of the best galleries
(Dorsch and Snitzer among them) no
longer hold their exhibition receptions on
those second Saturdays?
To avoid clogging their galleries with
clueless partygoers who care more about
the "refreshments" than the art, they're
now having receptions on Friday nights
or at other times.
So Craig Chester and I could not
be farther apart on appreciating Art
Walk. But we do agree on one thing: The
streets and sidewalks have become so
congested that it's only a matter of time
before there is a very bad car-pedestrian
confrontation. (Cars always win those.)
So if the crowds are going to be there
for food and drink and fun, something
must be done to correct that dangerous
situation. Chester's proposal to close a


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012


portion of NW 2nd Avenue to vehicles
is a great idea. Let's hope he and others
who still care about Art Walk can get the
City of Miami to do something creative
to solve the problem.
As for me, I still go gallery-hopping
in Wynwood, but never on the second
Saturday evening of the month.
William Ortega
Downtown Miami

What Would Gaspar Have Said?
Regarding Gaspar Gonzhlez's most recent
and, unfortunately, final column ("A
Novel Truth," October 2012), it's appro-
priate to thank him for his many columns
illuminating our Village of Biscayne Park.
While a select few may not have liked his
assessment of some aspects of our gem
of a community, I believe the majority of
us appreciated his humor, accuracy, and
clarity of thinking on local issues that, as
Gaspar wrote in that last column, "don't
get discussed much outside the monthly
commission meetings."
Jay Beskin's Aventura column (Sepa-
rated at Birth," October 2012) discussing
local election dates was also illuminat-
ing, given that on our November 6 ballot,
there's a Biscayne Park charter amend-
ment to change the election date from
our traditional December in odd years to
even-year Novembers so as to coincide
with national and state elections. If
passed, the measure would also increase
the current term of two commissioners
most recently elected.
The idea is that this change would
save money and increase voter turnout,
both reasonable concepts. There are also
some not-so-good things that can come
of a change like this less of a focus
on village issues amid an avalanche of
other state and national concerns, and
a tendency to turn our nonpartisan race
into one tied to political parties via presi-
dential signs in the yards of candidates
and supporter.
What's disappointing is that an issue
like this would get put on a ballot with
no serious public discussion of the facts.
Most cities don't place charter amend-
ments on a ballot without a full charter
review because of the complexities
involved. We have. As a result, many
questions were never asked, such as:
How many cities in South Florida have
changed their election dates to coincide
with state and national elections, and
how much did they save? How does our
current voting turnout compare to other
Continued on page 14










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Commentary: LETTERS


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Letters
Continued from page 12

cities? What percentage of our budget
will we save?
What's even more disappointing is
that, as of the writing of this letter, the
village has put out no information about
this charter amendment. No village
newsletter, website page, flyer, or e-mail
blast with details about the proposed
changes. There's also been no newspaper
article, so how will people know what
they are voting on, and why?
My own research indicates that only
13 out of 35 Miami-Dade cities have
local elections that coincide with state
and national elections, and Broward and
Monroe have an even lower percentage,
meaning Biscayne Park will be joining
the minority.
The Village already has a consistent-
ly higher turnout than most stand-alone
cities, even though our Village does
virtually nothing to encourage turnout
(those "Vote This Tuesday" signs you've
seen for years were all done privately).
As for savings, Aventura saved
$80,000 (and the City of Miami might
save $1 million if it passes), but it's es-
timated our change will save the village
only $4600 per year out of a $ 2,337,132
budget. That's 0.2 percent.
Do we simply want more voters even
if they're less informed and less focused?
Must our candidates compete with un-
limited ads to gain your attention? Shall
it be quantity over quality? As much as I
have been working toward greater voter
turnout for years, I'll take quality every
time. Please vote "No" on this charter
amendment.
I'm sure Gaspar could have written
this much better, and there are many
Biscayne Park residents who will be
sorry to see him go. In any event, those
of us who have appreciated his words
look forward to reading future Biscayne
Times contributions from him.
Steve Bernard
Village of i, ... i i,.. Park

After 128 Hours in Publishing
Purgatory, Free Monthly
Mercifully Dispatched
In May of this year, Gaspar Gonzalez
reported ("Well Shut My Mouth") a
promise from the publisher of Bis-
cayne Times.
This promise pertained to a request
from a large majority of people randomly
polled in Biscayne Park, to the effect


that they did not want the BT delivered
to individual homes, where it sits on
properties looking bad and signaling the
possibility or likelihood that no one was
home, and the house could be considered
easy pickings.
The promise was that 48 hours after
deposit of the BT on yards and sales,
any copies uncollected by the resident
would be collected by a crew sent by
the publisher of the BT It took until
September for me to take the risk of
testing this promise.
I left the BT in my driveway and
did not obscure or drive over it, for
about 128 hours. That's 80 hours more
than promised.
I then had someone pick it up for
me, since I was out of town. I have to
assume the publisher would in fact never
have collected the BT from my driveway,
where he dumped it.
Is there some amended or follow-up
proposal from the BT? Or is it business
as usual?
Fred Jonas
Biscayne Park

A Rising Tide Lifts All Readers,
East Coast or West
I couldn't read Erik Bojnansky's article
"Lost in a Rising Sea" (September 2012)
fast enough. I immediately wanted to
learn all the information about rising sea
levels.
What an eye-opener. If South
Florida residents and city officials aren't
awakened by this article, nothing's going
to get through their heads.
It disgusts me that all the builders
care about is money in their pockets. I'm
not just frightened for Miami residents;
this is such a huge global issue.
I'm embarrassed to say that, living
in Southern California, I have not
thought about the "rising sea.". My eyes
are open now. Thank you, Erik Bojnan-
sky and Biscayne Times. What a great
in-depth article!
Mary Jane Reynolds
San Diego County

A Gift Named Harper
I continue to pick up Biscayne Times
hoping to read at least one article on our
ecology by Jim W. Harper.
Thank you, BT, and even bigger
kudos to Harper for caring and sharing
his concerns with the rest of us.
He is a gift to South Florida.
Steven Leidner, D.VM.
Edgewater


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November 2012









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Commentary: CULT FOLLOWING


Curtain Call

Remembering Paquito Hechavarria, 1939-2012


By Gaspar GonzAlez
BT Contributor

I first met Paquito Hechavarria in 2001,
in the lobby bar of the Deauville
Hotel in Miami Beach. I'd gone there
looking for him after a friend with a fine-
tuned ear told me the man was one of the
best piano players he'd ever heard.
When I arrived, I found him enter-
taining an audience of two. The couple
would soon call it a night, leaving only
Paquito and me in the otherwise empty
bar. I introduced myself and pulled up
a chair. Paquito asked if I had a request.
I told him to play whatever he liked.
So for the next hour, he ran through
various American standards, popular
Cuban tunes from the 1940s and 1950s,
even the James Bond theme, all in his
signature style a kind of Cuban
swing, highly rhythmic and distinctly
percussive.
I quickly realized my new acquain-
tance was not your typical lounge lizard.
Paquito (a nickname for Francisco) had
been a child prodigy in Cuba. By the
time he was 16, in 1955, he was the fea-
tured piano player for Conjunto Casino,
a popular band on the island. That was
followed by a stint with the renowned
Orquesta Riverside.
With those groups, Paquito played
the Capri, the Tropicana, and virtually
every hot spot in Havana. By his early
20s, he had made his way to Miami -
courtesy of the revolution and had
landed at the Fontainebleau. There,
IL. ^


during the days of Frank and Sammy
and Judy, Paquito presided over the
hotel's famed Boom Boom Room.
In the 1970s, he moved to Las Vegas
to play with Pupi Campo's orchestra.
After a couple of years, he got homesick
and returned to Miami, where he worked
local clubs and also became an in-de-
mand session musician, cutting records
with, among others, Carlos Santana,
Macy Gray, and Miami Sound Machine
(along the way authoring one of the most
recognizable pop-music hooks of the last
40 years: the piano intro to "Conga").
He told me a lot of this that first
night, in between songs and drags from
the cigarette holder he always used. He
was friendly and funny and supremely
talented. By the end of the evening, we
were friends. We stayed friends until this
past September, when I got the call that
Paquito had died unexpectedly at age 73.
His passing was noted in the Span-
ish-language El Nuevo Herald and a few
days later, somewhat belatedly, on the
Website of the Miami Herald, which re-
ferred to him as a "Cuban music legend."
Paquito probably would have gotten
a chuckle out of that, not because the ac-
colade wasn't deserved it was but
because, as much as anyone, he knew
Miami isn't always kind to its legends.
From the time we met, I made it
a point to go see Paquito wherever he
might be playing. The occasional show
at the Van Dyke or Jackie Gleason not-
withstanding, the gig would usually be
in some out-of-the-way bar or restaurant


where the owners expected him to pull
in customers, even when they had done
nothing to advertise the night.
If the crowds didn't materialize,
they'd replace him with a DJ the follow-
ing week or scrap music altogether. More
than once, they "forgot" to pay him.
More than once, he mentioned to me
how grateful he was to have the little bit
of money his musicians' union pension
brought in every month.
He used to joke that maybe someone
would "rediscover" him, like the actor
Andy Garcia had done with the Cuban
bassist Israel "Cachao" L6pez. (It wasn't
so farfetched a notion when you consider
that Paquito and Cachao used to play
together around Miami in the 1980s.) Of
course, it didn't happen, at least not the
way Paquito envisioned it. Nevertheless,
in his last years, he did get to do a couple
of projects that reminded everyone how
great he was.
In 2009 the distinguished music
producer Nat Chediak invited him to
make an album of Sinatra standards in


the Cuban style. The resulting CD, titled
Frankly, is nothing short of brilliant.
"Paquito is the only guy who could play
those songs that way," Chediak told me
at the time.
And in 2010, my filmmaking partner
Brett O'Bourke and I made Hecho a
Mano: Creativity in Exile, a documenta-
ry that featured Paquito, along with three
other Cuban artists living in Miami. It
aired on PBS affiliates around the coun-
try and won an Emmy.
The film was a very special project
for us, and I know Paquito enjoyed being
a part of it. He was wonderful in it, telling
stories and playing the music he loved.
He never said so, but I suspect he also ap-
preciated that, out of all our subjects, we
gave him the last say. His words now take
on an unintended poignancy.
"Y como qued6, qued6," he declares,
striking a final note on the piano before
the credits roll. "The way it is, is the way
it ends."

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November 2012







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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Commentary: MIAMI'S KING




Voter Fraud That Works
State lawmakers love absentee ballots so much, they


decriminalized criminal conduct

By Jack King
BT Contributor

It's really too bad the presidential elec-
tion has overshadowed so many state
and local contests. Part of the problem
is there are fewer news outlets to cover
local politics than a decade ago, so we
simply don't learn about some elections.
Couple that with a ballot that will be 12
pages long in some areas, and there just
isn't enough manpower to go around.
For instance, how much have you
heard about Florida's U.S. Senate race
between incumbent Bill Nelson and
Connie Mack? Not much. And what about
the local congressional race between Joe
Garcia, whose opponent, Rep. David
Rivera, calls Garcia "the most corrupt
politician in South Florida." Funny, I
thought Rivera had already been crowned
Most Corrupt Politician in South Florida.
The list goes on and on, through
many races you'll never hear about, being
won by people you've never heard of, who
will then be in a position to make a differ-
ence in your life for better or worse.
Another for instance: The billionaire,
right-wing, nut-case Koch brothers have
decided the Florida Supreme Court is much
too liberal, so they want to get rid of three
justices who are up for merit retention. Not
only have the Kochs politicized the judiciary,
they've spent more to oust the three sitting
judges than their annual salaries combined.
Too much money in politics? Nah...
Add to all this the 11 proposed
amendments to the Florida Constitution


- spelled out in deadening legalistic
jargon on the ballot; all of which are
useless and should be voted down -
and we have one of the worst election
cycles in many years.
But wait! It gets worse.
As we all know, absentee voting
doesn't work very well in Florida,
unless you're a Republican who knows
how to game the system. (And boy, do
they!) How's it done? You start off by
heading to Hialeah and contacting some
ballot brokers, who seem to be on every
street corner.
It certainly wasn't hard for current
Republican stars Gov. Rick Scott and
Sen. Marco Rubio to find them. Case in
point: Scott got 75,000 absentee votes
in his successful run against Alex Sink,
who garnered 25,000. Without the absen-
tee ballots, Sink would have very nearly
won the governor's race.
Which leads us to another part of the
discussion. If in-person voter fraud -
the kind involving illegal immigrants,
felons, and stolen identification is so
rampant in Florida (even though no one
can find any), why don't the Republicans
do something about absentee voter fraud,
which we're finding on a daily basis?
The answer is that Republicans own
the voter fraud that works (absentee bal-
lots). Their efforts to curtail nonexistent
in-person voter fraud are really designed
to suppress voter turnout.
Absentee voter fraud works because
the state legislature decriminalized
it years ago. Miami-Dade County has


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demeanor, but in reality no one gets
charged, even if they're caught red-hand-
ed with hundreds of absentee ballots. So
much for law-and-order Republicans.
So is there a better way to vote? I think
there is, and that's by mail. It has been
used for a dozen years in Washington state
and Oregon. You might think it's no dif-
ferent from absentee ballots, but it is quite
different. Here, you call up and ask for a
ballot and the elections department just
sends it to you. There, they send you the
ballot because you are on the voter rolls
and you return it by mail. Period.
Here, absentee ballots are picked
up by ballot brokers, who can then do
anything they want with them. There,
voter fraud is serious business. Oregon
mailed out 15 million ballots between
2000 to 2010, investigated thousands of
complaints, and found just nine violators,
all of whom got jail time or deportation.
Here, our illustrious Governor Scott has
investigated thousands of voter-fraud
claims and found nothing. But if he were
to investigate absentee voter fraud, he'd
find hundreds of cases that are not pros-
ecuted because there are no penalties.


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When you
mail in ballots, you also have another
layer of security: The feds take a dim
view of mail tampering.
Would a system like this work in
Florida? It should, as it has more safe-
guards than the current system, which
is without doubt broken. You'd think it
would be a no-brainer to adopt a system
that works, saves millions of dollars
in taxpayer money (no poll workers
because there would no polls) and saves
voters time and money because they
don't have to drive anywhere.
Until the mentality in Tallahassee
changes such that the best interests of
Florida's citizens are always put first, it
probably won't happen.
Phil Keisling, the former Oregon
secretary of state who shepherded vote-
by-mail through the initiative process,
put it best when he cited political cow-
ardice and calculation as obstacles, along
with the "craven fear of that has been
demonstrated on both sides of the aisle
that this is bad for their side."

Feedback: letters@ibiscaynetimes.com


( InnerBalance
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November 2012









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November 2012


































OPENING SUNDAY NOV 11


FOR THOSE
WHO LIKE IT BLOODY


FOR THE
FASHIONISTAS


MONDAY NOV 12

FOR KIDS WHO ASK
TOO MANY QUESTIONS
Lemony Snicket!
School's closed but the Fair is open!
Bring a list of 'wrong" questions and
celebrate the new series. I 4 p.m.


Tom Wolfe
on Back to Blood I 6 p.m.


Us'- -


Isabel and Ruben Toledo
talk life, love and the
Roots of Style I 7 p.m.


FRIDAY NOV 16

FOR GLBTQ FOLKS AND FRIENDS
Michael Bronski, A Queer History of the
United States Rodger Streitmatter, Outlaw
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Extraordinary Same-Sex Couples Susie
Bright, Big Sex, Little Death, and others


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November 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


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November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Commentary: URBANIA


Sunbird's Vacation

Where do you go when your backyard is a warm, tropical playground?


By Christian Cipriani
BT Contributor

Nearly every working adult's
year is built around the prospect
of getting out of town, and for
many of them, the words "vacation" and
"beach" are interchangeable. But what
does vacation mean when you live in one
of the world's warmest and most desir-
able beach destinations? A change of
pace. In a word, cool.
When I find myself excited at
the prospect of vacationing in a cool
climate, I know I've staked my claim as
a Miamian. I visit Pennsylvania to see
family and friends for Thanksgiving and
Christmas, but those trips are just long
enough around five days to inject
some grim reality into my cold-weather
romanticism. Five days also happens to
be that sweet spot where many families
go from "great to see you" to "let's get
ready to rumble."
My fiance and I had only been to-
gether about six months when I splurged
on an eight-day trip to Barcelona in the
spring of last year. It turned out to be the
last time we could afford something like
that, as I followed that vacation with five
months of semi-employment.
In September we decided it was time
to get away again for a few days. We began
looking for non-Miami weather and terrain.
There was only one part of the U.S. I had
never visited but wanted to: New England.
She had never seen autumn leaves.


Never an autumn leaf?
Facts like that blow my mind. Here's
another one I've heard on many occa-
sions: We've never seen snow. How can
you reach your 30s having never expe-
rienced our planet's four basic seasons?
(Autumn is the season I really miss.)
I didn't know a thing about New
England outside of books, pictures, and
some time spent in Boston. We tossed
around a lot of idyllic scenarios: apple-
picking on a Vermont farm on the edge
of Lake Champlain; historic Newport; a
drive through New Hampshire's White
Mountain National Forest, where the
leaves along the Kancamagus Scenic
Byway are supposedly some of New
England's finest; and on the list went.
We eventually settled on Nantucket.
This appealed to us for a few reasons. It
was remote a fair consolation prize
for my first idea: a lighthouse on the
eastern tip of St. John's, Newfoundland.
Also we'd get our fill of fall leaves driv-
ing from Boston all the way down Route
3 to Hyannis.
More than anything, though, Nan-
tucket spoke to my inner WASP. I love
Latin culture, but I'm a northern white
boy at heart. My cardigans don't get
much action down here.
The high-speed ferry across Nan-
tucket Sound carried just a few pas-
sengers. We were arriving two weeks
past high season, after everyone took
their last dip before the winter. For 30
miles we felt the ferry buck in the murky,


choppy sound, spraying our windows
with cold water, finally pulling into the
port as dusk approached.
On this Sunday, the island was a
ghost town. We looked up from silent,
pitch-black streets to admire the stars, a
sight so foreign in Miami that we don't
even miss it. Their number and clarity
were astonishing to take in, and phone
apps helped us pick out the planets and
constellations within view.
Rain clouds threatened in the morn-
ing, but they burned away as we pulled
out of Young's Bike Shop, founded in
1931, on a pair of beach cruisers. We
headed to one of Nantucket's many his-
toric lighthouses, where I learned that you
can't take a bad photo of a lighthouse.
It was 67 and sunny. I refused to
take off my sweater and continued
to sweat. Each time we pedaled around
a corner, we came upon another street
of perfect homes, each one larger and
more rustic than the last. The houses
were empty save for workmen prepping
them for winter, and all of them were


identically clad top-to-bottom in unfin-
ished cedar shingles that, within a year,
turn a coarse, weather-beaten gray.
It's a look that matched well with a
belt I picked up at Murray Toggery Shop,
featuring tiny cartoon whales. Murray's
is the kind of store that makes me look
forward to a time in my life when I can
wear lobster-print seersucker pants with-
out a trace of irony.
A few pieces of salmon and a dozen
oysters later, and we were back on the
ferry. Truth be told, there is nothing to
do in Nantucket but ride bikes and eat,
which is perfect for two days.
I was happy to look down from the
plane and see the black ocean cut off by
a coast full of city lights. Finally I peeled
off my sweater, tucked my jacket into
my suitcase, and stepped out into the last
dog days of Magic City summer.
Our vacation was over, but now that
it's high season in Miami, we get to be
part of someone else's.

Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012








The bridge between


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November 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com








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545 NE 59TH STREET
Magnificent and architecturally stunning 1925 2-story
Old Spanish home on double lot in Morningside.
4-bedroom main house and two 1-bedroom guest
houses. Original wood floors, fireplace, beamed
volume ceilings, large wood/granite/stainless steel
eat-in kitchen, formal dining room, foyer, library.
Fenced yard with 8-foot privacy wall. Property has
much potential as it is residential on tree-lined street
in gated neighborhood but zoned for office. In the
Upper Eastside and close to shops and restaurants.
$1,095,000


540 GRAND CONCOURSE
This turnkey 2-story custom 6-bdrm 4-bth Miami Shores
home combines traditional & rustic island elements to
create an amazing functional & stylish FL home.
Completely renovated w/no expense spared. Addition
in 2012 to create a one-of-a-kind beauty. Features
include wd firs, gourmet top-of-the-line ktchn, luxurious
master suite, designer bths w/top-of-the-line fixtures,
winding solid wd staircase, open airy spaces, loft, office,
French drs & lots of windows unite interior w/tropical
pool, Chicago brick patio.
$1,595,000


10669 NE QUAYBRIDGE COURT
Luxurious European style 4-story townhouse in mani-
cured full-service Quayside community. Traditional
with many updates including all new impact windows.
Soaring ceilings in 3 of the 4 floors, lots of windows,
timeless mahogany built-ins, enormous living area
with wetbar, elevator, several balconies, patio, bay
views. Master suite is entire floor with his & hers baths.
Secure upscale community with several pools, restau-
rant, spa, tennis center, kids' play area. Ideal for
families and entertaining.
$1,095,000


776 NE 73RD STREET
Island cottage-style charm in this Vintage Belle Meade
home. 3/2 main house + 1/1 guest house is an urban
oasis in the heart of the Upper Eastside. Modern
upgrades include impact windows, generator, newer
roof & A/C. Features include original hardwood firs,
fireplace, art deco archway, wood-beamed vaulted
ceiling. Sitting room w/clay tile floor unites the interior
w/serene private garden and tropical yard w/lush land-
scaping. Walking distance to chic boutiques and res-
taurants of MiMo historic district.
$599,000


701 NE 67TH STREET
Old Spanish Estate and Guest House By the Bay.
Upper East Side (Mimo district) by Bay in rare Forest.
Two, 2 Story Old Spanish Houses (front and back)
Double Lot, over 6000 sf combined living area and 8
baths. Commerical/Residential uses. AAA location,
Historic but can be remodeled. Features include high
ceilings, hard wood/tile flooring, archways, fireplace,
balcony, 2 sundecks, 4 private walled gardens, iron
fence. A unique property in Miami's hottest location.
$1,495,000


1490 NE 101ST STREET
Mid-century home on the wide bay on cul-de-sac in
serene Miami Shores location with 130 feet on the
water and smashing downtown views. House needs
work but great layout and position on the lot.
$1,795,000


November 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Our Sponsors: NOVEMBER 2012


BizBuzz

Sales, special events, and more f
Biscayne Times possible

By Pamela Robin Brandt
BT Contributor

At last! By this month's end, hur-
ricane season will be over. But
those other seasonal storms
that blow in each year as regular as
clockwork will have commenced the
deluge of visiting friends and relatives
from the frozen north, craving our warm
weather (plus, of course, our hottest
entertainment and eats).
Step one is getting your home
dressed to impress, as BT advertisers
evidently know based on the flood of No-
vember news from furniture, accessories,
and construction companies.
Last month, in preparation for the
year's busiest sales season, Dave Widdas
of 360 Furniture Consignments (18340
W. Dixie Hwy., 305-627-3148) suggested
that it was a perfect time for folks to
bring in their high-quality furniture for
consignment sale. Boy, did he ever get
what he asked for. The consignor list is
now huge. His November deal is a blow-
out sale of 30-50% off 360's "gently used"
stock to make room for all the new stuff.
At Herval Furniture (2650 NE
189th St., 305-935-4545), one big piece of
news is that the company is now entirely
located in Aventura and the downtown
Biscayne showroom is no more. But the
drive north will be well worth it this
month for downtowners. Mention the
BT to enjoy a 10% discount on Herval's


rom the people who make


striking stock of modern furniture: sofas
and sectionals, wall units, dining tables,
patio sets whatever you need to fur-
nish your place, inside or out.
Modern Home 2 Go (270 NE 39 St.,
305-572-1222) is, this month, holding
a floor-sample sale on not only normal/
everywhere indoor con-
temporary furniture, but
on exactly what people
want during winter in
Miami: outdoor dining
and lounging sets. The
sets are all-weather and
eco-friendly.
We welcome new
advertiser Omega Decor
(3300 N. Miami Ave., r
305-631-2077), a modern
furniture and accessories
shop that can fix you right
up, whether you need a
whole dining room and bedroom set or
just a bench or lamp. In fact this month
Omega will give BT readers a free lamp
with a $1500 purchase.
When we first heard about the new
Swarovski Crystal Palace Collection
"Casino Royal" chandelier installation
at Farrey's Lighting & Bath (1850 NE
146th St., 305-947-5451), we thought that
this Lenny Kravitz-designed piece must
be connected to Art Basel. But although
Farrey's is the only Florida showroom to
have the fixture, it's not just an art display.
"Casino Royal" can light up your pad.


If leaks, collapsing walls, and so on
have caused you to suspect that your home
needs more than d6cor fabulosity, give a
call to new advertiser GMG Construction
Consulting (6006 NW 6th St., 305-975-
0965). Guillermo Mendoza's licensed and
insured firm does both residential and
commercial building/renovations.
The owner of Piper Companies
(1885 NE 149th St., 305-940-2030), Evan
Scott Piper, has a story that makes you
wonder why it hasn't been made into a
reality show. He started in the automo-


tive business at age 13, developed Piper
Automotive & Marine Services while in
high school, and went into the construc-
tion industry at 17, eventually develop-
ing Piper Construction. Since a 2001
plane crash, he's been wheelchair-bound,
although "bound" hardly seems the right
word. In fact he has another company,
Piper Medical, Mobility & Accessibility,
which, among other things, customizes
motor vehicles to enable disabled people
to live independently.
For some seniors perhaps your
own parents/grandparents living as


independently as possible means some
level of assisted living. This can be a first-
class experience at Vi Living (19333 W.
Country Club Dr., 888-697-6125), where
the focus is on "whole person wellness."
Spacious homes come in several different
sizes, and different levels of care are of-
fered, depending on individual needs.
To truly enjoy South Florida's warm
winters, you'll want to spend some time
outdoors. But enjoying your yard won't
be much fun if it's been invaded by those
nasty iguanas. Call new advertiser Blue
Iguana Pest Control (855-525-5656),
whose full range of preventative services
ensure that your property doesn't look
like a lizards' party invitation.
Would you prefer a new abode? Con-
tact new BT advertiser and real estate
agent Robbie Bell (901 S. Miami Ave.
#215, 305-528-8557). This San Francisco
transplant has a passion for finding folks
homes where they can live, work, and
play within walking distance, so they
can enjoy a truly urban lifestyle.
The problem with having a perfectly
put-together home is your own imperfect
self can start feeling out of place in it. But
Tamayo Medical Center & Urgent Care
(9037 Biscayne Blvd., 305-835-2797) can
fix that with November's deal for BT read-
ers: laser body contouring and skin tight-
ening for just $150 per zone. That zone can
be your belly, inner thighs, outer thighs,
upper arms, knees, face, or neck.
If you're more of an exercise person,
then here's some news for you. Real estate
broker Brian Carter of Majestic Proper-
ties (305-582-2424) has just facilitated the
merger of Steel Gym Miami and NY with

Continued on page 32


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.comNovember 2012


Gwen MAKE THE STRONGEST VOICE YOUR CHOICE


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012















































































































Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012






Our Sponsors: NOVEMBER 2012


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BizBuzz
Continued from page 30

Island City Health and Fitness in Fort
Lauderdale. The news for Miamians, and
Miami visitors/snowbirds from NYC, is
that your Steel membership now works in
NY, Miami, and Fort Lauderdale.
At this point your dog, who no doubt
thinks he/she is a person, is going, "Well
goodie for them with their snazzy improve-
ments. What about me?" Treat the mutt
to a makeover at new advertiser Salon
Poochini (1019 Kane Concourse; 305-864-
1944), a pet-grooming spa and boutique
that has just added two new services for
busy working owners: early opening (8:00
a.m.), and a pick-up and delivery option.
Top it off with a visit to Legitimutt (192
NW 36th St., 305-438-4385), where No-
vember's featured products are waterproof,
odor-proof, and mildew-proof Sunshower
collars, leashes, and harnesses, in 11 fashion
colors. Readers who buy a leash with a collar
or harness this month get 20% off. Bonus:
Post your funniest dog pic on Legitimutt's
Facebook page to receive 20% off any item
Don't forget the kids. Are they getting
a well-rounded education? Monsignor
Edward Pace High School (15600 NW
32nd Ave., 305-623-7223, x342 for an
appointment) is holding two open-house
sessions on Saturday, November 10. Each
session (8:30 and 10:00 a.m.) runs for two
hours. Pace offers its students a futuristic
and dynamic learning experience via fea-
tures like its new one-on-one iPad initiative.
Even if your kids are between the
ages of 0 (newborn) and 10, it's not
too early to get them going green at
new advertiser Atlantis Natural (1717
N. Bayshore Dr. #218, 305-379-2722),
a "children's enrichment and wellness
education center and organic store" that
carries everything from organic cotton
diapers to complete fixings for a green
kiddie party such as reusable banners,
and fair-trade snacks.
How about picking up your guests
from the airport in your 2013 Cadillac?
As if, eh? But new advertiser Ocean
Cadillac (1000 Kane Concourse, 305-
864-2271) says such luxury can be yours
for just $355 for a two-year/10,000-mile
lease or $33,990. No dealer fees, and
scheduled maintenance is included.
Whew. Exhausted yet? After arrang-
ing all those improvements to your home,
kids, pets, kids, senior relatives, car, and
self, we sure could use some sustenance.
Many restaurants close for Turkey Day,
but not the Upper Eastside's longtime


home-away-from-home, Soyka (5556 NE
4th Ct., 305-759-3117), which will open
at 5:00 p.m. on Thanksgiving. If you'd
rather eat in your real home, let Soyka
fix you a traditional dinner for either 4-6
or 10-12 people, and pretend you did it
yourself. Pre-order by November 19.
For a traditional meal with tasty Ital-
ian-American touches, order your holiday
feast from Laurenzo's Market (16385 W.
Dixie Hwy., 305-945-6381). Get a 14-16
lb. bird for $49.95 or $64.95 with stuff-
ing and gravy. Or go large with a 20-22
pounder for $69.95; $89.95 with stuffing
and gravy. Order before November 20.
David Cohen of Bagels and Compa-
ny (11064 Biscayne Blvd., 305-892-2435)
is offering a complete turkey feast for
ten at $175. Order now!
Personally, we enjoy cooking
Thanksgiving din ourselves, except for
dessert. Fortunately Midtown's new
Acme Bakery (3451 NE 1st. Ave., 786-
507-5799) does old-fashioned American
cakes, pies, and pastries that are better
than those in your dreams. You'll also
want to pick up some Midtown Sour-
dough for turkey sandwiches later.
For many, the ideal night-before-
major-food-holiday dinner is take-out
Chinese. After all, who wants to cook
the day before cooking for an army? Try
3 Chefs (1800 Biscayne Blvd. #105, 305-
373-2688), which serves up not just the
Chinese-American favorites that make
your car smell so tantalizing on the drive
home, but Vietnamese dishes as well.
If you're a healthy sort who believes
that the turkey-and-starch fest must
include a green-ish vegetable, you'll find
it at new advertiser Aaron's Farmers
Market (2250 NE 163rd St., 305-947-
9242). This recently opened place has
fresher produce than your average su-
permarket and better prices, too. Aaron's
is also now a BT distributor, so you can
pick up the pub with your peppers.
Speaking of health: The first Aventura
location of Smoothie King is scheduled
to open later this month at 18185 Biscayne
Blvd. Drink a welcoming toast in more than
60 flavors, in categories designed to accom-
modate a wide range of fitness needs: Trim
Down, Build Up, Snack Right, and more.
For football fans, snacking right means,
above all, chicken wings. And you won't find
better wings than the big, juicy, mildly mari-
nated, grilled beauties at Sports Grill (2995
NE 163rd St., 305-944-4552), anew location
in a mini chain that's a Miami institution.
Inevitably, out-of-town visitors want
to sample Miami's Latin American eats,


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012









but being unaware that "Latin American"
isn't one giant generic food group, won't
know what they want. Make it easy
for them with a visit to new advertiser
Sabor Latin Restaurant & Caf6 (1880
79th St. Cswy., 305-741-2020). This
family-run spot specializes in Colom-
bian favorites, but also serves typical
Peruvian, Mexican, and Cuban dishes.
Since its opening, new advertiser
BagelWorks (18729 Biscayne Blvd., 305-
937-7727) has proved particularly popular
with younger Jewish deli mavens, owing
to both its clean contemporary d6cor and
its modernized menu. All the traditional
faves are here, but so are lighter choices.
Will it be an old-fashioned pastrami on
rye or a pastrami panini?
Just in time for Art Basel, and in the
right Design District locale, too: Watch
the lot at NE 38th Street and Biscayne
Boulevard for Miami's newest and
artsiest pop-up, Orchid at the Pleasure
Garden. As well as a food and beverage
program curated by homegrrrl star chef
Michelle Bernstein, the tent's entertain-
ment experience will feature song, dance,
burlesque, and aerial acrobatics.
For spiritually minded folks, First
United Methodist Church (400 Biscayne
Blvd., 305-371-4706) will be offering
"Harvest Festival Sunday" on November
18. Started in the 1980s by a small group
of members, this celebration is patterned
after services held in Caribbean/Central
American countries every fall.
After all the holiday food excesses, a
visit to new advertiser Clean Start (6901
Biscayne Blvd., 305-603-8540) could be
a wise move. The company does body
system cleansing of specific areas/organs
using natural products, colon hydrother-
apy, detox massage, yoga, and more.
Entertainment options this month
abound, including an event that, till very
recently, was the only reason many Miam-
ians went downtown all year: Miami Book
Fair International (www.miamibookfair.
com for a map, but you can't miss it). The
event, running November 11-18 (street fair
November 16-18), features hundreds of
authors offering subjects for everyone. Ad-
ditionally, for those who want to be one of
those authors someday, MDC's Center for
Literature (305-237-3023 or www.TheCen
terMDC.org) is presenting The Miami
Writers Institute November 14-16. Inten-
sive workshops (some in Spanish) cover
both the profession's artistic side (writing)
and the business side (publishing).
At the fair, incidentally, try to get an
autograph from C.C. Radoff, author of


The Big Split, a satiric novel/survivors
manual for living in a future-Florida run
by gun nuts. You might have a hard time
locating Radoff as the name's a pseud-
onym for a well-known local writer who
wants to avoid getting shot.
If movies are more your thing, the
City of Miami Beach's SoundScape
series presents free flicks every Wednes-
day at 8:00 p.m., on a very big wall
outside the New World Center (500 17th
St.). Bring a blanket and stretch out.
Also free, thanks to new advertiser/
sponsor Treece Financial Group, is a
November 27 screening of Gen Smart, an
unusually thought-provoking, critically ac-
claimed documentary that asks the question:
"Do LGBT seniors need to go back in the
closet?" The film, documenting discrimi-
nation in retirement communities, will be
shown at Miami Theater Center (9806 NE
2nd Ave., 305-573-6477) at 7:30 p.m.
Live music fans won't want to miss Yemen
Blues, a nine-piece Israeli-American group
whose fusion of Arabian and West African
sounds with contemporary grooves, fromfunk
to mambo, hastakenthe word-music sceneby
storm. Part of Miami-Dade College's Live Arts
series, the concert is scheduled for 9:00 p.m on
November 10 at Grand Central (697 N Miami
Ave.) For more info and tix: 305-237-3030.
Broadway show lovers are in luck also.
On November 9 at 8:00 p.m., the Aventura
Arts & Cultural Center (3385 NE 188th St.,
877-311-7469) presents The Broadway Tenors,
featuring not one but three well-known
Broadway leading men singing some of the
Great White Way's most beautiful songs.
At O Cinema (90 NW 29th St., 305-
571-9970), actually a multi-media center,
November's featured exhibit is Swim-
ming Upstream, a mixed-media show that
explores the struggle of female artists
through an aquatic focus that's not with-
out humor and considerable weirdness.
Some advertisers are looking ahead,
like KB Christmas Trees (11400 Biscayne
Blvd., 305-899-1955), an advertiser who has
been in business for three decades.
Finally, a warm welcome to new
advertiser Douglas Gardens Community
Mental Health Center, serving Miami
Beach since 1979, on the grand opening
of its second location at 1150 NE 125th St.
No, we're not suggesting that this season's
visiting relatives and friends will trigger a
need for therapy. But if they do, 305-531-
5341 is the number to call for appointments.

