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Title: Largo leader
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00099643/00034
 Material Information
Title: Largo leader
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Tampa Bay Newspapers
Place of Publication: Largo, Florida
Publication Date: November 11, 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00099643
Volume ID: VID00034
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
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        Page A 9
        Page A 10
        Page A 11
        Page A 12
        Page A 13
        Page A 14
        Page A 15
        Page A 16
        Page A 17
        Page A 18
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
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        Page B 10
Full Text







Ironman championship set for Saturday Race to be held in Clearwater for the last time ... Page 4A.


LARGO


Harrison Ford stars in


'Morning Glory' along


with Diane Keaton

Local news producer finally lands dream job
in big city. See opening this week ... Page 3B.


Volume XXXIII, No. 17 www.TBNweekly.com November 11,2010



SA City building study raises eyebrows


COMMUNITY

Veterans Day boat

parade on deck
A field of about 50 boats is expected
when the 14th annual Veterans Boat Pa-
rade sails Saturday, Nov. 13, 11 a.m., on
the Intracoastal Waterway.
The route starts at American Legion
Post 273, 600 American Legion Drive,
goes south under the Tom Stuart Cause-
way bridge to Treasure Island and back.
... Page 9A.
PET CONNECTION

Speaking of Pets
Dr. Michael Ru-
more, DVM, dispels
myths about pets
passing diseases to
their owners.
... Page 11A.


COUNTY

Agencies merged
Pinellas County Commissioners gave
unanimous support Oct. 26 to a plan
to merge the Pinellas Planning Council
and the Metropolitan Planning Agency
into a new consolidated board.
... Page 6A.
BUSINESS

Brewery continues

to tap into success
Those who visit Dunedin Brewery will
find a number of fresh local beer offerings
on tap year-round, including such names
as Piper's Pale Ale, Redhead Red Ale,
Apricot Wheat Ale, Lowland Wheat Ale,
Razzbery Wheat Ale and Celtic God Ale.
... Page 10A.


VIEWPOINTS

Bob McClure
Former baseball
manager Sparky An-
derson was one of the
sport's finest ambassa-
dors.
... Page 16A.


Business ................. 10, 12A
Classifieds ................ 6-9B
Community ................... 9A
County ................... 5-8A
Entertainment ............. 1, 3-5B
Just for fun ................... 2B
Pet connection ................ 11A
Police beat ....................5A
Sports ...................... 14A
Viewpoints ................ 15-16A
Call 397-5563
For News & Advertising


By TOM GERMOND
LARGO A building study of Largo's Police Depart-
ment and City Hall recommends an estimated $10 mil-
lion in renovations for long-range planning purposes.
The total project renovation cost for City Hall was
pegged at $7.8 million; construction of a new building
was estimated at $11.8 million. The total renovation proj-
ect cost for the Police Department building is $2.1 mil-
lion.
"There were two parts of this study part of it was
about energy efficiency and part of it was about fixing the
roof," Mayor Pat Gerard said. "I didn't think it was about
totally rehabing the building, but apparently it is."
Though it appears that City Hall is meeting the current


space needs requirements of its departments housed
within the building, the study said, significant work is
needed to bring the building into conformance with cur-
rent Florida building code requirements for wind-load re-
sistance and minimum energy efficiency standards.
Because of the age of City Hall and the "fact that it was
built as not a government 50-year long-term facility, but
as a speculative office building, basically it just wasn't
built to the kind of standards that we would build a gov-
ernment complex to today," said Paul Portal, principal ar-
chitect for Long Associates Architects/Engineers Inc., at
the commission's Nov. 9 work session. City Hall was built
in 1972.
"The existing roof is well past its service life," Portal
said. "There's ongoing water intrusion problems."


Air-conditioning, heating and venting equipment need
to be replaced along with insulation, the study said.
The Police Department building was constructed in
1975 and appears to be meeting space needs of the de-
partment, but it also has roofing and insulation problems
and water intrusion.
The building has some structural deficiencies but not
as difficult to deal with as City Hall, Portal said.
City officials said the maximum level of work they
could do without having to meet the wind requirements is
to put the same type of roof on City Hall that exists now.
That would last for about five to seven years.


See STUDY, page 4A


Club helps members


experience the world


By ALEXANDRA CALDWELL

CLEARWATER- Pinellas residents cu-
rious about and fascinated by other cul-
tures share and experience these
interests through the Friendship Force
Florida Suncoast club. Part of Friendship
Force International, there are 360 chap-
ters in more than 60 countries on six
continents, and the clubs host each
other on exchange trips.
The Suncoast chapter was established
in 1988 and primarily draws members
from the Clearwater, Seminole and Largo
areas, though its 120 members range
from St. Petersburg to Spring Hill, said
Sandy Gourdine of Clearwater, president
of the Suncoast chapter. The club gener-
ally takes two outbound travel exchanges
and accepts two incoming exchanges
each year, Gourdine said.
Each year by Nov. 1, each club sub-
mits to headquarters in Atlanta their top
three areas that they would like to visit
and how many weeks they are willing to
host. This year the Suncoast club said
that for travel year 2012 it would like to
visit Sweden, Morocco or Egypt and that
it would be willing to host for two sepa-
rate weeks. In January, clubs around
the world learn which trips they have


Friendship Force
International was
established in 1977
with help from Jimmy
and Rosalyn Carter,
with the mission of
overcoming barriers
that typically separate
people, believing that
friendship can foster
world peace.

been chosen for, she said.
"We (also) said is we would receive
(people) from anywhere, but we would
especially like to receive people coming
in from developing countries," Gourdine
said. "It is always great to host people
from those clubs, especially who are on
their first visit to the United States be-
cause you can share with them so
much, and it's so exciting to share your
culture with them."
Friendship Force International was es-
tablished in 1977 with help from Jimmy


Photo courtesy of SANDY GOURDINE
Members of the Friendship Force Florida Suncoast club pose for a picture in Cape
Town, South Africa, in March 2010.


and Rosalyn Carter, with the mission of
overcoming barriers that typically sepa-
rate people, believing that friendship can
foster world peace.
"It was the height of the Cold War, and
Friendship Force really took a leadership
role in arranging exchanges between
people in the Soviet Union and people in
America," Gourdine said. "I mean we're
talking about thousands and thousands


of citizens who became friends as a re-
sult of that. And those initiatives were so
successful that actually the organization
was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize in
1992."
In modem trips, there are not neces-
sarily direct exchanges where the same
two clubs visit each other, although
See CLUB, page 4A


Largo officials hope to acquire land for fire station


By TOM GERMOND

LARGO City commissioners Nov. 3 said they will
continue to pursue the acquisition of a 1.5-acre par-
cel off Indian Rocks Road that would be used for a fire
station that would replace a station in Belleair Bluffs
and one in the Ridgecrest area.
Based on response times, city officials ranked the
property, located at Indian Rocks Road and Georgiana
Street, as their top choice for building a new station.
The property is owned by Hospital Corporation of
America and is just north of Largo Medical Center, In-
dian Rocks Road campus.
City officials said that the parcel is the only one of


five proposed sites that allows response time to the
northern edge of their fire district, including Belleair
Bluffs and Belleair, within 7.5 minutes. It also main-
tains appropriate response times along the southern
boundary of the fire district, Walsingham Road.
City officials said the drawback to acquiring the
property, at $495,000, is a deed restriction limiting
the use of the property to a fire station and related
public safety uses. The concern is that the restriction
may make marketing and sale of the property diffi-
cult.
Commissioner Curtis Holmes, noting that HCA's
property "has copious strings on it," asked whether
other land was available than the five locations pre-


sented to the commission.
Assistant City Manager Michael Staffopoulous said
the city would have to look at "smaller parcels and
multiple parcels" if the commission didn't want to ac-
cept the options presented.
Holmes asked Largo Fire Chief Michael Wallace if
the HCA property was satisfactory to him as far as
providing service is concerned.
Wallace said the restrictions were outside of his
purview; whether they were acceptable was a policy
decision for the commission.
'The property itself- all things being equal it's a
See STATION, page 4A


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Cougars maul Packers


Photos by JIM LAYHIlLU
Above, Largo freshman quarterback Jarvis Stewart has a helmet to helmet collision with Countryside's
Alex Dixon Nov. 5 at Largo. Countryside completed its first undefeated season, defeating Largo 38-
14. At right, Largo wide receiver Raheem Harvey draws double coverage from Countryside's Cody
Chmelik (13) and Denzel Thompson.









2A Largo

Briefs

Cafe renovation plans approved
LARGO City commissioners Nov. 3 approved plans for the renova-
tion of the Largo Library Cafe, which is expected to open Dec. 1.
The new configuration is designed to update the look of the cafe,
provide a more efficient preparation area for the cafe staff and improve
customers' experience with ordering and buying food, according to li-
brary director Casey McPhee.
"Something that is new and kind of great about the new design is
that there is an ability to use trays and a railing system," he said.
The new vendor is the owner of R.G.'s Restaurant Inc., which is lo-
cated in LaBelle Plaza on Highland Avenue. R.G.'s is paying for the
renovation of the space.

City awards contract for recreation center
LARGO City commissioners Nov. 3 approved a construction man-
agement contract with Creative Contractors of Clearwater to perform
design work for the new Highland Recreation Center.
Creative Contractors is building the new Largo Community Center,
which should be finished in the next few weeks.
City officials said the quality of the work has been excellent and the
firm has been cooperative and professional in all their dealings with
city officials and the designers.
Commissioners approved a fee of $65,000 for the design phase of
the building. After the design is completed, city officials will negotiate
the price and scope of work for the project with the firm.
The city received 19 responses to the request for proposals and in-
terviewed five firms.
The replacement of the Highland Recreation Center is expected to
cost about $13 million.
Tom Germond


Correction
An article in the Oct. 28 edition incorrectly said that Atocha
sank in a 1662 hurricane. The ship sank in 1622.


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Leader, November 11, 2010


Volunteers praise Cultural Center


By TOM GERMOND


LARGO The Largo Cultural Center re-
ceived accolades from volunteers Nov. 3 who
were upset over recent criticism that it has
drawn in recent weeks.
At issue has been the subsidies that the
center receives from city coffers and ques-
tions over the handling of funds at the Cul-
tural Center's concession area. Meanwhile,
city officials and the Suncoast Performing
Arts Foundation are conducting a survey to
determine the usage of the center and its eco-
nomic value.
Commissioner Curtis Holmes has been
critical about subsidies to the Cultural Cen-
ter, saying in September that if it and the golf
course don't show substantial improvements
in their financial health by next year that he
would strive to make neither of them receive
any further subsidies. He had also asked for
copies of wholesale invoices for beverages
that were purchased for the Cultural Center.
Longtime Cultural Center volunteer Betty
Laing said Nov. 3 that she was responsible
for interviewing new volunteers and doing
other work after a volunteer coordinator's po-
sition was cut from the budget last year.
"Our volunteers are tired of hearing nega-
tive news about concessions," she said. 'The
volunteers are above reproach. We have a
good reputation, and we will keep it that
way."
The Cultural Center has a database of
more than 24,000 patrons she said.
"And your name, Mr. Holmes is not among
them," she said. "Let's promote the outstand-
ing facility we have and make it more suc-
cessful instead of constantly criticizing it,"
she said.
Later in the meeting, Holmes said if people
have a problem with what newspapers write,


"There are positive things
happening at the Cultural
Center. I've never heard
anybody leave the Cultural
Center and say 'that's a
lousy show; I didn't enjoy
it."