\.,, 1. ri,,' special coming up at your busi-
ness? Send info to bizbuzz@biscaynetimes.
com. For BT advertisers only.


November 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com





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November 2012


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YOU CAN BET ON IT
WITH BILLIONS OF DOLLARS AT STAKE, GENTING AND
OTHER CASINO OPERATORS WILL NEVER EVER GIVE UP
By Erik Bojnansky










More than a year ago, executives
from the Genting Group, a
Malaysian-based multinational
company headed by K.T. Lim that oper-
ates casinos in five countries, announced
their plans to build a gigantic, $3 billion
resort casino complex where the Miami
Herald building now stands.
Designed by Arquitectonica, Resorts
World Miami was to include 5200 hotel
rooms, more than 1000 condominium
units, 50-plus restaurants and bars, a
rooftop lagoon, a sandy beach, and
700,000 square feet of convention space
and gambling areas large enough to
hold up to 8500 slot machines and other
Las Vegas-style games.
Resorts World Miami is now in
limbo, but it's far from dead. In fact,
Genting has already spent at least $236
million on the project, and may spend
millions more even before major con-
struction commences.
"The reason Genting is concen-
trating on Florida is two-fold," says
John Kindt, a business professor at the
University of Illinois and a fierce critic
of casino gambling. "One, they think
they can do it, that Florida will suc-
cumb to the onslaught of money they're
bringing to the table. The other reason is
that Florida is a plum to be picked, with
billions of dollars in tourist money that
Genting can take out of the state forever."
The vast majority of money Genting
has spent so far, about $500 million,
according to media reports, was used
to buy 30 acres of land on both sides of
Biscayne Boulevard near the Adrienne
Arsht Center. Those properties include
14 acres of land, the Herald building, and
the historic Boulevard Shops that Genting
bought from McClatchy Newspapers for
$239 million in May of last year.
Genting also purchased the largely
vacant Omni Mall, its parking garage,
and the adjoining 527-room Hilton Hotel.
Price tag: around $215 million.
In an effort to legalize gambling
at its future resort, Genting has also
spent more than $1 million lobbying the
state legislature and governor, accord-
ing records. Among the 32 lobbyists
Genting hired in Tallahassee are former
congressman Lincoln Diaz-Balart and
school board member Carlos Curbelo.
(Curbelo withdrew as a lobbyist this past
June. Diaz-Balart did so in August.)
Another $2 million-plus was
invested in campaign contributions to
statewide committees, political parties,
and legislative candidates.


The Miami Herald building is being considered for historic designation, meaning Genting could not demolish it,
which would drive them crazy.


In Miami-Dade County, Genting
funneled $63,000 to countywide candi-
dates and local political groups, includ-
ing $10,000 to a committee set up by
county Mayor Carlos Gimenez; $6000 to
four incumbent county commissioners
who faced challengers in the August pri-
mary election; and $2500 to five county
judge candidates, four of whom chal-
lenged incumbents that same month.

n spite of the millions spent, a nine-
month push by Genting's army of lobby-
ists ended in failure this past February,
when a bill that would have allowed the
company to apply for a gaming license died
in committee (it had been sponsored by
State Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff of Fort Lauder-
dale and State Rep. Erik Fresen of Miami).
Lobbying against the resort concept
was an alliance of religious groups,
restaurant and hotel business groups,
Disney World, and existing gambling
interests ranging from racinos such as
Magic City Casino and Gulfstream Park
to the Seminoles and Miccosukee. These
interests have also spent millions on lob-
bying and campaign contributions.
A month after the bill died,
Genting distributed a press release
stating its intention to build a luxury
resort on the five-acre waterfront site
where the Herald building now stands,


including an 800-foot-long promenade
along the bay.
Those plans have now been chal-
lenged. On October 22, Miami's Historic
and Environmental Preservation Board
(HEP Board) narrowly approved a resolu-
tion to study whether the 770,000-square-
foot Miami Herald building, constructed
in 1963, is worthy of being protected as
an historic structure.
Dade Heritage Trust, a nonprofit
preservation group, is seeking the
historic designation, arguing that the
building and those who worked inside
it had a huge impact on the region. The
group also argues that the building can
be adapted to suit Genting's needs.
Genting's architects, including
Arquitectonica principal Bernardo Fort-
Brescia and former Dade Heritage Trust
president Richard Heisenbottle, argue
that the building is ugly and only worthy
of the wrecking ball. One of Genting's
local attorneys, Vicky Garcia-Toledo,
insists that Genting would never have
purchased the property if they'd believed
the city might designate it as historic and
prevent its demolition.
Once the historic preservation staff
prepares the report, the HEP Board will
officially rule. (Board decisions can be
appealed to the city commission.) When
will that be? Difficult to say.


On November 6, the HEP Board will
get a report on when the big report might
be ready. William Thompson, Resorts
World Miami's senior vice president of
development, nervously whispered into
the ear of Garcia-Toledo as she tried
to get a date certain so her client could
prepare. The HEP Board refused to give
her one. The report, its members argued,
must be a detailed one, and so staff
shouldn't be forced to rush it.
Garcia-Toledo called the ruling a
"tremendous burden" for Genting and a
waste of taxpayer money. "What they've
decided is that even though it doesn't
meet the criteria, they need more infor-
mation, and they're going on to the next
step," she told the BT after the meeting.
Genting's Thompson would not
discuss the board's decision, which is in
keeping with the company's new phi-
losophy. Once chatty with its promises to
bring rich "whales" from Asia to Miami
and create thousands ofjobs, Genting
now speaks sparingly to the press. The
only comment to the BT was this e-mailed
statement: "Over the past months, we have
continued to meet with many stakehold-
ers to evaluate the needs of the state and
local community. Resorts World Miami's
efforts are future-focused and we continue
Continued on page 38


November 2012Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com









Bet on It
Continued from page 37

to keep an open mind as plans are mapped
out moving forward. Our commitment to
Florida remains as we work to be a produc-
tive and valued corporate citizen in the
state for many years to come."
Company silence will be difficult to
maintain if Genting pursues a statewide
referendum on a Florida constitutional
amendment in 2014 or 2016 that would
ask voters if county residents, orjust those
living in Miami-Dade County, should be
allowed to decide if they want casinos.
So far Genting has poured $936,500
into its own political action committee
called New Jobs and Revenues for Florida
(NJRF), which is currently studying
ballot language for a statewide referen-
dum. Such a task won't be easy. Without
the help of the legislature, NJRF will
need to gather 700,000 signatures to put a
referendum on the ballot. To get that ref-
erendum passed, state law now requires
approval by 60 percent of Florida voters.
To assist in their quest, NJRF has
also hired two former associates of Gov.
Rick Scott: former spokesman Brian
Hughes and pollster Tony Fabrizio.
Another option for Genting: Per-
suade state legislators to legalize a
limited number of new casinos in
Florida, or in Miami-Dade County
alone. Or persuade the legislature to let
Miami-Dade residents decide if they
want casino gambling. Perhaps in an
effort to gain Tallahassee's cooperation
(or elect people who will see things their
way), Genting has spent $133,000 on
contributions to state political campaigns
since July. "They have enough money to
do one track, two tracks or even a three
track approach," Kindt says.
If money is any clue, however, the
campaign contributions might be a
hedge. "They're giving the legislators
another chance to pass something," rea-
sons Steve Geller, a former state senator
and current lobbyist who is also repre-
senting a company interested in building
a casino in South Florida whom he
declines to name. "If not, they'll fund a
petition for a constitutional amendment."
But Peter Zalewski, a real estate
analyst and founder of Condo Vultures,
doesn't think Genting has a lot of time.
"There are so many developers who are
coming forward at a rapid pace that it
could be a situation that, the longer you


Casino Money: Keeping It Local
Genting Group's subsidiaries and employees have contributed at least $63,000 to political groups and can-
didates in Miami-Dade County. Below is an sampling of the total. The figures come from public records.


* Republican Party of Miami-Dade: $30,000
* Common Sense Now (supporting Mayor
CarLos Gimenez): $10,000
* Get It Done (supporting mayoral candidate Joe
Martinez): $10,000
* Miami-Dade County Mayor CarLos Gimenez:
$500
* Miami-Dade County Commissioner Bruno
Barreiro: $2000
* Miami-Dade County Commissioner Barbara
Jordan: $1500
* Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey Ed-
monson: $1500
* Miami-Dade County Commissioner Dennis Moss:
$1000


* Candidate for county court judge Tanya Brin-
kley: $500
* Candidate for county court judge Johnny Rodri-
guez: $500
* Candidate for county court judge Michelle ALva-
rez Barakat: $500
* Candidate for county court judge Frank Hernan
dez: $500
* Candidate for county court judge Greer ELaine-
WaLLace: $500
* Circuit Court Judge Antonio Arzola: $500
* Circuit Court Judge GiseLa Cardonne Ely: $500


* New Jobs and Revenues for Florida: $936,500
(Funded entirely by the Genting Group)
* Republican Party of Florida: $556,045
* Florida Democratic Party:$310,916.76
* Florida Conservative Action Committee: $60,000
(Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart)
* Alliance for a Strong Economy: $45,000 (Sen. J.D.
Alexander, R-Sebring; Sen. Lizbeth Benacquisto, R-Ft.
Myers; Sen. Mike Bennett, R-Bradenton; Sen. Mike Ha-
ridopolos, R-Melbourne; Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart)
* Florida Leadership Fund: $40,700 (Sen. Jack Latvala,
R-St. Petersburg)
* Citizens for an Enterprising Democracy: $31,000 (Rep.
Chris Dorworth, R-Fort Lauderdale; Rep. Jason Bro-
deur, R-Sanford)
* Committee for a Prosperous Florida: $15,000 (Sen.
Jeremy Ring, D-Margate; Rep. Jeff Clemens, D-Lake
Worth)
* Nature Coast Conservative Coalition: $15,000 (Sen.
Charles Dean, R-Inverness)
* Committee for a Prosperous Florida: $15,000 (Rep.
Perry Thurston, D-Fort Lauderdale)
* Taxpayers for Integrity in Government: $15,000 (Rep.
Joseph Abruzzo, D-Wellington; Rep. Alan Williams,
D-Tallahassee)
* Foundation for Conservative Values: $10,000 (Sen.
Miguel Diaz de La Portilla, R-Miami)
* Citizens for Commons Sense: $10,000 (Rep. Daryl
Rouson, D-St. Petersburg)
* Alliance for Better Representation: $7500 (Rep. Perry
Thurston, D-Fort Lauderdale)
* Veterans for Conservative Principles: $5000 (Rep.
Frank Artiles, R-Miami)
* Protecting Leadership Principles: $5000 (Rep. Eddy
Gonzalez, R-Hialeah)
* Florida For Strong Families: $5000 (Rep. Gary Siplin,
D-Orlando)


* Common Sense in Florida: $1000 (Rep. Geraldine
Thompson, D-Orlando)
* Choosing Right for Florida's Economy: $5000 (Rep.
Steve Precourt, R-Orlando)
* Florida Freedom Fund: $5000 (Rep. Dorothy Hurkill,
R-Port Orange)
* Coalition for Conservative Leadership (CCE): $5000
(Venice accountant Eric Robinson)
* Citizens for a Progressive Florida (CCE): $5000 (Sen.
Nan Rich, D-Sunrise)
* Floridians for Efficiency in Government: $2500
(Democratic fundraiser Benjamin Pollara)
* The Future Is Now: $5000 (Miami City Commissioner
Francis Suarez)
* Initiative for Florida's Future: $25,000 (Tallhasee at-
torney Mark Herron)
* Alliance for Progressive Representation: $12,500 (Tat-
Lahassee lawyer Mark Herron)
* The American People Committee, Inc: $5000 (Talla-
hassee political consultant Keyna Cory)
* People in Need of GovernmentAccountability:
$10,000 (Tallahassee webmaster Pedro Buigas)
* Protect Florida's Economic Freedom: $25,000 (GOP
fundraiser Nancy Powers)
* Florida First: $4500 (GOP fundraiser Nancy Powers)
* Conservative Leadership Coalition: $20,000 (Coral
Gables politicalconsultantJose Riesco)
* The Democracy Project, Inc: $5000 (Miami political
consultant Keith Donner)
* Citizens First: $20,000 (Genting Lobbyist John French)
* Sen. Eleanor Sobel, D-Hollywood:$2000
* Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale: $1500
* Sen. Jack Latvala, D-St. Petersburg: $1500
* Rep. Daphne Campbell, D-Miami Shores: $1000
* Rep. Ana Rivas Logan, D-Kendall: $1000
+ Rep. Joseph Abruzzo, D-Wellington: $1000


Continued on page 40 1 I


Casino Money: Spreading It Around
Public records show that the Genting Group has given at least $2.3 million to numerous political commit-
tees and PACs, state political parties, and specific state politicians. Individuals affiliated with committees
and PACs are shown in parentheses. This is a sampling, and includes only cash and in-kind contributions of
$1000 or more.


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012




































































































.. .


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


-a '- !


November 2012









Bet on It
Continued from page 38

wait, the more likely you'll miss this new
development wave," he says. When that
happens, developing anything at that site
will be less profitable.
Genting may also risk having to
deal with more competitors. Three Las
Vegas-based casino companies already
have lobbyists in Tallahassee: Las
Vegas Sands, MGM Grand, and Caesars
Entertainment.
Of the three, Las Vegas Sands may
be Genting's most potent adversary.
The company already has three lobby-
ing firms representing its interests in
Tallahassee and one in Miami, the Coral
Gables-based Barreto Group, headed by
longtime county insider Rodney Barreto.
According to media reports, Las
Vegas Sands is looking at two possible
sites for its casino: Watson Island, where
a stalled mega-yacht marina and the
financially troubled Jungle Island are lo-
cated; and Miami Worldcenter, a 25-acre
area bounded by NE 2nd Avenue and N.
Miami Avenue (east-west), and NE 6th
Street and NE llth Street (south-north).


This downtown parcel, formerly the site of the Miami Arena and now a temporary park, was recently
purchased by someone with an interest in casinos.


Last year representatives from both
Las Vegas Sands and Miami Worldcen-
ter confirmed they were talking, but no
agreement was reached. Then last month
one of the main investors in Miami


Worldcenter, Art Falcone, bought the ad-
jacent four-acre site of the former Miami
Arena for $35 million.
Falcone did not return phone calls
from the BT, but Geller, whose client


list includes Falcone, describes Miami
Worldcenter as a "superb location" for
a casino resort. Not that he knows what

Continued on page 42


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November 2012








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Bet on It
Continued from page 40
Falcone intends to do with the land. "All
I know is what I read in the papers,"
Geller professes.
L as Vegas Sands and Genting are
already competitors. They both
have two giant casino resorts
in Singapore. Las Vegas Sands is also
trying to open a casino in New York City
despite resistance from Genting, which
already operates an $800 million casino
near JFK airport.
In fact, Las Vegas Sands expressed an
interest in building a casino somewhere
in Florida long before Genting arrived
on the scene. Andy Abboud, Las Vegas
Sands's vice president for government
relations, told state legislators back in
March 2010 that his company wanted to
build a casino in Tampa or somewhere in
South Florida under certain conditions.
Sheldon Adelson, CEO of Las Vas
Sands, has also criticized Genting's deci-
sion to back a proposal allowing three
mega-casinos in the state. Florida's market,
Adelson asserts, can only handle one.
Adelson has gained notoriety for
pumping millions of dollars into this


The big splash Genting officials made with wild designs and extravagant promises turned Tallahassee
politicians against them.


year's presidential campaigns, first to
Newt Gingrich, then to Mitt Romney.
His main lobbyist in Tallahassee, Nick
larossi, told Miami Today last month they
favor stopping all gambling efforts until


statewide hearings on the issue take place.
Such hearings are being proposed
by state Sen. Don Gaetz of Niceville
and state Rep. Will Weatherford. If re-
elected, as expected, they may get their


way. Gaetz is slated to become the next
Senate president and Weatherford the
next speaker of the House.

Continued on page 44


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Bet on It
Continued from page 42

"The legislature would prefer to
measure twice and cut once," says Rep.
Matt Gaetz, Senator Gaetz's son. "If it's
possible, we'd like to have time to collect
data and really study the lasting impacts
of gambling."
The Bogdanoff-Fresen bill died last
year in large part because of opposition
from most Miami-Dade legislators, who
were uneasy about expanding gambling
here. "Genting had high hopes that they
would have casino licenses issued in
Miami-Dade County, but the driving
force behind blocking the issuance of
these licenses has been the Miami-Dade
legislative delegation," Matt Gaetz notes.
Genting's arrogant attitude didn't help
matters, says Bob Jarvis, a professor of
casino law at Nova Southeastern Univer-
sity. "Genting pissed off a lot of people
and made a very bad impression in Tal-
lahassee," Jarvis tells the BT "They came
in and acted like they owned the place."
Indeed, given that Genting didn't even
have its gaming license yet, its initial pub-
licity campaign and over-the-top promises


I




. ^


Slot machines are a casino's bread and butter, so whatever Genting
builds, even if it's not a casino, will be slots-ready.


were very unusual. "Normally the way the
gambling guys operate is that they hold
their cards close to their vest," observes
John Sowinski, president of No Casinos,
Inc. and an Orlando political consultant.
"When Genting came on the scene, they
made a big splash and released those
grandiose drawings." While the splash cre-
ated some positive energy at first, Genting


soon had to deal with plenty of criticism
when people began looking at the details,
Sowinski says.
Professor Kindt of the University
of Illinois believes the stumble was the
result of cultural differences between the
United States and Asia. The big public-
ity approach for future casinos "works
extremely well in the Asian-Pacific area,"


he says. "That is Genting's home base, so
that might have influenced their strategy."
Aside from being less specific regard-
ing details a strategy Genting now ap-
pears to be following the company will
need to "put together the broadest coali-
tion" in order to get a 60-percent victory
in a statewide vote, suggests Steve Geller.
A referendum that paves the way for a
resort casino in South Florida, but forever
bans gaming elsewhere in the state might
appeal to voters living in north Florida's
Bible Belt, Geller says.
Thus far, however, the only broad
coalition that seems to be forming is the
one opposing Genting. Sowinski, for
example, sees casinos as a cancerous
growth that metastasizes every time a
new gambling venue is allowed to open.
Even gambling proponents like Izzy
Havenick, vice president of Magic City
Casino (formerly Flagler Greyhound Track),
have fought Genting. Havenick won't accept
any legislation that gives destination resorts
an unfair advantage over pari-mutuels like
Magic City. "Everyone should be treated the
same," Havenick insists.

Continued on page 46


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Bet on It
Continued from page 44

Another arch critic of Genting also
doesn't appear to be budging: Disney
World, a company that has contributed
more than $2 million to campaigns since
2011. "We oppose the expansion of casino
gambling in our state for many reasons,
including the fact that it is inconsistent
with Florida's brand as a family-friendly
destination and with efforts to diversify
Florida's economy," a Disney spokesman
says in an e-mail to the BT

Of course, Genting does have its
supporters. During the Historic
and Environmental Preservation
Board meeting last month, opponents of
Dade Heritage Trust's efforts to preserve
the Miami Herald building outnumbered
supporters nearly two-to-one. Among
those who advocated for demolition were
members of the construction industry,
Adrienne Arsht Center for the Perform-
ing Arts Foundation chairman Mike
Eidson, Miami-Dade Chamber of Com-
merce president Bill Diggs, Omni Com-
munity Redevelopment Agency director


Professors John Kindt and Bob Jarvis see Genting and others fine-tuning their approach, but never
abandoning their goal.


Pieter Bockweg, and several people who
owned units at the Grand, a venerable
bayside high-rise condo just north of
Herald building.
"The last time we chased somebody
away from here it was Walt Disney; we


ran him out of town in the late 60s and
early 70s," says Fred Joseph, a board
member of the Grand homeowners
association and a real estate broker.
As far as Joseph is concerned, even
Genting's controversial designs by


Arquitectonica would be preferable to
an "ugly box" blocking access to the
bay. "It has never been neighborhood
friendly," Joseph says.

Continued on page 48


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Bet on It
Continued from page 46

Joseph's attitude is not shared by the
Venetian Causeway Neighborhood Alliance,
which approved a resolution unanimously
opposing Resorts World Miami last year.
For one thing, the group's members are
against the further expansion of gambling
in Florida, explains Jack Hartog, president
of the Alliance. For another, they felt that
the project was just too big. "The size and
scope of the Genting project was so huge
the concern was that no matter how they try
to mitigate the effects on traffic, it will have
an adverse effect," Hartog says.
The Alliance has yet to take any
position on the Miami Herald building,
Hartog adds, nor has it been presented
with any revised plans to judge.
Though it might seem counterin-
tuitive, Genting might be able to count
other casino operators, including Las
Vegas Sands, as their allies if only
temporarily, says Jarvis of Nova South-
eastern University. He's confident they
are probably helping each other even
now, despite the rhetoric of Las Vegas
Sands executives. "I have no doubt
they're helping; it's in their interest,"
Jarvis says. "They'll try to open up the
market first, and once the market is open,
then they'll become competitors."
Still, Jarvis doesn't expect resort ca-
sinos to be legalized for at least the next
two years. There are too many pitfalls
for any legislators to support it, espe-
cially outside of South Florida. "If you're
a north Florida legislator and you make
any kind of deal expanding gambling,
you've made a deal with the devil," he
says. "In central Florida, if you allow
gambling, Disney will make sure you
won't win re-election."
But Jarvis does see some pos-
sibility of legalized casinos in the


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comfort of your own home.
The U.S. Department of Justice
issued an opinion late last year that
allows states to license online gam-
bling, such as poker, so long as the
sites have nothing to do with sports
betting. Jarvis asserts that state of-
ficials, desperate to raise revenue, are
already trying to figure out a way
to issue licenses for online gaming
operations in Florida. He suspects
north Florida politicians might be able
to back it: "At least you won't have
casinos with their flashing neon lights
coming into your neighborhood."
Jarvis also believes that with the low
overhead of online gaming, and the con-
venience for the consumer, old-fashioned
brick-and-motor casinos might "go the
way of the Dodo bird."
With the Dodo factor in mind, might
Genting consider yet another possibility:
Giving up?
Grant Stern, president of Morning-
side Mortgage, says if Genting were
to build something similar to the Epic
Hotel and Residences in downtown
Miami, it could make a fortune even
without a casino. "It's on the water, it's
convenient to mass transit, it's in an area
where people want to live, work and
play," Stern notes.
Professor Kindt, however, doubts
that Genting will ever give up on build-
ing a casino along the Biscayne Cor-
ridor. If Genting ever announces such a
surrender, Kindt warns that it'll likely
be a "red herring," that whatever project
Genting builds, it will be designed with
the expectation that Genting's casino
goal eventually will be realized.
Says Kindt: "They'll put in all kinds
of electrical sockets in anticipation of
hooking up slot machines."

Feedback: letters(aibiscaynetimes.com


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012


































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Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDOR


Framing Success

Broadway Art's Ken Beck has done more than just hang around the


Biscayne Corridor for 20 years -

By Margaret Griffis
BT Contributor
The Biscayne Corridor has seen
many dramatic changes, some
good and some bad. But one of
the seemingly smallest changes in years
reveals just how much the Upper East-
side has transformed itself in the past
two decades.
Broadway Art and Framing has
been a fixture on the Boulevard since
1990. That is, until this summer, when
it moved from its most recent location,
at 7226 Biscayne Blvd., a couple miles
north to the Shores Square shopping
center. (Across the Boulevard from the
Miami Shores Publix.)
The man behind Broadway Art is
Ken Beck. Along with his partner in
business and love, George Cohen, Beck
is one of the architects of the Biscayne
Corridor renaissance, chipping away the
neighborhood's Wild West image and
helping to transform it into one of the
most alluring areas in the city.
Growing up in Hollywood, Florida,
Beck had never really visited Miami
until he answered an ad for an "art


he's helped transform it


salesman" in the early 1980s, eventually
going to work for then-famous Tip Free-
man's Painting and Art Gallery on 79th
Street. There, Beck not only learned his
trade, he grew to love the area.
By 1990 he felt ready to strike out on
his own and, for $1000 purchased a fram-
ing business. Beck had hoped the new
enterprise would pay the bills and allow
him to earn $8.50 an hour, what he'd been
making at Tip Freeman's. Instead the
store quickly surpassed his expectations.
"Back in the early, early days when
I first opened, I had such an incredible
business," Beck recalls. "I was sitting
alone on Biscayne Boulevard with the
hookers and the pimps and the crime. A
lot of people related to it as the 'combat
zone.' But I took such great pride in my
work, and I was so available to custom-
ers, they kept coming back."
It's no secret that prostitution was
rampant on the Boulevard back then;
at times the streetwalkers seemed to
outnumber the streetlights. Beck recalls
the hookers would doll themselves up in
Broadway Art's Boulevard-facing window,
then, if the police dove by, run inside and
hide in the bathroom. Beck eventually put


Lzwpw a-- ,Wwp--
Two decades of Upper Eastside memories: Ken Beck (left) with partner
George Cohen and colleague Lori Lirosi.


a stop to that when, on several occasions,
the girls exited the bathroom in a cloud of
what Beck thought was crack smoke.
Crime on the Boulevard wasn't limited
to sex. One time a man ran out of Beck's
store with an antique; neither he nor
the piece was seen again. Another time
burglars removed the store's A/C unit and
climbed in through the hole it left.
Con artists would visit the store, too,
relaying some cockamamie story about
broken-down cars or saying that so-and-
so sent them. Peddlers would drop in
and try to sell Beck boxes full of rocks
labeled as electronic gear. Selling fake
jewelry was a popular swindle in those
days, as well. An amused Beck refers to
it all as "good shenanigans" now, even
though he got taken a couple of times.
Some of it still goes on, he says.


One of the more memorable events
occurred in the early 1990s, during a
demonstration that brought the Haitian
community out to the Boulevard. A
tense confrontation between African-
Americans and Haitians at nearby Bis-
cayne Plaza sparked the incident.
"I remember the Haitians, with signs,
were protesting," says Beck. "I'd never
seen a mob of people. I was scared that
maybe violence would occur." That's
when the storeowner engaged in some
quick thinking: "I opened the shop. I
gave them sticks and stapled all the matte
board to it, and let them make signs." The
activists returned the favor by cluing
Beck into Haitian art. An avid collector,
he now owns more than 4000 pieces.

Continued on page 54


A Naked Grab?

Activists fear the county's plans to develop Haulover Beach Park
threaten the clothing-optional crowd


By Erik Bojnansky
BT Senior Writer

Throughout much of the 1980s, a
band of South Floridians advo-
cated for a place to enjoy sun
and water without the restrictions of a
bathing suit. In 1991, their dream became
reality. The county officially designated
as clothing-optional a 2000-foot-long
stretch of sand along the northern area
of Haulover Beach. More than 20 years
later this beach attracts naturists those
who enjoy communal nudity and nude


sunbathers from all over the world.
This month, the same group of activ-
ists who established Haulover's nude
beach is preparing to prevent Westrec
Marina from building a large boat-
storage facility just west of a parking
lot used by naturists. Richard Mason,
president of South Florida Free Beaches,
fears the enclosed 508-boat facility -
slated to include a convenience store, a
bait-and-tackle shop, and new docks
- will make it difficult for naturists to
visit the north end of the beach. Worse,
contends Mason, Miami-Dade officials


and Westrec Marina are defying the law.
"All we are asking the county to do
is live up to the charter," he says. "The
people who wrote the charter said there
should be no abuse of public land, and
the county is abusing the taxpayers' land
for convenience."
Mason will ask Miami-Dade Mayor
Carlos Gimenez to put the boat facility up
for a countywide vote, as required by the
charter regarding development in county
parks. Mason also will ask that the stor-
age facility be built farther south, where
the current 265-boat Haulover Marine
Center now operates, as called for by
Haulover's 2001 master plan. (The county
intends to demolish the marine center.)
Maria Nardi, chief of planning and
research for Miami-Dade Parks and
Recreation, says building a new facil-
ity on that spot would interfere with the


county's plans for creating more efficient
traffic circulation within Haulover Beach
Park. Additionally, she says, "building at
the current marine center would have re-
quired extensive dredging for a new boat
basin, which would have had significant
environmental impacts."
She also asserts that the charter does
not require a county referendum. "Boat
storage was an existing use at Haulover
Beach Park when Article 7 was adopted,"
she explains, referring to the portion of
the county charter dealing with public
parks and aquatic preserves. Nardi adds
that "facilities for marinas, sightseeing
and fishing boats, visiting military vessels,
and fishing" are exempt from Article 7.
Mason disagrees. Article 7, he insists,
requires a public hearing and a referendum

Continued on page 56


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.comNovember 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012
















Soul Survivor

Tales from Tobacco Road on its 100th anniversary


By Erik Bojnansky
BT Senior Writer
Photos by Silvia Ros
aura Hirata knows how to pour a
Guinness beer. Very slowly. She
can also mix cocktails while
juggling drink and food orders. Yet
the tattooed bartender has an Achilles
heel: handling remote controls. "I hate
technology," she mutters while trying
to find the Miami Marlins game. "I still
have a VCR."
"I have a couple of porno tapes, but I
don't have a VHS," a customer declares,
quickly adding: "Just kidding!"
A few seats away, the conversation
is more somber. "Jimbo's is gone. It's
history!" one patron groans, referring to
the smoked-fish and beer establishment
that operated at Virginia Key from 1954
until last year.
People sitting on either side of him
rattle off other Magic City bars and hang-
outs that have shut down in recent years.
"There's nowhere left!" one man gripes.
"I'm with you," mumbles a stocky
drinker sitting to his left.
The cluster of people at the bar then
makes a toast, to Miami's lost haunts and to
the good times they've had at Tobacco Road.
Located at 626 S. Miami Ave.,
Tobacco Road is renowned for its drink
specials, comfort food, and live music.
When Miami-Dade State Attorney
Janet Reno was appointed U.S. Attor-
ney General in 1993, Tobacco Road was
the scene of the celebration. When the
cinematic version of Miami Vice was being
filmed, actor Colin Farrell frequented
Tobacco Road during his off-time. He
enjoyed the jalapefio-rich Death Burger,
drank with cops who served as consultants
for the film, and flirted with a certain
female bartender. When celebrity chef
Emeril Lagasse is in town, you might catch
him playing drums with one of the bands.
Although the famous and influential
do enjoy the Road, as longtime patrons
call it, so do construction works, waiters,
and various local characters. "Most places
you go, they tend to attract a certain type


of person," says Mark Weiser, who has
booked music acts at Tobacco Road for
more than 30 years. "But every kind of
person goes to the Road at the same time.
It's pretty cool like that."
Tobacco Road is not only cool, it's
old. On November 17, it will celebrate
its 100th anniversary. During much of
the 20th Century the bar has operated
under different names and owners as a
speakeasy, a gambling den, a gay bar, a
dive bar, a strip joint, a theater house,
and a music club. It has survived prohibi-
tion, military boycotts, city-sanctioned
homophobia, dramatic demographic
changes, police raids, violent crime,
urban renewal, and broken friendships.
And along with that long life are
plenty of stories. Patrons and owners from
the early years are gone, their tales taken
with them to the grave. But the past three
decades, under the ownership of Patrick
Gleber and Kevin Rusk, have produced a
long string of memorable moments.
There's the time a naked man tried
to get inside the Road but the doorman
wouldn't let him in. "We have a dress
code," he informed him.
There's the time when a couple were
having sex in the upstairs lounge right
when Rusk's relatives were visiting the Road.
There's the time when 60Minutes cor-
respondent Ed Bradley jumped on stage with
a tambourine during a blues performance.
There's the time when Cindy Crawford
was turned away for not having an ID.
There are the times when Jimmy
Buffet, Lenny Kravitz, Jefferson Airplane,
the Romantics, and other big names in
the music world, after watching local acts,
decided to join the jam session.
And there are plenty of stories sur-
rounding the late Willie Bell, also known
as Dr. Feelgood, a skinny ex-con who
poked unruly guests with a finger, was
fond of saying "that's what she said,"
and hid a large knife and gun beneath
his clothes, either of which he could pull
out at the blink of any eye if he felt the
bar was threatened.
The Road's past is certainly color-
ful. The future, however, is anything but


Threatened by health officials in the early 1980s, Tobacco Road was
closed for several months to undergo renovations, including the
addition of this outdoor patio.


Road co-owner Patrick Gleber: "When we bought this land, it was as a
real estate investment, so it was always for sale."


certain: It's unclear if the place will out-
live Brickell's latest development boom.
Much of the surrounding area has
been transformed into the birthing
grounds of Brickell CitiCentre, a mas-
sive, towering $1 billion project of offices,
condos, hotels, and retail being built by
Swire Properties, the Hong Kong-based
company that developed Brickell Key.
"When Swire announced the project,
people came out of the woodwork look-
ing to buy our property," says Gleber,
co-owner of Tobacco Road since 1982.
This past April, Gleber and his
partners sold the two-story building for
$941,600 to Tobacco Road Property Hold-
ings, Inc. Fabio Faerman, commercial
division director for Fortune International
Realty, brokered the deal and represents
the new owner, but won't say who con-
trols Tobacco Road Property Holdings.


However, according to the Daily
Business Review, the company is headed
by Carlos Mattos, president of Hyundai Co-
lombia Automotriz, who has been investing
in land throughout Miami-Dade County.
The 3800-square-foot Tobacco Road
parcel was just a small part of a $12.5
million land deal between Tobacco Road
Property Holdings and various companies
connected to real estate investor Michael
Latterner, Gleber, or Rusk. The transac-
tion gave Tobacco Road Property Hold-
ings ownership of 49,950 square feet of
land that includes parking lots along SW
7th Street as well as restaurant, retail, and
office space. As part of the deal, Tobacco
Road and the River Seafood & Oyster Bar,
located a few doors south of the Road,
can continue operating in their current

Continued on page 52


November 2012Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDOR


Tobacco Road
Continued from page 51

locations for the next three years.
"When we bought this land, it was as
a real estate investment, so it was always
for sale," Gleber says with a sigh.
But the business itself wasn't and
isn't for sale.
Gleber continues to run Tobacco Road,
although the restaurant is now a mere tenant.
And if the Road is unable to endure at 626
S. Miami Ave., Gleber says he'll just move
it somewhere else. "I think the Road has
value, and the name has value," he says.
Mark Weiser believes the bar's long
history adds value to the land and, hence, is
sure it won't be demolished anytime soon
"If I were a developer, it'd be a plus to have
the oldest cabaret in
Miami on my property,"
he says. "So I'm not too
worried."
Indeed the new
landlord, who put
down another $28.2
million to buy 2.5
acres of nearby vacant
land, is reportedly in
no rush to demolish
anything, content with
rental income, which
will increase over time,
according to Faerman. Tobacco Road'
"The location is incred- from home for
ible," he says. "Miami finally closes.
Avenue's going to be a
major street that'll compete with Brickell
Avenue."

according to several newspaper
reports published since 1982, the
business later known as Tobacco
Road was opened in 1912. When Dade
County went dry and prohibited alcohol
a year later, a bakery and sandwich shop
served as a front while an illegal speakeasy
served liquor on the second floor.
Between the 1920s and 1930s, the
second floor also operated as an il-
licit casino. Among the guests was Al
Capone, who lived part-time on Palm
Island in Miami Beach.
At least that's the legend. The farther
back one goes, the harder it is to verify
elements of Tobacco Road's past. "I've
heard stories," says Paul George, a local
historian affiliated with Miami-Dade
College. "They're murky."
According to county property
appraiser's records, Tobacco Road's
current building was constructed in 1915,


Kevin Rusk partnered with Gleber in 1982 as co-owner, but eventually left:
"It was a shock that two people I admired would stick a knife in my back."


s downstairs bar is a home away
many, who say they'll miss it when it


although an employee of that department
acknowledges that records are some-
times inaccurate for such old buildings.
Gleber and Rusk are convinced that
Tobacco Road was founded 100 years
ago and operated illegally during the dry
years at that very spot. While renovating
the bar, they found the secret passageway
hidden by a bookshelf that led those in
the know from the bakery and sandwich
shop to the speakeasy on the second floor.
Locals, including a previous owner
and elderly former patrons, have also
told them the Road was a speakeasy.
Gleber remembers an incident 15 years
ago when a "white-haired little old lady"
asked to see the upstairs lounge, now
called the Cabaret Stage, one last time
before she moved from Miami.
Once there, she described what the
room looked like in the 1920s, replete
with bird cages, roulette wheels, and
gambling tables. "She goes: 'We used
to have such a great time here,'" Gleber
remembers her saying. "'We'd gamble


Mark Weiser has been booking band
Road for 30 years: "Every kind of per
the Road. It's pretty cool like that."

and drink when it wasn't allowed.'"
By the 1940s, the bar was called
Tobacco Road. For a period of time it was
a gay bar that featured male strippers as
part of its entertainment and transvestites
as part of its customer base. Jack Bell,
a Miami Herald columnist during that
decade, wrote that Tobacco Road was as
"queer as a nine-dollar bill," according to
a Herald article by Leonard Pitts, Jr.
The rest of the newspaper back then
called the place a "filthy hole." By 1944
the military had banned its personnel from
visiting the Road. Later that same year the
city's "morals squad" shut down the bar for
kIc\dnIsi according to the Herald.
It was reopened in 1946 under the
name Chanticleer Bar, and probably
continued to operate as a gay bar, in
spite of Miami leaders' obsession with
eradicating homosexuality in the Magic
City. Prodded by the Herald and the
Miami News, whose reporters and editors
labeled gays as s.c\ perverts," Miami
officials launched a series of raids on gay


bars in 1954. Among the establishments
hit was the "Shanticleer Bar," according
to a Miami News article, likely a mis-
spelled reference to the Chanticleer.
By the early 1970s, the place was
just a neighborhood bar. "I was in there
in 1975 when I was a college student,"
remembers historian Paul George. "It
was a Sunday afternoon. There were
hard-core drinkers, lots of smoke in the
place, and pinball machines."
Retired police officer Neil Katzman
reclaimed the Tobacco Road moniker
when he bought the building in 1977 for
$80,000. Much of his efforts were spent
renovating the upstairs lounge, which he
called the Speakeasy at Tobacco Road.
His decorating choices can still be seen:
photographs of old Miami, quirky lamps,
and a painting of a top-
Icss woman.
SWhy that painting?
S Katzman turned it into
Sta strip bar," Gleber
aIswers.
"He tried to make
ii a topless club," cor-
iccts Weiser, who at
SIle time was man-
ager of the Fat Chance
Blues Band, which
laterr renamed itself
I ko-Iko. "That failed.
s at Tobacco So they brought us in."
rson goes to Katzman turned
to blues and jazz for
entertainment (along
with the occasional stage play), but the
environment in Southside, as the area
was known, didn't exactly help business
owners.
"It was rows and rows of crack
houses," remembers Jack Pakonis, a
bartender at Tobacco Road for 30 years
(under Gleber and Rusk), who frequent-
ed the Road under Katzman's ownership
after working his shift at a Coconut
Grove club. "Unless you were already
really drunk, people were afraid to go to
that neighborhood."
Gram Wood Drout says the tough
neighborhood actually enabled him to
become a professional musician. The wife
of the Fat Chance Blues Band's original
lead singer wouldn't let him work there.
"The hours were 11:00 p.m. to 4:00 in the
morning, and the Road was notoriously
rough," he remembers. The rest of the
band asked Drout, then a budding musi-
cian, to take the singer's place. He did,

Continued on page 60


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November 2012













































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Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDOR


Broadway Art
Continued from page 50

The rich and famous could also be
seen visiting Beck's store. Julio Iglesias,
Gianni Versace, Sophia Loren, Donald
Trump, and Mel Brooks all walked
through the doors at Broadway Art and
Framing at one time or another.
Beck's memories of one particular
celebrity client are perhaps more amus-
ing than the rest. He recounts how Hedy
Lamarr walked into the store oozing of
Old Hollywood except Beck didn't
know who the 1930s glamour goddess
was. After another customer recognized
Lamarr, Beck looked her up. She went
on to become a great customer.
Beck, however, didn't just want to
become part of the local scenery. He
set out to transform the Boulevard. "I
always believed the Boulevard was going
to come into its own someday," he says.
"I believed in the power in it it's the
main artery to downtown, a very signifi-
cant road."
So he put money into the business
and, in turn, the Boulevard. By beautify-
ing Broadway Art's facade with bright


new colors, he hoped he would attract
more businesses to the area. He did.
Beck credits not only his custom-
ers for sticking with him despite the
dilapidated surroundings, but he also
gives kudos to the gay community for
leaving its mark on the Upper Eastside
and surrounding neighborhoods. "The
gay community got it," he says. "The
gay community is responsible, to this
day, not only in Biscayne Boulevard but
also in all the empowerment zones all
over the world, for starting trends and
fads and making notorious locations into
artistic venues. I'm going to give them
a plug, not because I'm a gay man, but
because that's the way it is."
The defining moment in the Bou-
levard's resurrection for Beck, though,
was when Soyka Restaurant opened in
1999. "That was the turning point," he
says. "It was a real happening." The
establishment of an upscale restaurant in
what was still a somewhat raw neighbor-
hood proved to Beck that the movers and
shakers in town shared his vision. Soon
developers also showed interest.
The memories of that early wave, how-
ever, also annoy Beck. He grumbles about


the missed opportunities when certain
neighborhoods groups fought many of the
proposed changes to the area. "Every time
somebody had an idea, people went out of
their way to do everything they could to
sabotage the progress," he says. "A lot of
those developers with big ideas could have
benefited the community and commerce in
the Upper Eastside. Instead it's at a stand-
still again, especially since the economy
has taken such big turns. And that's a
shame. There used to be electricity in the
air. All that feeling, the excitement of the
Boulevard, has dimmed down."
Nevertheless he'll also be the first to
say the area is in much better shape than
it was 20 years ago. Real estate values are
a good metric. Four years after establish-
ing Broadway Art and Framing, Beck
purchased the building's 7500-square-foot
lot for $85,000. This past March, he sold
it for $800,000.
Beck had hoped to use the windfall
to go into early retirement (he's only 49)
and work on his many personal projects.
However, his clients persuaded him to
continue in business.
On a recent afternoon, while Beck
was speaking of his devoted customers,


two walked into the new store, almost on
queue. Ann and Sarah Simpson are long-
time clients. They were in to have Beck
frame a photo of family patriarch Ernest
Williams. Now deceased, Ernest and his
wife Edith belonged to one of the pioneer
families of the Upper Eastside. They were
also among Beck's first customers, fol-
lowing him from Tip Freeman's place to
Broadway Art.
Now the Simpsons have followed
Beck 20 blocks north, to the recently
refurbished Shores Square, where
the eye-catching colors of Broadway
Art's previous location have been
traded for a larger workspace, plenty
of storage, better parking, and even a
security guard. Beck is thrilled with
the move.
Ever an advocate for progress, he
muses: "That's a problem with a lot of
places they don't want to change. They
are so worried about everything. Change
is what makes things work and grow. If a
plant never changed, then it wouldn't be
growing. It wouldn't give fruit."


Feedback: letters@biscaynetimes.com


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012


.......













* Gave 600 Million Dollars to the Marlins Stadium without
the Vters Approval
* Voted to move the Urban Development Boundary (UDB)
* Supports the Privatization of Jackson Memorial Hospital
* Voted to Increase Taxes
* Redirected Millions of Federal Grant Dollars intended for
the Poor to County Departments
* Hundreds of New County Cars were stockpiled in her
district for 5 years.
* Voted against Term Limits
*40% Unemployment in District 3
SEmergency Housing was Closed in District 3


SVoted to privatize Head Stan and hundreds of
employees lost their Jobs
" Voted to take Millions of dollars from Overtown
and made it available to Hialeah, Coral Gables,
Aventura, Miami Lakes, and Miami Beach.
* Took 5 Million Dollars for the redevelopment of
the historic Carver Theater and gave it to Edmonson's
favorite Developer.
* Greens Shoe Repair, in business over 50 years, is
being evicted so that the land can be given to
Edmonson's favorite Developer for Transit Village.


November 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


AURE EDMO* *'
tRECORD OF FAI LURE *


November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDOR


Legend
() Beach ( Open Lawn Space ( Park Maintenance Yard
SMarina i Promenade @ Park Maintenance Building
) Boat Launch @ Picnic Hub I Pavilion @ Conservation Easement
(3) Expanded Boat Basin @ Playgrounds @ Green Space
() New Dry-Stack Storage ( Restrooms ) Mangrove Restoration
() Boat Trailer Parking @ Concessions eae Reail) ( Existing FPL Substation
SVehicle Parking ( Amphitheater Pad ( Intersection Crosswalk
) On-Street Parking @ Pervious Pavement @ Outdoor Film Event Area
() Parking Garage (@ Re-Vegetation @ Future Parking Deck
@ Angled On-Street Parking ( Pier @ Dune Restoration
Overflow Turf Parking ( Shoreline Fishing A1A Complete Street
(2 Restaurants ( ADA Accessible Ramps Improvements
) Existing Dockmasterl Park Office ( Mid-Block Crosswalk Expanded Clothing
SLife Guard Headquarters ( Bus Stops ) Dog Park
Conservation Center ( Fuel, Bait and Tackle Building


This portion of the county's master plan for Haulover Park shows the proposed boat storage area and other planned changes. The legend covers
the entire map, which is available at www.biscaynetimes.com.


Naked Grab?
Continued from page 50

prior to building anything larger than 1500
square feet on the shoreline of a county park.
(The proposed facility is 600 feet long by
170 feet wide 102,000 square feet.)


Access to the beach is a primary
concern for Mason. To get to Haulover's
beaches, visitors must park their vehicles
on the west side of Collins Avenue and
then walk east through underground
passageways. Clothing-optional beach
patrons use the north lot, which includes


498 paved spaces and a grassy area the
size of two football fields. By noon on
weekends, the paved parking spaces are
filled, with hundreds of cars parked on
the grassy area as well.
With the parking lot immediately
south reserved for boat trailers (and


expected to be expanded under the
county's current plans), Mason wor-
ries that naturists will be forced to drag
their coolers, umbrellas, and beach
chairs more than a half-mile to reach the

Continued on page 58


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November 2012












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I- ILc


November 2012






Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDOR


Naked Grab?
Continued from page 56

clothing-optional northern end.
But just because a giant boat-storage
facility is being built on top of the nude
beach's auxiliary parking doesn't mean
parking will be taken away, Nardi counters.
As part of the county's 2010 agreement
with the company, Westrec, a national cor-
poration operating marinas in eight states
(including the Haulover Marine Center
since 1988), must invest at least $11.4
million in the project, money Nardi says
would go toward creating enough parking
for beachgoers and boaters: "The beach-
goer parking will remain at 498 spaces and
an additional 103 spaces will be used for
Westrec customers."
The new boat facility is just one
of many changes envisioned in Haulo-
ver's "general plan," which the county
commission has yet to approve in its
entirety. Along the west side, the parks
department anticipates the construction
of a new conservation center, a parking
garage, an outdoor film area and amphi-
theater, a picnic pavilion, and two new
restaurants (one of them being a Seasons


52) to replace facilities that burned down
a few years ago.
On each side of Collins, there will
be five concession areas selling food and
park-related items. One of those conces-
sion stands along with mangroves
relocated from the construction site of
the new facility will replace the cur-
rent marine center.
Some naturists think the real reason
county officials want to build the boat-stor-
age facility behind the north lot is to leave
room in the central portion of the western
park for the construction of even more res-
taurants and retail operations in the future.
"My personal opinion is that there is
money to be made [by putting] this boat-
house here," says Norma Mitchell, vice
president of South Florida Free Beaches.
Nardi maintains that future commer-
cial ventures at Haulover are limited to
what is outlined within the general plan.
But she acknowledges that her department
is seeking new revenue sources to keep
county parks open and maintained. "This
is a time when budgets are getting cut," she
says. According to a July 2010 memo, the
county will receive at least $21.6 million
from Westrec over a 25-year period.


But Mason points out that the cloth-
ing-optional beach is already a money-
maker for the county, with most of the
$1.2 million in annual parking revenue
from Haulover coming from naturists.
He adds that the region also benefits
from the estimated 1.3 million people
who visit the clothing-optional beach
each year, many of whom live outside
of Miami-Dade. "This is bigger than the
Marlins, Dolphins, and Heat, as far as
being a tourist attraction" he says. "Why
would you build a boathouse on the park-
ing lot of a major tourist destination?"
Despite the beach's popularity, the
county has been slow to make improve-
ments at Haulover, naturists tell the BT.
For example, notes Mason, it has yet to
make the beach passageways compliant
with the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Nardi concedes the county may have
ignored naturists in the past, but she says
that among the county's immediate plans
are adding wheelchair ramps for two of
the passageways leading to the beach, as
well as expanding the clothing-optional
beach by another 350 feet. "Moving
the fence is easy," she says, referring
to the wooden structure marking the


clothing-optional beach's southern
boundary. "We don't need a lot of money
to do that."
Such an expansion might save a
half-mile walk for naturists forced to park
in the central lots, but Mason doubts the
county will follow through. "The expan-
sion of the existing naturist beach...was ap-
proved by the county commission in 2001,"
Mason says. "That expansion was based
on the parks department building a dune
first. They have not done that in 11 years."
What really infuriates Mason is
that county officials never informed his
group they wanted to build the boat facil-
ity on the grassy lot. "We've been good
caretakers of the beach for 21 years," he
says. "We kept it from deteriorating by
keeping it clean and patrolling it. Yet
two years ago, without even asking or
bringing us into the loop, they sign an
agreement with Westrec."
He adds that the county wouldn't
treat the Vizcayans or the Miami-Dade
Zoological Society, two nonprofits that
also support county institutions, the way
they treat South Florida Free Beaches.

Feedback: letters @biscaynetimes.com


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November 2012






















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November 2012


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Community News: BISCAYNE CORRIDOR


Tobacco Road
Continued from page 52


and remains the lead singer for Iko-Iko.
"We were there right after the Mariel
boatlift," Drout continues. For much of the
night, the bar was filled with Mariel refu-
gees, many of whom wanted to try their
hand at playing the drums. When things
got too crazy inside the bar, Katzman
would pull out his shotgun. Says Drout: "It
was click click, and he'd just hold it."
It was law enforcement, not rowdy
patrons, who ended Katzman's reign.
Under Gov. Bob Graham's direct orders,
state agents and local cops raided the
Road and nine other Miami establish-
ments for drugs in 1981. The charges
against Katzman didn't stick, but he was
determined to sell all his properties, so he
hired real estate broker Michael Latterner.
"When it came time to sell Tobacco
Road, nobody would touch it," Gleber
says. (Katzman, who is supposedly
living in Mexico, couldn't be reached
for comment. Latterner also couldn't be
reached by deadline.)
So in 1982, Latterner himself bought
the Road's building for $150,000 and
asked Gleber to become his partner in
running the bar. At the time, Gleber was
a 22-year-old recent graduate of Florida
International University's hospitality
program who ran the Vine Wine Bar at
The Falls shopping center. As he likes
to tell it, Gleber visited the Road for the
first time on St. Patrick's Day, found a
rabbit's foot talisman in the gutter, and
heard the song "Tobacco Road" play on
the radio while he was driving home.
"That was enough for me," he says.
But Gleber couldn't do it alone. After
being rejected by at least one prospective
partner, Gleber turned to Kevin Rusk, a
fellow FIU hospitality graduate who also
worked at the Vine Wine Bar. As Rusk
recounts: "He said something along the
lines of, 'Hey, I'm doing this thing about
buying this place. This guy really needs
to get rid of it and it's a horrible run-
down bar that's poorly managed.'"
When Rusk visited the Road, it was
love at first sight. "I'm from Baltimore,"
he explains. "I know dive bars. I love
dive bars. So I was like, 'Oh, yeah. This
is great. Let's do it!'"

after Gleber and Rusk bought a
stake in the Road, Rusk pretend-
ed to be a trainee bartender in
order to figure out how the operation was
being run. "There were a lot of seedy


Bluesman Gram Wood Drout:
When things got too crazy, the
previous owner would pull out his
shotgun. "It was click click, and
he'd just hold it."

things going on," Rusk recalls.
The senior bartenders, for example,
instructed Rusk not to hassle a particular
drug dealer, a few prostitutes (several of
whom lived in rooming houses across
the street) openly solicited customers,
and some drink proceeds were kept
separate from the cash register.
When Rusk revealed himself as one
of the new owners, the old staffers knew
it was time to go. "Most of them were
gone when they found out we were really
making changes," Rusk says. "They
wanted nothing to do with it."
Besides drug-dealing and sexual
activity ("There were some really interest-
ing silhouettes," Drout recalls), the new
owners had to contend with lots of vio-
lence. For the first six months, there were
so many barroom brawls that Gleber often
had to use the brass knuckles and a roll of
quarters he carried with him. One person
was fatally stabbed in the bar. There were
also drive-by shootings outside.
When the health department threat-
ened to intervene, Gleber and Rusk shut
down the Road for several months and
invested $60,000 renovating the build-
ing. They expanded and cleaned up the
kitchen (the old Road was content with
serving hard-boiled eggs and pretzels),
shortened the main bar, changed the
seating, and turned a garbage strewn
rear lot into an outdoor patio bar.
They hired their culinary friends as
chefs and cooks and created a decent lunch
and dinner menu. Because choices were
more limited in downtown Miami back
then, Tobacco Road was a hit, especially
with Miami's legal community, in particu-
lar with federal prosecutors, whose offices

Continued on page 62


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com November 2012


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November 2012














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Tobacco Road
Continued from page 60

were nearby on the north side of the Miami
River. "There weren't that many restau-
rants in downtown Miami back then,"
Weiser says. "So Tobacco Road became
very popular for lunch, or happy hour, or
dinner. You had judges and you had law-
yers from both sides of important cases."
When the Road reopened in 1983, it still
had to contend with the Florida Department
of Transportation, which was ripping apart
the street as they built a new Miami Avenue
bridge. Several businesses closed down as a
result of the disruptive construction
Among the casualties was Lucky
Strike Bar. Established in 1932 at 524
S. Miami Ave., Lucky Strike's bartend-
ers were fond of first ridiculing anyone
ordering a cocktail (even a screwdriver
or a Bloody Mary) as a sissy, and then
suggesting they order a drink at To-
bacco Road. FDOT seized Lucky Strike,
demolished it, and built the ramp to the
new drawbridge right over it.
The Road had another trick up its
sleeve: music. "We tried a lot of differ-
ent things: reggae, jazz," Rusk says. "As
much as people liked jazz, the jazz people
would just sip a glass of wine. But if you
get a good blues band, they down glasses
of beer at three times the rate."
Besides bringing Fat Chance Blues Band
back to the Road (they left after just three
months working under Katzman), Weiser
also attracted superstars of the blues world
and American roots genre. John Hammond,
James Cotton, John Lee Hooker, Koko
Taylor, and Albert Collins are just some of
the blues giants who have performed at the
Road. "That's really what started to build our
reputation all over the world," Weiser says.
Not even the roadblocks that were present
during the Miami Avenue bridge's construc-
tion were a deterrent for the blues crowd. "It
was part of the fun," Weiser says. "It almost
made it like a secret place."
Iko-Iko became the Road's unofficial
house band, performing there almost
every week for 15 years. But after the
mid-1990s, the Road was booking fewer
blues acts in favor of other genres like
jam bands, rock, and heavy metal. As
time went on, Iko-Iko's appearances
became increasingly sporadic. "We
play up north in Fort Lauderdale and
West Palm Beach," says Drout, who still
performs solo at the Road on Tuesdays.
"That's where our audience moved to."
In the years that followed, Latterner,
Gleber, and Rusk increased their real


estate holdings along S. Miami Avenue.
Gleber and Rusk also started other restau-
rant ventures, including Fishbone Grille,
which operated in the space now occupied
by the River Seafood & Oyster Bar.
But by 1996, Rusk walked away from
managing the Road. Rusk, who went on
to open the successful Titanic Restaurant
and Brewery in Coral Gables, feels he
was forced out by Gleber and Latterner.
"It was a shock that two people I admired
and I thought of as family would stick
a knife in my back," he says today. "I
could've sued them, but that's not my
thing. I was more hurt than anything else."
"There was a disagreement about
how things should be run," replies
Gleber, who owns a stake in Pegasus
Thruster Inc., a company that makes
underwater propulsion gear for divers.
"Kevin is a talented restaurateur. We just
have different theories."
Still, Rusk plans to make an ap-
pearance at the Road during the 100th
anniversary, along with many friends. "I
love Tobacco Road and everything about
it," Rusk says. "I'd love to see it live for
another hundred years, but I'm a realist,
and I do understand the business aspect."
Rusk doubts a developer would be
willing to invest the money needed to
address the building's quirks, includ-
ing cleaning out the asbestos. "It is fine
and stable," he says, "but once you find
asbestos in a building, then the cost to
repair anything increases."
Gleber credits Rusk, Weiser, Pakonis,
and several other employees and partners,
past and present, with making Tobacco
Road a success. But he insists the Road
isn't done yet. "We're constantly working
on different ideas," he says. "It's always a
work in progress. You slow down, you die."
Historian Paul George, has fre-
quented the Road in recent years, isn't
sure it'll be the same if it isn't at 626 S.
Miami Ave. "A different building has
a different ambiance, I don't care what
they do," he says. "I hope they're plan-
ning the 100th in a big way because it
might not be around much longer."

Tobacco Road's 100th anniversary takes
place on November 17from 6:00p.m. to
5:00 a.m. Musical acts include Big Sam's
Funky Nation, Heavy Pets, Iko-Iko,
Spam Allstars, Locos Por Juana, and
A 1, ,. ii;/ For more information visit
www.tobacco-road.com.


Feedback: letters),biscaynetimes.com


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November 2012








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Neighborhood Correspondents: BRICKELL / DOWNTOWN


No Place to Party
Will another round of development put Brickell's festival culture
on the skids?


By Craig Chester
BT Contributor
Only a few short years ago, if you
asked a Miamian what there
was to do for fun in Brickell, the
answer was probably "not much." As the
cornerstone of Miami's financial district,
Brickell was characterized by little more
than its high-rise office towers, foreign
banks, parking lots, and garages.
Anyone who's set foot in the area
over the past few years knows that image
of Brickell is ancient history.
The condo boom added tens of thou-
sands of new residents to the neighbor-
hood, which, in turn, attracted a growing
cluster of restaurants, bars, shopping,
and other services.


The neighborhood is rapidly becom-
ing not just a local hub of activity, but a
regional entertainment district as well.
While during the week, you're likely to
find happy hours filled with office work-
ers and locals, weekend evenings bring
a distinctly more regional crowd, with
throngs of vehicles descending upon
Brickell from throughout the county,
their occupants ready to party until the
wee hours.
Amid all the development and ex-
citement, a specific identity is beginning
to emerge: Brickell is the new place to
party, and the place for festivals. Re-
cently, local businesses and promotional
agencies have organized a variety of
festival-style events that have attracted
thousands of people, primarily using the


few remaining vacant, undeveloped lots
in the area as a venue.
Over the past 18 months, these lots
have played host to such well-attended
events as Taste of Brickell, Cinco de
Mayo, Oktoberfest, St. Patrick's Day,
Brickell Farmers Market, and the Brick-
ell InDpenDanz Festival.
In addition, the Miami Circle Park,
next to the Icon Brickell complex along
the Miami River, hosted its own Ok-
toberfest event this year, as well as the
Brickell Beer, Burgers, and Balls (Meat-
balls) Festival back in August.


And of course, there's always the
old-fashioned block party. Over the past
two years, portions of S. Miami Avenue
have been closed to motorized traffic and
opened to people for World Cup viewing
parties, Miami Heat playoff parties, a St.
Patrick's Day event, and Bike Miami Days,
not to mention the ING Marathon and the
Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure.
According to the 2010 census, Brick-
ell has 37,622 people per square mile,
making it one of the densest residential
neighborhoods in the United States. The
primary demographic of young urban


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012









professionals and the increasingly re-
gional appeal of the neighborhood, com-
bined with Miami's insatiable appetite
for partying, provide the perfect condi-
tions for this festival culture in Brickell.
But there is another important factor
enabling the neighborhood's party repu-
tation: the availability of open lots where
these events are held. This is also the
factor that most threatens the continua-
tion of the area's party scene.
Even after the unfettered develop-
ment boom of the early 2000s, when new
condo towers sprouted like fungi after
a spring rain, Brickell still has a few
remaining undeveloped parcels that pro-
vide an ideal setting for large, festival-
style events. But now that the construc-
tion cranes are back for another building
bonanza (seven new towers are currently
under construction, including the mam-
moth Brickell CitiCentre), many of these
vacant lots are either active construction
sites or will be shortly.
The centrally located parking lot at
1001 S. Miami Ave., which has played
host to the majority of Brickell's recent
festivals, is perhaps the most immediately
threatened. At a recent meeting of Miami's


Planning and Zoning Board, a representa-
tive for developer and property owner Mal-
lory Kauderer said Mr. Kauderer wants to
build a 46-story tower on the site.
This would not only mean the end of
accessible festival space in the heart of
the neighborhood, but also for popular
bar and restaurant Baru Urbano, as well
as small Allen Morris Park. The latter
would be the casualty of a questionable
land-swap scheme in which Kauderer
would give the City of Miami additional
park space on an adjacent property in
exchange for the existing park.
Another two-and-a-half-acre lot at
1201 Brickell Bay Dr., home to the popu-
lar Taste of Brickell event for the past two
years, was recently put up for sale by its
owner, Tibor Hollo's Florida East Coast
Realty. The site is currently zoned for an
80-story residential tower. While there
are no immediate development plans, the
property's prime waterfront location and
the resurgent condo market are on a colli-
sion course that will have the cranes and
bulldozers back in no time.
This latest bout of development fever
is casting a spotlight on a frequent criti-
cism of Brickell: the district's lack of public


gathering spaces. With no signature park
or plaza in the neighborhood, where are the
popular festivals going to be held? Will they
continue? It's quite possible that Brickell's
emerging reputation for popular gatherings
will be sacrificed to the condo towers.
Street festivals are possible, but
they're more complicated than setting up
tents on an empty lot. They require traf-
fic alteration plans, paying police officers
overtime, and permitting requirements,
not to mention the physical limitations
of a 30-foot-wide pavement corridor.
With the number of new condo buildings
under way, and the expected increase
in traffic they'll bring, gaining support
from local residents and business owners
to frequently close streets could prove to
be a difficult proposition in the future.
The situation reminds me of "the
party analogy" coined by urban philoso-
pher Ian Rasmussen: Observant party
hosts notice that the first wave of guests
tends to make the party better arriving
with snacks, another six-pack, some new
music, and so on. But then, once the party
becomes crowded enough, additional
guests usually end up making the party
worse overcrowding it, straining the


refreshment supply, and potentially upset-
ting the neighbors with excessive noise.
(Students of economics may rec-
ognize Rasmussen's formulation as a
variation on the classic "tragedy of the
commons" scenario, in which indi-
viduals, acting in their own best interest,
deplete a shared resource, despite their
knowledge that doing so is to the detri-
ment of all in the long term.)
I see this same idea playing out in
regard to the urbanization of Brickell. The
first wave of development was a boon for
the neighborhood. Each new resident and
occupied condo increased the demand for
new businesses for dry cleaners, shoe
repair shops, restaurants, and corner stores.
So far, it's been a terrific party. But is more
development without accompanying public
space going to make the party worse?
I certainly believe that responsible de-
velopment is an enhancement over parking
lots and vacant land. However, without any
significant public gathering place, living in
Brickell could wind up like being trapped
inside a party with no back door to sneak
out and grab a breath of fresh air.

Feedback: letters @biscaynetimes.com


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Neighborhood Correspondents: AVENTURA


Other Side of the Tracks


Three good reasons why Aventura
neighborhoods

By Jay Beskin
BT Contributor
et's say you're a resident of
Aventura and you were to take a
leisurely drive west of the FEC
railroad tracks. What might you notice?
A not-small number of business estab-
lishments with the word "Aventura" in
their names.
There's Aventura Honda, Aventura
Professional Suites, and Aventura Beauty
Supply, all located in North Miami
Beach. Then there's Aventura Colli-
sion, Aventura Kids, Aventura Travel
Professionals, and many more located in
unincorporated Miami-Dade County.
The one church that shepherds city
residents calls itself the Church at Aven-
tura, but it's west of the city limits. A
posh housing complex being built in the


should annex its western


California Club area is to be crowned
Aventura Isles.
It's not difficult to grasp the reason
for this phenomenon. And no, it's not
because a name like Unincorporated
Miami-Dade County Deli and Bakery is
laughable which it is.
It's that these business owners and
residential developers west of the tracks
hope the stardust emanating from our
fair city will drift down on them, bless-
ing everyone it touches with status and
prestige, along with increased profits and
higher home values a kind of com-
mercial benediction.
Our city founders would have
enjoyed watching this. They adamantly
decreed that Aventura's western bound-
ary extend no farther than the centerline
of the FEC railroad tracks. Aventura's
eastern boundary would flow not one


drop beyond the middle of the Intra-
coastal Waterway.
They would have no industrial ware-
houses or mobile-home parks infiltrating
us from the west, or seedy motels and
tacky tourist shops coming at us from the
east. They wanted clear and defensible
borders to preserve the Aventura lifestyle.
Indeed, when then unincorporated
Sunny Isles started calling itself Aventu-
ra Beach in a play for annexation by our
city, Mayor Arthur Snyder summarily
killed the effort by vowing that Aventura
would never, ever hitch up with a place


as shabby as Sunny Isles.
A chorus from our shores shouted,
"Drop dead, Sunny Isles!"
But over the course of the past decade,
something astonishing has happened in
the east. It can be captured in this one
startling prospect: Because of high-end
development and redevelopment, by the
year 2015, the total property-valuation tax
base of Sunny Isles Beach may very well
surpass that of Aventura.
This from a city with half the popu-
lation and without the major economic
benefit of a world-renowned shopping mall,


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012









the mainstay of Aventura's revenue stream.
In unexpected ways, that prospect
should direct our attention to the west.
Twice in the past 15 years, leaders
of the unincorporated Highland Lakes-
Skylake communities have approached
Aventura to inquire about the possibility
of our city annexing those areas. Perhaps
they came with some of that Aventura
stardust in their eyes. Or maybe their
motivation was the same as that which
impelled our founders to incorporate:
more and better community services at a
much lower tax rate.
To the credit of Aventura's leaders,
they did not yell "Drop dead!" at our
neighbors west of the tracks. Rather they
commissioned feasibility studies. The
studies came back negative.
The annual cost of providing police
and community services to the west,
together with enormously expensive
investments required to bring their infra-
structure up to Aventura standards, would
exceed tax revenues generated from that
area by at least a million dollars.
In other words, Highland Lakes-
Skylake couldn't pay for themselves. That
analysis, along with a county-imposed


moratorium on annexations of unincorpo-
rated areas, effectively quashed the pos-
sibility of Aventura expanding westward.
Or did it? A number of months back,
the county lifted the moratorium, and
now word has it that the leaders of High-
land Lakes-Skylake may take one more
swing at annexation before they pursue
their own incorporation effort. (See the
BT's "Highland Lakes to County: We
Want Out!" May 2012.)
It would be perfectly understand-
able if Aventura officials just shook their
heads No. In a time of shrinking proper-
ty values, it's highly unlikely the results
of new feasibility studies would change
in favor of annexation. In fact the cost/
revenue analysis might look worse.
Even so, there are reasons the City
of Aventura may want to re-examine
its position.
Remember about nine years ago,
when Turnberry purchased a large tract
of land along the east side of Dixie
Highway, with plans for a large discount
shopping center? The only way the new
center could be economically viable
would be to create a new crossing over
the railroad tracks at 199th Street.