- William Ballantine

they should take it up with the papers.
'They are the ones who are printing this
stuff," he said.
As far as people wanting to criticize his cul-
tural activities, he said, "that's totally your
business, but culture is in the eyes of the be-
holder."
William Ballantine of Largo said he has vol
unteered at the Cultural Center for seven
years. He also questioned why the center re-
ceives so much negative publicity.
'There are positive things happening at the
Cultural Center. I've never heard anybody
leave the Cultural Center and say 'that's a
lousy show; I didn't enjoy it,"' he said.
If there is something wrong with the book-
keeping, he said, somebody should check
into it.
"We have accountants. Let them handle it,"
he said.
He said there are 250 volunteers at the
Cultural Center, and they are happy.
"It's worth its weight in gold," he said, "and
we are one of the few that have it."
Irene Cook said volunteering at the Cultur-
al Center is a rewarding experience.


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'To see the shows like 'Singing in the Rain,'
... and 'Big River,' which is coming out and
many other shows ... but my greatest joy is
being a part of greeting the children who at-
tend the children's theater," she said.
She called it an asset to the city.
"It is a known fact that the very people who
oppose and criticize the center have never
participated nor have they even entered into
the theater," Cook said.
Dolores Ruskin said the children's pro-
grams are a joy to her. At a time when tech-
nology is changing, she said, children need to
have the exposure of live performances "so
that they realize there is something more in
life than just a flat screen. Their tastes need
to be culturally developed."
The Cultural Center will always be subsi-
dized, she said.
"It is worth it," she said.
Both Mayor Pat Gerard and Commissioner
Gigi Arntzen commended the Cultural Center
volunteers for their efforts.
"We couldn't do it without them," she said.
Most city commissioners have said they
don't have a problem subsidizing the Cultural
Center, saying that a 70 percent recovery rate
is good compared to similar venues across
the country. For the current fiscal year, the
center was earmarked to receive $335,000
from the city's general fund. The proposed
budget for this year said that fees are expect-
ed to generate $754,000.
City officials also have received e-mail in
support of Holmes' feelings about the Cultur-
al Center. Some critics have said the building
is not being used to its fullest potential.
The Cultural Center is a 24,000-square-
foot building that houses the Tonne Play-
house, a 333-seat theater. The facility also
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Leader, November 11, 2010

Around

Largo
Cily events

Veterans Day ceremony, Thursday, Nov. 11, 7 until 9 p.m., Largo
Central Park.
Description: "Join the city of Largo as we celebrate our Veterans
Day with an intimate ceremony in Largo Central Park at the Military
Court of Honor. We will have special music, a keynote speaker and
color guard presentation."
Call587-6740, ext. 5014.
Sunset Sounds, Friday, Nov. 12, 7 to 9 p.m., Ulmer Park, 301
West Bay Drive.
Description: 'This free music series will showcase The McMillans.
Dine at a nearby restaurant or bring a picnic supper. Sprawl out on
your favorite comfy blanket and spend some time with your family
and friends as you unwind from the week and set the tone for a great
weekend."
Call 587-6740, ext. 5014.
An Evening with David Pack/The Voice of Ambrosia, Friday,
Nov. 19, 8 p.m., Largo Cultural Center.
Description: "David Pack was the co-founder, guitarist and main
vocalist for the band Ambrosia. In addition to being a Grammy
Award winning singer, David is a Grammy winning record producer.
His collected works as a performer and producer have sold over 40
million records worldwide. Noted hits from the band Ambrosia that
were written and sung by Pack include 'Biggest Part of Me,' 'How
Much I Feel,' 'You're the Only Woman,' 'Holdin' on to Yesterday' and
many more.
Visit LargoArts.com for more information.
Call 587-6793.
2010 Bay Area's Best Magician Competition, Saturday, Nov. 20,
8 p.m., Largo Cultural Center.
Description: "Who is the best magician in Florida? The Tampa Bay
Magic Club hosts their annual Magic Competition, featuring the best
magicians from Florida and around the United States competing for
cash and prizes. See the stars of magic before they disappear to the
big time!"
Visit LargoArts.com for more information.
Call 587-6793.
George Harrison's "All Things Must Pass," Saturday, Nov. 27, 8
p.m., Largo Cultural Center.
Description: "Join us while several Tampa Bay area bands perform
George Harrison songs and The Ditchflowers and Friends perform
four sides of the classic album 'All Things Must Pass."'
Call 587-6793.


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4A


City's Ironman world


By ALEXANDRA CALDWELL

CLEARWATER Top athletes from around the
world will compete on Saturday, Nov. 13 for the last
time in the Foster Grant Ironman World Champi-
onship 70.3 in Clearwater. It has been in Clearwater
for five years, and next year the race will move to Las
Vegas.
Athletes will start out at 6:45 a.m. at Pier 60 on
Clearwater Beach and swim 1.2 miles in the Gulf of
Mexico, then they will bike 56 miles throughout
Pinellas County, and they will finish with a 13.1-mile
run in downtown Clearwater. More than 1,500 ath-
letes ranging from age 18 to more than 70 years old
are expected to compete in the triathlon, said Jessica
Weidensall, director of media and public relations for
the championship.
Competitors had to score top marks at any of the
nearly 50 qualifying events throughout the world this
past year to qualify for this race, she said. There is no
qualifying time to make it to the world championship,
Weidensall said. Most often, it comes down to place-
ment in specific age groups, she said.
"If I'm racing and I come in first in my age group
(in a qualifying event,) then I know that I'm going to
qualify for the world championship," Weidensall said.
"I could potentially come in second or third and also
qualify because there are a certain number of slots
granted in the various age groups, and it's done on
different age groups' size and demand. And there's
also a component called roll-down. Immediately fol-
lowing a qualifying event, you have to claim your at


chan


the world championship. So if you're unable to claim
your or if you don't want your slot, then it rolls down
to the next person in that age group."
Also, the two winners of the previous year's world
championship automatically qualify for the current
year's championship.
It takes athletes about four hours to complete the
70.3-mile course, Weidensall said, but given the wide
age range, times vary, going all the way up to 7.5
hours. The race is spectator friendly with areas to
watch at all legs of the course, plus the finish lines.
'There's such a sense of accomplishment at our
finish lines, and there's such a joy and raw emotion
that's showcased at each of our finish lines, so it's re-
ally empowering and inspirational to come see that,"
Weidensall said.
Whether or not people are triathletes or even ath-
letes, people come away with a sense of inspiration
by seeing other people accomplish their goals and
dreams, and that feeling can be applied to other
areas of one's life, Weidensall said. She encourages
people to come out to the event while it is still in the
Tampa Bay area.
'We're moving to Las Vegas, and we're putting a
new event in a new series that we just launched in its
place," Weidensall said. 'We're moving the event be-
cause at the 70.3 distance, having the world's best
athletes here, the cycling course, being that it's so
flat, it's not the best for the 70.3 distance. But we
have really enjoyed being in Clearwater and our part-
nership with the city and all the different entities in
the area is strong, so we wanted to make sure we still
kept an event here, so we're introducing a 51.5 event,


ipionship set
which is going to close the 51.5 series."
The new event is expected to bring in about 2,000
athletes, and it is neither a world championship nor
qualification based, so there is a lot of growth oppor-
tunity to reach more athletes than the current race,
Weidensall said.
'We're grateful to he city of Clearwater for being a
fantastic host to the Ironman World Championship
70.3 over the past five years," said Steve Meckfessel,
World Triathlon Corporation's chief operations officer
in a press release. "Clearwater's sports-minded spirit,
enthusiasm and dedication of resources have been
critical to building the Ironman 70.3 Series."

If you go
Spectator viewing
There will be an IronmanLive broadcast 6:15 a.m.
to 3 p.m. shown on the Jumbotron at Pier 60 behind
the finish line. People also can see the swim start
from 6:45 a.m. to 8 a.m. on Clearwater Beach just
south of Pier 60. The swim finish is 7:05 a.m. to 9:05
a.m. when the athletes exit the water, change into
their cycling gear and head out to Causeway Boule-
vard.
From 9:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m. is the run start. The
NBC helicopter and Ford Pace Vehicle will bring the
leaders in from the bike course, and age-group ath-
letes will follow over the next few hours. From 9:50
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. is the run turnaround, where ath-
letes will begin their second lap at the turnaround
near Pier 60. Finally, between 10:25 a.m. and 3 p.m.
the athletes will cross the finish line at Pier 60, and
the winner will be crowned.


Leader, November 11, 2010


for Nov. 13
Race day parking and shuttle service
Parking at Pier 60 is limited, so on race day, shut-
tie buses will be available from the following parking
venues:
Sand Key Park
Municipal Services Garage at the comer of S.
East Avenue and Pierce Street
Garden Avenue Garage at the comer of Garden
Avenue and Cleveland Street
Courthouse lot at the comer of Court Street and
Oak Avenue
Oak Avenue lot at the comer of Chestnut Street
and Oak Avenue
County Parking Garage at the comer of Court
Street and South Osceola Avenue
Fort Harrison lot at the comer of Chestnut Street
and Fort Harrison Avenue
Court Street lot at the comer of Court Street and
South Osceola Avenue
Shuttle buses will begin running from these park-
ing sites to Pier 60 beginning at 4 a.m. and will oper-
ate until 6 p.m. Race participants get priority seating
on all buses.
Other information
People can track their favorite athlete's progress at
ironman.com or by stopping by Athlete Tracking at
the race information tent at Pier 60.
Race cutoff times are 9 a.m. for the swim, noon for
the biking, and 3 p.m. for the run.
For detailed information on road closures, call the
hotline at 662-INFO.
For more information about the race, visit iron-
man.com.