Problem was, traffic studies showed
that it would have taken at least five traffic-
signal cycles for a driver to exit west on
199th Street. Further, traffic would have
slowed considerably on Biscayne Boule-
vard, a result of westerly turns across the
tracks and into the new shopping center.
The city's elected officials (me among
them) determined that they had to fight
this proposed development. Because the
city didn't control anything west of the
railroad tracks, it was a significant battle.
We know the city eventually prevailed, but
the whole thing could have been avoided
had the city controlled zoning to the west.
So wouldn't it be better for Aventura
residents if the city annexed the west?
Here are three reasons the answer is Yes:
First, zoning. Today the W Dixie
Highway corridor is ripe for redevelopment,
and the Ojus Master Plan governing that area
embraces the tenets of New Urbanism -
mixed-use developments of shops, restau-
rants, offices, and residences. It would be
in Aventura's best interest to ensure that the
master plan is followed, and that projects are
designed to benefit all residents of the area.
Second, recent and tragic events at
Michael Krop High School have prompted


some Aventura parents to seek a charter
high school within Aventura city limits. The
same issues could apply to the elementary
and middle schools in that area. Hundreds
of Aventura children attend those schools.
Wouldn't it be a good idea for those
schools to be under the protection of
the Aventura Police Department, which
could continually patrol and quickly
respond to emergencies?
Third, our main east-west corri-
dors Miami Gardens Drive and Ives
Dairy Road run through Highland
Lakes/Skylake. As anyone who drives
these streets knows, they are madden-
ingly congested. Wouldn't it be great if
our city stepped in and improved the
situation with traffic control and enforce-
ment? It's certainly worth a look.
While annexation may cost Aventura
some money in the short term, the city has
enough in reserves to do it without raising
property tax rates. And who knows? With
proper redevelopment, the area to the west
may not only be able to sustain itself, it actu-
ally might contribute positively to Aventura's
tax base. Just look at Sunny Isles Beach.

Feedback: letters @biscaynetimes.com


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Neighborhood Correspondents: MIAMI SHORES


A Fox Tale

It all started when my husband wanted a different kind of pet


By Jen Karetnick
BT Contributor

W e called her Olympia. I posted
the picture of her sweet, silvery
snout and curious, upright ears
on Facebook the moment we brought her
home, and the response from friends mir-
rored my own. "What a beauty!" some
wrote. "Did you rescue her? Lucky girl
that she gets to live with you."
Then there were those, closer to
me, who know that my husband has
long enforced a ban: "What? I thought
you weren't allowed to bring home any
more animals!"
Naturally, a curious few wanted to
know her breed. I called her our "Rus-
sian catdog." A couple of people took


me at my word. "I didn't know there
was such a thing...."
There isn't, of course, unless you
live in a world sponsored by Nickelode-
on. But I didn't yet know the legalities
of keeping a Soviet relative of Vulpes
vulpes in the Shores.
See, Olympia is, in short, a Russian
silver fox.
Domesticated, with doglike qualities
that include whimpering, barking, licking
her owners to show affection, and wagging
her tail, Olympia is a particularly successful
result of a program introduced in Russia 50
years ago. Many of the descendants of this
selective project also exhibit these good
traits, which, of course, was the aim.
But their tails became curly, or their
coats piebald. Olympia's tail is a straight,


full brush, and her coat an unrelenting
mass of burnished pewter. If there were
a Westminster for foxes, Olympia would
win "best in show."
Still, no matter how much I admired
her, I wasn't the one to introduce her
to our household (an intro that came
with an involuntary explosion of highly


odorous fox urine every time our dachs-
hund and dachshund-beagle mutt snarled
at her). It was all Jon's fault.
My husband is a good man. He
is certainly better than I deserve. He
works harder than most people I know.
He shoulders more than his share of
housework, errands, and parenting


Just like all of us, classical music lives
and breathes. Make it part of your lifestyle.
Tune to Classical South Florida on the
radio or online. It's in your nature.


'P.A.. ~


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.comNovember 2012


,.0p


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012









responsibilities. And when it came time
for his midlife crisis, not only was he
right on schedule at the age of 44, he was
considerate. Rather than forfeiting the
kids' college fund on fast cars or flashy
women, he tried to bring home things I
would like, too: exotic animals.
It began with caracals. He heard
about them from a friend, a nurse in
one of the hospitals where he works as
a neurologist. Caracals are 50-pound fe-
lines from southern Africa and southern
Asia that have dun-colored coats, long
tails, and black-tufted ears. They're
related to servals but look a lot more
like lynxes.
On the pet market these days, you
can find two kinds of domesticated
caracals: purebred and hybrids (crossed
with Abyssinians and called "caracats,"
or crossed with servals and called "cara-
vals"). Jon's friend owns both, a caracal
and a caraval, and while the former is a
doll, sleeping in bed with her and enjoy-
ing visitors, the latter is somewhat surly.
Either way, though, the pizza delivery
guy is pretty sure he's encountering a
cougar and a bobcat when he rings the
doorbell at her house.


It's thanks to these caracals that
we came by Olympia. At first, Jon also
thought caracals were a good idea.
"When the dogs pass away, these are the
next animals I want," he said. I remained
skeptical, which turned out to be a wise
move. (I'm more the rescue type, prefer-
ring to pick up an animal that needs
help rather than pay a bunch of money
to a breeder.) After he met his friend's
big cats, he thought twice about owning
animals that could, potentially, kill him
in his sleep.
I also had the sense to say no when
he e-mailed me early one morning with:
"Hey, do you want a marmoset? My
friend knows a breeder whose marmoset
just had three babies. She could get us a
really good deal."
A marmoset? Had the man lost his
mind? Jon had gone to great lengths
to make sure we wouldn't have a third
child, but he was willing to buy me a
mini monkey that would never grow
beyond the size of an infant, that would
have the mental and emotional capabili-
ties of a toddler, that would sleep in bed
with us and wear diapers and travel with
us all for the next 30 years.


Jon's third strike came in the form of
rabbits. We had long ago agreed to stand
firm in the face of our daughter's resolve:
She wanted "baby bunnies," but we
already had their natural enemies, dachs-
hunds, in the house. S'more and Rolo are
lovely doggies who lick children up and
down, but they can't help their instincts.
In order to pacify her, we named
a cat Baby Bunny (BeBe for short).
We've also called a cat Monkey for
the same reason, after an animal we
should never own. Still, Jon proved
susceptible a few months ago and
brought home two adorable bundles of
fur. They lasted a week before a com-
bination of Monkey's machinations
(he knows how to open doors) and the
dogs' determination ended the bunnies'
chances of survival for good.
All this predisposed me to say yes
to Olympia, who was living uneasily
with the caracals at the time. Caracals
are highly territorial, and Jon's friend
thought they might kill her. So while
she loved Olympia, having gotten her
from a woman whose kid went to col-
lege shortly after acquiring the fox, she
had to give her up.


Suffice to say, we never had to
worry about getting Olympia a license
because, after only 48 hours of chaos,
we passed her on to the science teacher
at my school. Her boyfriend, a trapper
by trade, had been removing foxes from
Barry University there are still plenty
of wild red foxes in the Shores, including
two males that live at Miami Country
Day School and coincidentally, had
been looking for an abandoned baby
Vulpes vulpes to raise as his own. Olym-
pia was perfect for him. I hear from time
to time how happy she is with him down
south, where he's built her a huge pen in
his backyard.
My son was distressed to see Olym-
pia go. But he also remembers when
we had chickens for six months before
they flocked to a farm in Ocala, and is
resigned to the unpredictability of our
family's pet situation. It's hard to know
what creature will roost with us next on
its journey to its forever home, but now
that this drama is over, I might just let
his father back in the house.


Feedback: letters@ibiscaynetimes.com


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November 2012





Neighborhood Correspondents: BELLE MEADE


A Case of the Blues
The city's new recycling bins have brought a splash of color to


Belle Meade but not in a good
By Frank Rollason
BT Contributor

Sl little boxes on the hillside,
S Little boxes made of
I ticky tacky,
Little boxes on the hillside,
Little boxes all the same.
There's a green one and a pink one
And a blue one and a yellow one,
And they're all made out of ticky tacky
And they all look just the same."
I am sure this Pete Seeger song
brings back some distant memories for
many of us. The lyrics and music were
written and composed by Malvina Reyn-
olds back in 1962 as she and her husband
were on their way from where they lived


in Berkeley, through San Francisco,
and down the peninsula to La Honda,
where she was to sing at a meeting of
the Friends Committee on Legislation, a
public-interest lobby in California. (Tiny
La Honda, in the Santa Cruz mountains,
was also home base for author Ken
Kesey and his Merry Pranksters.)
As she drove through Daly City,
she said to her husband: "Bud, take
the wheel. I feel a song coming on."
The result was this cult classic, "Little
Boxes," which was recorded by Seeger
and is still utilized today to epitomize
our frustrated attempts at individual-
ity; the more we try to be different, the
more we are the same. ("Ticky tacky" is
a reference to the use of cheap building


materials in house after house, creating a
oneness that, while perhaps functional, is
obscenely obnoxious.)
And this introduction brings us to
my latest rant on the neon-blue recycling
bins that were distributed throughout the
Upper Eastside over the past few weeks,
and throughout the entire city over the


past couple of months. As I look out my
window while writing this column, I can
see down several blocks of homes, and
what catches one's eye are these damn
neon-blue containers.
At this point, a little history on the
changeover from manual garbage collec-
tion to automated pickup. Years ago all


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November 2012


S


K









kinds of garbage containers, individually
purchased by homeowners, had to be
physically emptied into heavy aluminum
"totes," as they were called. These totes,
in turn, were hefted onto the shoulders of
toterss," as the workers were called, and
when full, were carried to the back of a
garbage truck, where the contents would
be dumped.
The toters suffered all types of inju-
ries as a result of this heavy lifting, from
back and muscle strains to actual infesta-
tions of worms in the shoulders on which
they rested their totes while making the
rounds. (The liquid in the garbage would
leak from the totes into open wounds on
the toters' shoulders and maggots would
begin to incubate within these cuts; not a
very pretty picture is it?)
So back in 2001, then director of
solid waste management Clarance Pat-
terson proposed to city manager Carlos
Gimenez (now the mayor of Miami-
Dade County) that Miami convert to an
automated garbage collection system that
would be more efficient and cost effec-
tive, and would curtail the numerous
on-the-job injuries that were becoming
quite expensive for the city.


Of course, the initial outlay for the
new trucks with the automatic pick-up
arm (referred to as "one-arm bandits")
and the required containers the city
would have to provide to every single-
family home and duplex would be sig-
nificant. In the long run, however, dollars
would be saved by not having to hire
as many workers as the current system
required, and by not having to cover as
many injuries to workers.
The manager was intrigued enough
by the proposal to request that Mr. Pat-
terson set up a demonstration project so
we (I was working for the city at the time)
could view the system in actual operation.
I asked Clarance to set it up in the Grove,
on a narrow street with lots of trees and
relatively low-hanging power lines, so that
we could test whether these worst-case
conditions would present a problem.
While at the demonstration -
which went very well I noticed that
we were using black containers and
casually asked Clarance if we would be
using black containers when we went to
this system. His answer was immedi-
ate. "No," he said, "because many of
the homeowners will keep these bins in


their front or side yards, where they'll
be visible from the street, so the best
color to make them [so they'll blend in]
is a dull green." I asked him what made
him think of that, and his reply was also
immediate. "Garbage is my business," he
said, "and that includes how the neigh-
borhoods look as a result of my actions."
And that, my friends, brings us back
to my rant on the newly delivered, ugly,
neighborhood-degrading, neon-blue re-
cycling containers. Why would someone
make the decision to select a color that
stands out like the proverbial sore thumb?
As you drives down the streets of Belle
Meade and other neighborhoods, you're
greeted with blue containers everywhere.
I would think, purchasing as many bins
as the city has, that a more neutral color,
such as a dark brown or tan, would have
been specified. That would be more compat-
ible with the surroundings in which they
will probably sit in between their short stints
on the street every other week for collection.
Suppose someone in one of the city's
historic districts requested to paint their
front wall or garage door a similar shade
of neon blue. Do you think the historic
preservation board would approve of


such a color choice? I would hope not,
but when the city decided to embark
upon this form of recycling collection
(which I support, by the way), did anyone
ever think of the unintended impact of
such a garishly colored bin being placed
in front of every home? Apparently not.
Oh, where was the wisdom and
experience of Clarance Patterson when
we needed it? If you think the color really
makes little difference, next collection day,
see if you can find one of the blue recycling
containers standing near a green garbage
container. The green one would probably
never have caught your eye, but the blue
one, truly a thing of beauty, makes both
bins more noticeable. What an eyesore to
have foisted upon our neighborhood!
Thank you, city leaders, for yet an-
other well-conceived idea. Perhaps a trial
program would have allowed this issue
to surface before the city expended the
funds citywide?
"Little boxes on the hillside,
Little boxes made of ticky tacky,
Little boxes on the hillside,
Little boxes all the same!"

Feedback: letters@ibiscaynetimes.com


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"The original Red Priest [Vivaldi] should be dancing in his grave!" (BBC MUSIC MAGAZINE)
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All programs are subject to change without notice. St. Martha in the Shores 9301 Biscayne Blvd., Miami Shores.


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November 2012


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Neighborhood Correspondents: NORTH MIAMI


Score One for the People
Disaffected residents crowd the mike at a North Miami City Council


meeting and


surprise! the council listens


By Mark Sell
BT Contributor

Councilman Scott Galvin packed
'em in the evening of October 18
at the Alaska Coffee Roasting
Company in North Miami.
The subject: What to do with the
$17.5 million in Swerdlow money from
the Biscayne Landing project that had
just dropped through the chimney, sud-
denly making the city solvent.
The consensus: Be careful. Be very
careful. In fact, many in the crowd,
including Galvin, wanted to sit on the
money, treat it as an endowment, get ag-
gressive with grants, spend only the inter-
est, and say that before the microphone at
the October 23 city council meeting.
And guess what? It worked for
the most part.


Councilman and mayoral candidate
Jean Marcellus, who will need eastside
votes in the future, turned the tide. To
raucous applause from the audience, the
council voted 3-2 for Marcellus's motion
to use the Swerdlow money to raise the
city's reserve from $5 million to $15
million, plus $2.5 million for capital
improvements such as police cars and
the library.
"This is a great day for the city," said
Councilman Michael Blynn, who voted
with Galvin and Marcellus. Even Mayor
Andre Pierre who voted against the
measure along with Councilwoman Marie
Steril applauded, if perhaps in jest.
The message from Galvin and frus-
trated citizens across the city: Start going
to council meetings and speaking up.
This was not Marcellus's first pivotal
vote amid public pressure. In September


With his motion to put $15 million in the bank, Councilman Jean
Marcellus turned the tide.


he'd cast the deciding vote not to donate
$150,000 worth of garbage trucks to
Haiti, after citizens objected. (The alter-
native was to sell them.)
"If there are enough people, there
can be a difference," Galvin had told the
crowd at Alaska Coffee. "There have
been victories. The only thing I can
guarantee you is that, if you are not in the
room, you are definitely not going to win."
To touch upon the dynamics at
work recently:


The budget: Without the Swerdlow
money, the city has an operating budget
of just less than $50 million, of which
64 percent goes to personnel, including
salaries, pensions, and overtime; 20 per-
cent goes to operating costs; 8 percent
to internal services, such as general ben-
efits, maintenance, and insurance; and
the rest to bond payments and grants.
City manager Stephen Johnson worked
particularly hard this year to prevent a defi-
cit. He and the council avoided repeating


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.comNovember 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012









the $6 million deficit of 2011 largely by
privatizing sanitation and building inspec-
tion. If upcoming budgets don't dig into
the Swerdlow money, the city could have a
tricky time avoiding future deficits.
On the other hand, with the Swerd-
low money, you're suddenly looking at
a $67.5 million budget with a $17.5 mil-
lion surplus, giving the city one of the
healthiest balance sheets in the state.
Used improvidently, this one-time
payment could turn into sugar water,
causing an adrenaline rush and subse-
quent crash. Used wisely, it could pro-
vide genuine financial nourishment for a
city with a 24-percent poverty rate.
Count your fingers: If one single issue
rankled the discontented in the run-up to
the council meeting, it was the proposed $4
million council discretionary fund proposed
by the city manager (and, one might pre-
sume, supported by Mayor Pierre).
Many in the city suspect this could
prove to be an invitation to, at best,
patronage and, at worst, criminal cor-
ruption. The city has not been noted for
its transparency or speed of communi-
cations, and suspicion arises in inverse
proportion to the level of transparency.


The failed donation of garbage trucks
to the Haitian charity is a case of suspicion
at work. The council voted to put the trucks
up for auction only after Marcellus, under
citizen pressure, voted against giving them
away. Yet a city provision evidently exempts
donating individual items under $25,000
from council approval. Could this mean the
city is giving the trucks away piecemeal?
"I got the auction list last night and
the trucks weren't on there," Galvin said
at the meeting at Alaska Coffee. "And
I thought, 'The sneaky devils.' You can
see why my hair has turned white."
Then there was the near miss of the
$99,000 contract to clean new sidewalks
along 125th Street. Galvin, an emerg-
ing master of the political e-mail blast,
posted a video of himself on YouTube,
walking along the sidewalk and calling
the contract a big waste of money. The
video went viral when news emerged that
Faustin Denis, a top official at IMECO,
the contractor, was under indictment for
racketeering and organized fraud.
The city quickly pulled the con-
tract and put it up for bid again only
to then award IMECO a $270,000
streetscaping contract, bringing the


firm's total business with the city to
more than $1 million. (The justification:
Faustin Denis is technically an employee
rather than owner, and presumed inno-
cent until judged guilty.)
Laws? What laws?: The October 9 city
council meeting was odder and even more
rancorous than usual. One curious moment
came after Galvin sprung a trap by reveal-
ing that approving money to groups lacking
an eight-point package of documentation
violates a 2010 city ordinance.
The instant issue was over giving
$60,000 (Swerdlow money, of course)
to help Annunciation Greek Orthodox
Church, on NW 2nd Avenue and 122nd
Street, with its 50th anniversary festival
scheduled for November 2-3.
"To vote on this resolution would be
breaking our laws," Galvin said.
"What are the consequences of violating
the resolution?" asked Councilwoman Steril.
"You all probably violate many reso-
lutions very often. Here, there's probably
no consequence for violating the resolu-
tion, honestly," said city attorney Regine
Monestime. (Say what?)
Then she backtracked, said that
a cause of action was possible, and


confirmed the approval would indeed
violate the law not that she was recom-
mending one course of action over another.
Steril, of all the council members,
pretty much settled things. "If we spend
everything from Biscayne Landing for
festivals and brotherhood," she said,
"there will be nothing left for taxpayers."
Catherine Christofis, a serious civic
activist and Annunciation board member,
went from testy to furious as she saw
she wouldn't be getting even half a loaf.
It failed again October 23, when Pierre
cut the offer to $15,000 and Christofis
refused to bite, going home with zero.
Change of heart? Not so fast. The coun-
cil, Steril included, voted after midnight Oc-
tober 9 to donate $9000 in fee waivers and
in-kind protection and $5000 in hard costs
for a soccer festival to a defunct, for-profit
corporation, thereby yet again demonstrat-
ing elasticity in ordinance enforcement.
One Swerdlow expense already ear-
marked: payment of the $154,000 fine for
nondisclosure that Steril's mother used
federal grant money to buy and refurbish
a house on NW 142nd Street.

Feedback: letters(@biscaynetimes.com


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Neighborhood Correspondents: MIAMI AT LARGE


Holy Heaps of Art!
Sure, a hoarder's house may seem like it's filled with junk, but
look again


By Wendy Doscher-Smith
BT Contributor
Hoarding is the new black.
No, really, I'm serious. I'm
so serious that as I type this I am
concurrently contemplating if the half-
rusted yet still shiny enough to manipu-
late hubcap I saw R.I.P. (Resting in Piles)
is still by the curb down my street.
I really hope it is, because then I can
strap some unfortunate and possibly already
decapitated Barbies, Skippers, Kens, or other
dolls made to resemble perfectly propor-
tioned fictional people to its slightly corroded,
crisscrossed shapes and make something.
I make things. In some circles these
things are called "art." But I don't like


saying I am an artist. See? Oh. I guess
you can't see it, but I just cringed.
The word "artist" has always rung
pompous and hollow to me, partly because
it is a synonym for unemployed, selfish,
overly sensitive, arrogant, alcoholic, drug
addicted, insecure, petty, and self-righ-
teous. Of course, I'm describing musicians,
too! And writers! (But notjournalists, as
they are a bunch of heartless pricks.)
Miami is on the verge of Art Basel
and all that comes with it: VIP parties,
swag times ten, traffic jams, people pre-
tending to know more and be more than
they are. And hoarding.
Not all artists or self-proclaimed art-
ists require material objects to create their
art. But many do, and while they may


be brilliant, witty, creative, insufferable,
and broke, many of them are also closet
hoarders. Thankfully, I'm not one of them.
Hi. My name is Wendy and I am
an... er, ahhrtist and borderline hoarder.
Or hoarder by trade. But I don't have a
problem. Not really. I mean, I need all
my crap.
When I find an item, I never know if
I'll find one like it again, so if possible,


I buy it. Or I flash my breasts as pay-
ment. Just kidding. Or not. Point is: This
buying impulse is strong.
I may not use the purchase immedi-
ately, though. So it sits and occupies space
until that golden hour could be the
next day, could be ten years from now -
when it is required to construct the instal-
lation called Fruit Loop and Lego Forest
Utopia ofElves. You're wondering: Huh?


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November 2012









It's an ahhrt thing. You're not sophisti-
cated enough to understand.
There are terms for people like me
and, no doubt, many of the Art Basel art-
ists. Hoarder is just one of them. If items
are discovered outside of a shop, includ-
ing roadside, in a Dumpster (hence the
term "Dumpster diving"), in Granny's
attic, or wherever, and you did not pay
for them, they are considered "found ob-
jects." There is an entire art genre based
on found objects. Did you know that? It's
called "found object."
I'm a fan of found objects (photograph-
ing them as I find them and collecting
them for purposes yet unknown) because
of their diversity and histories. Something
new that just rolled off the conveyor belt
simply smells too plastic to inspire.
I suppose I should get on the wagon.
Maybe throw some of my items away.
Let me think about that. No, never. My
items are not merely objects. Many
have names and histories and mean-
ing! (Note: Projecting meaning onto
inanimate objects qualifies as anthro-
pomorphism. There's your word of the
day. Don't you dare say you never learn
anything from my column.)


Anyway, assigning meaning to
inanimate objects is also a definite "yes"
on the "Are you a hoarder?" checklist on
the Mayo Clinic website. But as we all
know, those quacks just make that stuff
up to pad their egos, so never mind.
All visual artists require some items
to create their work. These items may
include drawing paper, sketchpads, can-
vasses, easels, paints, pencils, and live
models. But those are called art supplies.
(Even the people. Sorry.) And that is
where the "Artist as Hoarder" problem
comes into play.
See, we, the AAH, need much more
than some fancy crayons and a naked
woman. We require "props." Props is an
umbrella term encompassing costumes,
books, magazines, scores of empty
prescription medicine bottles, animal
skeletons, shoes (did I say shoes?), and
crotchless undergarments that a dog had
fun eating, to name only a few examples.
Countless other items fit the bill. Hell,
bills themselves fit the bill.
The problems resulting from being any
type of hoarder are many one being, at
least in my case, that there are no more
surfaces in our house. The surfaces still


technically exist. But they have been trans-
formed. They are no longer surfaces, but
piles. And a room that should be used for
other purposes, such as a spare bedroom,
becomes a "Crap Room," as it is referred
to in my house.
It is sneaky, this materials need that
I and, I'm sure, many other borderline
hoarders/ahhrtists have.
While I'm on the subject: I don't
think you can be a hoarder without being
a collector. But you can be a collector
without being a hoarder. Quick! Some-
one draw me a Venn diagram.
It doesn't matter if the material is
a corroded bottle cap or a vintage ball
gown. What it is, isn't important. The
point is that, while these objects mas-
querade as hubcaps, rocks, mannequins,
records, scraps of paper, discarded toys,
fabrics, and even larger items such as
doors, glass panels, tires, and the occa-
sional baby carriage or bassinet, they are
downright alive to the hoarder.
As grim as this all may sound, I am
thrilled to see that I have done my part
for this country, as well as for ahhrt, and
have stayed current with mental illness
trends. Back in the 1990s, the Sex and


the City days, depression was all the
rage. Well, I had (and have) that one, too!
Hoarding is tres trendy right now.
The A&E network series Hoarders is
among the highest-rated programs on
cable television. The popularity of that
show is probably what caused another
cable network, the Syfy (formerly Sci-Fi)
Channel, to start its own series on hoard-
ing, this one focused on collectors as
hoarders (Collection Intervention).
These poor souls and their stuff are
paraded on camera each week, accom-
panied by furrow-browed, concerned
family members and friends, and a well-
meaning (and likely well-paid) pseudo
psychologist. All of these people want to
help the hoarder.
Oftentimes, however, the hoarder
does not want to be helped. Well, I say:
Let the lunatic be! Last time I checked,
this was a free country and people are
allowed to literally suffocate in piles of
Spice Girls and Star Trek figures if they
so choose.
Some may even slap a $120,000
price tag on it and call it ahhrt.

Feedback: letters@tbiscaynetimes.com


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012





Culture: THE ARTS


A Chinese Artist Comes Home
Ma Desheng will show his work and his gratitude to the Miami
Project to Cure Paralysis at this year's Art Miami


iNLN`


(r


Untitled black ink on paper, laid on canvas, 1989.


By Anne Tschida
BT Arts Editor
The artist Ma Desheng's path through
life has not been an easy one. But
it has cut a swath that has left a
profound impact on both aesthetic creation
and on people, from China to France to the
United States, specifically Miami.
This incredible road is documented
in a photograph from 1979, as China was
just emerging from the traumatic years
of the Cultural Revolution and Mao Ze-
dong's rule. Ma and several other artists
are pictured in the black-and-white photo,
still wearing the drab "Mao uniforms"


that almost every Chinese citizen wore
back then.
Ma stands out. He is the one lean-
ing on a wooden crutch, evidence of
his childhood polio. This was a photo
of one of the first contemporary arts
groups in the country, called "the Stars,"
orXingXing, a group that also included
the now internationally famous and
provocative Ai Weiwei, among others.
Although China has an artistic tradi-
tion spanning thousands of years, the
revolutionary era in China was stifling,
as individual expression was looked
down upon, even violently suppressed.
But the Stars began to push boundaries,


opening up the Middle
Kingdom to modern-
ist and post-modernist
trends that had been
absent from China.
Back then, Ma was
working in woodcuts,
and could be called an
outsider artist, as he
had no formal train-
ing. There were no real
private art galleries, so
this new generation of artists would show
their works on walls in Beijing. For a time,
the new government in China allowed
this flowering. (The arts have always
been a way for officialdom to promote
development.) But the opening came to a
close a decade later, with the clampdown
of Tiananmen Square. That's when Ma
left China for Paris, never to return.
His decision to leave China, says Ma,
speaking from his home and studio in
Paris, was a necessary one: "China did not
have space for the development of modern
art; modern art originated in the West."
In 1992 Ma was vacationing in the
Florida Keys when he was involved in a


terrible car accident. His girlfriend was
killed in the crash, and Ma spent two
years in rehabilitation at the Miami Proj-
ect to Cure Paralysis. There he confronted
yet another challenge: While polio had
always limited his movement somewhat,
the car accident left him a quadriplegic.
In the midst of this tragedy, the artist
also found comfort, as the Miami Project
founded by Dr. Barth Green of the
University of Miami allowed Ma to
forge a powerful connection to South
Florida and its people.
Artistically, Ma moved from
woodcuts to painting. Using irregu-
lar illustrations of stone, he began to
compose figures, nude and otherwise,
on canvas. He literally took the idea of
"building blocks" embodied by stones
and rocks and ran with it. Initially
his paintings resembled his woodcuts;
they were black and white, monotone,
somber in feeling. Recently, though, Ma
has turned to a wider range of color, on
increasingly bigger canvases.
Maybe that's a reflection of his new
outlook on life. The ink wash paint-
ings, even the woodcuts, are no longer


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Untitled and undated woodblock, a method Ma used in his
early days.


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November 2012


~4~6~~


Ltr-









possible with his limited mobility. He
needs help with his large paintings now,
and he has moved to acrylic, which
allows for more versatility when creating
the works. It also allows for more color.
Sitting in their architecturally stun-
ning house from the 1930s in Miami
Beach, Hank and Margarita Courtney
talk enthusiastically about Ma Desheng.
Hank, a lawyer, handled Ma's court case
after the car accident, and he and his wife
became huge fans of the artist's work -
and an even bigger fan of the man himself.
"Ma is the most generous, wonderful
person you can meet," says Hank. For
someone who survived polio and the
Cultural Revolution, who was intention-
ally denied an education, who helped
open up art in China only to be crushed
again, who was then almost entirely
crippled, "he has a beautiful spirit that


Ma Desheng: "Miami is a paradise
on earth. It's so attractive and, we
can say now, a cultural center."

can't be contained," says Margarita. "He
is also a poet, so there is so much inside."
Although Ma does have some use of his
arms, physical movement is not easy. Nev-
ertheless he will get on a plane for Miami
next month. At the art fair Art Miami (held
during Art Basel Miami Beach in early
December), Ma will show his works, mostly


Untitled acrylic on canvas, 2003.

from the stone series, at a booth But not
just any booth This one will be sponsored
by the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis.
Proceeds from every painting sold will be
donated to the Miami Project.
"Miami is a paradise on earth," says
Ma, whose two-year stay here, though dif-
ficult, was also rewarding. "It's so attrac-
tive and, we can say now, a cultural center."
More than 30 years after Ma and the
Stars attempted to shake up the Chinese
cultural landscape, that country has
undergone profound changes. A Mao
suit may be worn to a nightclub as a sign
of retro chic, but no one today would don
such an outfit in the countryside, much
less in Shanghai.


And contem-
porary Chinese
art has become Untitled acrylic o
some of the most
coveted and expensive art on the market;
work from students straight out of the
major universities in Beijing and Shang-
hai sell for astronomical sums.
Ma and his colleagues from the
1970s have benefited from this art boom
as well. Their works sell for big money
at auctions and fairs internationally.
And while China still has a nasty streak
of cracking down on dissidents, the
economy has been given a freer rein.
Ma's art shows up with regularity these
days in galleries across China.


n canvas, 2003.


Not so with the artist himself.
"I left mainland China 27 years ago,"
he says, "and I will never go back." He will,
whenever possible, return to Miami. That
says a lot about how far we have come cultur-
ally, and where we might yet be able to go.

Art Miami opens Wednesday, December
5, and run ;h,. i,-li Sunday, December 9,
from 11:00 a.m. to 7:00p.m.; 3101 NE 1st
Ave., Midtown Miami. Cost is $20.

Feedback: letters(ibbiscaynetimes.com


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Culture: GALLERIES + MUSEUMS


WYNWOOD GALLERY WALK &
DESIGN DISTRICT ART + DESIGN NIGHT
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2012

GALLERIES
101/EXHIBIT
101 NE 40th St, Miami
305-573-2101
www 101exhibit com
Through November 26
"Urban Narrative" with Claudlo Ethos and Ruben Ublera

ABBA FINE ART
233 NW 36th St, Miami
305-576-4278
www abbafineart com
Through November 15
"Lama Norlha" by Robert Miller
Through November 17
"An Unborn Child Leaves a Shadow on the Soul" by
Debra Holt

ACND GALLERY OF ART
4949 NE 2nd Ave, Miami
305-751-8367
www acnd net
November 10 through January 18
"Art from Within" with Yunler Cervino Oliver and Jose
Ramirez
Reception November 10, 7 to 10 p.m.

ALEJANDRA VON HARTZ FINEARTS
2630 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-438-0220
www alejandravonhartz net
Through November 24
"Other Impertinences" by Ana Tiscornia
"Evidence Multlgrade Light" by Juan Pablo Garza,
curated by Ruth Auerbach

ART FUSION
1 NE 40th St, Miami
305-573-5730
www artfusiongallery com
Through December 17
"Fusion IX Seducing the Globe" with various artists

ART NOUVEAU GALLERY
348 NW 29th St, Miami
305-573-4661
www artnouveaugaleria com
November 29 through January 30
Rafael Barrios
Reception November 29, 6 to 9 p.m.

ASCASO GALLERY
2441 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-571-9410
www ascasogallery com
Call gallery for exhibition information

BAKEHOUSE ART COMPLEX
561 NW 32nd St, Miami
305-576-2828
www bacfl org
Through November 2
"R4 Recycled, Reclaimed, Reused, and Reinterpreted"
with various artists
"Jack Me In, Jack Me On, Jack Me Off" by Kim Litch

BLACK SQUARE GALLERY
2248 NW 1st PI, Miami
786-999-9735
www blacksquaregallery com
November 10 through January 5
"Scribe's House" by Pablo Lehmann


Reception November 10, 5 to
9 p.m.

BORINQUEN ART GALLERY
100 NE 38th St, Miami
305-491-1526
www borinquenhealth org
Call gallery for exhibition
information

BRIDGE RED STUDIOS /
PROJECT SPACE
12425 NE 13th Ave #5, North
Miami
305-978-4856
www bridgeredstudlos com
Through November 11
"Robert Flynn, Paintings and
Drawings" by Robert Flynn

CALDWELL / LINFIELD
GALLERY & STUDIO
8351 NE 8th Ct, Miami
305-754-2093
www susannacaldwell com
November 1 through June 1
"Mahogany Sculptures and
Sculptural Offering Bowls carved
from Florida Hardwoods" by
Susanna Caldwell
Reception November 3, 5 to
8 p.m.

CAROL JAZZAR
CONTEMPORARY ART
158 NW 91st St, Miami Shores
305-490-6906
www cjazzart com
By appointment carol@cjazzart
com
Through December 9
"Byways" by Robert Huff

CARIDI GALLERY
758 NE 125th St North Miami
786-202-5554
www cardigallery com Will Roni
November 15 through
December 15 at Dina Mit
"Aguaviva" by Cecilia Sanchez
Vegas
Reception November 15, 7 to
10 p.m.

CHAREST-WEINBERG GALLERY
250 NW 23rd St, Miami
305-292-0411
www charestweinberg com
Call gallery for exhibition information

DAVID CASTILLO GALLERY
2234 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-573-8110
www davidcastillogallery com
November 8 through December 31
"Dark Flow Lurking" with various artists

DIANA LOWENSTEIN FINE ARTS
2043 N Miami Ave, Miami
305-576-1804
Through November 21
"A Veces Me Asaltan Las Dudas Celestes" by Cecilia
Paredes
"Lagan" by Caroline Lathan-Stlefel

DIASPORA VIBE GALLERY
3938 N Miami Ave Miami


.-.-


s, Le Petit Parisien, gelatin silver print, 195
rani Gallery.


786-536-7801
www diasporavibe net
Call gallery for exhibition information

DIMENSIONS VARIABLE
100 NE 11th St, Miami
305-607-5527
www dimenslonsvarlable net
November 9 through January 2
'Paper Folding" by Odalis Valdivieso
Reception November 9, 7 to 10 p.m.

DINA MITRANI GALLERY
2620 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
786-486-7248
www dinamitranlgallery com
Through November 2
'Light in the Shadows" with William Maguire and
Roberto Rivertl
November 10 through January 11
'Paris" by Willy Ronis
Reception December 3, 7 to 10 p.m.

DORSCH GALLERY
151 NW 24th St. Miami


305-576-1278
www dorschgallery com
Call gallery for exhibition information

DOT FIFTYONE ART SPACE
51 NW36th St, Miami
305-573-9994
www dotflftyone com
Through November 12
"Languade of Silence" by Lydia Azout
"Repossessed" by Gulllermo Riveros

DURBAN SEGNINI GALLERY
2145 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
www durbansegninl com
Through November 29
"Celebrating the Curve" by Beto de Voider

ELITE ART EDITIONS
46 NW 36th St, Miami
754-422-5942
www elitearteditions com
Call gallery for exhibition information

ETRA FINE ART
50 NE 40th St, Miami
305-438-4383
P www etrafineart com
November 10 through December 7
"Retrospective" by Marlo Velez
S Reception November 10, 7 to 10 p.m.

FREDRIC SNITZER GALLERY
S 2247 NW 1st PI, Miami
305-448-8976
Sr www snitzer com
Through November 24
S Jon Pylypchuk

GALERIE HELENE LAMARQUE
.. 125 NW 23rd St, Miami
S 305-582-6067
www galerlehelenelamarque com
Call gallery for exhibition information

GALERIE SCHUSTER MIAMI
, 2085 NW 2ndAve, Miami
S786-266-2445
www galleryschuster com
Call gallery for exhibition information

GALLERY 212 MIAMI CONTEMPORARY ART
GALLERY
2407 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
786-431-1957
www gallery212miaml com
Through January 1
"Art Basel 2012" with Pedro Zublzarreta, Sergey
Ashkeev, Irna Davydova, Agata Agatowska, Florlan
Fausch, and Maxim Wakultschlk

GALLERY DIET
174 NW 23rd St, Miami
305-571-2288
www gallerydlet com
Through November 24
"The Us and the It" by Fablenne Lasserre
November 30 through December 31
"The Working Day" by Ohad Meroml
Reception November 30, 7 to 9 p.m.

GARY NADER FINE ART
62 NE 27th St, Miami
305-576-0256
www garynader com
Through November 30
"Multiverse" by Soraya Abu Naba


WORSHIP TIMES


SUNDAY

Informal
Traditional


8:30a i
11:00anm


WEDNESDAY
Bible Study 6:30:1111



Iiiu,_'tUi iL fi'll "11.," u iI


A welcoming space to discover or reconnect with A SEASON OF
God and fellowship with like-minded singles THANKSGIVING
and families. Whether in flip-flops and shorts or
a three-piece suit, you're invited!


ACROSS FROM BAYSIDE

FREE PARKING ON 5th St.

NURSERY AVAILABLE FOR 11:00am WORSHIP

Visit us on the web anytime! Join with us in the tradition

www.FUTMCmiamni.com of sharing the bounty
Harvest Sunday

/FUMCmiami t /FUMCmiami November1am1


_ __ _U


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012











GENERAL AUDIENCE PRESENTS
769 NE 125th St, North Miami
786-467-0941
www generalaudiencepresents com
Through November 10
"Architectural Archetypes" by Derrick Adams

HARDCORE ARTS CONTEMPORARY SPACE
3326 N Miami Ave Miami
305-576-1645
www hardcoreartmlaml com
Through November 10
"2nd MADA New Media Festival" with Gaston Ugalde,
Gavin Benjamin, John Fitzgerald, and Misael Soto

HAROLD GOLEN GALLERY
2294 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-989-3359
www haroldgolengallery com
Call gallery for exhibition information

IDEOBOX ARTSPACE
2417 N Miaml Ave, Miami
305-576-9878
www ideobox com
Call gallery for exhibition information

JACQUELINE FALCONE BED AND BREAKFAST
1040 NE 82nd St, Miami
By appointment jacqueline falcone@gmall com
Through December 12
"Marriage, Blood, and Adaptation" with Dogan
Arslanoglu, Kevin Arrow, P Scott Cunningham, Sinisa
Kukec, Ragnar Kjartansson, Kenton Parker

KABE CONTEMPORARY
123 NW 23rd St, Miami
305-573-8142
www kabecontemporary com
Through November 30
"Ups and Downs Landscape" by Nadav Welssman

KAVACHNINA CONTEMPORARY
46 NW 36th St, Miami
305-448-2060
www kavachnina com
Call gallery for exhibition information

KELLEY ROY GALLERY
50 NE 29th St, Miami
305-447-3888
www kelleyroygallery com
Call gallery for exhibition information

KIWI GALLERY
48 NW 29th St, Miami
305-200-3047
www klwlartsgroup com
Ongoing
William John Kennedy's Fine Art Photography
Collection of Early Pop Artists

LELIA MORDOCH GALLERY
2300 N Miami Ave, Miami
786-431-1506
www galerleleliamordoch com
Call gallery for exhibition information

LOCUST PROJECTS
3852 N Miami Ave, Miami
305-576-8570
www locustprojects org
November 10 through December 12
"Soul Manufacturing Corporation" by Theaster Gates
"Wound, Bound, Tied and Knottedem" by Jacin
Giordano


MIAMI-DADE COLLEGE, CENTRE
GALLERY
300 NE 2nd Ave, Miami
Bldg 1, Room 1365
305-237-3696
www mdc edu
Through December 21
"Sweat" with various artists

MIAMI-DADE COLLEGE MUSEUM
OF ART AND DESIGN
Freedom Tower
600 Biscayne Blvd Miami
305-237-7700
www mdc edu
Through December 14
"CINTAS Foundation Fellows
Competition Exhibition" with various
artists
November 9 through February 2
"Toledo/Toledo Full Circle" by Isabel
and Ruben Toledo
Reception November 9, 1 to 3 p.m.
November 16 through February 2
"Where Ideas Are Born A Juggler's
Notebooks" by Manuel Estrada
Reception November 15, 7 to 9 p.m.

MIAMI-DADE COLLEGE, GALLERY
NORTH
11380 NW 27th Ave, Miami
305-237-1532
www mdc edu
November 9 through January 11
"Passages and Other Exploratory
Journeys" with Victor Gomez and
Alena Fresquet
Reception November 8, noon
to 2 p.m.

MICHAEL JON GALLERY
20 NE 41st St, Suite 2, Miami
305-760-9030
www mlchaeljongallery com
Through December 1
"Crocuta Crocuta" by Krlsten
VanDeventer

MYRA GALLERIES
177 NW 23rd St, Miami
631-704-3476
www myragallerles com
Call gallery for exhibition
information

NEW WORLD GALLERY
New World School of the Arts
25 NE 2nd St, Miami
305-237-3597
Call gallery for exhibition information

NINA TORRES FINE ART
1800 N Bayshore Dr, Miami
305-395-3599
www ninatorresfineart com
November 2 through 24
"November Contemporary" with
various artists

O. ASCANIO GALLERY
2600 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-571-9036
www oascanlogallery com
Through November 7
"Concrete Perspective"
by Hester


Rowan Smith, How Meaning Changes Over Tir
Through the Degradation of Speakers /Ayesat
Amagwala (Dubula Ibunu), 8" speakers, speak
wire, paper, wood, amplifier, sound recording,
at Spinello Projects.


OM GALLERY
8650 Biscayne Blvd Suite 21, Miami
305-458-5085
Through December 31
"Animals" by Hausey Leplat and Julien Garcla

ONCE ARTS GALLERY
170-C NW 24th St, Miami
786-333-8404
www oncearts com
Ongoing
Pablo Gentile, Jalme Montana, Jalme Apraez, and
Patricia Chaparro

OXENBERG FINE ART
50 NE 29th St, Miami
305-854-7104
www oxenbergart com


Through November 10
"Drawings and Sculpture" by Humberto Castro
November 10 through January 3
"The Paintings of Ashley Collins" by Ashley
Collins

PAN AMERICAN ART PROJECTS
2450 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-573-2400
www panamericanart com
November 10 through January 5
"Un Pais, una Ilusl6n (A Country, an Illusion)" by
Abel Barroso

PRIMARY PROJECTS
4141 NE 2nd Ave, Suite 104, Miami
www primaryprojectspace com
Info@primaryflight com
Call gallery for exhibition information

SUMMER GALLERY
82 NE 29th St, Miami
305-441-2005
www artnet com/sammergallery html
Through November 5
"Equivocal Space" with
various artists

SPINELLO PROJECTS
2930 NW 7th Ave, Miami
786-271-4223
www spinelloprojects com
November 10 through January 5
Abby Double, Agustina Woodgate, Ana
Mendez, Antonia Wright, Federico Nessl,
Ingrid Lee, Manny Prleres, Naama Tsabar,
Reeve Schumacher, Robert Montgomery,
Rowan Smith, Ruben Millares, Sinisa Kukec,
Sand TYPOE
Reception November 10, 7 to midnight
THE LUNCH BOX GALLERY
310 NW 24th St, Miami
305-407-8131
www thelunchboxgallery com
Through November 24
"A Visual Diary of Jalme Ferreyros" by Jalme
Ferreyros
ne Reception November 10, 7 to 10 p.m.
Ua UNDER THE BRIDGE
12425 NE 13th Ave North Miami
er 305-978-4437
2012, Through November 11
Interventions" by Karen Rifas

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI GALLERY
2750 NW 3rd Ave, Suite 4, Miami
305-284-3161
www as miami edu/art
November 9 through 23
"Here and There" with Lamla Khorshld and Alex Adams
Reception November 10, 2 to 9 p.m.

UNIX FINE ART GALLERY
2219 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-496-0621
www unixfineart com
Ongoing
Alexis Torres

WALTMAN ORTEGA FINE ART
2233 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
305-576-5335
www waltmanortega com
Through November 6
"Graphic Nature" by Joe Segal


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November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com




























YEMEN BLUES

Sgs Mr. paGr
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SWYNWOOD WALLS
NW 2nd Avenue between 25th and 26th
streets
305-573-0658
www thewynwoodwalls com
Ongoing
"Wynwood Walls" with Retna, How &
Nosm, Roa, b, The Date Farmers,
Saner, Sego, Liqen, Neuzz, Falle, Vhils,
Interesni Kazkl, Kenny Scharf, Nunca,
Shepard Fairey, Aiko, Ryan McGinness,
Stelios Faltakis, and avaf
YEELEN ART GALLERY
250 NW 23rd St, Unit 306, Miami
954-235-4758
www yeelenart com
Call gallery for exhibition information
ZADOK GALLERY
2534 N Miami Ave, Miami
305-438-3737
www zadokgallery com
Through December 2
"Tapestries?" with Chuck Close, William
T Wiley, Hung Llu, Doug Hall, Enrlque
Chagoya, Deborah Oropallo, Guy Dlehl,
and Mesaml Teraoka

MUSEUM & COLLECTION
EXHIBITS
ARTCENTER/SOUTH FLORIDA
800 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach
305-674-8278
www artcentersf org
Through November 11
"101 Dresses" by
Adrlana Carvalho

BASS MUSEUM OF ART
2100 Collins Ave Miam Beach
305-673-7530
www bassmuseum org
Through November 4
"UNNATURAL" with Boaz Aharonovitch, Ein
Galantl, Azlz + Cucher, Celeste Boursler-M
Arlane Michel, Blane De St Crolx, Rose-Ly
Orl Gersht, Melrav Helman and Yossi Ben
Hilja Keading, Freddy Shachar Kislev, Siga
Dana Levy, Tobias Madison, Richard Moss
Ratman, Samantha Salzinger, Tomer Sapir,
Sasportas, Michal Shamir, Url Shapira, Jen
Steinkamp, Gal Welnstein, Wendy Wischer,
Zagursky, curated by Taml Katz-Frelman

CIFO (Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundatio
1018 N Miami Ave, Miami
305-455-3380
www clfo org
Through November 4
"Not Me Subject to Change" with Eduardo A
Francisca Aninat, Julleta Aranda, Tamar Gu
Glexls Novoa, Daniela Ortiz, Marta Maria P
and Marlsa Rublo

DE LA CRUZ COLLECTION CONTEMPOI
ART SPACE
23 NE 41st St, Miami
305-576-6112
www delacruzcollection org
Ongoing
"Works from the Collection of Rosa and Carl
Cruz" with various artists

FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY
ART MUSEUM
10975 SW 17th St, Miami
305-348-2890
thefrost flu edu
Through December 9
"Material and Meaning Earthenware, Stone\
Porcelain from the Wolfsonian-FIU Collecti
various artists
"Fragile Nature The Florida Artist Series" by
Messersmith
Through February 24
"To Beauty ATribute to Mike Kelley" with vai
Through May 20
"American Sculpture in the Tropics" with Joh
Albert Paley, Dennis Oppenhelm, Chakala
Verina Baxter
November 17 through January 13
"Reflections Across Time Seminole Portraits
various artists, curated by Annette B Fromr
November 17 through January 13
IAM1 "Fluorescent Light Sculptures" by
Ivan Navarro

LEGAL ART
1035 N Miami Ave, Suite 200, Miami
www legalartmlaml org
Call gallery for exhibition
information

Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


Odalis Valdivieso, Untitled, archival print on
cotton 310gsm, 2012, at Miami Art Museum.


LOWE ART MUSEUM, UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI
1301 Stanford Dr, Coral Gables
305-284-3535
at Arf- www lowemuseum org
ougenot and November 10 through January 13
nn Fisher, "Prints and Objects" by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
Shoshan, Through February 10
lit Landau, "Saintly Blessings A Gift of Mexican Retablos from
e, Gilad Joseph and Janet Sheln" with various artists
Yehudit Through April 21
nifer "Adapting and Adopting Waves of Change as East
and Guy Encounters West, Modern and Contemporary
Japanese Art" with various artists

n) MIAMI ART MUSEUM
101 W Flagler St, Miami
305-375-3000
www mlamlartmuseum org
Ongoing
,baroa, "Between Here and There Modern and Contemporary
imaraes, Art from the Permanent Collection"
erez Bravo, Through November 4
"Message to Our Folks" by Rashld Johnson
November 21 through May 12
RARY "New Work Miami 2013" with various artists

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART
770 NE 125th St, North Miami
305-893-6211
www mocanoml org
os de la Through November 11 "Trading Places II" with Dona
Altemus, Onajide Shabaka, Magnus Sigurdarson, Rick
Ulysse, Antonia Wright
FROST
THE MARGULIES COLLECTION
591 NW 27th St, Miami
305-576-1051
www margulieswarehouse com
Through April 28
ware, and Anselm Klefer, Richard Long, William Tucker, Simryn
on" with Gill, Doug Aitken, David Ellis, Roberto Lange, Kader
Attla, Nathalie Djurberg, Leandro Erlich, Sabelo
Mark Mlangenl, Barbara Probst, and Wael Shawky, curated
by Katherine Hinds

rious artists THE RUBELL FAMILY COLLECTION
95 NW 29th St, Miami
n Henry, 305-573-6090, http //rfc museum
Booker, and Call gallery for exhibition information
WORLD CLASS BOXING
" with Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection
m 170 NW 23rd St, Miami
305-438-9908
www worldclassboxing org
November 10 through February 28
"Raga For Fishwife" by Aaron Angell
Reception November 10, 7 to 10 p.m.

Compiled by Melissa Wallen
Send listings, jpeg images, and events information to
art@biscaynetimes com

November 2012






Culture: EVENTS CALENDAR


It's a Teen Thing
The Arsht Center for the Performing Arts and the University
of Miami's theater department are joining up again for the
production of Girls vs. Boys. It's a great collaborative idea,
coming on the heels of their first outing, a reinterpretation of
Federico Garcia Lorca's The House ofBernarda Alba. This
play is just as edgy, but contemporary. To a score of punk
and metal-band music, a brother and sister enter the world of
adolescence, with traumatic results. At the Arsht Center (1300
Biscayne Blvd.) through Sunday, November 18. Tickets are
$35. Go to www.arshtcenter.org.


Broadway Comes South
The names of the Broadway Tenors are
not as well known as those of the Three
Tenors once were, but you may be fa-
miliar with their roles and voices: Brent
Barrett starred in (C i.i,. Ron Bohmer
in The Phantom of the Opera (and in
Ragtime), and Matt Cavenaugh was in
the recent revival of West Side Story. At
the Aventura Arts and Cultural Center
(3385 NE 188th St.) on Friday, Novem-
ber 9, at 8:00 p.m., these three top tenors
will sing the songs of Sondheim, Lloyd
Webber, and others, in a night of Broad-
way hits. Tickets are $40 and $45. Go to
www.aventuracenter.org.

Nature Biking in the Grove
While we all know the Biscayne Corridor
is the place to be, it's also nice to remem-
ber we live amid some of the most amazing
vegetation in the nation, particularly down
in the Grove. But don't just drive through
the botanical treasures of that tropical
oasis. Bike through them. Courtesy of His-
toryMiami, on Saturday, November 10,
from 10:00 a.m. until noon, historian Frank
Schena will lead you through not just the
flora, but also the unique architecture of
the area. The Vizcaya to North Grove
Eco-Bike Tour costs $25 for members
($35 for nonmembers) and includes all-day
admission to Vizcaya and its gardens. Go
to www.historymiami.org.


Wrapped Up in Art
Once upon a time, the acclaimed art
duo Christo and Jeanne-Claude came to
town and turned our islands pink. They
literally wrapped islands in Biscayne
Bay in fuchsia cloth, one of their most
monumental and memorable projects.
On Saturday, November 10, the Lowe
Art Museum at the University of Miami
(1301 Stanford Dr., Coral Gables) is pre-
miering Christo and Jeanne-Claude:
Prints and Objects. The exhibit will
include drawings and renderings of proj-
ects such as the encased Sydney Opera
House, The Gates of Central Park, and
smaller works dating to the 1950s, as
well as images of the completed produc-
tions. Go to www.miami.edu/lowe.

Take Me to the River
It's time to take back our waterfronts
as public places, especially downtown,
where access has been too limited for too
long. For the fifth year in a row, join the
Downtown Miami Riverfront Festival,
which wraps around both the river and
the bay downtown (one block south of the
Bayfront Park Metromover station). On
Saturday, November 10, there will be
bands, featured artists, strolling musicians,
food booths, a mess of children's ac-
tivities, and a boat parade. And it's free.
This year the festival features the culture
of Jamaica. The fest runs from 10:00 a.m.


to 4:00 p.m. For more information, visit
www.miamiriverwalkfestival.com.

Going for Baroque
Anyone who thinks a baroque music per-
formance should be staid and boring is just
wrong. "Baroque," after all, is about over-
the-top expressiveness in art, architecture,
and music. Take, for example, Red Priest, an
English ensemble that plays with heart, soul,
and some swashbuckling stage presence. At
St. Martha's Church (9301 Biscayne Blvd.)
on Sunday, November 11, at 3:00 p.m., this
quartet will liven up some Bach and Vivaldi.
The latter holds special resonance for the
group, which took the red-haired com-
poser's nickname ("The Red Priest") as its
own. Tickets cost $10 to $20. Go to www.
saintmartha.tix.com.

Make Mine Mahler
Classical composers, like painters, have
a way of falling into and out of fashion.
Gustav Mahler, though, has remained a
perennial favorite for smart conductors
and smart audiences, so no surprise that
the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra will
kick off its residency season at the Arsht
Center for the Performing Arts on Friday,
November 16, and Saturday, November
17 with Mahler's Third Symphony. With
Franz Welser-Most holding the baton, the
Austrian's longest work will be in good
hands. Shows are 8:00 p.m. both nights.


Books for the People!
The cover of Carolina Garcia-Aguilera's latest book depicts a g-string
and jockstrap. That should be a dead giveaway, as the novel is about
a sports groupie/geisha who services elite male athletes. Garcia-
Aguilera, best known for her Lupe Solano mystery series, will be just
one of the tons of authors from around the world at Miami Book Fair
International, held at Miami-Dade College's downtown campus from
Sunday, November 11, through Sunday, November 18. Highlights
this year include a "Literary Death Match," twilight tasting with read-
ings, screenings of the documentary Tom Wolfe Gets Back to Blood,
about the author's new Miami novel, and, of course, the street fair.
Check www.miamibookfair.com.


Fusion in the Blood
James Blood Ulmer was born 70
years ago in rural South Carolina,
where his dad gave him a guitar at age
four, and gospel music was the suste-
nance of life. But then rock and roll,
jazz, and the blues crept into Ulmer's
soul. He made his way north to De-
troit, where he hung with innovators
of funk, and then to New York, where
he began playing with legendary
jazzman Ornette Coleman. The end
result is a unique musical sound that
will fill the Colony Theatre (11 141 Lin-
coln Rd., Miami Beach) on Saturday,
November 17 at 8:30 p.m., courtesy of
Tigertail Productions. Tickets range
from $25 (for students) to $50. Go to
www.tigertail.org.


Tickets range from $35 to $165. For details
go to www.arshtcenter.org.

Shorter is Better
Miami really does have something for
everyone, especially film fanatics. Aside
from one of the biggest international
film fairs, we have a plethora of smaller
ones, fitting every taste. For example,
the Miami Short Film Festival, which
features films from around the globe (as
long as the running time is 20 minutes
or less). Started back in 2002 with 50
chairs and a projector, it has grown
into a festival that will screen shorts at
Miami Beach Cinematheque and the
Paragon Grove 13, with special showings
at the Miami Children's Museum and the
North Beach Bandshell. The shorts roll
from Saturday, November 24, through
Saturday, December 1. Go to www.
miamishortfilmfestival.com.

Compiled by BT arts editor Anne Tschida.
Please send information and images to
calendari(a)biscaynetimes.com.


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com 81


November 2012






Columnists: POLICE REPORTS


Biscayne Crime Beat
Compiled by Derek McCann


Friendly Gesture Backfires
1700 Block of I .,. ,I i,.. Boulevard
Because of the heat in these parts, we
tend to have a laidback culture when it
comes to meeting new people. A two-
some hung out on a bench, shooting the
breeze. The future victim even let his new
chat partner borrow his cell phone. Why
not? If he can talk eloquently about the
Marlins, he must be trustworthy. With
that, the victim went to use the Burger
King restroom. When he returned, his
new friend had fled with his phone and
his bicycle. With no bike and no phone,
the hapless victim is now resigned to
talking to himself while sitting on the bus
bench, like so many others.


Cabbie Taken for a Ride, Again
3500 Block oJ i:,... ,\ ic,. Boulevard
Cab drivers should know better by now.
If the final destination for their prospec-
tive passengers is "on the cane," keep
going. This cabbie picked up his female
passenger at Fort Lauderdale-Holly-
wood International Airport and drove
her to Miami. Once the vehicle hit the
Biscayne 'hood, the passenger exited
the cab without paying the $100
fare. The cab driver tailed her until she
disappeared into one of the famous
Boulevard motels. The cabbie managed
to park his vehicle and enter the motel,
but employees there had no knowledge
of the woman's whereabouts.


Our Crooks Believe in Change
800 Block ofNE 72nd Street
For a criminal to go through the trouble
of a break-in, you'd think the goal would
be obtaining something of great value.
But sometimes our criminal slime settle
for what they can get. This victim had
his laundry room broken into. What was
stolen? Some loose change in ajar. The
poor victim now has to fix the damage
to his door and find some more loose
change to clean his dirty laundry. This
coin crime ring is still on the loose, so
remember, Miamians: Keep your change
in your pockets!

At Least He Didn't Go on the Carpet
7800 Block ofNE 2ndAvenue
Some landlords require additional
deposits for pets. Maybe they need to
extend that policy to boyfriends. This
boyfriend, the day after his girlfriend
had the audacity to end their dysfunc-
tional relationship, came back to get his


wi


television. The victim refused to give it
to him. He reacted to her stubbornness
by breaking down the door and punching
holes in the walls. He then left the scene.
Victim was later told by her landlord that
she would be responsible for all the dam-
ages. We think a cat would have been a
better and less costly roommate
for this victim.


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012









Snooze Over Shoes, You Loose
401 Biscayne Blvd.
A tourist, visiting from Dorothy's home
state, placed her purse on the floor of
a Clarks shoe store. Victim was deter-
mined to find out if Clarks' current mar-
keting campaign of "Fabulous Fall Style"
is accurate. It may very well be, but you
still have to pay for the shoes. Her purse
went missing immediately; it contained
her wallet, iPhone, and identification
cards. Victim will have to be happy with
her summer best, or perhaps even -
gasp recycle last year's fashions.


Those Little Rascals
1501 Biscayne Blvd.
A teacher at Miami International University
of Art and Design stepped out of the class-
room to use a vending machine. Thinking it
was safe to do so after all, these were her
students she left her purse on the desk.
Later that evening, when she arrived home,
she discovered her wallet was missing.
Internet purchases were later made with her
credit card. We would suggest an hour of
detention for the whole class, but someone
would probably steal the clock.


Woman Suffers Ultimate
Identity Crisis
13800 Block ofNE 12th Avenue
Victim parked her car in front of a
laundromat and went inside to wash her
clothes. She made a conscious decision to
not lock her car doors. While she watched
her clothes enter the spin cycle, someone
entered her car and stole her backpack
from the back seat. This was no ordinary
backpack. According to the victim, it
contained her driver's license, her Social
Security card, her children's Social
Security cards, her checkbooks (from two
different banks), her passport, her CPR
certification card, and her nursing license.
There are no suspects in the case. Or
rather, there are too many to count.

New Appliance Store to Open in
North Miami
600 Block ofNE 129th Street
Speaking of laundry a theme this
month a residence was ransacked by
an unknown intruder. The perpetrator
stole a television and, for good measure,
the home's washer and dryer. We guess
he wants to watch television while he
washes his dirty clothes. Makes sense to


us. If only these criminals could put their
ambition to more positive use.

Here's a Tip: Steer Clear of
Anyone Offering Help in Miami
NE 11th Street and istAvenue
Victim tried to parallel park her vehicle
next to the curb, but was not having much
success, so a man offered to help her.
She said okay, and was delighted with
the outcome. However, when the man
demanded a tip for his artful maneuver-
ing, she refused. He then grabbed her cell
phone from her lap, jumped out of the
vehicle, and ran westbound. No arrests
have been made. A sad case of yet another
creep masquerading as a Good Samaritan
- and another bad Miami tipper.

There's a Reason They Call It
a Locker
1801 NE 123rd St.
No better way to get those endorphins
pumping than a good day spent at L.A.
Fitness, which is now a North Miami
staple. There is also no better crash than
having your wallet stolen. This so-called
victim left her wallet inside a gym bag
she placed in a locker a locker she


neglected to lock. We've got an idea.
Next time the victim, or anyone inclined
to put so much blind faith in their fellow
humans, heads to the gym in North
Miami, they should make a quick stop at
the Starbucks on 135th Street and order
a venti cup of the "Wake the Hell Up"
blend of the day.

A Criminal with Real Drive
14290 W Dixie Hwy.
While we have encountered endless
reports of people leaving their car doors
open or their purses in full view while
pumping gas, we have never quite seen
a report like this one. Victim was filling
his tank with gas when a man jumped
into the vehicle (the keys were still in the
ignition), started the car and drove
off! Fortunately, the victim had been ac-
companied to the gas station by a friend
driving another car. As a result, they
were able to follow the thief for approxi-
mately ten blocks. While he managed
to get away, the thief did leave behind a
useful piece of evidence: He dropped his
cell phone in the victim's vehicle.

Feedback: letters@tbiscaynetimes.com


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November 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


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November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Columnists: PARK PATROL


Keeping It Simple

Barry Silverman Park may not look like much, but more
communities could use a green space just like it


By Jim W. Harper
BT Contributor

R eal estate around New York's
Central Park is extremely valuable,
persuasive evidence that the "park
effect" is real. The closer you are and the
better your view, the higher the price.
Here in South Florida, the beaches
and waterfront offer the same concept: If
you want to have great views of nature
within a city, you're going to pay for it.
Nearby green or blue space makes real
estate more valuable.
Does that mean parks and waterways
are for rich people, not meant for the
99 percent? Or even the 47 percent? In
New York, Central Park is so large that
it extends nearly into Harlem, where
real estate is obviously much cheaper
than near the Plaza Hotel, on the park's
southern boundary. But here in South
Florida, our urban parks are typically
small. (An exception is Oleta River State
Park, which is the state's largest urban
park, actually larger in acreage than
Central Park.) As for the typical little
neighborhood park, does it raise the
value of surrounding real estate?
Your real estate agent has the answer
to that one. My guess is that green is


good and blue is better, which is why,
even though we call them "public" parks,
they serve many private interests. Put
another way: Wealthy people pay the
majority of taxes that support parks, and
they reap the greatest benefit of living
near them.
Enter a neighborhood park in North
Miami Beach. The surrounding real
estate ranges from shoddy to palatable,
from storage facilities to multi-story
apartment complexes to single family
homes. It's a mix of lower- to middle-
class offerings very close to the urban
core of 163rd Street. Not exactly prime
real estate. (No water in sight.)
This small parcel of green space in a
modest neighborhood may bring a slight
boost to surrounding real estate values,
but it clearly offers greater value com-
munity service. What's more, this little
park provides an interesting model of
public and private financing.
Dr. Barry J. Silverman, a retired physi-
cian, donated the land to the City of North
Miami Beach. It cost $222,539 to create
the park, which opened in 2006, according
to a commemorative plaque found there.
The relatively low cost of this ap-
proximately two-acre park demonstrates
that neighborhood parks need be neither


The park features not one but two beach volleyball courts they'd be
better as kiddie sand pits.


expensive nor elaborate.
The modest offerings in
this park echo the real
estate market.
Of course, getting
the land donated probably
saved a cool million. Was
this property a real estate
investment gone bad, or
was Dr. Silverman simply
concerned for his commu-
nity? He did not return my
calls for comment.
Silverman Park serves Was Dr. S
children with its tot lot, so an invest
there are some immediate
improvements that need
to be made. While chain-link fenc-
ing surrounds the park, its entrances
lack gates. Therefore, a child in the
playground could easily bolt for the
street. And if you know children,
you know they love nothing more
than running.
Within the park, another gate
is needed to cover the utility
station. Strangely, the station is
surrounded by fencing, but a door-
size space remains open. Again,
any child on the run could easily
go inside and start climbing the
electric meter.
On the positive side, you've
got your tot lot for the under-eight
crowd, and you've got your open
space surrounded by a walking
path for older folks. Inside the path
are two exercise options: a set of
monkey-bar contraptions, and two
yes, count them, two beach-
style volleyball courts.


ilverman's gift to North Miami Beach
nent gone bad or an act of altruism?