CLUB, from page 1A


sometimes two clubs from different cities will team
up to take the same trip together. The first week or
so are home stays at members of the host club's
homes, said Gladys Evan of Seminole, treasurer for
this year's Turkey trip for the Suncoast club. After
the initial week, often the traveling club will have
planned an extension trip to another nearby loca-
tion since they have already traveled so far. Not
only is this a much more affordable way to travel,
starting off with home stays, it allows for an extra
opportunity to travel as a post-trip, said Ann Scott
of Clearwater. For instance, after the group's up-
coming trip to Turkey. The group agreed that the
home stays make the trips much more personal
and they learn so much more about the culture
than they would if they were typical tourists.
"Cities and places in the world are no longer dots
on a map once you've been there and made friends
and stayed with families," Gourdine said. "You
tend to stay in touch, and what happens in those
communities suddenly takes on a greater signifi-
cance."
John Hayner of Clearwater, exchange director
for the club's Turkey trip, agreed.
"Case in point, I was on a New Zealand exchange
last fall with a Sacramento club, but when the
earthquake hit in the south island, we immediately
e-mailed our host families to inquire about damage
and making an assessment or let us know, is any-
one hurt? Did anyone suffer losses? And so on,
and it was a beautiful thing," Hayner said. 'They
were overwhelmed with our inquiries."
Ed Evan of Seminole Gladys's husband said
that often the contacts and friendships continue
even beyond the exchanges. The Evans hosted a
group from Hamburg, Germany, one time, and
they are still friends and travel together when pos-
sible, Ed and Gladys said.
As exciting as it is to travel to see other coun-
tries and cultures for themselves, the group equal-
ly enjoys hosting people and learning about other
cultures that way. A group from Ghana visited in
2004 and brought their ceremonial tribal cos-
tumes and put on a show for the Americans to
share their culture with their new friends, Gladys
said. The Evans' guests brought them gifts of a
woman's afghan and necklace and a man's shirt
that represented their culture, she said. Another
host family during that exchange was invited to
Ghana when her former guest got married, said
Jean Choong of Palm Harbor, exchange coordina-
tor and webmaster for the club.


Gourdine recently hosted a teacher from Japan
as part of the Clearwater Sister City Program, and
she was able to meet and talk with his family back
home through a Skype video call. She said that
since it was around Halloween, the Americans had
fun showing them masks and other Halloween tra-
ditions as well as discussing the differences and
similarities between the two cultures. Even though
she has traveled to Japan before, she said she
learned so much more about Japan just through
that hosting experience.
Hosts always enjoy seeing the little and unex-
pected things that visitors want to do and see. For
instance, when a group of Russians visited in
2006, the group agreed that one of their favorite
activities was going to Walmart. They could spend
hours there, Ed said. Gladys added that they had
lists from their friends of things to buy at Wal-
mart, and one man who stayed with them had a
request from his wife to buy certain kinds of vita-
mins. Gladys therefore spent two hours helping
her guest read labels and pick out just the right
kinds of vitamins. Choong said when she brought
her group of Russians to Walmart, one of the
workers at the store was Russian and overheard
them talking, so she came over and personally
helped the group pick out items and found them
the best bargains.
Gladys said that people can learn about cultural
differences by the different ways people handle sit-
uations. For instance, her Russian guest wanted
to buy his wife a bathing suit but didn't know
what size she wears.
"I said, you're going to have to call her and ask
her measurements or something because I've
never seen her and I can't guess," Gladys said.
"But he wasn't going to do that because in his
mind, that's very expensive, even though it isn't
for us. I said, okay, is she as tall as me or is she
shorter? Is she wider? I don't know."
She eventually learned that the wife was about
her height, and Gladys measured herself and held
it up to the man and asked how he thought his
wife compared approximately in measurements.
They went to every beach shop on Gulf Boulevard,
and after he saw the options, he decided he want-
ed one with leopard print.
"We finally found one on Treasure Island, and I
hope the poor soul could get into it," Gladys said.
"And so what did we learn about him? He's very
respected in his society, which has certain param-
eters in his society. He's chauffeured (because he
always sat in the back in the car.) And he has cer-
tain things, like, I'm not going to call my wife even


Photo courtesy of SANDY GOURDINE
Members of the Friendship Force Florida Suncoast club are joined by members of the Friendship Force
Sydney Australia club. The Suncoast club greeted the Australian visitors to Pinellas County.


though she wants one, I'm not going to ask her."
Sometimes Friendship Force groups travel for a
specific purpose or cause. One such case is when
the Suncoast club traveled to Cape Town, South
Africa, in March of 2010. The group brought
school supplies and nine laptop computers to a
poor school in South Africa, Choong said.
"It actually started something off because they
didn't really have any special computer room,"
Choong said. "This is a very, very basic school,
and the local education authority has now helped
by providing some mobile classes so one of the old,
original, concrete, strong classrooms can be used
as a computer lab."
Now the Friendship Force group in Cape Town
has taken on the responsibility of fundraising for
that school to keep providing it with needed mate-
rials, Gourdine said.
The group also works with the Clearwater Sister
City Program and with exchange students at Eck-


erd College. It also hosts and participates in cul-
tural events throughout Tampa Bay.
The club always welcomes new members,
which, for the first year, is $35 for individuals and
$55 for families. To join, contact Geri Espy at 595-
0463 or e-mail gerisails@hotmail.com. For infor-
mation, visit
www.friendshipforcefloridasuncoast.org. There is
still one spot left for the Turkey trip, and the pub-
lic is invited to fill that spot.
People interested in the club is invited to attend
its event, New Cultural Experiences on Saturday,
Nov. 20, 2:30 p.m., at Freedom Square Auditori-
um, 7800 Liberty Lane, Seminole. There will be
speakers who will explain the club's new partner-
ship with Eckerd College's International Student
Program, SPIFFS, and Clearwater Sister Cities.
"(Friendship Force is about) changing the way
you see the world," Scott said. "... It will add a new
dimension to your life."


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STUDY, from page 1A


Commissioner Curtis Holmes said "I don't know
about spending $12 million or $14 million fixing these
two buildings up."
If a Category 4 storm came through the area and
leveled the buildings he preferred that "we eat the de-
ductible on the wind storm and just rebuild the thing.
The kind of money you are talking about here, we are
building a whole community center over there for less
money than this," Holmes said.
"You get to the point of diminishing returns. Do you
really want to spend this kind of money on a 40-year-
old building," he said.
Gerard agreed, saying that the city could put mil-
lions of dollars into the building knowing that there
was a lot more work that needs to be done.
Commissioners plan to study information to deter-
mine what work should be done soon and what can
wait for several years from now. They will discuss the
report in another work session.
Long and Associates evaluated the facilities based


STATION, from page 1A

great location," he said.
By consolidating the Ridgecrest and Belleair
Bluffs stations, the city expects to reduce person-
nel in the stations by half. City officials said they
expect the savings to be $500,000 to $1 million an-
nually. The new station is expected to last 35
years.
City Attorney Alan Zimmet said he had concerns
about the property acquisition because it is "much
different than from any other real estate purchase
contract you have agreed to."
He said the city will be "extremely restricted in
not only the use of the property but also your abili-
ty to resell the property."
"I would advise you if you make a decision to
proceed, you will own this property for at least 50
years," he said. "And if the fire station ever goes
away for whatever reason, there is no use for the
property. It will sit there and just be something the
city will have to maintain," Zimmet said.
He added that he realized city officials have
worked hard in negotiations with HCA and agreed
that "this is probably the best we are going to do."
Staffopoulous said HCA wouldn't want the city
to use the property in a manner that would com-
pete with the hospital, such as an employee medi-
cal clinic. He said he didn't think HCA would have
a problem including that into a deed restriction.
Other sites were determined to be unfeasible.
The number two ranked site, the Serenity Gardens
property on Wilcox Road, is being reserved for fu-
ture private development that will complement the
cemetery and mausoleum operations already in


on direct observation by design professionals and a
review of existing drawings and utility bills. The com-
pany conducted interviews with city staff to identify
known deficiencies in energy use and prepared draw-
ings and three-dimensional building information
models.
City Hall is 59,294 square feet; the police depart-
ment building is 42,534 square feet.
In other matters, commissioners heard a presenta-
tion on economic development marketing efforts.
Economic Development Manager Teresa Brydon
said one of the critical tasks the department has un-
dertaken is creating Web pages.
"Web pages are a great way for businesses, reloca-
tion of people, any of those types of individuals who
are looking at either expansion and or relocation into
a market they do it quietly. That's how they like to
proceed with looking and analyzing where they want
to go, how they want to grow their businesses," Bry-
don said.
City commissioners also agreed to name Commis-
sioner Robert Murray vice mayor for the next year.


use on the property.
Wallace added that the status quo of the two
stations is working but "this is a matter of how can
I be more efficient with the system."
Commissioner Robert Murray asked how the
station would fit into a consolidation process in-
volving other governments.
"Actually, it would be able to provide service to a
larger area than it currently is planned to serve.
Because it is on a main thoroughfare, Indian Rocks
Road, it would be able to go south all the way past
Walsingham and within five and a half, six min-
utes, be able to serve an area currently served by
another smaller fire department, Pinellas Suncoast
Fire District."
The city would also serve the area north to
Clearwater and able to serve areas west of the Bel-
leair Beach Causeway Bridge, Wallace said.
Wallace also was asked if the city had looked
into expanding the Belleair Bluffs station so it
could be put to better use.
"We have not looked into it," he said. 'That is an
old gas station. As far as I know, it never had the
gas tanks pulled from the ground."
He said Belleair Bluffs officials have said they
would be willing to work with city officials to build
a station.
"But that would require the cost of building the
building and continually staffing that building. We
don't gain any savings from keeping two fire sta-
tions open," Wallace said.
City commissioners directed their staff to see if
HCA would be willing to allow the city to have
green space on the property if the fire station were
closed.









County 5A


Leader, November 11, 2010


Police beat


Man charged with
attempted murder
LARGO A Clearwater man was booked into Pinellas County Jail
Nov. 7 for attempted murder and other charges
after he allegedly fired shots from a handgun at
some motorists.
Largo police said that Adrian Stubbs, 24, a con-
victed felon, arrived to work sick and was sent
home.
He was hanging around a Kentucky Fried
Chicken parking lot and engaged in conversation
with the victims of this incident. Stubbs was
showing an interest in a handgun that the victims
had in their vehicle. Stubbs became aggressive,
asking to hold the victim's gun, but was refused Adrian Stubbs
permission, reports said.
The victims secured the gun in the center console and began to
back out of a parking space when Stubbs lunged into the car, took the
.40 caliber semi-automatic and fled on foot. The victims called 911 and
kept an eye on Stubbs, reporting his location. The victims' pursuit
ended when they cornered Stubbs, who leveled the handgun at them.
The victims made a quick U-turn at which time Stubbs fired at them,
striking the top of their trunk lid deflecting the round into the trunk.
Officers arrived and Stubbs fled from them in the area of Royal
Palms and East Bay Drive. A perimeter was set and a Sheriffs Office
K-9 and helicopter assisted. When Stubbs was eventually located, he
no longer had the handgun, but a .40 caliber round was found in his
pants pocket.
Stubbs was arrested and charged with being a felon in possession of
a firearm, felon in possession of ammunition, armed burglary and at-
tempted murder. Bond was set at $160,150.


Student arrested
for computer fraud
LARGO A Largo teen was arrested for computer fraud after al-
legedly accessing the Pinellas County School District's computer server
and changing students' grades.
Pinellas County Sheriffs Office and School Resource Unit deputies
arrested Brennen Browder, 17, Nov. 4 in his Largo apartment.
According to deputies, since about Oct. 19, Browder had been con-
tinuously accessing the Pinellas County School District's computer
server via NOVA NET under the identity of David Cross, a Bayside
High School teacher. Bayside High School is located in Clearwater.
Browder had reportedly logged into the system using his laptop com-
puter at his home.
Browder repeatedly changed possible grades, and granted himself
and three other students, approval of class modules, which they had
not taken, a sheriffs office report said. Browder was able to get the
teacher's username and password by observing the teacher typing this
information into the Nova Net System.
The crime was discovered when a teacher at the school was denied
access to the system because of a password change. An investigation
into how that occurred eventually revealed Browder had been access-
ing the system and making changes.
Deputies interviewed Browder who allegedly admitted to the crime.
He was arrested for one count of computer fraud and taken to the
Pinellas Juvenile Assessment Center.
The investigation continues.

Police arrest three men on drug charges
LARGO Police have arrested three men on drug charges as part of
an investigation into the sale of marijuana and crack cocaine at Water-


chase Apartments, 401 Rosery Road, Unit 819.
Over several months, police received multiple tips in reference to the
sale of drugs at the apartment unit. A search warrant was obtained at
about 11:30 p.m. Nov. 8. All three suspects were booked into the Pinel-
las County Jail.
Edward Hobson, 23, of Largo was charged with possession of crack
cocaine, possession of marijuana, possession of paraphernalia and vio-
lation of probation/parole. Bond was set at $15,500.
Kevin Currington, 18, of Largo was charged with sale of marijuana,
possession of marijuana, possession of marijuana with intent to dis-
tribute, possession of crack cocaine, unlawful use of a two-way com-
munication device, possession of paraphernalia and possession of
cocaine. Bond was set at $45,500.
Paul Morelli, 18, of Largo was charged with sale of marijuana and vi-
olation of parole/probation. Bond was set at $150.
Police seized crack, marijuana and a firearm.

Body found in
Seminole area lake
SEMINOLE The body of a 53-year-old man was retrieved Nov. 4
from a small lake east of the Seminole Gardens Apartment complex.
According to a sheriffs report, the man was identified as Ricky D.
Stottler whose last known address was 10415 Valencia Road, Semi-
nole.
The body was recovered on the east side of the lake, identified as
Sunrise Lake, closest to 10991 Oakdale Terrace in Seminole.
Detectives said the body was removed from the lake by responding
fire rescue personnel and apartment complex employees.
The cause and manner of death was to be determined by an autop-
sy. Detectives said there were no signs of foul play.


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6A County


Leader, November 11, 2010


County focuses attention on transportation needs


By SUZETTE PORTER
CLEARWATER Pinellas County Commissioners gave unani-
mous support Oct. 26 to a plan to merge the Pinellas Planning
Council and the Metropolitan Planning Agency into a new consoli-
dated board.
The commissioners also approved an ordinance amending the fu-
ture land use and quality communities element of the comprehen-
sive plan to provide for transit-oriented development. While sitting
as the Countywide Planning Authority, they approved a countywide
plan amendment regarding a transit-oriented development map
category.
For the past six months, a joint land use and transportation
committee, chaired by Commission Chair Karen Seel, has met to
study the potential for consolidating transportation and future land
use planning at the countywide level.
The committee "recommended that the MPO and PPC functions
be more closely aligned on transportation and land use issues to
create a more streamlined and integrated process, which should
identify and eliminate any redundancies, disconnects or inefficien-
cies in the current system," according to a resolution the committee
is asking municipalities, county commissioners and the county's
legislative delegation to support.
The committee further recommended that the process include a
new countywide future land use plan, "which establishes a broad,
forward-looking land use planning framework, incorporates and
guide multimodal transportation planning and allows sufficient
flexibility to accommodate the redevelopment needs of Pinellas
County."
According to a report from the committee to the county commis-
sioners, "the most effective way to achieve these goals would be to


The merger of the MPO and PPC is just
one of the many steps county officials are
undertaking to improve transportation
and prepare for the future. The changes to
the comprehensive plan and land use
map also support transit-oriented
development.

unify the membership of the boards of the MPO and the PPC into a
single consolidated board that would be empowered to carry out
the functions of both the MPO and PPC ..."
The committee is encouraging local governments to support the
consolidation and is looking for the Pinellas County Legislative Del-
egation, which meets on Nov. 22, to support the legislation neces-
sary to accomplish the recommendation.
Two new members would be added to a consolidated board. One
would represent the cities of Belleair, Belleair Bluffs, Gulfport, Ken-
neth City, Seminole and South Pasadena. The other would repre-
sent Belleair Beach, Belleair Shore, Indian Rocks Beach, Indian
Shores, Madeira Beach, North Redington Beach, Redington Beach,
Redington Shores, St. Pete Beach and Treasure Island.
The total membership of the new board would be 13. The current
MPO has 11 members. The board includes one representative from
Clearwater, Largo, Pinellas Park and Dunedin; two representatives
from St. Petersburg; a rotated seat shared by Oldsmar, Safety Har-
bor and Tarpon Springs; three county commissioners; and one
PSTA member.


Jewel White Cole, with the Pinellas County Attorney's office, said
the new "unified agency" would wear two hats, one for the trans-
portation planning and the second for land use planning.
Commissioners Susan Latvala said if the merger were approved
by the state, it would make simple land use changes more econom-
ical for citizens.
Cole said a proposed new countywide plan would contain fewer
categories and lessen the need for change requests.
The merger of the MPO and PPC is just one of the many steps
county officials are undertaking to improve transportation and pre-
pare for the future. The changes to the comprehensive plan and
land use map also support transit-oriented development.
Officials are expected to ask Pinellas County residents to support
a penny sales tax to help fund construction and operation of a rail
or fixed-guide way transit system.
"Construction of such a transit system would represent a major
public investment in the county's future," a staff report said. "The
resulting level of transit service would provide convenient, frequent
and high quality service for walkable, mixed-use urban develop-
ment around the transit stations at a scale consistent with the sur-
rounding community."
Transit oriented development is an approach that favors develop-
ment of areas within an easy walking distance of transit stations,
roughly the area within one-half mile of the station, the report said.
An agreement has been signed between Pinellas County agencies
and the state Department of Transportation to undertake a federal
transit administration alternatives analysis to identify the preferred
transit corridors for the first phase of a rail or fixed-guideway tran-
sit system.
The alternative analysis is anticipated to be complete in 2012,
after which time, officials will most likely schedule a referendum.


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Leader, November 11, 2010


County 7A


Several changes proposed for tourist tax collections


By SUZETTE PORTER

CLEARWATER- Pinellas County Commission-
ers will consider amendments concerning the ad-
ministration and collection of tourist tax during
public hearings scheduled on Nov. 16 and Nov.
30.
The commissioners will discuss revisions re-
quested by Tax Collector Diane Nelson during the
first hearing on Nov. 16 at 9:30 a.m. in the fifth
floor Assembly Room on the Pinellas County
Courthouse, 315 Court St.
The second hearing on Nov. 30 at 6:30 p.m. will
consider extension of the fourth cent of the 5 per-
cent tourist tax, which currently goes toward debt
service for Tropicana Field, and proposed revisions
to the tourist development plan. A work session on
the matter at 1 p.m. on Nov. 16 will precede the
public hearing.
Nelson requested changes to the code relating to


quarterly and electronic filing of tourist tax pay-
ments, bad check charges, dispute resolution pro-
visions and the permitting and approval process.
The Tourist Development Council recommended
approval of the revisions at its September meeting.
If approved, fees for bad checks would increase
as follows: $25 for checks $50 or less; $30 for
checks more than $50 but less than $300; $40 for
more than $300 but less than $800; and $50 for
values more than $800.
Changes to the dispute resolution code gives
taxpayers, who have been notified by the tax col-
lector that a written dispute requires more infor-
mation, the right to request in writing an
additional 15 days to submit the required informa-
tion. If the taxpayer does not submit the informa-
tion within the 15 days, the dispute shall be
dismissed and the taxpayer will forfeit their rights.
The proposed revisions also include a new sec-
tion be added to the code, permits and approvals,
which defines activities requiring a permit, the


Convention Visitor Bureau's responsibilities in the
permitting process, facilitation of permits, condi-
tions, denials, transfers, revocation and fees.
The Nov. 16 workshop and Nov. 30 hearing will
take up matters that are more complicated: the
extension of the fourth percent tourist tax and re-
visions to the tourist development plan.
According to the staff notes, the Tourist Devel-
opment Council considered, debated and revised
this plan at multiple workshops and TDC meet-
ings, and approved this plan, as well as recom-
mended the extension of the fourth percent tourist
tax."
The TDC's approval worries Commissioner
Susan Latvala.
"I tried to follow what was happening with the
TDC," she said. "There was great diversity and
then suddenly a unanimous vote. I would like to
see what we're allowing. My concern is as we go
down the road and set aside money for stuff, we
won't have money we need for marketing and pro-


motion."
Commission Chair Karen Seel, who sits on the
TDC, said during the TDC discussions "something
for everyone" was added to "satisfy concerns" of all
who need money, including the Sports Commis-
sion and beach renourishment.
'That's what I was afraid of," Latvala said. "Ev-
erybody got a little something to go along."
Latvala said she wanted a "bigger discussion."
Commissioner Nancy Bostock agreed, saying she
also had concerns about the future.
The Nov. 16 work session was scheduled to
allow commissioners an opportunity to discuss the
proposed revisions, including what to do with the
fourth cent of the tourist tax when it sunsets on
Sept. 30, 2015.
The commissioners also are expected to talk
about revisions to the tourist development plan,
which determines funding for tourism-related
projects, facilities, programs and events that are
paid for using the 5 percent tourist tax.