One volleyball court lacks a net alto-
gether, while the second court's net sags
in a sad arc. My guess is that not many
children from the nearby elementary
school are interested in volleyball. Throw
in some plastic shovels and call it a giant
sandbox and you'd get somewhere.
The monkey-bar contraptions are
not upscale, Vita-course style machines.
No, these come from the Sears and
Roebuck catalogue, circa 1962, and they
are packed into a tight box with a mulch
floor. Some of them are slightly bent, and
others need to be more firmly rooted in
the ground.
The tot lot skews more modern and
Ikea-esque. The best feature resembles
a waterfall frozen in green plastic, and it
can be scaled down or up to enter a fort-
like center of slides and other escapes.
One enclosed gray slide gets futuristic
on the way down, with a sky window.
Nifty. Across the mulch, a second, small-
er fort offers opportunities for success to
the four-and-under crowd.


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com November 2012


NE 163rd St




NE 162nd St



NE 161st St I
|
SI
z
NE 160th St
L 'O


I ARR SI RAN PA E


Park Rating


NE 161st Street and
19th Place
North Miami Beach
305-948-2957
Hours: Sunrise to sunset
Picnic tables: No
Barbecues: No
Picnic pavilions: No
Tennis courts: No
Athletic fields: No
Night lighting: Yes
Swimming pool: No
Playground: Yes


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012

























The park borders private homes, whose owners
have taken their own measures to fix the fence.


Chain-link fences facing the street lack gates, Kids can scale the frozen green waterfall and
which makes it too easy for kids to run into traffic. explore their way into a fort-like maze of slides.


One maintenance question surrounds
this six-year old park: Are its fences
public or private? The green chain-link
fences are clearly on public property, but
half of the park abuts private residences,
where the dividing wall is composed of
white clapboards. Its sections are in vari-
ous states of disrepair.
So who is responsible for fixing the
holes in these fences? It would appear


that residents have placed plywood
across some of the larger openings, but
it also could have been the city. (In last
month's column, I wrote about North
Miami Beach placing plywood over di-
lapidated plastic playground equipment
in Victory Park. Call it their recessionary
fix-it choice dujour.)
One small but noteworthy item in
this park: a recycling bin! Of the nearly


100 parks in South Florida that I have
visited, only a few offer recycling. On
the downside, one of the trashcans in
Silverman Park was lying on its side.
Overall, Silverman Park offers a
pleasant break from the surrounding con-
crete and residential jungle. Its simplicity
is a strength, because there's little that
needs to be maintained, and visitors can
use their imagination to enjoy the space.


This type of park needs to be
multiplied 100 times in every lower- to
middle-class neighborhood across South
Florida. It may not raise real estate
values very much, but it does give area
children and adults a place to
gather. Nothing could be more valuable
than that.

Feedback: letters@dbiscaynetimes.com


WM offices n honroe, Call for FREE Estimate 1
CW Dad and Brward Call ll Tree
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e.aleMathrn~diaS 855-525-5656

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November 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


Smiling Pets

Veterinary Clinic


November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com





Columnists: PAWSITIVELY PETS


Crime and Punishment:

A Dog's Tale
Positive training works, but it's still a negative world out there


By Lisa Hartman
BT Contributor
Afew weeks ago I received a call
from a BT reader asking for help
with his dog. His rather large
female terrier mix, which he'd adopted
two months earlier, was very reactive
when encountering other dogs. He had
been working her but was growing more
angry, frustrated, and embarrassed as
his corrections and use of a choke chain
were not effective. This was leading him
to avoid walking the dog altogether.
Although a reader of this column, he
didn't fully understand science-based,


positive methods or how they can work with
out-of-control dogs. In fact most people
wrongly believe that dog-friendly methods
are for pets with sweet dispositions and that
problem dogs need a firm hand. In theory,
he thought, the choke chain makes sense:
Don't like a behavior? Punish it.
But after consulting training books
and working by himself to no avail, he
decided to give me a call. "Hi, Lisa," he
said. "I guess I'm like most people in that
I'm skeptical the positive ;i,,, can work."
Well, yes, and no. Many people seek
me out specifically for the po.I, i c thing."
Others, like this gentleman, have been
conditioned over a lifetime to believe


punishment is the way to go. No surprise
that this line of thinking is prevalent. We
ourselves live in a punitive society and
are consistently punished for bad be-
havior. Certainly no cop has ever pulled
anyone over to give them a reward for
driving safely.


But let's for a minute try to imagine
a world in which the opposite is true.
What if traffic cops occasionally pulled
people over for going the speed limit -
and then gave them a hundred bucks?
What if your insurance premiums were
drastically lowered as a result? I'll bet


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most people would be driving the speed
limit. What if someone handed you a
valuable gift certificate for cleaning
up after your dog? I'm pretty sure that
behavior would increase as well.
Several years ago poSiim\ i became
the catch phrase, and trainers every-
where began to claim they were positive,
when in fact most were still punishment-
based trainers. After all, how would
punishment-based trainers advertise?
(Our motto: "Don't complain. Jerk the
chain!") Not very dog-friendly. So they
came up with more marketable terms
such as "natural" and "balanced."
Some trainers need to feel they are in
control by physically dominating a small
domesticated animal (which rewards the
trainer with feelings of power). Others
believe they are positive when they aren't.
Most don't keep up with their education
and only know whatever techniques their
mentor taught them years ago. Interest-
ingly, training is one of the few fields in
which I find this to be common.
Training is equal parts art, science,
and mechanics. You have to be able
to juggle the dog, the leash, and other
necessities while walking in public and


giving feedback to the dog (mechan-
ics). You have to understand cognitive
theory how dogs learn, what to do
with them and why, what not to do and
why (science). The art of it comes in
knowing how to adapt when life throws
curve balls, being able to modify your
approach to fit different owners and dogs.
Certainly all teachers aren't the same.
This is not to say that punishment
can't work. It can. But administering
punishment correctly and effectively
is so difficult it's no wonder it hardly
ever succeeds. The punishment must be
immediate, fit the misbehavior, happen
every time, be severe enough the dog
wouldn't think of doing that again, and
must not be equated with you.
If punishment doesn't work the first
couple times you use it, it's simply not
working. Here's an example: A former
client was squirting her little dog with a
water spray bottle for barking and growl-
ing. She actually brought the bottle with
her and blasted it in public! She had done it
hundreds of times. The dog was obviously
still barking or she wouldn't be carrying
the bottle. But she would see the dog stop
barking when she sprayed it (behavior


suppression). However, she didn't seem
to realize its failure when her dog barked
again minutes later. This routine was ruin-
ing her relationship with her pet.
One reason positive training is not
the norm is that some people feel there is
a stigma attached to using food rewards.
(Oddly, these same people often see no
stigma attached to punishment.) Another
reason is that positive training is not con-
sidered sc\\ Yes, there is very little
grandstanding in dog-friendly training,
but when I see a great trainer change the
behavior of a dog, human, dolphin, or
chimpanzee in a subtle way well, it
doesn't get sexier than that.
There is one undeniable side effect
of positive training: the affection that
grows between student and trainer
working as a team. It is great to see dogs
building confidence, with their heads
held high, and owners loving their dogs,
who are finally "getting it." It is the same
for the proud dog who stops mid-training
to kiss the trainer in happiness and love
- not supplication.
So how is my new client doing with
his terrier mix? Very well thus far. In the
first lesson, I reinforced sitting and calm


behavior. I also showed the dog that when
I'm around, great things happen. After
explaining to the owner what new things
we were going to do and what old practices
we were no longer going to do, we took the
dog outside. Right away an "enemy" dog
appeared. Our canine student did nothing
but wag her tail. The owner was amazed as
she didn't bark or lunge at all.
In our second lesson, we took the
dog off-leash in a park and practiced
recalls. For the first time she didn't just
go off on her own. She wanted to be
with us and learn more. In lesson three, I
brought my dogs. After 15 minutes, the
terrier was walking around the park with
my dogs, not flustered by their presence
in the least.
Now her tail wags with every lesson,
and I leave each session covered in
doggy kisses! That is the power of "the
positive thing."

Lisa Hartman, ,, i,,- Long Island, was
forced to evacuate ahead of Hurricane
Sandy. This column first appeared in
December 2009.

Feedback: letters@tbiscaynetimes.com


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Columnists: PICTURE STORY


Idyllic Miami and the


Royal Palm Hotel
A view of our past from the archives of HistoryMiami


By Paul S. George
Special to the BT

As seen in this hand-colored pho-
tograph, taken circa 1900, early
Miami was an Edenic paradise.
Looming above everything was Henry M.
Flagler's magnificent Royal Palm Hotel.
An agreement between Flagler, the
oil and railroad baron, and Julia Tuttle,
a widow determined to transform a wil-
derness into a progressive city, birthed
Miami in 1896.
As part of their agreement, Flagler, in
return for hundreds of acres of prime land
received from Tuttle and Mary Brickell,
whose family controlled today's Brickell
Avenue neighborhood, brought his Florida
East Coast Railway to the Miami River
and agreed to build a great hotel.


The hotel opened in 1897 and
quickly became a magnet for many of
America's Gilded Age princes. It oper-
ated for just 30 years.
The Miami River, located south of
it, remained pristine in the early years of
the city, before it began hosting tourist
vessels and commercial ships. Beyond
the mouth of the river are the quiescent
waters of Biscayne Bay, with none of
today's built environment obstruct-
ing views of a forlorn peninsula that is
today's Miami Beach.
Near the left corner of the photo-
graph, beyond the palm trees, stands
the home of Julia Tuttle, a building that
once served as a slave owner's house and
officers' quarters when the Army's Fort
Dallas occupied the site in the middle of
the Nineteenth Century.


In the lower right corner is the un-
developed south bank of the river. Today
the area hosts tall condominiums and
commercial buildings. What a difference
a century makes!


To order a copy ofthis photo, please contact
HistoryMiami archives manager Dawn Hugh
at305-375-1623, i~,,ii- l tulnr. ,lti e,,;,i. rg.

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Columnists: YOUR GARDEN


Ackee, Rice, Saltfish


Are Nice

A favorite Jamaican dish can be made with fruit found right here


By Jeff Shimonski
BT Contributor
While driving home from work
every day, I pass by one of the
less common tree species in
our local landscape, Harpullia pen-
dula, or tulipwood. This attractive tree
normally has dark green, glossy leaves,
but what really makes it an interesting
landscape specimen is its fruit, which is
normally seen this time of year.
The fruit is bright red, about the size
of a quarter, and, when ripe, splits open
to reveal one or two shiny black seeds.
These trees seem to tolerate neglect very
well. The one I drive by every day has
been hit by cars and savaged by Weed
Eaters and still keeps growing its lush
canopy of foliage.
Another tree in bloom this time of
year comes from the same family, the
Sapindaceae, sometimes called soap-
berry. The golden rain tree, Koelreuteria
elegans, can be covered with yellow
flowers until the pinkish fruit form,
eventually turning brown or copper
colored. This is a striking tree when in
bloom, and I'm surprised it's not used in
more landscapes.
This plant family is commonly
called the soapberry family because the
fruit contain saponins, which are a natu-
ral surfactant and have been used as soap
by native peoples around the world.
We have a native plant called Florida
soapberry, or Sapindus saponaria. It
can grow into a nice size tree and is very


drought tolerant once established in the
landscape. The orange fruit are quite
noticeable and attractive. I planted three
small seedlings at Jungle Island a couple
of years ago and they are now about six
feet tall. They haven't produced fruit yet,
but once they do, I'm interested in seeing
if the fruit makes for good soap.
We also know other trees in this
family. The lychee, Litchi chiensis, is not
uncommon in the yards of older homes
in our area. Mamoncillo chino, as our His-
panic friends call it, is also a distinctive
tree in the landscape, with a nice canopy
of dark green leaves. Individual trees pro-
duce delicious red fruit every other year.
Still another tree in this family that
is well known to our friends from south
of the border is mamoncillo, Melicoc-
cus bijugatus. We see this small, round,
edible, green fruit being sold on street
corners throughout our area.
This past year I wrote a column on
another fruiting tree in the soapberry
family: ackee, or Blighia sapida. It origi-
nally hails from Africa and found its way
to England and eventually the Caribbean
via Captain William Bligh of Mutiny on
the Bounty fame.
This is not an uncommon tree in
our residential landscapes. You can
sometimes see them full of attractive
red fruit and, even though this tree is
commercially cultivated for its fruit (you
can buy it canned), you must be very
careful when picking it for eating. It is a
very toxic fruit, with only one part being
edible after it ripens.


Two ripe ackee fruit ready to have the arils removed for dinner after
cleaning and boiling.


The Jamaican dish saltfish is made
with the ackee fruit. I've eaten it numer-
ous times and always enjoyed it, so
recently I challenged my favorite cook,
Monica, to prepare the dish.
Monica collected ripe fruit from
a neighbor's tree (with permission, of
course) and very carefully extracted and
cleaned the edible part. She then boiled it
for about five minutes and poured it into
a strainer to drain out the water.
In a heated skillet she added grape
seed oil, yellow onions, green peppers,
orange peppers, half a Scotch bonnet
pepper, garlic cloves, salt and pepper, and
finally, two cod fillets. Once the fish was
cooked, she carefully added the ackee.
(Apparently, stirring the ingredients too
much can cause the ackee to fall apart.)
When I finally had a chance to taste
this dish, it was delicious. (Well, maybe
with a little less of the hot Scotch bonnet
pepper next time.) There was enough
for two days of lunches and each day the
dish tasted better. Monica is now going to
try ackee in different dishes, including a


vegetarian recipe. I can't wait to taste them.
You can see two ripe ackee fruit in
the photo that accompanies this article.
The fruit have to split open first. The
three dark things you see in each fruit
are seeds, which are surrounded by
spongy, yellowy-white stuff. This is
called the aril and it's what is eaten after
the fruit has been cleaned really well and
then boiled.
I think we're really lucky here in South
Florida to be able to grow so many differ-
ent species of plants and trees, especially
those that produce edible fruit, foliage, or
roots. When we plant and cultivate our
urban forest and landscapes, we should not
only consider aesthetics, but the culinary
opportunities available to us as well.

i. \NI,,,. ,,'I-, is an ISA-certified munic-
ipal arborist, director of horticulture at
Jungle Island, and principal of Tropical
Designs of Florida. Contact him atjeff@
tropicaldesigns. com.

Feedback: letters @ibiscaynetimes.com
V


I I.,:& irTIJ.?.Vi i f !I-IITi L.in ..


November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com 89


M.T, 1j -T1 aT l P r1IaTTBi 1I1 J.:Wm






Columnists: GOING GREEN


Our $12 Billion Plumbing


Problem
Miami-Dade's water and sewage pipes are long overdue for replacement


WBy Jim W. Harper
BT Contributor
our toilet is crying. Listen to it
mourn. It feels pain every time
you flush.
The reason for widespread toilet
trauma is a $12 billion problem known
as "aging infrastructure." Pipes past the
human age of retirement. Treatment plants
straining to keep up with the demands of
an expanding population. A system being
held together with "chewing gum."
The gum reference is not from some
obscure blogger seeking to rile his read-
ers; it comes from John Renfrow, the
longtime director of the Miami-Dade
Water and Sewer Department. He is
saying, in essence, that the system is
ready to fall apart. Speaking in Septem-
ber to the county commission, Renfrow
placed the price tag to fix the aging
system at $12 billion (over 15 years).
"This is absolutely sticker shock.
It's going to hurt," says Alexis Segal,
the executive director of Biscayne Bay
Waterkeeper. "It's the cumulative effect
of not dealing with these issues in a
timely way." Segal asserts that water and
sewage rates in Miami-Dade County are
the lowest in the nation.
While the price tag may come as a
shock, the problem should not. Federal
and state authorities have been on Mi-
ami's case for years to fix its aging pipes,
and now Biscayne Bay Waterkeeper is
demanding action. On October 8, the


nonprofit organization, along with a local
resident, informed Miami-Dade County of
its intent to sue for violations of the federal
Clean Water Act. They used the county's
own records to document 47 million gal-
lons' worth of illegal discharges since 2010.
"Getting spill reports from the
county, I was amazed at the frequency
they were occurring," Segal recalls.
"The fact that those pipes are in a de-
crepit, crumbling state is disturbing."
Segal adds that they are requesting a
meeting with Mayor Carlos Gimenez to
resolve the issue before December, after
which the suit would go forward.
"Litigation should be a last resort,"
says Segal. "It was our only avenue at this
stage of things to get our voice heard."
She explains that the organization wants
a "voice at the table" to represent the
concerns of average citizens, such as Judi
Kolsen, a resident of Key Biscayne and
regular kayaker on Biscayne Bay, who
also signed the "intent to sue" letter.
Segal says they want to ensure that
the county develops new plans that are
comprehensive, fully financed, and envi-
ronmentally sound.
Responding to demands from
the federal Environmental Protection
Agency, the county must produce a
consent decree outlining its plans to fix
its infrastructure. This isn't the first time.
In 1995 the county was forced to create
two consent decrees, as well as pay the
largest fine to date for violations of the
Clean Water Act.


While rate hikes on water and
sewage bills are not proposed yet, they
should be expected by next year.
A total of $1.4 billion is anticipated for
immediate repairs. A map posted on the
Website of the water and sewer department
shows new repair projects located mostly
in the northwest and southern portions of
the county, with a notable exception being
the pipe running under Biscayne Bay from
Miami Beach to Virginia Key. Part of this
pipe near Miami's port falls within the
area of a major dredging project ("Deep
Dredge") that has been approved and is
expected to begin next year.
The map of proposed "consent
decree capital projects" does not show
any pipes slated for repair east of
Biscayne Boulevard, though the North
District Wastewater Treatment Plant,
located east of the Boulevard at 156th
Street, is scheduled for repairs estimated
at $249 million.
These immediate repairs would be
the first step in Renfrow's vision of a $12
billion overhaul of the system.
Systemic waste treatment problems
flow deep and wide. Every day near the
beaches of South Florida, 300 million
gallons of partially treated sewage are
dumped into the ocean through giant


pipes called outfalls. Palm Beach County
responded to protests and closed one of
the six outfalls, and state legislation calls
for the other five to go offline by 2025.
(State Sen. Miguel Diaz de la Portilla
from Miami has failed so far in repeated
attempts to introduce legislation that
would undermine the anti-outfall law.)
Water is obviously a huge issue for
South Florida, where tourism reigns su-
preme. "Every aspect of our lifestyle de-
pends on a well-run infrastructure. You
can't attract tourism or business without
it," says Segal, who also worries about
impacts on the environment. "We should
want a state-of-the-art sewage system
because we want to have a first-class city,
not because we're breaking the law."
The pipelines connecting our homes
and businesses to water treatment facili-
ties must be dealt with. Our pipes are
broken, and we either pay to fix them or
we agree to live in a community where
the streets regularly flood with sewage.
Both choices may sound crappy, but one
is much crappier than the other.

Send your tips and clever ideas to:
goinggreen@biscaynetimes.com.

Feedback: letters(i biscaynetimes.com


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November 2012






Columnists: KIDS AND THE CITY








When Does Mom Get a


Break?

Juggling kids, family, and career leaves little time for well,
almost anything else


By Crystal Brewe
BT Contributor

I am exhausted. No, really. I am
Lindsay-Lohan-got-hauled-off-to-
rehab-for-exhaustion exhausted.
(And seriously, Lindsay, walk a mile in
my shoes, you pansy!)
All the moms I know are busy. We
hold that candle up high and let the wax
drip from both ends. USA Today recently
reported that more than 71 percent of
mothers with children under the age of 18
are working; many of them single moth-
ers. (I do not relay this statistic to dispar-
age stay-at-home moms. Stay-at-home
moms work hard. Working moms work
hard. Both make sacrifices and commit-
ments. Staying at home just isn't for me.)
It's cliche, but I often get asked how
I do it. Juggling a demanding job, board
meetings, Girl Scouts, and writing this
riveting column have not earned me any
Mother-of-the-Year awards, but at mid-
night, when I'm answering the last of that
day's e-mails, I often feel like Superwom-
an. This feeling doesn't always resonate
as a positive, though. It oftentimes comes
riddled with sacrifice and guilt.
At the end of the day, I walk into my
home, hang up my cape, and there are my
husband and kids, and even my dog, all of


whom have made just as many sacrifices.
Why do we do it all? I do it because
I'm attempting balance. I want to bal-
ance my need for a meaningful career
with being a powerful and positive role
model in the community. I want my
kids to see that extracurricular activi-
ties and interests are important even
into adulthood, and that volunteering
your time in the community is vital.
I pull everything off but the balance
part. (Insert irony here.) That part tends
to get a little tricky, and what suffers are
the things no one else sees sleep, diet,
hygiene. (Extended time in the shower to
shave my legs is a small victory.)
In a recent marathon catch-up ses-
sion, I sent a late-night e-mail to about
20 parents regarding an upcoming
project. I received 11 responses back
within ten minutes, all from moms.
Why were these moms responding at
this hour?
Last spring Facebook COO Sheryl
Sandberg astonished working mothers
everywhere by admitting that she leaves
the office every day at 5:30 p.m. in order
to eat dinner with her family by 6:00 p.m.
Then she followed this up by saying she
gets her laptop out and works some more
once she has tucked her kids into bed.
Well, then.... There it is!


Susan, a fellow working mom, recently Just when we have a tender, work-


shared that she can't muster the courage to
leave her desk in time to pick up her kids
from school. She makes her husband do
it because it's more acceptable for him to
leave his job by 5:00 p.m. She feels guilty
visiting Target.com on her lunch break to
order kids' socks and refuses to even take
time out of her day to make a gynecologist
appointment. Leaving early fills her with
guilt. She feels it signals that she isn't get-
ting herjob done, not just to her higher-ups,
but to her peers and staff.
She knows it's ridiculous, but now
that everyone has 24-hour access to
everyone, she wants to rise above the
rest. Is it right to perpetuate the expec-
tation that we answer e-mails from the
moment we wake up to the moment our
heads hit the pillow? It seems like an
unsustainable example to be setting for
our children, peers, and staffs.
Addiction to connectivity has added
a whole new level to the working mom's
dilemma. Remember undivided atten-
tion? I wonder if our kids do. If we don't
take time to periodically look up from our
iPhone, the things that matter most will
pass us by in the blink of a i" cl Post?


free, family moment, we snap a picture
and upload it to Facebook, or go on
Twitter or Instagram. Next thing we
know, we are in the social-media vortex,
spending time "liking" 11 pictures of
cupcakes and a post that our high-school
sweetheart is having a boozy brunch.
Newly appointed Yahoo CEO Ma-
rissa Mayer's recent announcement that
she would not slow down after the birth
of her son ignited a national debate over
the state of the glass ceiling. Herein lies
the rub of motherhood: You're damned if
you do and you're damned if you don't.
My friend Kate works in the music
industry. None of the executives in her
office has children and not many are
women. There is no empathy when she
is home with one of her kids who has the
flu or when she has to leave early for a
parent-teacher conference. The e-mails
still fly in with one "crisis" after another.
On her birthday, when she blew out the
candles on her cake, I asked her what she
wished for. She answered without a beat:
"For my boss to have some babies, already!"

Feedback: letters(@ibiscaynetimes.com


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November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com






Columnists: VINO


Gobs of Turkey Day Bottles

Red, white, and you: Agreeable wine for $12 or less


By Bill Citara
BT Contributor

kay, quick quiz. The original
Thanksgiving celebration in 1621
was: A. A party to commemorate
a bountiful harvest. B. A cynical grab of
the fruits (and meats and vegetables) of
others.
The Pilgrims who put on that origi-
nal celebration were: A. Simple people
who fled religious persecution in Eng-
land. B. Anal-retentive hypocrites with a
violent streak as long as a hose.
Our current Thanksgiving celebra-
tion is about: A. Giving thanks for all the
good things life has brought us. B. Ped-
dling hormone-addled turkeys and other
crap from the holiday-industrial complex.
The typical Thanksgiving meal
is: A. A heartwarming compilation of
iconic American comfort foods. B. A
calorie- and cholesterol-ridden melange
of dishes we wouldn't think of eating at
any other time of year.
The best beverage to pair with the
typical Thanksgiving meal is: A. Wines
of balance and restraint, generally with
lower alcohol, a bit of fruit, and good
acidity. B. Beer, or if weird old Uncle
Henry is at the table, vodka.
Whether you are more inclined
to choose A or B depends, I guess, on
whether you see the glass of life half-full
of Dom Perignon or raw sewage. Since
fine Champagne is always preferable to
ick, yuck, and blech, this space will go
with A, at least when it comes to what to
drink with our annual fall orgy of turkey,
stuffing, sweet potatoes, pumpkin pie,


and really bad football by teams that
couldn't beat their own grandmothers.
The age-old problem of Thanksgiv-
ing, beyond whether to get drunk and
ignore Uncle Henry or stuff a sock in his
mouth and lock him in the closet, is find-
ing wines that play well with the various
and disparate dishes of the day, which
generally means avoiding the Axis of
Ubiquity that is Chardonnay, Cabernet
Sauvignon, and Merlot. White wine
blends I find particularly successful, also
varietals that balance bright fruit and
crisp acidity, like Viognier and Riesling.
As for reds, Pinot Noir goes with every-
thing, and ros6s are pretty versatile, too.
That makes the 2011 Domaine Hour-
chart C6tes de Provence as good a place
to start as any. It's a classic Provencal rose,
medium-bodied and well balanced, its
strawberry and raspberry fruit tempered
by bracing citrus acidity and a pronounced
earthy-mineral tang. It's the kind of easy-
to-drink wine that should appeal to just
about anybody, and would be an especially
good partner with Thanksgiving ham.
But on Thanksgiving, we're mostly
talking turkey, so let's look at a pair of
whites and a pair of reds that help build
a better bird.
Torrontes, the poor man's Viognier,
is both an underappreciated varietal and
an excellent value. For example, there's
the Elm Tree 2011 Torrontes (Mendoza,
Argentina), a lush, fruity, full-figured
wine that smells like a honeysuckle field
in summertime bloom. Yet all those floral
and tropical fruit flavors are balanced by
equally bracing acidity, and at two bottles
for $12, the value is remarkable.


The North Miami Crown Wine and Spirits (12555 Biscayne Blvd., 305-892-
9463) has the Domaine Hourchart Rose for $9.99 and the Famille Perrin
C6tes du Rhone for $11.99. At the North Miami ABC Fine Wine & Spirits
(16355 Biscayne Blvd., 305-944-6525), you'll find the Elm Tree Torrontes
on sale at two bottles for $12, and the Fat Bastard Pinot Noir for $8.99.
The Smoking Loon Pinot Noir and Clean Slate Riesling are at the Publix
at Biscayne Shopping Center (1776 Biscayne Blvd., 305-358-3433), and
also the Biscayne Commons Publix (14641 Biscayne Blvd., 305-354-
2171), both for $9.99.


That same blend of sensuous fruit
and sensible acidity marks the 2010 Clean
Slate Riesling. This German import, at
only 10.5 percent alcohol, is ideal for
all-day sipping, yet delivers a mouthful of
silky peach and apricot fruit riding atop
a sturdy lemon-lime backbone, making it
an excellent companion to the usual T-Day
bird and even a big platter of stone crabs.
You don't have to be a fat bastard (or
a skinny bitch) to appreciate Thierry &
Guy's 2010 Fat Bastard Pinot Noir. Just
kick back and enjoy the surprising nuances
of this light-bodied French product, from
its bright, fresh strawberry-raspberry
aromas with hints of black olive to the lean
berry fruit and earthy, mineral flavors.
Nor do you have to be a loon,
smoking or otherwise, to enjoy the 2011


Smoking Loon Pinot Noir. Its ripe
strawberry fruit with hints of nutmeg
and citrus show off its California heri-
tage, and though fleshier than the Bas-
tard, it still maintains a welcome balance.
If you want something with a little
more weight, perhaps to complement a
standing rib roast or leg of lamb, you could
do far worse than Famille Perrin's 2010
C6tes du Rhone Reserve. It delivers a
mouth-filling blast of rich, ripe black-cher-
ry fruit, nicely restrained by soft tannins
and acidity, and will leave you with the
not-at-all-unappealing choice of:
A. Finishing the bottle. B. Opening
another one. (This time, actually, we'll
take B.)

Feedback: letters@ibiscaynetimes.com


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012


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Columnists: DISH


Long, Strange Trip

Food news we know you can use


By Pamela Robin Brandt
BT Contributor
Until last month's release of Butter,
a movie centered on butter-
sculpting competitions, we'd
have agreed with Paula Deen that you
can't get enough of the fabulous fat. Too
bad the flick kinda flops.
Still, a major motion picture featur-
ing Jennifer Garner carving JFK's fatal
convertible (complete with Jackie O
sprawled on the trunk) from a mammoth
block of butter! Who'da thunk it, even a
few years ago?
The same could be said of last
month's many intriguing restaurant
openings in Biscayne Times territory
- which was, only a short while ago,
hardly a major dining draw. How far
we've come.

OPENINGS
South Street Restaurant & Bar (4000
NE 2nd Ave., 305-573-5474). Eater-
ies from restaurateur Amir Ben-Zion
(backer of South Street's predecessor
in this historic space originally the
Buena Vista Post Office Sra. Marti-
nez) are much-anticipated.
This "neo-soul" spot, featuring
Philly chef Amaris Jones's lightened ver-
sions of family recipes, is no exception.
As for the concept of healthier soul food:
Are grilled green tomatoes a substitute
for the fried kind? This is a question
that, for me, will take more soul-search-
ing and a lot more tomatoes. The


accompanying basil cream aioli, though,
is a powerful persuader. Meanwhile,
try juicy free-range fried chicken (with
collards and candied yams), shrimp and
cheddar grits with good ol' Carolinas
country gravy.
Machiya Ramen Noodle House
(3250 NE 1st Ave. #116, 786-507-5025).
Don't even let those 35-cent packages of
instant noodles that got you through col-
lege cross your mind. They bear as much
resemblance to charmingly chewy real
ramen as instant Nescaf6 does to the arti-
san brews at Wynwood's Panther Coffee.
Admittedly, Machiya's prices don't bear
much resemblance to 35 cents, either.
But $15-$20 bowls such as the Hokkaido
come lavishly packed with toppings like
king crab, scallops, shrimp, mussels, and
veggies. And the "kae-dama" system
gives diners a whole extra serving of
ramen for their leftover soup (don't drink
it all!), for just $2.
The Hoxton (1111 SW 1st Ave.,
786-691-2730). From Nobu veteran
Santiago Rodriguez, this casual-chic
"urban beach house" is the first of three
attached eateries/lounges scheduled to
open in the same location. Park once,
eat and drink all night. Fish & chips
attest to British inspiration; bluepoint
oysters say Hamptons. But the menu
mostly features upscaled versions of
New England classics, like a Maine
lobster roll, on brioche roll rather than
hot dog bun. There's even a luxe take on
Quebecois poutine (think Jersey shore
disco fries, except good): Housemade


frites snazzed-up with Vermont cheddar,
duck, and confit gravy.
Buddha Sushi Bar (1071 NE 79th
St., 305-677-3633). Please see this
month's newly added Dining Guide
entry for details. Yeah, yeah, we know
it's not responsible to rush right in and
write about a restaurant minutes after
it has opened. But as an admirer of the
artistic, delicately flavor-balanced Japa-
nese fusion tapas of Morimoto veteran
Michael Asalie at Little Lotus, we were
confident his new "floating sushi" spot
wouldn't be the typical novelty act with
dubious-quality seafood. We were right.
Top Burger (109 NE 1st St., 305-
379-3100). Given the place's name,
there's no surprise about the specialty.
And as at a number of other "better
burger" joints these days, ingredients
are top quality 100 percent Angus
beef; fresh, hand-cut fries; old-fashioned
shakes made from real ice cream, not
packaged mixes. You won't find the
fancy, chef-driven garnishes and sides
featured at celeb chef burger bars, but
you won't find fancy prices, either. D6cor
is picture-perfect 1950s soda shop; one
expects to find Archie, Veronica, and
Jughead at the next table.
Laboca Grill Caf6 (1250 S. Miami
Ave., 786-452-8851). No surprises here,


except d6cor, centered on amusing street-
art renditions of life in Buenos Aires's
artsy, colorful La Boca barrio. The menu
features Argentina's familiar favorite
steaks, pastas, substantial salads, and
snacks like generously stuffed empana-
das (chicken especially recommended).
Vapiano (1221 Brickell Ave., 305-
374-0311). "Stylish" and "cafeteria"
aren't words that normally go together.
But they do at this fashionable fast-
casual Euro-caf6 chain (113 branches
and growing), where self-serve special-
ties include made-to-order pastas and
pizzas. Stand in a series of lines to
supervise chefs; grab a vino at the bar;
garnish your dish with basil growing
on the tables. Frenetic for sure, but fun.
If the high-ceilinged, two-story space
gives some foodies flashbacks, it once
housed chef Maria Frumkin's innovative
fine-dining outpost Duo, which, in 2004,
stood alone in this part of Brickell, amid
scary vacant lots, construction sites,
and lots of free parking. To paraphrase
the Grateful Dead: What a not-so-long,
strange trip it's been.
More restaurant news in "BizBuzz"
(page 30). Send me food news! E-mail:
restaurants @biscaynetimes.com.

Feedback: letters(@biscaynetimes.com


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Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


f5


November 2012





























Restaurant Listings


The Biscayne Corridor's most comprehensive restaurant guide. Total this month: 304.