Healthy Families Pinellas recognized for outstanding
Healthy Families Florida re- voluntary home visiting program 'The economic success of our provide their children with the child abuse and neglect for less
cently recognized Healthy Fami- with a proven record of prevent- state requires a strong founda- safe, stable and stimulating ex- than $1,700 a year per child.
lies Pinellas with a Fiscal Year ing child abuse and neglect in 98 tion of healthy, safe and produc- periences they need to achieve "We have a responsibility to in-
2009-10 Excellence Award for percent of the high-risk families tive families," said Program their full potential, both in school vest in effective prevention, for
providing outstanding services to served in Florida. The program Director Ray Hensley. "We help and in life." both moral and economic rea-
families and maintaining a com- began serving families in Pinellas families overcome a variety of se- Parents enroll in Healthy Fam- sons," said Mike Stone, JWB
mitment to high standards of ex- County in 1992 and now serves rious challenges to grow into lies Pinellas during pregnancy or Children's Services Board of
cellence. more than 2,300 local families healthy families that can con- just after the birth of their child. Pinellas County Inc., the primary
Healthy Families Pinellas is a and children each year. tribute to their communities and During home visits, parents re- founder for Healthy Families serv-


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themselves, such as continuing
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ble housing and employment.
Florida taxpayers pay more
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an abused or neglected child,
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ices in Pinellas County.
Along with JWB, Healthy Fam-
ilies Pinellas is also funded by
the Healthy Start Coalition of
Pinellas County, Circle of Parents
and Healthy Families Florida
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Healthy Families Pinellas is
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services
County Health Department,
which is the lead agency. Com-
munity partners helping to im-
plement this local home visiting
initiative include Bayfront Medi-
cal Center, St. Petersburg Gener-
al Hospital, Morton Plant Mease
Health Care, Operation PAR and
Suncoast Center Inc. Healthy
Families Pinellas is accredited by
Prevent Child Abuse America.
"Healthy Families is proven to
prevent child abuse and neglect,
improve maternal and child
health and increase family self-
sufficiency," said Carol McNally,
Healthy Families Florida execu-
tive director.
Call Program Director Ray
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Leader, November 11, 2010


Around Pinellas


City struggles to
downsize Penny list
CLEARWATER- When the City
Council met on Jan. 31, 2007 to
approve its $130.6 million list of
Penny for Pinellas projects to be
accomplished between fiscal
years 2010 and 2020, the council
members didn't realize that rev-
enue from the 1 percent sales tax
surcharge had already peaked
and had started to follow the
economy into the cellar.
At that time, the county's esti-
mate of Clearwater's share of
Penny revenue was $137 million
for the 10 years. In March 2009,
the county downsized that esti-
mate to $118 million.
"Since that time, revenues
have continued to decline," a re-
cent staff memo to the council
said. "At this time, staff has esti-
mated funding for the 10-year pe-
riod should be reduced to
approximately $92 million. This
will require the further elimina-
tion and/or reduction of planned
projects."
At the council's Nov. 1 work
session, City Manager Bill Home
had his department heads and
senior staffers sat in the first few


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rows of seats so that they could
instantly come to the podium
with their input on how the cuts
could be made. The projects were
divided into high, medium and
low priorities.
The proposed changes submit-
ted by budget director Tina Wil-
son would cut $2 million from the
$8 million previously earmarked
for the Downtown Intermodal Fa-
cility, which will take tourists ar-
riving from Orlando from
downtown to the beach via ex-
press buses and, later, by high-
speed rail. Its terminal would be
at the former St. Petersburg
Times site if the city and the
newspaper can reach a mutually
agreeable price.
That was Wilson's only pro-
posed cut in the high-priority cat-
egory. Projects such as police and
fire vehicle purchases, fire station
remodeling, Joe DiMaggio Recre-
ation Complex upgrades and
Royalty Theater refurbishing
stayed the same.
Councilman Paul Gibson said
the $2.5 million straightening of
Bayshore Boulevard should be
downgraded from high priority or
eliminated altogether.
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eral minor accidents have oc-
curred) as traffic calming," Gib-
son said. "It slows cars down."
A decision on whether to spend
$1,093,840 to renovate the North
Greenwood Recreation Center
was postponed until staffers
could determine if a rumor that
the nearby Martin Luther King
Jr. Center will use outside money
to offer services similar to those
at North Greenwood is true.
"If our goal is to give our citi-
zens all the (library) services
they've gotten (in the past,) I'm
not sure we can do that," Home
said. "I'm not sure we should do
that."
A proposed joint library agree-
ment with St. Petersburg College
has apparently fallen through, al-
though Barbara Pickell, the city's
library director, hopes it can be
resurrected later. In the mean-
time, a $5 million renovation and
limited expansion of the Country-
side Library is a medium-priority
goal.
Councilman Gibson said that
the $2,833,250 set aside for new
sidewalks should be moved up
from "low priority" status and
Vice Mayor John Doran agreed,
saying someone tripping on a de-
teriorating sidewalk could result
in a lawsuit against the city.
Staffers are going to revise the
proposed list and bring it back for


further tweaking at the council's
next work session. The public
hearing that is required before
the list can be finalized will prob-
ably take place in December.

No short-term rentals
for Belleair Beach
BELLEAIR BEACH An ordi-
nance prohibiting short-term
rentals of single family homes in
Belleair Beach will remain.
The unanimous consensus of
the City Council at its Nov. 1
meeting was to keep the current
minimum rental length of three
months or longer. The council
may increase the minimum in
the future after more study of the
ordinance. The city will work
more on code enforcement and
the council plans to meet with
Code Enforcement Officer Jack
Ouimette.
Resident Rick Davis said there
was a problem with code enforce-
ment in his neighborhood and
short-term rentals were the
worst-kept houses in the neigh-
borhood. Resident Paul Clements
said they need more time of the
code enforcement officer; he
talked about several complaints
he made to the city about a
short-term rental near his home.
About 50 people came to Mon-
day's meeting. Nine people spoke


in opposition to short-term
rentals and one person spoke in
favor of short-term rentals. Corre-
spondence included in the city
council agenda packet included
three letters opposing short-term
rentals, one letter supporting lim-
ited short-term rentals and one
letter supporting short-term
rentals.
Some residents spoke in favor
of increasing the rental minimum
to six months or longer. Resi-
dents said longer-term renters
were more committed to the com-
munity. Resident Mark Edmunds
said he opposed any shortening
of the ordinance. He said he
thought the existing ordinance
was way too short and the city
should consider a minimum of
six months.
Some residents spoke in favor
of the current three-month rental
minimum. Martha Vasquez said
she is a condominium resident
and a Realtor. Vasquez said most
condominiums in town allow 30-
day rentals, some shorter. As a
full-time resident, Vasquez said
she would be happy with no
rentals but that's not a reality.
Three months makes sense, she
said. Some of her clients buy
property for future use and the
three-month rentals help them
out.


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Council supports PPC-
MPO merger
SEMINOLE City councilors
approved a resolution Oct. 26
supporting the consolidation of
the Pinellas Planning Council and
the Metropolitan Planning Agen-
cy.
The proposal is to merge the
PPC and the MPO, and to expand
the MPO membership to include
all 25 municipalities in Pinellas
County.
A joint committee of the Pinel-
las County Commission, MPO
and PPC are seeking a resolution
from all local governments in the
county to present to Pinellas Leg-
islative Delegation Nov. 22 for po-
tential action during the 2011
legislative session.
County officials, led by Com-
mission Chair Karen Seel, have
been working on the concept
since last spring in an effort to
combine transportation and land
use planning within one agency.
The two agencies would remain
independent bodies with a single
board.
The MPO is focused on trans-
portation issues and the PPC on
land use.
The merger would make future
transportation plans more easily
attained.
In other action, councilors:
Passed a resolution support-
ing First Lady Michelle Obama's
Let's Move campaign, which is
designed to increase awareness
about childhood obesity. The pro-
gram focuses on eating healthy
and exercise.
Voted 6-1 to move the second
City Council meeting in Decem-
ber from the fourth Tuesday to
Dec. 21. The first meeting of the
month will take place Dec. 14.
Councilor Leslie Waters voted
against the change because she
has a conflict on Dec. 21.

Treasure Island fire
rating may drop
TREASURE ISLAND The city
needs to come up with additional
funding for the fire department to
ensure that four firefighters are
working on each shift.
ISO, a New Jersey-based com-
pany that provides risk informa-
tion to insurance companies,
recently evaluated all fire depart-
ments in Pinellas County and
found Treasure Island operating
with three firefighters instead of
the recommended minimum of
four about 50 percent of the time,
due to staff vacations and sick
leave.
Fire Chief Charlie Fant told
commissioners Nov. 2 the city
needs to quickly upgrade to four
full-time firefighters per shift to
maintain its current Class 4 fire
rating.
Otherwise, Fant said, ISO will
drop Treasure Island to Class 10
- the lowest rating. If that hap-
pens, fire insurance rates in the
city could triple, according to
ISO.
"It looks like we'll have to up-
grade funding for overtime," said
Fant. "That would be about
$130,000 for this year."
Treasure Island, like other one-
fire station cities in the county,
use firefighters from other cities
to help with fires in the city lim-
its.
Fant said three pumpers, a
ladder truck and about 15 fire-
fighters is a normal response for
a fire in the city limits. He said
there are five fire stations within
five miles of Treasure Island that
help out in emergencies.

Bay Pines plans
Veterans Day salute
SEMINOLE Bay Pines VA
Healthcare will commemorate
Veterans Day with a ceremony
Thursday, Nov. 11, 10 a.m., out-
side on the Bay Pines campus.
The keynote speaker is Michael
Jemigan who served in the Unit-
ed States Marine Corps, 2nd Ma-
rine Regiment, 2nd Battalion.
In 2004, he was severely in-
jured by an improvised explosive
device blast while on patrol in
Iraq. After extensive surgeries, re-
construction, and rehabilitation,
Jernigan has been able to take
his experiences, along with the
training provided to him by the
Marine Corps and his family up-
bringing, to make a positive im-
pact in the world around him.
Jernigan was featured in
HBO's "Alive Day" documentary
and is currently fundraising for
Southeastern Guide Dogs.
Other speakers include Wal-
lace Hopkins, Bay Pines VA
Healthcare System director and a
Vietnam Veteran; and Tom Bow-
man, a Vietnam veteran and act-
ing deputy network director for
VISN 8 and Vietnam Veteran.


Keswick Christian High School
will perform various musical se-
lections. The ceremony also will
include a firing salute, taps per-
formance, artwork and military
vehicle display.
Parking is available nearby and
shuttles will provide transporta-
tion for guests from parking lots
to the ceremony area. The venue
is handicapped accessible.
A sign language interpreter will
be available for the hearing im-
paired.


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Leader, November 11, 2010

Briefs
Operation Christmas
Child under way
LARGO The Westside Church
of the Nazarene will serve as a
collection point for Operation
Christmas Child.
Through Operation Christmas
Child, Largo residents are helping
send shoe box gifts this year to
more than 8 million children in
100 countries suffering from nat-
ural disaster, war, terrorism, dis-
ease, famine and poverty. The
shoe box gifts will be sorted and
sent using whatever means nec-
essary sea containers, trucks,
trains, airplanes, boats, camels,
even dog sleds to reach suffer-
ing children around the world.
Operation Christmas Child
uses tracking technology that al-
lows donors to "follow your box"
to the destination country where
it will be hand-delivered to a child
in need. To register shoe box gifts
and find out what country they
are delivered to, use the EZ Give
donation form found at
www.samaritanspurse.org. Print
out the online labels that include
a bar-code as labels on your shoe
boxes.
The local collection sites are
Westside Church of the
Nazarene, 11633 137th St.,
Largo. Call 595-6338 for hours.
Chick-Fil-A, 10790 Park Blvd.,
Seminole. Call 398-0777; Coun-
tryside Christian Center, 1850 N.
McMullen Booth Road, Clearwa-
ter. Call 799-1618.
Last year, Westside Church of
the Nazarene contributed 21,766
gift-filled shoe boxes to join the
Operation Christmas Child effort.
This year, organizers hope to col-
lect more than 25,000 gift-filled
shoe boxes from families, kids,
churches, schools and civic or-
ganizations in the area.

Renaissance Speaker
wins regional contest
LARGO Sioux Hart, a mem-
ber of Renaissance Speakers
Clearwater, won first place in the
Toastmasters Division H. Speech
Evaluation Contest recently at
the Armed Forces Military Muse-
um in Largo. This was a regional
contest.
Hart is the founder and a past
president of Renaissance Speak-
ers Clearwater, which meets
weekly on Tuesdays, 6:15 p.m.,
at Accelerated Training Solutions,
Suite 220 in the Atrium Building,
601 Cleveland St. in Clearwater.
The club had two participants
in the contests, having won first
place in both the Speech Evalua-
tion Contest and the Humorous
Speech Contest for the local area.
Hermann Strijewski, a recent
member of Renaissance Speak-
ers, won first place in humorous
speeches in that contest.

Candle-lighting
ceremony planned
LARGO A candle-lighting cer-
emony will be presented Sunday,
Nov. 14, 7 p.m., at Grand Villa of
Largo, 750 Starkey Road.
The ceremony will remember
and honor those with Alzheimer's
disease and related illnesses. It is


Community 9A


being presented as part of the
National Commemorative Candle
Lighting, an annual event of the
Alzheimer's Foundation of Ameri-
ca.
Call 586-0108.

Bromeliad Society
to meet
CLEARWATER The Florida
West Coast Bromeliad Society will
meet Tuesday, Nov. 9, at Hope
Presbyterian Church, 1698 S.
Belcher Road.
Doors will open at 7 p.m. and
the meeting will begin at 7:30
p.m. The speaker will be Terrie
Bert. Bert will talk about unusual
bromeliads in her presentation.
Bromeliads will be available for
sale. There is no cost to attend.
Call 439-7782.

Clearwater Garden
Club to meet
CLEARWATER- The Clearwa-
ter Garden Club will meet Friday,
Nov. 12, 10 a.m., at 405 Semi-
nole St., Clearwater.
The speaker will be Karen
Stewart from Marie Selby Gar-
dens. She will discuss repotting,
propagating and growing ferns.
The club also will host a trash
and treasure sale Saturday, Nov.
20, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Call Cathy Foley at 443-7032.

Heritage Village hosts
Market in the Park
LARGO -The Pinellas County
Market in the Park is presented
Saturday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at
Heritage Village, 11909 125th St.
N.
The market is now in its fourth
year and features farm-fresh pro-
duce, natural products and gar-
dening items. Admission is free.
Parking is available in the Pinel-
las County Extension parking lot
next to Heritage Village.
For information, call 582-2123
or visit www.pinellascoun
ty.org/heritage.

Library to host
program on plants
PALM HARBOR A program
on native plants will be presented
Thursday, Nov. 11, 2 to 3:30
p.m., at Palm Harbor Library,
2330 Nebraska Ave.
The program will be repeated
6:15 to 7:45 p.m.
For those who may be hesitant
about taking a chance on new
plants in their garden after last
year's cold damage, this program
will examine native plants that
have a batter chance of surviving
not only Florida's cold weather
but also its dry and sometimes
very wet weather.
Jason Beck, UF/IFAS Pinellas
County Master Gardener, will
lead this free class. Attendees
will learn more about native
plants best suited to Pinellas
County. Beck also will discuss
how best to use these plants in
the landscape.
Registration is required at
least 24 hours prior to the class.
To register, call 582-2100 or visit
www.pinellascountyextension. or


g and click on the Online Class
Registration button.

Monthly garden
meeting set
PINELLAS PARK The Pinellas
Park Garden Club will meet
Monday, Nov. 15, 10 a.m., at
Park Station, 5851 Park Blvd.
The meeting is open to the
public. It will begin with guest
speaker Bob Blalock of Bob's
Bees. Blalock will discuss the
importance of bees and the re-
cent decline in the bee popula-
tion.
Club members are encouraged
to bring a plant for the monthly
plant raffle. Call 563-9145 or
320-8684.

Library to host
landscaping class
SAFETY HARBOR An
overview of Florida-friendly land-
scaping will be offered Tuesday,
Nov. 16, 2 to 3:30 p.m., at Safety
Harbor Library, 101 Second St.
N.
Attendees will learn how to de-
sign and maintain a landscape
so that it is friendly to Florida's
environment. An educator from
the Pinellas County Extension of
University of Florida Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences
will be on hand to teach this
overview of the nine principles of
Florida-friendly landscaping. The
free class will cover what it takes
to make the landscape less de-
pendent upon water, more at-
tractive to wildlife and less
polluting for area waterways.
Registration is required at
least 24 hours prior to the class
by visiting www.pinellascoun-
tyexten sion.org, clicking the On-
line Class Registration button
then the Extension Service tab.
For information, call 724-
1525, ext. 112.

Rain harvesting
workshop set
ST. PETERSBURG A rain
harvesting workshop will be of-
fered Thursday, Nov. 18, 10 to
11 a.m., at Weedon Island Pre-
serve, 1800 Weedon Drive NE.
This class will teach attendees
how to capture the water that
comes pouring out of the gutter
downspout. The water collected
can be used when needed for
landscape, potted plants, veg-
etable and herb gardens and
special plant collections. Atten-
dees will receive set-up instruc-
tions and reference booklet.
Advance registration is re-
quired. To purchase a rain barrel
(which must be accomplished at
the time of registration for $30
plus tax), choose Participant
with Rain Barrel on step 4 of the
online registration process. This
will insure a rain barrel is avail-
able for pick up at the class.
Those who do not wish to pur-
chase a rain barrel may use the
drop-down and select Participant
to register for this free class.
Registration is required at least
24 hours prior to the class. To
register, call 582-2100.


Photo by MIKE GRIESEMER
A field of about 50 decorated boats is expected for this year's Veterans Boat Parade Saturday, Nov. 13,
on the Intracoastal Waterway.



Boat Parade sets sail Saturday


By BOB McCLURE

MADEIRA BEACH A field of about 50 boats
is expected when the 14th annual Veterans Boat
Parade sails Saturday, Nov. 13, 11 a.m., on the
Intracoastal Waterway.
The route starts at American Legion Post 273,
600 American Legion Drive, goes south under
the Tom Stuart Causeway bridge to Treasure Is-
land and back.
Vanessa Quillao will perform the National An-
them about 10:50 a.m., followed by a flyover of
U.S. Navy aircraft.
"We'll either have jets from Key West, helicop-
ters from Pensacola or prop jobs from South Car-
olina," said parade co-chairman Warren
Shepard. "I won't know until the last minute."
Shepard has lined up a U.S. Navy landing
craft, as well as the return of a U.S. Army land-
ing craft that participated in the parade a year
ago. He is also trying to arrange for an appear-
ance by the U.S. Navy Leap Frogs, a precision
paratrooper team that will be in Fort Pierce a few
days earlier.
'The Pentagon said they need 60 days notice
to get them," said Shepard, "but I'm still working
on it."
Cash prizes will be awarded to the best deco-
rated boats. The entry fee is $20 per boat.
Late registration will be accepted at the skip-
per's meeting Thursday, Nov. 11, 6 to 7:30 p.m.,
at Post 273.


Skippers and crew are invited to a post-parade
party Nov. 13, 1:30 p.m., at the Holiday Isle Elks
Lodge, 14111 E. Parsley Drive, Madeira Beach.
Silent and live auctions will follow, as well as an
awards presentation for the top entries.
Patrons can best view the parade from Legion
Post 273, the Elks Lodge and at John's Pass.
An awards pickup and slide show of the festiv-
ities will follow Monday, Nov. 22, 6 to 8 p.m., at
Post 273.
Sponsors this year are DeLosa's Pizza, Don's
Docks, Gators Parasail, Fly-N-High Parasail,
Woody's Watersports, Skully's The Hut, Johnny
Pastrami's, the Pirate Ship, Overhead Surf Shop,
Ciega Bay, Bronze Lady, Angel Haven Gift Shop,
Walt's Fish Shack, Cuban Paradise, The Spice
and Tea Exchange, A-n-A Hawaiian Treasures,
Latitudes Waterfront Dining, Wind Song Kite
Shop, Kilwin's, Publix and Winn-Dixie, Mama's
Kitchen, the Friendly Fisherman, Bubba Gump
Shrimp, Gulfport Natural Health Center, Dock-
side Dave's, Melitta, Tampa Bay Newspapers,
TowBoat U.S., Daiquiri Deck, My Place, Thun-
derbird Beach Resort, law offices of Marshall
Reissman, Sea Hag's Bar and Grill, Bilmar Beach
Resort, Tahitian Beach Motel, Snug Harbor Boat-
yard, Doe Doe's Coffee Cup, Executive Limou-
sine, Addicted to the Bean, Dolphin Beach
Resort, Allied Specialty Insurance, Salt Rock
Grill, Lee Roy Selmon's and Beaver Flags.
For further information, visit www.Veterans
BoatParade.org.


Carving Station: Grainy
mustard & Horseradish crusted
Prime Rib Slotw roasted %whole Turkey v.,th
gray Entrees: Turkey Braised Shoit Ribs Turkey
and Tarragon Pot Pie with cheddar biscuits Sunset
Salmon Roast Pork Loin Pistachio and Plantain
Crusted Mahi Mahi Chicken Rutica Parmesan Crusted
Lamb Cedar Plank Roasted Arctic Char
Accompaniments: Stuffing Sweet Potato Green Bean
Casserole Whipped Potatoes Roasted New Potatoes
Asparagus Cold Bar: Assortment of Salads Peel &
t Eat Shrimp Oysters on the half shell Smoked
Salmon Sushi Sashimi Assorted Hors
d'oeuvres & much more!




N ^ I


1 2.0 F










1 OA Business


Leader, November 11, 2010


Former home brewer turns pastime into profession


By LEE CLARK ZUMPE

DUNEDIN There was a flur-
ry of Facebook activity in mid
October when Dunedin Brewery
announced that it would be tap-
ping the first keg of its new au-
tumn amber, Honey Pumpkin
Ale, brewed with pumpkin and
local honey.
The buzz culminated Oct. 15
with a successful sampling that
pleased patrons, and another ale
was added to the brewery's long
list of ambrosial selections.
Those who visit Dunedin Brew-
ery will find a number of fresh
local beer offerings on tap year-
round, including such names as
Piper's Pale Ale, Redhead Red
Ale, Apricot Wheat Ale, Lowland
Wheat Ale, Razzberry Wheat Ale
and Celtic God Ale.
Developing that lineup didn't
happen overnight and the de-
cision to found the business


more than a decade ago required
a catalyst.
"A 1994 economic and health
scare pushed me to do some-
thing that I always dreamed of,"
said Michael Bryant, owner of
Dunedin Brewery. Bryant had
long wanted to bring fresh
homemade brews to others for
their enjoyment. "It was a simple
process ... that could involve the
whole family and possibly pro-
vide better economic stability vs.
that of the construction industry
I was involved in then and now."
While the process may be sim-
ple, Bryant admitted that the
business aspect is complex,
fraught with difficult state laws.
Still, Bryant managed to turn
his home-brewing hobby into his
livelihood, opening Dunedin
Brewery in 1996. Despite the in-
tricacies of growing a new busi-
ness, from his vantage point, the
brewery was an immediate suc-


cess.
"It is still a daily effort to keep
the dream stable and develop-
ing," Bryant said. "Success to us
is being able to offer your hand-
crafted product to the lovers of
fresh local beer no matter how
large or small the amount. So I
guess we were successful from
the start."
Bryant pointed out a number
of challenges he has faced as a
business owner.
"We, like others, have been af-
fected by the economic situa-
tions presented over the past
years," Bryant said. "9/11
stopped a 25 percent per year
compounded growth rate years
ago."
Bryant also said that hurri-
canes of the recent past had ex-
posed the business to the stress
associated with the possible loss
of all its in-process product.
'That could have been devas-


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Michael Bryant opened the Dunedin Brewey in 1996.