NEW THIS MONTH MIDTOWN I WYNWOOD / DESIGN DISTRICT
1111111111111111111111111111111 11111111


Restaurant listings for the BT Dining Guide are written
by Pamela Robin Brandt (restaurants@biscaynetimes.
com). Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy,
but restaurants frequently change menus, chefs, and
operating hours, so please call ahead to confirm
information. Icons ($$$) represent estimates for a typical
meal without wine, tax, or tip. Hyphenated icons ($-$$$)
indicate a significant range in prices between lunch and
dinner menus, or among individual items on those menus.
$= $10 and under
$$= $20
$$$= $30
$$$$= $40
$$$$$= $50 and over



Brickell / Downtown

Aijo
1331 Brickell Bay Dr., 786-452-1637
Hidden within Jade condo, this sleek Japanese fusion resto-
lounge (whose name means "love") is also a jewel Food-
loving Venezuelan owner Rene Buroz encourages innovation,
and his chefs (including four from Zuma) respond with beau-
tifully plated items as fun as they are flavorful Don't miss the
layered croquante (a sort of Asian croqueta mouthwatering
crispy rice, subtly smoked salmon, and creamy crab), Ago
kani (king crab legs with citrus foam clouds and rich emulsi-
fied butter dip), or creative cocktails from a mixologist who
also juggles and plays with fire

Area 31
270 Biscayne Boulevard Way, 305-424-5234
Not that the sleek interior of this seafood restaurant (named
for fishing area 31, stretching from the Carolinas to South
America) isn't a glamorous dining setting But we'd eat
outside From the expansive terrace of the Epic condo and
hotel on the Miami River, the views of Brickell s high-rises
actually make Miami look like a real city It's hard to decide
whether the eats or drinks are the most impressive The
food is impeccably fresh regional fish, prepared in a clean
Mediterranean-influenced style The cocktails are genuinely
creative Luckily you don't have to choose one or the other
$$$-$$$$

Azul
500 Brickell Key Dr., 305-913-8254
Floor-to-ceiling windows showcase Biscayne Bay But diners
prefer ogling the raw-bar-fronted open kitchen, where glo-
betrotting chef Joel Huff crafts imaginative, often multi-part
dishes -- some Asian-inspired (like oysters with fresh wasabi,


hibiscus granite, and Asian pear), as one would expect from
the Mandarin Oriental s top eatery But most of Huff's dishes
are strongly European-influenced, primarily by New Spanish
cuisine Elegant, playfully molecular gastronomy-accented
almond gazpacho with foie gras "snow," or "eggs, bacon &
toast" (suckling pig, tempura duck egg, truffled potato, and
speck air") tell the story $$$$$

Balans
901S. Miami Ave., (Mary Brickell Village), 305-534-9191
Open until 4 00 a m on weekends, this London import
(Miami's second Balans) offers a sleeker setting than its
perennially popular Lincoln Road progenitor, but the same
simple yet sophisticated global menu The indoor space can
get mighty loud, but lounging on the dog-friendly outdoor
terrace, over a rich croque monsieur (which comes with an
alluringly sweet/sour citrus-dressed side salad), a lobster
club on onion toast, some surprisingly solid Asian fusion
items, and a cocktail is one of Miami's more relaxing experi-
ences $$-$$$

Bali Caf6
109 NE 2nd Ave., 305-358-5751
While Indonesian food isn't easy to find in Miami, downtown
has secret stashes small joints catering to cruise-ship and
construction workers This cute, exotically decorated cafe
has survived and thrived for good reason The homey cook-
ing is delicious, and the friendly family feel encourages even
the timid of palate to try something new Novices will want
Indonesia's signature rusttafel, a mix-and-match collection
of small dishes and condiments to be heaped on rice Note
bring cash No plastic accepted here $-$$

Banana & Leaf
234 NE 3rd St., 786-431-5548
Ever get tempted by the convenience of supermarket sushi
boxes, but feel uneasy about freshness and disgruntled
about sparseness of fillings' In the grab-and-go containers
here, raw fish glistens and makls like a plump snow crab roll
have a satisfying seafood-to-rice ratio If you'd rather, dishes
on the larger custom menu arrive almost as fast There is
also limited, tasty Southeast Asian fare Most unbelievable
Prices beat supermarket sushi by far $

The Bar at Level 25 (Conrad Hotel)
1395 Brickell Ave., 305-503-6500
On the Conrad's 25th floor, The Bar's picture-windowed
space is notjust a watering hole with panoramic views At
lunch its an elegant sandwich bar, at night its a raw bar
(with pristine coldwater oysters) and (best) a tapas bar
serving pintxos That's just the Basque word for tapas, but
here there's nothing mere about the generously portioned
small plates They range from traditional items like cod
fish equixada and saffron-sauteed Spanish artichokes to
inventive inspirations like foie gras and goat cheese-stuffed
empanadas $$$


BRICKELL / DOWNTOWN

Brother Jimmy's BBQ
900 S. Miami Ave. #135, 786-360-3650
The South is supposed to be the source of barbecue
But Bro J evidently didn't hear about that His signature
North Carolina pork 'cue comes from NYC, where the first
Brother Jimmy's opened more than 20 years ago Miami's
location is actually the first south of the Mason-Dixon line
But the slow-smoked pulled pork butt tastes righteous
-- no interfering glop, just hot sauce-spiked vinegar to bal-
ance the fab fattiness There's other 'cue, too, including
big (not baby back) ribs, and respectable brisket $$-$$$


Pizzarium
69 E. Flagler St., 305-381-6025
Roman-style rectangular pizzas, served in square slices,
have been available in the Miami area since the mid-
1990s But the familiar squares and Pizzarum's are simi-
lar only in shape Main difference dough, here allowed to
rise for four days The resulting crusts are astonishingly
airy, as authentic Roman slices, intended as light street
snacks, should be Toppings, a rotating selection of nearly
30 combinations, are highlighted by quality imported
ingredients -- not to mention a healthy imagination, as the
zucca glalla attests pumpkin cream, pancetta, smoked
scamorza cheese $


TIKL Raw Bar & Grill
1450 Brickell Ave. #110, 305-372-0620
From restaurateur Claudlo Giordano and chef Simon
Stojanovic, the team behind longtime South Beach sea-
food favorite Altamare, this eatery is similar in food genre
(contemporary American), though more global influences,
especially from Asia, are evident here Additionally, rather
than serving conventional three-course meals, TIKL's
menu focuses on small plates creative crudos (like
hamachl with yuzu, wasabi, and olive oil powder), plus
robata-grilled and otherwise cooked items Standouts
garlic/citrus-splked local white shrimp with sweet shishito
peppers, Thai curried mussels with crisped sushi rice, sin-
ful bacon toast $$$-$$$$


Bento Sushi & Chinese
801 Brickell Bay Dr., 305-603-8904
Hidden in the Four Ambassadors Towers, this tiny spot (which
specializes in sushi plus Japanese small plates, but also


Acme Bakery & Coffee
3451 NE 1st Ave. #103, 786-507-5799
From Pious Pig Restaurant Group (whose other ventures
include Vietnamese pop-up Phuc Yeal and the creative/
rustic Federal Food, Drink & Provisions), this cozy bakery/
cafe is, again, just what its neighborhood needed The
specialty is homemade artisan breads, from Colonial-era
Sally Lunn to crusty sourdough made with wild midtown
Miami yeasts, these honest loaves make the place's
breakfasts, served all day, and lunchtime's sandwiches
(like meatloaf and cheddar with onion marmalade) supe-
nor Coffee is single-origin stuff from Wynwood's Panther
Also available gift baskets featuring housemade pre-
serves and pickles $$

UPPER EASTSIDE

Buddha Sushi Bar
1071 NE 79th St., 305-677-3633
While the setting is still more low-rent/high-speed cause-
way than restaurant row, this stylish, much-more-than-
sushi spot definitely brings the street giant steps toward
destination-dining status The invention and skill shown in
makis like the Fruity (shrimp, salmon, tuna, whitefish, roe,
asparagus, and peaches, dressed with creamy mustard
sauce), or small plates like shrimp crullers with a red
wine reduction, isn't surprising considering the crafter is
Michael Asalie, original chef at downtown's Little Lotus
Order from the menu or grab something from the circulat-
ing sushi river," whatever floats your boat $$$


8 Oz. Burger Bar
14815 Biscayne Blvd., 305-830-1988
Celebrity chef Govind Armstrong's first 8 Oz, in South
Beach, almost singlehandedly started Miami's burger
craze, and when Armstrong severed ties with the Alton
Road original, this location became his standard-bearer
Burgers are far from bargain-priced, but ingredients like
grass-fed Wagyu beef, Niman Ranch lamb, and Humboldt
Fog goat cheese, plus garnishes shining with chef-driven
creativity (charred escarole, unctuous short rib, fried
caper tartar sauce)justify the extra bucks Kobe corn
dogs, grilled artichokes with herb aioli, and stout-battered
onions rings are also highly recommended $$-$$$

serves limited Chinese and Thai-inspired dishes of the mix-
and-match, pick-your-protein-then-preparation sort) has been
mostly an insider's secret deliveryjoint for Brickell residents
But it's actually a pleasant place to relax outside, enjoying
a bay view and budget bento box specials that include miso


94 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012


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Dining Guide: RESTAURANTS


soup, ginger-dressed salad, California roll, and fresh orange
sections, plus two mini-entrees (the nigir assortment sushi
and lacy-battered tempura especially recommended) Bubble
tea, tool $$-$$$
Bon Fromage
500 Brickell Ave. #106, 786-329-5632
Though independently owned instead of a chain cog, this
cheese and wine cafe/shop is like a pint-size version of Midtown
Miami's Cheese Course, right down to being officially self-service
But it is staffed by accommodating employees who, unofficially,
do their best to double as servers for eat-in diners The cheese
(plus charcuterie) menu of garnished platters, salads, and crusty
baguette sandwiches features numerous high-quality, imported
favorites, but don't miss more unusual domestic treasures like
Wisconsin bread, a cooked cheese that, like hallouml, doesn't
melt but tantalizingly softens when heated $$
Bryan in the Kitchen
104 NE 2nd Ave., 305-371-7777
This quirky cafe-market's chef/owner is a former smoothle-
swilling model who is now into fresh whole foods, and though
his eclectic green gourmet" menu does uniformly reflect his
dedication to ecological consciousness, it otherwise could
only be described as intensely personal Offerings are an odd
but appealing saint/sinner mix, ranging from healthy pasta/
grain salads and homemade-from-scratch snacks (beefjerky,
granola) to unique cupcakes featuring not-too-sweet adult fla-
vors and irresistible sticky buns If we had to choose just one
category, we'd sin But luckily, you can have it all $-$$
Caf6 Bastille
248 SE 1st St., 786-425-3575
Breakfasting on a ham-egg-cheese crepe at this very French-
feeling -- and tasting -- cafe is a most civilized way to start the
day Formerly breakfast and lunch only, the cafe is now open
for dinner, too And while the crepes (both savory and sweet)
are tempting and varied enough to eat all day, dinner choices
like homemade foie gras (with onion jam and Guerande salt),
salmon with lentils and fennel salsa, or a very affordable skirt
steak au polvre make it possible to resist $-$$$
Caf6 Sambal
500 Brickell Key Dr., 305-913-8358
Though the Mandarin Oriental Hotel describes this space as
its casual hotel restaurant," many consider it a more spec-
tacular dining setting than the upscale Azul, upstairs, owing
to the option of dining outdoors on a covered terrace directly
on the waterfront The food is Asian-inspired, with a few Latin
and Mediterranean accents For the health-conscious, the
menu includes low-cal choices For hedonists there's a big
selection of artisan sakes $$$-$$$$$
Cavas Wine Tasting Room
900 S. Miami Ave. #180, 305-372-8027
Like South Miami's predecessor (now closed), this Cavas
is mainly an upscale, high-tech tasting lounge for the wine-
curious Patrons buy prepaid cards to sample ounce, half-
glass, or full-glass portions from more than 50 self-service
dispensing machines But there's an extensive selection of
tapas/pintxos small plates, flatbread pizzas," sandwiches,
plus fully garnished charcuterie and cheese platters specially
selected to pair well with vino Additionally, more substantial
dishes have been added, including a daily three-course lunch
special and some tasty, bargain-priced soups (carrot cream
with Gouda particularly recommended) $$-$$$
Chophouse Miami
300 S. Biscayne Blvd., 305-938-9000
Formerly Manny's Steakhouse, Miami's Chophouse retains
basically everything but the famed name (from the original
Manny's in Minneapolis), and remains Miami's most inten-
tionally masculine steakhouse Here, ensconced in your
black leather booth, everything is humongous dry-aged
choice-grade steaks like the Bludgeon of Beef (a boldly flavor-
ful 40-ounce bone-in rlbeye, described as part meat, part
weapon"), king crab legs that dwarf the plate, cocktail shrimp
that could swallow the Loch Ness monster whole, two-fisted
cocktails that would fell a T-Rex Not for the frail $$$$$
The Corner
1035 N. Miami Ave., 305-961-7887
With a Zuma alum in the kitchen, a Gigi alum crafting classic or
creative cocktails, a warm pub feel, and hours extending from
lunch to nearly breakfast the next morning, The Corner is trans-
forming a desolate downtown corner into a neighborhood hang-
out The nicely priced menu of sandwiches, salads, snacks, and
sweets (the latter from Om Nom Nom's cookie queen Anthea
Ponsetti) ranges from 100-percent homemade ice cream
sandwiches to the Crazy Madame, France's elaborate Croque
Madame (a bechamel sauce-topped grilled cheese/ham/fried
egg sandwich) plus bacon and caramelized onion $-$$
Crazy About You
1155 Brickell Bay Dr. #101, 305-377-4442
The owners, and budget-friendly formula, are the same here
as at older Dolores, But You Can Call Me Lolita Buy an entree
(all under $20) from a sizable list of Mediterranean, Latin,
American, or Asian-influenced choices (like Thai-marinated
churrasco with crispy shoestring fries) and get an appetizer
for free, including substantial stuff like a Chihuahua cheese
casserole with chorizo and pesto The difference This place,
housed in the former location of short-lived La Broche, has
an even more upscale ambiance than Dolores -- including a
million-dollar water view $$$
Cvi.che 105
105 NE 3rd Ave., 305-577-3454
Fusion food -- a modern invention Not in Peru, where native
and Euro-Asian influences have mixed for more than a


century But chef Juan Chipoco gives the ceviches and tira-
ditos served at this hot spot his own unique spin Specialties
include flash-marinated raw seafood creations, such as
tiradito a la crema de rocoto (sliced fish in citrus-spiked chill/
cream sauce) But traditional fusion dishes like Chinese-
Peruvian Chaufa fried rice (packed with jumbo shrimp,
mussels, and calamari) are also fun, as well as surprisingly
affordable $$
db Bistro Moderne
345 Avenue of the Americas, 305-421-8800
Just two words -- Daniel Boulud" --should be enough for
foodies craving creative French/American comfort cuisine
to run, not walk, to this restaurant If they can find it (Hint
The mysterious Avenue of the Americas" is really Biscayne
Boulevard Way Don't ask) Downtown's db is an absentee
celeb chef outpost, but on-site kitchen wizard Jarrod Verblak
flawlessly executes dishes ranging from the original NYC db
Bistro's signature foie gras/short rib/black truffle-stuffed
burger to local market-driven dishes like crusted pompano
with garlic/parsley veloute $$$-$$$$
The Democratic Republic of Beer
255 NE 14th St., 305-372-4161
The food here Beer is food The DRB serves 400 beers
from 55 countries, ranging from $2 Pabst Blue Ribbon to
$40 DeuS (an 115% alcohol Belgian method Champenoise
brew) But for those favoring solid snacks, tasty global small-
ish plates include fried fresh zucchini with dip (cheese recom-
mended), chorizo with homemade cilantro Mayo, or steak
tacos, served Mexican-style with onions, cilantro, and spicy
salsa Sadly for breakfast-brew enthusiasts, the DRB isn't
open that early But it is open late -- till 5 00 a m $$
D-Dog House
50 SW 10th St., 305-381-7770
While it has become increasingly common to find servers
at upscale restaurants utilizing computerized POS (point of
service) systems to take orders, this high-tech hole-in-the-wall
trumps them by replacing servers -- and in-house entertain-
ment, too -- with iPads that accept not just food orders and
credit cards but music requests You can web surf or game,
too, while waiting for your choice of the house specialty
supersized hot dogs, most overloaded with internationally
inspired toppings To accompany, hand-cut fries are a must
And have a cocktail There's a full liquor bar $-$$
Dolores, But You Can Call Me Lolita
1000 S. Miami Ave., 305-403-3103
From the stylish setting in Miami's historic Firehouse No 4,
one would expect a mighty pricy meal But entrees, which
range from Nuevo Latino-style ginger/orange-glazed pork
tenderloin to a platter of Kobe mini-burgers, all cost either
$18 or $23 And the price includes an appetizer -- no low-
rent crapola, either, but treats like Serrano ham croquetas,
a spinach/leek tart with Portobello mushroom sauce, or
shrimp-topped eggplant timbales The best seats are on the
glam rooftop patio $$$
Dominique Bistro-Club
1451 S. Miami Ave., 305-371-8859
At typical restolounges, the resto" part often gets the short
end of the stick But not at this chic but friendly spot, where
Gerardo Barrera, an alumn of Pars's Le Cordon Bleu, plus
his wife Dominque and her brother Jose Sigona, welcome
diners with France's best-known bistro classics coquilles St
Jacques (tender scallops in mushroom/white wine sauce), a
precision-cooked entrec6te rib-eye with Bearnalse or complex
Cafe de Paris butter, creme brulee (from scratch) or macaron
cookies (from heaven) No velvet ropes, and club music isn't
cranked till 1100 p m $$$
Edge, Steak & Bar
1435 Brickell Ave., 305-358-3535
Replacing the Four Seasons formal fine dining spot Acqua,
Edge offers a more kick-back casual welcoming vibe And
in its fare there's a particularly warm welcome for non-
carnivores Chef-driven seafood items (several inventive and
unusually subtle ceviches and tartares, a layered construc-
tion of corvina encrusted in a jewel-bright green pesto crust,
atop red plquillo sauce stripes and salad, lobster corn soup
packed with sweet lobster meat, more) and a farm-to-table
produce emphasis make this one steakhouse where those
who don't eat beef have no beef $$$$-$$$$$
Elwoods Gastro Pub
188 NE 3rd Ave., 305-358-5222
Cordial English owners, classic rock music (sometimes live),
and updated classic pub fare make this hangout a home
Made from scratch with artisan ingredients, traditional Brit
bites like fish and chips can't be beat -- thick pieces of crisply
beer-battered moist cod, served with hand-cut fries and
"mushy [mashed] peas," plus housemade tartar sauce and
ketchup All desserts are also made in-house including a deliri-
ously rich (but worth it) sticky date pudding with toffee sauce
Tie down your dental implants They're in for a wild ride $$
Eos
485 Brickell Ave. (Viceroy Hotel), 305-503-0373
Originally opened by Michelin-starred New Aegean" chef
Michael Psilakis, Eos changed upon the chefs departure into
a more familiar Mediterranean resort eatery, minus Greek-
inspired innovations Now inspiration comes mainly from
Spain and Italy, with nods to Morocco and Latin America
Best bets include a tasting platter of Spanish cheeses and
cured meats, a pistachio-garnished salad featuring Serrano
ham, figs, and arugula, crispy parmesan risotto balls with
prosciutto and smoked tomato dip, and olive/smoked
paprika-rubbed roast chicken At lunch burgers and upscale
sandwiches are added $$$-$$$$


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com November 2012


flakr








0Ma~t


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012


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Dining Guide: RESTAURANTS



Eternity Coffee Roasters
117 SE 2nd Ave., 305-609-4981
Normally we list only full restaurants, but even a (not so)
simple cuppa joe from Chris Johnson and Crlstina Garces's
sleek micro-roastery will convince anyone possessing taste
buds that fine coffee can be as complex as fine wine, and
as satisfying as solid food A changing selection of superior
single-origin beans (many varieties from the Garces family's
Colombian farm, most others from Ethiopia and Kenya),
roasted in-house, produces "slow-pour" regular brews with
amazing nuances of fruits, chocolate, and more The espres-
so is so smooth sugar isn't necessary Other treats flaky
chocolate-stuffed "cigars" and other locally baked pastries
Free parking $

Fado Irish Pub
900 S. Miami Ave. #200, 786-924-0972
Unlike most Miami "Irish" pubs, which serve mostly American
bar food, rarely foraying past fish and chips or shepherd's
pie, Fado (pronounced "fdoe") has a menu reflecting the
pub grub found today in Ireland, including solid standards
But most intriguing are dishes mixing classic and contempo-
rary influences, particularly those featuring boxty, a grated/
mashed potato pancake Try corned beef rolls (boxty wraps,
with creamy mustard sauce and cabbage slaw), or smoked
salmon on minl-boxty "blini," with capers and horseradish
sauce There's a seasonal menu, too $$

Finnegan's River
401 SW 3rd Ave., 305-285-3030
Pool tables are expected in a sports bar and grill But an
actual pool? And a Jacuzzi? This Miami River hideaway has
other surprises, too, on its extensive outdoor deck, including
a boat dock and a large array of umbrella tables and lounge
chairs where its easy to while away many happy hours The
menu is the same array of bar bites served by South Beach's
older Finnegan's, but angus burgers are big and tasty, and
zingyjalapeno-studded smoked-fish dip is a satisfying table-
snack choice $$

First Hong Kong Caf6
117 SE 2nd St., 305-808-6665
Old Hong Kong saying If it walks, swims, crawls, or flies,
it's edible And nowhere is this truer than in this historically
international trade ports "cafes" -- meaning fast-food res-
taurants Typical menus present hundreds of items that are
local interpretations of dishes from all China, and most other
nations So believe us At this cafe, whose head chef is from
HK, the Indian-style curries, sambal-splked Indonesian chow
fun, even the borscht (a tomato/beef, not beet-based version
of the Russian soup) are as authentic as the kung pao what-
ever, and as tasty $$

Fratelli Milano
213 SE 1st St., 305-373-2300
Downtown isn't yet a 24/7 urban center, but its experienc-
ing a mini explosion of eateries open at night That includes
this family-owned rlstorante, where even newcomers feel at
home At lunch it's almost impossible to resist paninl, served
on foccacia or crunchy clabatta, even the vegetarian version
bursts with complex and complementary flavors During
weekday dinners, try generous plates of risotto with shrimp
and grilled asparagus, homemade pastas like seafood-
packed fettuccine al scoglio, or delicate Vitello alla Milanese
on arugula $$-$$$

Garcia's Seafood Grille and Fish Market
398 NW N. River Dr., 305-375-0765
Run by a fishing family for a couple of generations, this vener-
able Florida fish shack is the real thing No worries about the
seafood's freshness, on their way to the dining deck overlook-
ing the Miami River, diners can view the retail fish market
Best preparations are the simplest When stone crabs are in
season, Garcla's claws are as good as Joe's but considerably
cheaper The local fish sandwich is most popular grouper,
yellowtail snapper, or mahl mahl $-$$

Giovana Caffe
154 SE 1st Ave.305-374-1024
If the menu at this charming downtown hideaway contained
only one item -- pear and gorgonzola ravioli dressed, not
drowned, in sage-spiced cream sauce -- we'd be happy But
the caf6, formerly lunch-only but now serving weekday din-
ners, is also justly famed for meal-size salads like grilled
skirt steak atop sweetly balsamic-dressed spinach (with
spinach, tomatoes, bacon, hard-boiled eggs, blue cheese,
and almonds), or an especially lavish chicken salad with pine
nuts, golden raisins, apples, and basil, an Italian twist $$

Grimpa Steakhouse
901 Brickell Plaza, 305-455-4757
This expansive indoor/outdoor Brazilian eatery is sleekly
contemporary, but no worries The classic sword-wielding gau-
chos are here, serving a mind-reeling assortment of skewered
beef, chicken, lamb, pork, sausages, and fish And included
in the price (dinner $47, lunch $34) is the traditional belly-
busting buffet of hot and cold prepared foods, salad, cold
cuts, and cheeses A pleasant, nontraditional surprise
unusual sauces like sweet/tart passion fruit or mint, tomato-
based BBQ, and mango chutney, along with the ubiquitous
chimichurrl $$$$-$$$$$

Half Moon Empanadas
192 SE 1st Ave., 305-379-2525
As with South Beach's original Half Moon, you can get wraps
or salads But its this snackery's unique take on Argentine-
style empanadas that makes it seem a natural for national
franchising The soft-crusted, doughy crescents -- baked, not
fried, so relatively guilt-free -- are amply stuffed with fillings
both classic (beef and chicken, either mild or spicy) and


creative the bacon cheeseburger, the pancetta/mozzarella/
plum-filled Americana, and several vegetarian options Atjust
over two bucks apiece, they're a money-saving moveable
feast $

Hawa Jade
1331 Brickell Bay Dr., 305-905-5523
When thinking "fusion" cuisines, Japanese and Lebanese
don't instantly spring to mind But taking the medieval Spice
Route connection as inspiration, the Hawa family makes the
mix work at both its original Coral Gables Hawa and this new
location in the Jade Residences Golden Pockets (tofu crepes
encasing macadamias, avocado, and tuna, crab, shrimp, or
Kobe-style beef) are musts Plus there are unique combos
containing makls plus substantial salads, like crunchy tuna
enoki rolls with falafel salad -- not the usual green garnish
Housemade desserts with a French twist are also a pleasant
surprise $$

Hibachi Grill
45 NE 3rd Ave., 305-374-2223
Imagine a mini-express Benlhana This place specializes
in teppanyaki cuisine -- minus the thrilling (or terrifying)
tableside knife theatrics, true, but the one-plate meals of sea-
soned steak slices, chicken, shrimp, or salmon plus dipping
sauces, fried rice, and an onion/zucchini mix come at bargain
prices There are also hefty soups or Japanese, Thai, and
Singapore-style noodle and rice bowls loaded with veggies
and choice of protein (including tofu) The limited sides are
Japanese (shumal, plump chicken gyoza) and Chinese (vari-
ous egg rolls) Fancy? No, but satisfying $-$$

II Gabbiano
335 S. Biscayne Blvd., 305-373-0063
Its location at the mouth of the Miami River makes this
ultra-upscale Italian spot (especially the outdoor terrace) the
perfect power lunch/business dinner alternative to steak-
houses And the culinary experience goes way beyond the
typical meat market, thanks in part to the flood of freebies
that's a trademark of Manhattan's II Mullno, originally run by
II Gabblano's owners The rest of the food Pricy, but portions
are mammoth And the champagne-cream-sauced house-
made ravioli with black truffles Worth every penny $$$$$

Indigo / Table 40
100 Chopin Plaza, 305-577-1000
Long known for its power-lunch buffet -- including hot entrees,
carving station, custom pastas, packed-to-the-gills salad,
sushi, and dessert stations -- the InterContinental Hotel's
Indigo restaurant now has a hip offspring intended for private
dining Table 40 The charming, glassed-in wine "cellar" (actu-
ally in the kitchen) enables 12-14 diners to watch the action
in heat-shielded, soundproofed comfort while eating creations
by veteran chef Alexander Feher, combining Continental
technique with local seasonal ingredients Highlights tender
house-smoked, stout-braised short ribs, lavish lobster salad
with grilled mango, and a seductive fresh corn gazpacho
$$$-$$$$$

Jackson Soul Food
950 NW 3rd Ave., 305-377-6710]
With a recently refurbished exterior to match its classy/
comfy retro interior, this 65-year-old Overtown soul food
breakfast institution now has only one drawback It closes
at 100 p m Never mind, night owls If you're a first-timer
here, order the astonishingly fluffy pancakes with juicy beef
sausage, and you II set multiple alarm clocks to return
Classic drop biscuits (preferably with gravy) are also must-
haves And hearty Southern breakfast staples like smoth-
ered chicken wings or fried fish do make breakfast seem
like lunch, too $

Jam6n, Jam6n, Jam6n,
10 SW South River Dr., 305-324-1111
From the outside, you know you're walking into the ground
floor of a new condo building But once inside the charmingly
rustic room, you'd swear you're in Spain Obviously Spain's
famous cured hams are a specialty, as are other pork prod-
ucts on the weekly changing menu, from a roast suckling pig
entree to a fried chorizo and chickpea tapa But seafood is
also terrific Don't miss bacalao-filled plquillo peppers, or two
of Miami's best rice dishes seafood paella and arroz negro
(with squid and its ink) $$-$$$

Kork Wine & Cheese Bar
2 S. Miami Ave., 305-377-8899
From the owner of Transit Lounge, a hip hangout long
before the downtown/Brickell revival, this more upscale-cool
venue is worth checking out for its almost medieval dimly
lit decor alone, including a subterranean wine cellar/party
room, formerly a WW II-era bomb shelter Comestibles are
limited to wine and cheese plus accompaniments Both are
available to go Kork is as much market as lounge But with
a stock of roughly 5000 bottles, and a selection of roughly
two dozen perfectly ripe artisanal cheeses -- curated by
a cheese sommelier who'll create perfect pairings -- who
needs more? $$

Largo Bar & Grill
401 Biscayne Blvd., 305-374-9706
Sure, Bayside Marketplace is touristy But it can be fun to
spend a day playing visitor in your own city If you do, this
waterfront place overlooking Miamarlna is a superior food
choice Expect nothing cutting edge, just tasty, familiar
favorites solidly prepared You won't go wrong with stone
crab claws and Cajun mustard dip, inauthentic but delicious
fish tacos in hard blue corn tortillas with two sauces (cilan-
tro and chipotle), generously portioned fish sandwiches
(grouper, mahl, snapper, or daily catch), and festive cock-
tails $$-$$$


November 2012 Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com








Dining Guide: RESTAURANTS



La Loggia Ristorante and Lounge
68 W. Flagler St., 305-373-4800
This luxuriantly neo-classical yet warm Italian restaurant
was unquestionably a pioneer in revitalizing downtown With
alternatives like amaretto-tinged pumpkin agnolloti in sage
butter sauce and cllantro-spiced white bean/vegetable salad
dressed with truffle oil, proprietors Jennifer Porclello and
Horatio Olivelra continue to draw a lunch crowd that returns
for dinner, or perhapsjust stays on through the afternoon,
fueled by the Lawyer's Liquid Lunch, a vodka martini spiked
with sweetened espresso $$$

La Moon
144 SW 8th St., 305-860-6209
At four in the morning, nothing quells the munchies like
a Crazy Burger, a Colombian take on a trucker's burger
beef patty, bacon, ham, mozzarella, lettuce, tomato, and
a fried egg, with an arepa corn pancake "bun While this
tiny place's late hours (till 6 00 a m Friday and Saturday)
are surprising, the daytime menu is more so In addition to
Colombian classics, there's a salad Nicolse with grilled fresh
tuna, seared salmon with mango salsa, and other yuppie
favorites $-$$

La Provence
1064 Brickell Ave. 786-425-9003
Great baguettes in the bread basket, many believe, indicate
a great meal to come But when Miamlans encounter such
bread -- crackling crust outside, moist, aromatic, aerated inte-
nor -- t's likely not from a restaurant's own kitchen, but from
La Provence Buttery croissants and party-perfect pastries are
legend too Not so familiar is the bakery's cafe component,
whose sandwich/salad menu reflects local eclectic tastes
But French items like pan bagnats (essentially salade Nigolse
on artisan bread) will truly transport diners to co-owner David
Thau's Provengal homeland $$

La Sandwicherie
34 SW 8th St., 305-374-9852
This second location of the open-air diner that is South
Beach's favorite apres-club eatery (since 1988) closes earlier
(midnight Sunday-Thursday, 5 00 a m Friday and Saturday),
but the smoothies, salads, and superb Parisian sandwiches
are the same ultra-crusty baguette stuffed with evocative
charcuterie and cheeses (saucisson sec, country pate,
camembert, etc) and choice of salad veggies plus salty/tart
cornichons and Sandwicherle's incomparable Dijon mustard
vinaigrette Additionally the larger branch has an interior, with
a kitchen enabling hot foods (quiches and croques), plus
A/C $-$$

Le Boudoir Brickell
188 SE 12th Terr., 305-372-233
At this French bakery/cafe, mornings start seriously,
with choices ranging from quality cheese, charcuterie/
pate, or smoked salmon platters to chic Continental
and complete American breakfasts At lunch, generously
salad-garnished, open-faced tartines are irresistible But
sophisticated salads and homemade soups make the
choice tough And do not skip dessert Superb sweets
include rich almond/fresh raspberry or properly tangy
lemon tarts, traditional Madeleines, airy layered mouss-
es, and addictive mini-macaroon sandwich cookies with
daily-changing fillings $-$$

Lime Fresh Mexican Grill
1 W Flagler St, Suite 7, 305-789-9929
(See Midtown / Wynwood/ Design District listing)

Little Lotus
25 N. Miami Ave. #107, 305-533-2700
Secreted inside the International Jewelry Exchange, this
eatery (owned by stealth super-foodle Sari Maharani
-- paralegal by day, restaurateur by night) is tough to find
but seems destined to become one of our town's toughest
tables to book Two talented chefs, whose credits include
Morlmoto (NYC) and hometown fave Yakko-san, create
Japanese, Indonesian, and fusion small plates that look
remarkably artful and taste like they're about ready to take
on Iron Chef Morimoto himself Saucing, often with mul-
tiple but balanced potions, is especially noteworthy The
prices A steal $-$$


LouLou Le Petit Bistro
638 S. Miami Ave., 305-379-1404
When Indochne's owner, Jacques Ardisson, closed his Asian
spot to open this charming French eatery in the same space,
it was a return to his roots He and his daughter, for whom
the place is named, come from Nice You'll be transported,
too, by dishes like lamb shank with flageolets (known as the
caviar of beans), duck leg confit on a bed of mouthwatering
green lentils from Le Puy, a classic moules/frites, a shared
charcuterie platter with a bottle from the savvy wine list, and,
of course, salade nigolse $$-$$$

Martini 28
146 SE 1st Ave., 305-577-4414
This stylish little lunch-only spot, a labor of love from a
husband-wife chef team, serves what might well be the
most impressive meal deal in town From an ambitious,
daily-changing menu of fare that's geographically eclectic but
prepared with solid classic technique, diners get a choice
of about ten entrees (substantial stuff like steak au polvre
with Madeira cream sauce and roasted potatoes, or pignolia-
crusted salmon with Dijon mustard sauce, potatoes, and
veggies), plus soup or salad and housemade dessert Forjust
$9 99 Told ya $

Miami Art Caf6
364 SE 1st St., 305-374-5117
For businessfolk on the go, this breakfast/lunch-only French
cafe serves up evocative baguette sandwiches (like camem-
bert) loaded, if you like, with greens, olives, and more For
those with time to sit, we'd recommend the savory crepes,
garnished with perfectly dressed salad, or sweet crepe like
the Bonne Maman (whose sugar/salted butter stuffing brings
Brittany to downtown) And quiches are nicely custardy But
there are surprises here, too, includingjust a few full entrees,
with correctly made traditional sauces one wouldn't expect at
a luncheonette -- except, perhaps, in Paris $-$$