The Dunedin Brewery has become a landmark in Dunedin.


taking," Bryant said.
The owner of Dunedin Brewery
believes the unfolding of the eco-
nomic reset is sill underway.
"We at Dunedin Brewery will
change with the needs of our cus-
tomers as the reset of economic
principals unfolds," Bryant said.
"We will always strive to fulfill
customers' changing needs for
local, fresh products through our
off premise packaging and on
premises products through our
tap rooms at the brewery."
Norman Dixon serves as the
head brewer at Dunedin Brewery.
He stared in the brewing scene in
the surf town of Solana Beach,
Calif.
"He brewed at G.T. Vitos on
U.S. 19, Palm Harbor, then Hop-
pers Brewery, in East Lake/Palm
Harbor," Bryant said. Bryant
studied under Dixon's hand at
Hoppers to get his commercial
experience. Dixon did stints as
brewmaster at Maumee Bay
Brewing in Toledo, Ohio, and the
Brickhouse Brewery in
Patchogue, N.Y., before returning
to Pinellas to join the team at
Dunedin Brewery.
Trace Caley currently serves as
assistant brewer.
"Caley was born and raised in
Dunedin," Bryant said. "A home
brewer that worked his way to


professional brewing, he started
with Dunedin Brewery in our bot-
tling and packaging operation in
1998."
Many Dunedin Brewery brews
have earned awards and recogni-
tion over the years.
The Highland Games Ale won
the 1998 World Beer Champi-
onship Silver Medal in the Scot-
tish Ale Category. Pipers Pale Ale
won 2003 BFBC Best Beer in
Florida and Dropkick Murphy's
Erin Red won the 2010 U.S.
Open Beer championship Gold
Medal in the American Amber
category. In addition, Dunedin
Brewery offerings have earned
numerous gold, silver and bronze
medals from Best Florida Beer
Championships since 2002,
along with other local beer festi-
val honorable mentions.
From the patrons' standpoint,
the favorites are clear.
"Apricot Peach Wheat and the
Redhead Red," Bryant said, are
clear winners. 'The Brewmasters
Reserve releases sell very well."
The establishment has become
a landmark in Dunedin.
"When we opened the brewery
in Dunedin, there wasn't much
of a village," Bryant explained.
Most of the businesses had
moved out of Dunedin to the new
frontier of U.S. 19 and East


Lake."
Bryant recalled that there were
a lot of vacant or failing shops in
the downtown district at that
time.
"It was fun to be one of the
businesses that drew new visitors
by offering something different,"
Bryant said. 'This helped shape
the Dunedin downtown core to
what it is and is progressing into
- a place where visitors can find
other than the normal everyday
shops and services found else-
where."
Dunedin Brewery gives back to
the community that has helped
the business thrive.
"We donate time to volunteer
on local committees and help
with events like the Highland
Games Committee, Dunedin Mer-
chants Association and Adopt a
Street," Bryant said. 'We donate
hand-crafted beverages to help
develop Rotary events and cham-
ber events."
The business also is looking to-
ward the future by thinking
green.
"We are striving to make our
facility a sustainable facility by
reducing our energy use," Bryant
said. "Our plan will save energy
use and provide leadership to
other businesses in the commu-
nity to follow our path."


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Leader, November 11, 2010


Pet connection 11 A


Looking for a home


Frankie is a very large male tabby. What a sweet boy. Although he
needs to lose a few pounds, his health is good. He likes attention and
gets along with other cats, though he has never lived with dogs or
children. Frankie has been neutered, vaccinated and microchipped. Call
Save Our Stays at 481-5262 for information on adopting Frankie.


'It I-

















Mirage
Mirage is a 3-year-old yellow Labrador mix with blue eyes. She's a
sweet girl and responds to basic commands. If you bring this article
with you to Pinellas County Animal Services, Mirage can be adopted for
$20. The shelter is at 12450 Ulmerton Road in Largo. Call 582-2600 or
visit www.pinellascounty.org/animalservices.


Kline
Kline is an 8-month-old male cat. He is very sweet, friendly, and loves
attention. He will do well with other friendly cats. He is neutered and
current with his vaccinations. If interested please call Pat at Second
Chance for Strays at 535-9154.


Pets are often falsely accused of spreading diseases


Ladies and gentlemen of the
jury, in closing, my client Fluffy
McTailwaggins, could, in fact, not
possibly be guilty of the crimes
for which he has been accused.
The prosecutors, ignoring all sci-
entific evidence, have falsely ac-
cused my defendant, and many
pets, of spreading diseases which
are not their fault. While blaming
the dog whenever for passing gas
may be fun, these accusations
are serious, unfair, unfounded,
and cause many pets to lose their
homes unnecessarily. Some of
the diseases that typically do not
come from pets include toxoplas-
mosis, head lice and pinworms.
Toxoplasmosis is a very
frightening disease for pregnant
women. Women exposed for the
first time to this parasite while
pregnant can have their fetus
sustain severe brain damage, and
may even be linked to
schizophrenia. Cats can have se-
vere symptoms as well, from
seizures and other neurologic
symptoms or severe liver disease.
While many pregnant women are
told that they need to give that
cat up because of the risk of this
parasite, few obstetricians warn
their patients about the most
common ways to catch toxoplas-
mosis, which includes eating un-
dercooked meat, especially pork,
and from soil exposure, such as
during gardening. Fully cooking
meat, and wearing gardening


Speaking of Pets
Michael J. Rumore,
D.V.M.


gloves and washing hands after-
wards, are immensely more im-
portant preventative measures
than forcing cats out of their
homes. Cats typically catch toxo-
plasmosis from prey, so keeping a
cat indoors is by far the best pre-
vention. Wearing gloves and
washing hands after cleaning the
litter box are easy ways to avoid
even the very small risk a cat my
bring. Additionally, because the
toxoplasmosis spores take more
than a day to become infective,
cleaning the litter box daily can
further eliminate the risk.
Head lice (Pediculus hu-
manus capitis) are a skin para-
site known to many parents of


school age children. Lice feed on
blood, and can be very difficult to
remove from any animal. Most
mammals and birds have lice
that live upon them, but these
pests are very picky about from
whom they feed off. Human lice
feed on humans, and dog lice
feed on dogs. While human lice
may bite a dog, and can even
cause itchiness, they cannot live
on a dog. Dog lice may temporari-
ly live on a person, and even lead
to a rash, but they cannot repro-
duce and propagate unless they
are on a dog. If your kids have
head lice, it simply cannot be
from the family dog.
Pinworms (Enterobius), also


known as threadworms or seat-
worms, are disgusting, yet com-
mon parasites of children and
adults. These very small worms
are known for causing intense
itchiness as they leave the rec-
tum. Pinworms, like many intes-
tinal parasites, are species
specific people worms live in
people, not in dogs or cats. Chil-
dren who catch pinworms have
caught them from other people,
not from the family dog or cat.
Hygiene and hand-washing are
imperative to prevent transmis-
sion of pinworms. Pinworms are
not the same as tapeworms,
which look like flat grains of rice
and can be commonly found in
the stool of dogs and cats. Dogs
and cats who have tapeworms
typically catch them by eating
fleas, though eating rodents or
other wildlife may expose them as
well. Good flea control, as well as
keeping your cat inside, can re-
duce their exposure to tape-
worms.
It is true that there are dis-
eases and parasites that can pass
between pets and people. But, too
often these days, pets lose their
homes because of worries about
diseases which could not be their
fault.
Gentlemen and ladies of the
jury, I rest my case.
Dr. Michael Rumore is the
owner of Lake Seminole Animal
Hospital


Cool canine



Moxie is a 6-year-old white
English bulldog who resides in
Treasure Island. She is the queen
of her house and rules everyone,
including the family's German
shorthaired pointer. Moxie
enjoys posing for the camera
and will do anything for a
cookie. Moxie likes walks on the
beach, naps, and joining her
favorite people, Cindy and Dave
Ditto, when they fish off their
dock. As our precious pet
winner, Moxie receives a $25
certificate toward grooming
services from Classy Canine
Mobile Pet Grooming Salon.
December's photo winner will
receive a $25 gift certificate to
Largo Feed.


Dig this* Q


SPCA has Canine Basics for
Busy People
The SPCA Tampa Bay in Largo will offer
Canine Basics for Busy People, Sunday, Nov.
21, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the education build-
ing. The 2-hour seminar includes practical
tips for stress-free living with your canine and
sharpening your communication and basic
handling skills. It includes house training,
chew toy training, jumping, barking and
pulling. The cost is $25. All bully breeds are


free of charge. Dogs must have current rabies
vaccinations to attend. Owners must call to
register at 586-3591, ext. 167.

Black Beauty Month at
Friends of Strays
November is Black Beauty Month at
Friends of Strays. Qualified adopters can
adopt a black cat or kitten at a reduced fee.
Friends of Strays is at 2911 47th Ave. in St.
Petersburg. Call 522-6566. The Adoption


Center is open Tuesday though Sunday from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Find a new best friend
TampaPets.org, in conjunction with the Hu-
mane Society of Tampa Bay and Hillsborough
County Animal Services, will be hosting its
sixth Adoption Expo at the Florida State Fair-
grounds on Saturday, Nov. 13, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Parking and admission are free. Visit
www.tampapets.org/expo.php.


* Routine wellness care including Vaccinations, Parasite control
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ANIMAL HOSPITAL
Thank you to Pinellas County for voting for us
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"Devoted to more wags and purrs."