Miami's Finest Caribbean Restaurant
236 NE 1st Ave., 305-381-9254
Originally from Jamaica, proprietor Miss Pat has been serving
her traditional homemade island specialties to downtown
office workers and college students since the early 1990s
Most popular item here might be the weekday lunch special
ofjerk chicken with festival (sweet-fried cornmeal bread pat-
ties), but even vegetarians are well served with dishes like a
tofu, carrot, and chayote curry All entrees come with rice and
peas, fried plantains, and salad, so no one leaves hungry $

Mint Leaf
1063 SE 1st Ave., 305-358-5050
Part of London's famous Woodlands Group, this stylish
spot, like its Coral Gables parent, serves the sort of upscale
Indian food rarely found outside Great Britain or India More
interestingly, the menu includes notjust the familiar northern
Indian "Mughlal" fare served in most of America's Indian res-
taurants, but refined versions of south India's scrum ptious
street food We've happily assembled whole meals of the
vegetarian chaat (snacks) alone And dosal (lacy rice/lentil
crepes rolled around fillings ranging from traditional onion/
potato to lamb masala or spicy chicken) are so addictive they
oughta be illegal $$$-$$$$

Miss Yip Chinese Caf6
900 Biscayne Blvd., 305-358-0088
Fans of the South Beach original will find the decor different
Most notably, there's an outdoor lounge, and more generally
a nightclub atmosphere But the menu of Hong Kong-style
Chinese food, prepared by imported Chinese cooks, is famil-
iar Simple yet sophisticated Cantonese seafood dishes rock
(try the lightly battered salt-and-pepper shrimp), as does
orange peel chicken, spicy/tangy rather than overly sweet
And a single two-course Peking duck (skin in crepes, stir-fried
meat and veggies with lettuce cups) makes mouthwatering
finger food, shared among friends $-$$$

Naoe
661 Brickell Key Dr., 305-947-6263
Chances are you've never had anything like the $85 prx-
fixe Japanese dinners at chef Kevin Corys tiny but nation-
ally acclaimed oasis, transplanted from its original Sunny
Isles space with its supreme serenity intact By reservation


* Free Glass of Wine
With Every Dinner Order. Limit one per customer. I
----------------------------I


only, in two dinner seatings of just eight people each, and
omakase (chef's choice) only, meals include a seasonal
soup, a four-course bento box, eight pieces of sushi, and
three desserts Cory personally does everything for you,
even applying the perfect amount of housemade artisan
soy sauce mix and fresh-grated wasabi to each mind-
reelingly fresh nigirl Few eating experiences on earth are
more luxuriant $$$$$

neMesis Urban Bistro
1035 N. Miami Ave., 305-415-9911
Truly original restaurants are hard to find here, and harder
to describe in standard sound bites But they often are the
attention-grabbing people-magnets that spark revivals of iffy
neighborhoods That's our prediction for this quirkily deco-
rated bistro, where the kitchen is helmed by Top Chef contes-
tant Micah Edelstein The intensely personal menu of creative
dishes inspired by her global travels (plus her fascination with
unfamiliar ingredients) changes constantly, but scrumptious
signatures include South African smoked veal bobotle, and
Peruvian pinoli pancakes with housemade chicken/apple
sausage, hibiscus syrup, and maple granules $$$-$$$$

Novecento
1414 Brickell Ave., 305-403-0900
For those who think "Argentine cuisine" is a synonym for
"beef and more beef," this popular eatery's wide range of
more cosmopolitan contemporary Argentine fare will be a
revelation Classic parrilla-grilled steaks are here for tradition-
alists, but the menu is dominated by creative Nuevo Latino
items like a new-style ceviche de chernia (lightly lime-marl-
nated grouper with jalapenos, basil, and the refreshing sweet
counterpoint of watermelon), or crab ravioli with creamy saf-
fron sauce Especially notable are the entree salads $$-$$$

Oceanaire Seafood Room
900 S. Miami Ave., 305-372-8862
With a dozen branches nationwide, Oceanaire May seem
more All-American seafood empire than Florida fish shack,
but menus vary significantly according to regional tastes and
fish Here in Miami, chef Sean Bernal supplements signature
starters like lump crab cakes with his own lightly marinated,
Peruvian-style grouper ceviche The daily-changing, 15-20
specimen seafood selection includes local fish seldom seen
on local menus pompano, parrot fish, amberjack But even
flown-in fish (and the raw bar's cold-water oysters) are ultra-
fresh $$$$

Ozzi Sushi
200 SE 1st St., 786-704-8003
Since its 1958 invention, conveyor-belt sushi has been the
most fun form of Japanese fast food, but problematic Who
knew how long plates had been circulating on the sushi-go-
round9 Happily, this sushi-boat spot avoids sanitation issues
with clear plastic covers, and as for freshness, low prices
ensure a steady stream of diners grabbing makis, nigirl, and
more as they float by Highlights include glistening ikura
(salmon roe) in a thin-sliced cucumber cup, a sweet-sauced
mango/guava/crab roll, and a festively frosted strawberry
Nutella dessert maki $-$$

Pasha's
1414 Brickell Ave., 305-416-5116
The original branch on Lincoln Road was instantly popular,
and the same healthy Middle Eastern fast food is served
at several newer outlets The prices are low enough that
you might suspect Pasha's was a tax write-off rather than a
Harvard Business School project, which it was by founders
Antonio Ellek and Nicolas Cortes Dishes range from falafel
and gyros to more unusual items like muhammara (tangy
walnut spread) and silky labneh yogurt cheese Everything
from pitas to lemonade is made fresh, from scratch, daily
$-$$

Pega Grill
15 E. Flagler St., 305-808-6666
From Thanasios Barlos, a Greek native who formerly owned
North Beach's Ariston, this small spot is more casually con-
temporary and less ethnic-kitschy in ambiance, but serves
equally authentic, full-flavored Greek food Mixed lamb/beef
gyros (chicken is also an option), topped with tangy yogurt
sauce and wrapped, with greens and tomatoes, in fat warm












20% OFF

i Traditional

Pizza

Breakfast Lunch Dinner

305-705-2434
17070 West Dixie Hwy
North Miami Beach, FL 33160


pita bread, are specialties But even more irresistible is the
taramasalata (particularly velvety and light carp roe dip),
available alone or on an olive/pita-garnished mixed meze
platter $$

Peoples Bar-B-Que
360 NW 8th St., 305-373-8080
Oak-smoked, falling-off-the-bone tender barbecued ribs
(enhanced with a secret sauce whose recipe goes back
several generations) are the main draw at this Overtown
institution But the chicken is also a winner, plus there's a full
menu of soul food entrees, including what many aficionados
consider our town's tastiest souse And it would be unthink-
able to call it quits without homemade sweet potato pie or
banana pudding, plus a bracing flop half iced tea, half
lemonade $-$$

Perricone's
15 SE 10th St., 305-374-9449
Housed in a Revolutionary-era barn (moved from Vermont),
this market/cafe was one of the Brickell area's first gentrl-
fled amenities At lunch chicken salad is a favorite, dinner's
strong suit is the pasta list, ranging from Grandma Jennie's
old-fashioned lasagna to chichi fiocchi purses filled with
fresh pear and gorgonzola And Sunday's $15 95 brunch
buffet ($9 95 for kids) featuring an omelet station, waffles,
smoked salmon and bagels, salads, and more remains one
of our town's most civilized all-you-can-eat deals $$

Pieducks
1451 S. Miami Ave., 305-808-7888
If you can overlook a name as unenlightening as most in-
jokes (it evidently refers to a favorite character of owner
Claudlo Nunes's kids -- we assume the Pokemon Psyduck),
you'll experience pretty perfect pizza Sadly, not all brick
ovens turn out perfectly char-blistered crusts, crisp outside
and airy/chewy inside, but that's what you'll consistently find
here and a newer take-out/delivery-only Midtown branch And
unlike many artisan pizzerias, Pleducks doesn't get cheesy
with cheese quantity (though we like that extra cheese is an
option) Elaborate salads complete the menu $$

Pier 94
94 SE 1st St., 305-379-5652
Tucked into "The Village," a collection of courtyard eater-
ies far from any waterfront, this ceviche bar specializes in
fresh seafood dishes from chef/owner Alex Del Corral's
native Peru, but also features famous Peruvian meat and
poultry dishes (including a refined aji de gallina, chicken
in aji pepper-spiced cream sauce) Emphasis is particu-
larly strong on Peru's penchant for fusion food, including
traditional Chlfa (Chinese-Peruvian) rice or noodle stir-fries
But the chef also fuses classic and creative influences Try
contemporary causes, combining Peru's favorite starch,
potatoes, with unique new sauces $$

Pollos & Jarras
115 NE 3rd Ave., 786-567-4940
From Juan Chipoco, Peruvian chef/co-owner of seafood-
centric Cvi Che 105, this stylish but affordable two-level
restaurant is centered around polio a la brasa, as a huge
rotisserie oven attests Grilled steaks, unique sandwiches,
anticuchos, and varied starters and sides are also served,
but the must-not-miss is rotisserie chicken, marinated in
roughly a dozen-and-a-half seasonings before a self-basting
spin on the spit cooks it to incomparable juiciness It's served
with crisp fries and a substantial salad Meals also come with
a complimentary cup of aguadito -- assertively cllantro-splked
chicken rice soup $$

Prelude
Adrienne Arsht Center
1300 Biscayne Blvd., 305-949-6722
Though the opening of Barton G s elegant performing arts
center eatery did feature a live giraffe, the food's actually
more grown-up than at his original SoBe spot The concept
is prlx fixe Any three courses on the menu (meaning three
entrees if you want) for $39 Highlights include silky, tarra-
gon-inflected corn/bacon chowder, beautifully plated beef
carpaccio with horseradish/mustard and shallot olive oil dip-
ping sauces, and over-the-top playhouse desserts, one with a
luscious creme fralche ice cream pop $$$$










1:1:1IH E go911: J












305-374-573


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com November 2012


November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com








Dining Guide: RESTAURANTS



Raja's Indian Cuisine
33 NE 2nd Ave., 305-539-9551
Despite its small size and decor best described as none,"
this place is an institution thanks to south Indian specialties
rarely found in Miami's basically north Indian restaurants The
steam-tabled curries are fine (and nicely priced), but be sure
to try the custom-made dosal (lacy rice crepes with a variety
of savory fillings) and uttapam, thicker pancakes, layered with
onions and chills, both served with sambar and chutney $$

The River Oyster Bar
650 S. Miami Ave., 305-530-1915
This casually cool jewel is a full-service seafood spot, as
evidenced by tempting menu selections like soft-shell crabs
with grilled vegetables, corn relish, and remoulade There are
even a few dishes to please meat-and-potatoes diners, like
short ribs with macaroni and cheese But oyster fans will find
it difficult to resist stuffing themselves silly on the unusually
large selection, especially since oysters are served both raw
and cooked fire-roasted with sofrito butter, chorizo, and
manchego There's also a thoughtful wine list and numerous
artisan beers on tap $$$

Rosa Mexicano
900 S. Miami Ave., 786-425-1001
This expansive indoor/outdoor space offers a dining experi-
ence that's haute in everything but price Few entrees top $20
The decor is both date-worthy and family-friendly festive but
not kitschy And nonsophisticates needn't fear, though nachos
aren't available, there is nothing scary about zarape de pato
(roast duck between freshly made, soft corn tortillas, topped
with yellow-and-habanero-pepper cream sauce), or Rosa's
signature guacamole en molcajete, made tableside A few
pomegranate margaritas ensure no worries $$$

Scalina
315 S. Biscayne Blvd., 305-789-9933
Comparisons between this new Tom Billante venture and the
other (slightly pricier) Italian eatery in the same building are
inevitable, especially considering similarities like key personnel
from NYC's II Mulino, Mullno-style abundant free appetizers,
and a power-dining crowd But why focus on competitive non-
sense when you can relax on the river-view terrace enjoying
chef Enrico G iraldo's specialties, including an elaborate take
on Venice's famed fegato (calfs liver and onions), upscaled
with Lucanica sausage and a balsamic reduction Or maybe an
even more evocative Roman ice cream tartufo? Manglal $$$$


sushi rolls are prepared with solid skill and style But most
intriguing are new inventions adding Peruvian fusion flair to
the Asian mix, such as a spicy, tangy tangle of crisp-fried yel-
low noodles with sauteed shrimp plus slivered peppers and
onions -- mod mee krob, with jalea-like tart heat replacing the
cloying sweetness $$

Soya & Pomodoro
120 NE 1st St., 305-381-9511
Life is complicated Food should be simple Thats owner
Armando Alfano's philosophy, which is stated above the entry
to his atmospheric downtown eatery And since its also the
formula for the truest traditional Italian food (Alfano hails from
Pompeii), its fitting that the menu is dominated by authenti-
cally straightforward yet sophisticated Italian entrees There
are salads and sandwiches, too The most enjoyable place to
dine is the secret, open-air courtyard Alfano serves dinner on
Thursday only to accompany local musicians and artists $-$$

Sparky's Roadside Restaurant & Bar
204 NE 1st St., 305-377-2877
This cowboy-cute eatery's chefs/owners (one CIA-trained,
both BBQ fanatics nicknamed Sparky) eschew regional pur-
ism, instead utilizing a hickory/apple-wood-stoked rotisserie
smoker to turn out their personalized style of slow-cooked,
complexly dry-rub fusion ribs, chopped pork, brisket, and
chicken Diners can customize their orders with mix-and-
match housemade sauces sweet/tangy tomato-based,
Carolinas-inspired vinegar/mustard, pan-Asian holsin with
lemongrass and ginger, tropical guava/habanero Authenticity
aside, the quality of the food is as good as much higher-
priced barbecue outfits $-$$

Sushi Maki
1000 S. Miami Ave., 305-415-9779
Fans of the popular parent Sushi Maki in the Gables will find
many familiar favorites on this Brickell branch's menu But
the must-haves are some inventive new dishes introduced to
honor the eatery's tenth anniversary and Miami multicultur-
alism sushi tacos" (fried gyoza skins with fusion fillings like
raw salmon, miso, chill-garlic sauce, and sour cream), three
tasty flash-marinated Asian/Latin tiraditos, addictive rock
shrimp tempura with creamy/spicy dip Also irresistible four
festive new sake cocktails $$-$$$

SuViche
49 SW 11th St., 305-960-7097


This small Japanese-Peruvian place serves food influenced
Soi Asian Bistro by each nation distinctly, plus intriguing fusion items with
134 NE 2nd Ave., 305-523-3643 added Caribbean touches Cooked entrees, all Peruvian,
From the owners of Calle Ocho's hip Mr Yum and 2B Asian include an elegant aji de gallina (walnut-garnished chicken
Bistro, Sol sports similar casual-chic ambiance and eclectic and potatoes in peppery cream sauce) But the emphasis is
Thai/Japanese cuisine Traditional Thai curries and familiar on contemporary ceviches/tiraditos (those with velvety aji


amarillo chill sauce particularly), plus huge exotic sushi rolls,
which get pretty wild When was the last time you encoun-
tered a tempura-battered tuna, avocado, and scallion maki
topped with Peru's traditional potato garnish, huancaina
cheese sauce? $$

Tobacco Road
626 S. Miami Ave., 305-374-1198
Prohibition-era speakeasy (reputedly a fave of Al Capone), gay
bar, strip club Previously all these, this gritty spot has been
best known since 1982 as a venue for live music, primarily
blues But it also offers food from lunchtime to late night (on
weekends till 4 00 a m ) The kitchen is especially known for its
chill, budget-priced steaks, and burgers There's also surpris-
ingly elegant fare, though, like a Norwegian salmon club with
lemon aloli A meat-smoker in back turns out tasty ribs $$

Trapiche Room
1109 Brickell Ave., 305-329-3656
With multiple Marriott hotels in Brickell and downtown, one
of them housing high-profile db Bistro, its not surprising that
this small, second-floor restaurant is something of a best kept
secret" But it deserves discovery Chef Maria Tobar hasn't
Daniel Boulud's fame, but she does have classic European-
type technical skills, combined with contemporary creativity
that turns even ultimately old-fashioned items, like a pork/
cabbage strudel, into 21st century fine-dining fare Both decor
and service, similarly, are swelegant, not stuffy, and the room's
intimacy makes it a romantic spot for special occasions $$$$

Tre Italian Bistro
270 E. Flagler St., 305-373-3303
Bistro" actually sounds too Old World for this cool hangout,
from the owners of downtown old-timer La Loggia, but resto-
lounge" sounds too glitzy Think of it as a neighborhood bis-
trolounge The food is mostly modernized Italian, with Latin
and Asian accents a prosclutto-and-fig pizza with Brazilian
catupiry cheese, gnocchi served either as finger food (fried,
with calamata olive/truffle aloli), or plated with orange-ginger
sauce But there are tomato-sauced meatballs with rigawt for
Grandpa Vinne, too $$-$$$

Truluck's Seafood, Steak, and Crabhouse
777 Brickell Ave., 305-579-0035
Compared to other restaurants with such an upscale power-
lunch/dinner setting, most prices are quite affordable here,
especially if you stick to the Miami Spice-priced date-dinner
menu, or happy hour, when seafood items like crab-cake slid-
ers" are half price Most impressive, though, are seasonal stone
crabs (from Truluck's own fisheries, and way less expensive than
Joe's) and other seafood that, during several visits, never tasted
less than impeccably fresh, plus that greatest of Miami restau-
rant rarities informed and gracious service $$$-$$$$


Tuyo
415 NE 2nd St., 305-237-3200
Atop the revolutionary Miami Culinary Institute, this
upscale eatery, unlike the cafe downstairs, isn't student-
run Rather it's designed to showcase school ideals --
including sustainability as well as definitive Miami cuisine
The changing menu, from a culinary Dream Team headed
by New World Cuisine" nventor/MCI instructor Norman
Van Aken (plus former proteges Jeffrey Brana and Travis
Starwalt), mixes citrus-inflected creamy conch chowder
and other pioneering signatures with new inventions like
mind-reelingly multidimensional oyster pan stew, or tartare
of tuna and burstingly ripe tomato topped with a delicate
sous vide egg $$$$$

Waxy O'Connor's
690 SW 1st Ct., 786-871-7660
While the menu of this casually craic (Gaelic for fun") Irish
pub will be familiar to fans of the South Beach Waxy's, the
location is far superior -- on the Miami River, with waterfront
deck And none of Miami's Irish eateries offers as much
authentic traditional fare Especially evocative imported
oak-smoked Irish salmon with housemade brown bread, puff-
pastry-wrapped Irish sausage rolls, lunchtime's imported Irish
bacon or banger butty" sandwiches on crusty baguettes.
served with hand-cut fries, the latter particularly terrific
dipped in Waxy's curry sauce $$

Wok Town
119 SE 1st Ave., 305-371-9993
Judging from the takeout window, the minimalist decor
(with communal seating), and predominance of American
veggies on the menu, this Asian fast-food eatery, owned by
Shal Ben-Ami (a Miss Yip and Domo Japones veteran) May
initially seem akin to those airport Oriental steam tables
Wrong Custom-cooked by Chinese chefs, starters (like soy/
garlic-coated edamame), salads, and have-it-your-way stir-
fries, fried rice, or noodle bowls burst with bold, fresh flavor
The proof a startlingly savory miso beef salad, with sesame/
ginger/scallion dressing Bubble tea, tool $$

Zuma
270 Biscayne Blvd. Way, 305-577-0277
This Miami River restolounge has a London parent on San
Pellegrino's list of the world's best restaurants, and a similar
menu of world-class, Izakaya-style smallish plates (robata-
grilled items, sushi, much more) meant for sharing over
drinks Suffice to say that it would take maybe a dozen visits
to work your way through the voluminous menu, which offers
ample temptations for vegetarians as well as carnivores
Our favorite is the melt-in-your-mouth pork belly with yuzu/
mustard miso dip, but even the exquisitely-garnished tofu
rocks $$$$


Acme's got Fall: Tuesday-Friday I 7:30am-6:30pm










WE USE ONLY LOCAL LAKE MEADOW NATURALS EGGS, FLORIDA MILK, KING ARTHUR UNBLEACHED UNBROMATED FLOURS-REAL INGREDIENTS, REAL GOOD


MIAMI


November 2012


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com








Dining Guide: RESTAURANTS





Midtown / Wynwood / Design District

3 Chefs Chinese Restaurant
1800 Biscayne Blvd. #105, 305-373-2688
Until this eatery opened in late 2010, the solid Chinese
restaurants in this neighborhood could be counted on the
fingers of no hands So it's not surprising that most people
concentrate on Chinese and Chinese/American fare The real
surprise is the remarkably tasty, budget-priced, Vietnamese
fare Try pho, 12 varieties of full-flavored beef/rice noodle
soup (including our favorite, with well-done flank steak and
flash-cooked eye round) All can be customized with sprouts
and fresh herbs Also impressive Noodle combination plates
with sauteed meats, salad, and spring rolls $$

Adelita's Caf6
2699 Biscayne Blvd., 305-576-1262
From the street (which is actually NE 26th, not Biscayne)
this Honduran restaurant seems unpromising, but inside it's
bigger, better, and busier than it looks Unlike many Latin
American eateries, this one sticks close to the source and
proves a crowd-pleaser On weekends especially, the dining
rooms are packed with families enjoying authentic fare like
baleadas (thick corn tacos), tajadas (Hondurass take on
tostones), rich meal-in-a-bowl soups packed with seafood or
meat and veggies, and more $

Basani's
3221 NE 2nd Ave., 786-925-0911
Despite this tiny place's modern decor, the family-run ambi-
ance and Italian-American comfort food evoke the neigh-
borhood red-sauce joints that were our favored hangouts
growing up in NJ's Sopranos territory And low prices make it
possible to hang out here frequently Pizzas with hand-tossed
crusts, not wood-oven but resembling honest bread, for less
than fast food pizzeria prices? It's an offer you don't refuse
Don't refuse garlic rolls, either, or sinful zeppole (fried dough)
for dessert There's more complex fare, like chicken a la
Francese, too And they deliver $$

Bengal
2010 Biscayne Blvd., 305-403-1976
At this Indian eatery the decor is cool and contemporary
muted gray and earth-tone walls, tasteful burgundy ban-
quettes And the menu touts Modern Indian Cuisine"
to match the look Classicists, however, needn't worry
America's favorite familiar north Indian flavors are here,
though dishes are generally more mildly spiced and present-
ed with modern flair All meats are certified halal, Islam's ver-
sion of kosher which doesn't mean that observant orthodox
Jews can eat here, but Muslims can $$$

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Best Friends
4770 Biscayne Blvd., 786-439-3999
On a restaurant-starved stretch of Biscayne Boulevard, this
spot serves the same sort of simple but satisfying Italian fare
(antipasti, soups, salads, pizzas) as its older sibling, South
Miami's Blu Pizzeria, plus burgers The thin-crust, pliable piz-
zas, though lacking burn blisters, are brick-oven cooked, as
are blues," unusual calzones (like the blu oceano, fatly filled
with mozzarella, prosciutto crudo, arugula, and fresh toma-
toes) Hefty half-pound burgers come similarly stuffed rather
than topped A sheltered patio and full bar make the place a
pleasant neighborhood lounge, too $$

Bin No. 18
1800 Biscayne Blvd., 786-235-7575
At this wine bar/cafe the decor is a stylish mix of contemporary
(high loft ceilings) and Old World (tables made from wine barrels)
Cuisine is similarly geared to the area's smart new residents
creative sandwiches and salads at lunch, tapas and larger inter-
nationally themed Spanish, Italian, or French charcuterie platters
at night Though the place is small and family-run friendly, chef
Alfredo Patino offers sophisticated snacks like the flgciutto aru-
gula, gorgonzola dolce, caramelized onions, pine nuts, fresh figs,
and prosciutto Free parking behind the building $$

Blue Piano
4600 NE 2nd Ave., 305-576-7919
The address suggests a street-corner location, but this casually
cool wine bar/bistro is actually hidden midblock Its well worth
the hunt, thanks to the passionate, very personally hands-
on involvement of its four owners, whose individual areas
of expertise encompass food, wine, and live entertainment,
melding all seamlessly The music is muted, encouraging
conversation, wines are largely small-production gems, sold at
comparatively low mark-ups And the small-plates menu fea-
tures delectably different dishes like the McLuvvin', a meld of
savory Spanish sausage and chicharrones, topped with a quail
egg and chipotle cream -- supremely satisfying $$

Buena Vista Bistro
4582 NE 2nd Ave., 305-456-5909
If a neighborhood eatery like this one which serves
supremely satisfying bistro food were within walking dis-
tance of every Miami resident, we'd be a helluva hip food
town Like true Parisian bistros, its open continuously, every
day, with prices so low that you can drop in anytime for
authentic rlllettes (a rustic pate) with a crusty baguette, steak
with from-scratch frites, salmon atop ratatouille, or many
changing blackboard specials Portions are plentiful So is
free parking $$

Buena Vista Deli
4590 NE 2nd Ave., 305-576-3945
At this casual cafe/bakery, co-owned by Buena Vista Bistro's
Claude Postel, the day starts in authentic French fashion,
with fresh breakfast breads, chocolate almond croissants,
and other delights At lunch cornichon-garnished baguette
sandwiches (containing housemade pates, sinfully rich pork
rlllettes, superb salami, and other charcuterie classics) are
irresistible, and a buttery-crusted, custardy quiche plus per-
fectly dressed salad costs little more than a fast-food combo
meal As for Postel's homemade French sweets, if you grab
the last Parls-Brest, a praline butter-cream-filled puff pastry,
we may have to kill you $-$$

Cafeina
297 NW 23rd St., 305-438-0792
This elegantly comfortable multi-room indoor/outdoor venue is
described as an art gallery/lounge," and some do come just
for cocktails like the hefty cafe con leche martinis But don't
overlook chef Gully Booth's 12-item menu of very tasty tapas
The signature item is a truly jumbo-lump crab cake with no
discernable binder At one South Beach Wine & Food Festival,
Martha Stewart proclaimed it the best she'd ever had Our own
prime pick melt-in-your-mouth ginger sea bass anticuchos, so
buttery-rich we nearly passed out with pleasure $$

Catch Grill & Bar
1633 N. Bayshore Dr., 305-536-6414
A location within easy walking distance of the Arsht Center
for the Performing Arts, in the extensively renovated Marriott
Biscayne Bay, makes this casual-chic eatery, whose specialty


is local and sustainable seafood, a great option for pre-
show bites Then again, enjoying lures like sweet-glazed
crispy shrimp with friends on the outdoor, bayfront terrace
is entertainment enough Its worth calling to ask if the daily
catch is wreckfish, a sustainable local that tastes like a cross
between grouper and sea bass Bonus With validation, valet
parking is free $$$-$$$$

Cerviceria 100 Montaditos
3252 NE 1st Ave. #104, 305-921-4373
Student budget prices, indeed A first-grader's allowance
would cover a meal at this first U S branch of a popular
Spanish chain The 100 mini sandwiches (on crusty, olive
oil-drizzled baguettes) vary from $1to $2 50, depending not
on ingredient quality but complexity A buck scores genuine
Serrano ham, while top-ticket fillings add imported Iberico
cheese, pulled pork, and tomato to the cured-ham slivers
Other options revolve around pates, smoked salmon, shrimp,
and similar elegant stuff There's cheap draft beer, too, plus
nonsandwich snacks $$

City Hall the Restaurant
2004 Biscayne Blvd., 305-764-3130
After 30+ years spent guiding other owners' restaurants
to success, Miami Spice program creator Steve Haas has
opened his own expansive, two-floor place, on a stretch of
Biscayne Boulevard that's suddenly looking fashionable
The vibe is a mix of power-dining destination and comfle
neighborhood hangout, and chef Tom Azar (ex-Emerils) has
designed a varied menu to match Highlights an astonish-
ingly thin/crunchy-crusted pizza topped with duck confit, wild
mushrooms, port wine syrup, and subtly truffled bechamel,
crispy calamari (rings and legs) with light, lemony tomato
emulsion, and tuna tartar that is refreshingly free of sesame
oil Big portions and a full bar to boot $$-$$$$

The Cheese Course
3451 NE 1st Ave., 786-220-6681
Not so much a restaurant as an artisanal cheese shop with
complimentary prepared foods, this place's self-service cafe
component nevertheless became an instant hit Impeccable
ingredients and inspired combinations make even the sim-
plest salads and sandwiches unique -- like bacon and egg,
elevated by hand-crafted cream cheese, roasted red peppers,
avocado, and chipotle Mayo Cheese platters are exceptional,
and customized for flavor preference from mild to bold, and
accompanied by appropriate fruits, veggies, nuts, olives, pre-
pared spreads, and breads $$

Clive's Caf6
2818 N. Miami Ave., 305-576-0277
Some still come for the inexpensive, hearty American break-
fasts and lunches that this homey hole-in-the-wall has served
for more than 30 years Since about 1990, though, when
owner Pearline Murray ( Ms Pearl" to regulars) and cook
Gloria Chin began emphasizing their native Jamaican special-
ties, the intensely spiced grilled jerk chicken has been the
main item here Other favorites savory rice and pigeon peas,
eye-opening onion/vinegar-flavored escovitch fish, sweet
plantains, and cabbage that redefines the vegetable $

Crumb on Parchment
3930 NE 2nd Ave., 305-572-9444
Though located in a difficult spot (the Melin Building's central
atrium, invisible from the street), Michelle Bernstein's bak-
ery/cafe packs em in, partly due to Bernstein's mom Martha,
who makes irresistible old-school cakes German chocolate
with walnuts, lemon curd with buttercream frosting, more
Lunch fare includes inspired sandwiches like seared rare
tuna with spicy Asian pickles and kimchi aioli And for morn-
ing people, the savory chicken sausage, melted cheddar,
kale, and shallot sandwich on challah will convince you that
breakfast is the most important meal of the day $-$$

The Daily Creative Food Co.
2001 Biscayne Blvd., 305-573-4535
While the food formula of this contemporary cafe is familiar -
sandwiches, salads, soups, breakfast food, and pastries, plus
coffee and fruit drinks a creative concept differentiates the
place Signature sandwiches are named after national and
local newspapers, including Biscayne Times, giving diners
something to chat about Sandwiches and salads can also

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be do-it-yourself projects, with an unusually wide choice of
main ingredients, garnishes, breads, and condiments for the
creatively minded $

El Bajareque
278 NW 36th St., 305-576-5170
Dozens of little Latin American eateries, all looking almost
identically iffy, line 36th Street But this family-owned bajar-
eque" (shack) is one where you definitely want to stop for
some of Miami's most tasty, and inexpensive, Puerto Rican
home cooking, from mondongo (an allegedly hangover-curing
soup) to mofongo, a plantain/chicharron mash with varied
toppings plus garlicky mojo Housemade snacks are irresist-
ible, too, and great take-out party fare pork-studded pasteles,
similar to Cuban tamals but with a tuber rather than corn
masa dough, or empanadas with savory shrimp stuffing $

Egg & Dart
4029 N. Miami Ave., 786-431-1022
While co-owners Costa Grillas (from Maria's, a Coral Gables
staple) and Niko Theodorou (whose family members have
several Greek islands restaurants) describe their cuisine
as rustic Greek," there is surprising sophistication in some
dishes an especially delicate taramasalata (cod roe dip),
precisely crisp-fried smelts (like a freshwater sardine), galac-
tobourico, an often heavy and cloyingly vanilla-saturated des-
sert, here custardy and enlivened by orange flavor Extensive
lists of mezze (snacks) and creative cocktails make the
expansive, invitingly decorated space ideal for large gather-
ings of friends who enjoy sharing $$$

Egyptian Pizza Kitchen
Shops at Midtown Miami
Buena Vista Avenue, 305-571-9050
Pizza, pita -- hey, they're both flatbreads So while many pizzas
do indeed, as this halal place's name suggests, have initially
weird-seeming Middle Eastern toppings, its really not surprising
that the Giza (topped with marinated lamb, feta, olives, pep-
pers, and pungently spiced cumin sauce) works at least as well
as Italian classics Additionally the menu includes interesting
Middle Eastern fare like foul, a hummus-like but lighter Egyptian
dish of favas, tahini, garlic, lemon juice, and olive oil A brick
oven makes both pizzas and homemade pitas superior $$

18th Street Caf6
210 NE 18th St., 305-381-8006
Most seating in this cool, pioneering neighborhood cafe is in
a giant bay window, backed with banquettes, that makes the
small space feel expansive -- fitting, since the menu keeps
expanding, too Originally breakfast/lunch only, the cafe,
though closed weekends, now serves dinner till 10 00 p m,
with comfort food entrees like secret-recipe meatloaf joining
old favorites daily-changing homemade soups, varied burg-
ers, layered international salads, inspired sandwiches (like
roast beef and provolone with creamy horseradish) Beer and
wine is available, and now so is delivery $$

The Federal Food, Drink & Provisions
5132 Biscayne Blvd., 305-758-9559
At the Fed, expect what locals know to expect from sommelier/
chef team Aniece Meinhold and Cesar Zapata, whose previous
restaurant concepts have included Blue Piano (gourmet stoner
snacks) and Vietnamese pop-up Phuc Yea That is, expect the
unexpected The Fed is an updated tavern featuring creative,
from-scratch takes on traditional American regional dishes
flaky Southern biscuits with sausage gravy (and crisp-coated
sweetbreads, if desired), Northeastern-inspired pig wings"
(pork drummettes with homemade Buffalo sauce, blue cheese
mousse, and pickled veggies) Desserts, from third partner
Alejandro Ortiz, include sinful sticky buns $$-$$$

Five Guys Famous Burger and Fries
Shops at Midtown Miami
Buena Vista Ave., 305-571-8341
No green-leaf faux health food here You get what the name
says, period, with three adds kosher dogs, veggie burgers,
and free peanuts while you wait Which you will, just a bit,
since burgers are made fresh upon order Available in double
or one-patty sizes, they re well-done but spurtingly juicy, and
after loading with your choice of free garnishes, even a little"
burger makes a major meal Fries (regular or Cajun-spiced)
are also superior, hand-cut in-house from sourced potatoes $


Biscayne Times www.BiscayneTimes.com


November 212