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12A Business


Leader, November 11, 2010


Briefs


Chamber to host
Women in Business Power Networking
SEMINOLE The Largo/Mid-Pinellas Chamber of Commerce
Women in Business Council will host its monthly Power Networking
event Tuesday, Nov. 30, 5:30 to 7 p.m., at Lake Seminole Square,
8333 Seminole Blvd., Seminole.
Cost is $5 for chamber members and $8 for nonmembers. Ad-
vance registration is recommended.
To register, call 584-2321 or e-mail events@largochamber.org.
Home Income Tax Service Inc. opens
BELLEAIR BLUFFS The Bluffs Business Association recently
welcomed Home Income Tax Service Inc., 261 Indian Rocks Road,
as a new member.
The BBA hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony celebrating the new
business.
Chamber to host Business After Hours
CLEARWATER The Largo/Mid-Pinellas Chamber of Commerce
will host its monthly Business After Hours networking event Thurs-
day, Nov. 18, 5:30 to 7 p.m. at Greektown Grille, 1230 Cleveland
St., Clearwater.
Cost is $10 for chamber members and $20 for nonmembers. Ad-
vance registration is recommended.
To register, call 584-2321 or e-mail events@largochamber.org.
Portofino Mediterranean Grill opens
CLEARWATER Portofino Mediterranean Grill recently opened its
doors in the Belleair Cove Shopping Center, 18825 U.S. 19 N.
Portofino Mediterranean Grill couples fresh and authentic





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Mediterranean cuisine with contemporary and chic surroundings.
The restaurant "embraces the essence of Mediterranean cuisine by
offering an extensive menu full of traditional favorite dishes as well
as some innovative signature creations." According to a press re-
lease, executive chef and co-owner Nick Polemis believes the foun-
dation of exceptional cuisine starts with the highest quality and
freshest ingredients available.
Portofino Mediterranean Grill is open seven days a week, 11 a.m.
to 3 a.m.
Business counseling available at chamber
LARGO The Largo/Mid-Pinellas Chamber of Commerce hosts
business counseling services provided by Service Corps of Retired
Executives by appointment first and third Thursdays at it offices,
151 Third St. NW.
SCORE counselors represent working and retired business exec-
utives who volunteer their lifetime experience providing assistance
for people looking to start a business and for owners and managers
of existing businesses. There is no cost involved. Counseling ap-
pointments can be made only by calling 584-2321.
Old Northwest group to meet
LARGO -The Old Northwest group will meet Monday, Nov. 15,
6:30 to 8:30 p.m., at Baltic Amber, 552 Clearwater-Largo Road.
Residents and business owners who would like to know about
what's happening in the Old Northwest neighborhood in Largo are
welcome to attend. Old Northwest in downtown Largo is located in
the central portion of Pinellas County and stretches for nearly 1.8
miles along both sides of the West Bay Drive corridor through the
heart of Largo.
For information, call Joseph Stefko at 581-6134 or visit www.dis


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NetworkingPartners.Org forms new chapter
PINELLAS PARK A new chapter of NetworkingPartners.Org will
meet Tuesday, Nov. 16, 11:30 a.m., in the Margaritaville Room at
Dino's Grill and Sports Bar, 4300 Park Blvd.
The group is just starting a new chapter in the Pinellas Park area
and is accepting applications. Those interested may attend the
lunch and learn about the dynamics of the group.
NetworkingPartners.Org are groups of enthusiastic community
service minded business professionals coming together to help each
other's business grow as they give back to the community. The
event is free but reservations are required. To R.S.V.P., call 892-
6050.

Corey Avenue to host annual sidewalk sale
ST. PETE BEACH Corey Avenue's annual fall sidewalk sale will
run Wednesday through Saturday, Nov. 10-13, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
along Corey Avenue in downtown St. Pete Beach.
More than 17 merchants will fill up the sidewalks with merchan-
dise sales, buy-one-get-one offers and discounts. Live music will be
presented daily and refreshments will be offered in participating
stores.
Parking is free. For information, call 498-8778 or visit
www.coreyave.com.
Benchmark Vintage Furnishings opens
ST. PETE BEACH Benchmark Vintage Furnishings recently
opened its doors at 409 Corey Ave.
The business features quality vintage furniture and accessories.




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Leader, November 11,2010 Outdoors 1 3A


Last winter may still

haunt local dolphins


One picturesque fall day, we
were cruising around the last
stop on our survey route. We had
seen only four dolphins. This
final bay seemed empty.
It meant we probably wouldn't
reach the average number of dol-
phins for fall surveys, which is
about a dozen. Most of the fall
surveys this year had been like
this.
At the last moment, we
glimpsed a distant flip of a fin at
the edge of the study area (which
is contiguous with other bays
and watery byways). By the time
we got there, it and a second
fleeting fin were heading out of
the study area. We followed bulls
Scrapefin and Hi W Ski, who fol-
lowed mother-calf pair Face and
4-month-old Falco, into the mys-
terious waters beyond.
The boys dropped back. Face
and her calf forged ahead. Face
wove back and forth across a
broad channel. Falco trailed her,
periodically lunging wildly to rid
itself of a remora.
Suddenly Face's silhouette
rocketed through the still waters
like a man shot out of a cannon.
Then she launched skyward and
dropped, landing flatly to stun a
bite to eat. The picture of Face in
mid-breach revealed her well-
stocked mammaries gorged with
milk for Falco. This is not sur-
prising to see on hoofed stock
mothers. But it is very surprising
to see on streamlined dolphins.
Face's full milk bags bespoke
of the age-old physical generosity
of mother mammals to their de-
pendent young. But the need of
mother dolphins like Face to pro-
vide baby food also whispered


Dolphin
Watch
Ann Weaver


warnings about the coming win-
ter.
For example, dolphin numbers
are down this year. There haven't
been so few dolphins since 2006,
the first year of construction of
our gleaming new John's Pass
Causeway.
Last winter may be one reason
why there are fewer dolphins this
year. Water temperatures were
nearly 20 degrees F. below nor-
mal for nearly a month, and the
resultant fish kill was consider-
able. If dolphin abundance is a
reflection of the amount of avail-
able food, we might speculate
that lower dolphin numbers re-
flect fewer fish to eat.
However, further clues suggest
that last winter may still be
haunting our locals.
The dolphins are thinner than
usual. You can tell when a dol-
phin is thin by the severity of the
ridging of the "backbone" just be-
hind the dorsal fin. A well-padded
dolphin has little ridging. An
emaciated dolphin has the most
severe ridging.
Ridging has to be seen in con-
text, though, because dolphin
girth changes naturally across
the seasons. Dolphins are "thin"
in summer and "fat" in winter.
Our local dolphins tend to be-
come thin in the summer be-
cause the seas get so warm (into
the upper 80-degree range, which


-- .
Photo by ANN WEAVER
A bottlenose dolphin mother is "bagged up" with milk for her calf. Dolphins are genetically related to hippos. Hippos are artiodactyls, an
astonishingly diverse order of hoofed mammals containing some 220 species. Artiodactyl moms like cows, goats and bison "bag up" noticeably.
Bottlenose dolphins rarely do.


is why swimming is so great). In
contrast, consider the chilly wa
ters off southern California,
which barely reach into the 70s
in the summertime.
In the fall, local dolphins start
to gain weight to bulk up for the
winter, which we can track by
changes in individual slender-
ness. This isn't surprising; fall is
the time when mammals feed fu-
riously to gain the weight they
need to get them through the
winter. But our locals never
achieve the remarkable size and
girth of bottlenose dolphins in
the coldest waters, such as the
giants who swim off Scotland.
If our impression that local
dolphins were thinner than usual
is true, and lowered abundance
indicates that there are fewer


food fish for the dolphins, this
could bode ill for the upcoming
winter.
In addition, the few dolphins
dotting the study area have
switched to unusual feeding
styles. They are either using new
techniques or enhancing classic
techniques with splashy new be-
haviors.
For example, some of the dol-
phins have started "bubbling,"
sending out a shot of water or
sound ahead of them while they
hunt. Such shots can be used to
scare or stun fish to make them
easier to catch. Other dolphins
have begun hunting around pil-
ings or under docks, both un-
usual feeding styles.
It goes without saying that na-
ture marches on bravely despite


adversity. We'll track the girth of
new mother dolphins Face, NF,
and Courtney in particular and
all the other dolphins in general,
and hope for the best. Wouldn't it
be ironic if the highly anticipated
government trimming was paral-
leled at sea?


Come and

enjoy our

own

back yard


^---------------s
Nov. Dec.

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14A Sports


Leader, November 11, 2010


Ruth Fellmeth, left, and Del Bowyer, were inducted into the National
Senior Softball Hall of Fame.


Softball players honored

LARGO Del Bowyer of Largo, a leftfielder, and Ruth Fellmeth, a
Largo winter resident, were inducted into the National Senior Soft-
ball Hall of Fame at the SPA Women's World Tournament in Gal-
latin, Tenn., Sept. 16-18.
Both play on the Freedom Spirit of Florida, a softball team based
in Clearwater that is composed of women who are at least 70 years
old.
The team played in several tournaments this year, including the
SPA Columbus, Ohio, Classic in July, where Freedom Spirit won
first place and the Huntsman Word Senior Games in St. George,
Utah, placing second.
"Due to the fact that very few of these softball players are able to
finance most of their tournaments, they take great pride in their
sponsors, Freedom Square and Seminole Square Retirement Com-
munities of Seminole and Momentum Bank of St. Petersburg for
their help with entry fees, travel expenses and team supplies," a
Freedom Spirit news release said.


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YOU FLRIT O CHIC


Dealing with

There's no question that al-
most a 10-degree drop in the
water temperature in a 24-hour
period is going to have an adverse
effect on our fishing.
Dramatic surges in the baro-
metric pressure can make fish
have lockjaw or feed like crazy. can get pretty
As I fished my way through the will agree tha
first real cold front of the year Ibecause theo
noticed a few things that helped because te
me understand Mother Nature's seek prote
effects on fishing, as we brace for blocked sho
the seemingly endless barrage of happy in di
cold fronts. even if yot
Maybe these tidbits will help you've had
you understand and be more ef- cently but t
coffee with
fective at catching fish in the face there long if
of adversity. erelong lf
of adversitybite. Those fi
Water clarity. When the wind tee o
howls straight out of the north di- there or son
rectly following a passing cold they're probe
front, the Intracoastal Waterway too good unt

Briefs


Southwest Pool offers
lifeguarding class
LARGO The city's Recre-
ation, Parks and Arts Depart-
ment said the beginning of an
r- ------------




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L - - - - -


changes in the weather


Fish Tales
Sl ,_


y dirty. Most people
at a north wind is the
sh around here just
re are few places to
action on a wind
reline. Fish are not
rty, muddy water,
I fish a spot that
great success at re-
he water resembles
cream. Don't stay
you're not getting a
ish are probably still
newhere nearby but
ably not going to bite
il it cleans up again.


American Red Cross lifeguarding
class is set for Dec. 6 through
Dec. 17 at Southwest Pool,
13120 Vonn Road.
Classes will be held from 5 to
8 p.m. Monday through Friday
for two weeks. Cost is $125 for
residents and $156.25 for non-
residents, and all individuals
must have a city recreation card
to participate. There is an addi-
tional fee for the American Red
Cross books and materials.
This class is open to people 15
years or older who wish to begin
a career in lifeguarding. This
course teaches the skills neces-
sary to become an American Red
Cross certified lifeguard, which
is widely accepted throughout
the aquatic progression. Stu-
dents completing the 30-hour
course will receive certification
in lifeguarding, CPR/AED for
the professional rescuer and
First Aid.
The following are prerequisites
necessary to enroll in the
course, which will be tested on
the first night of class: 300 yard
continuous swim using proper
front crawl and breaststroke (not
timed) and retrieving a brick
from 7- to 10-feet of water and
swimming with it 20 yards back
to the side and kicking only
(must be done in less than 1
minute 40 seconds).
The deadline for registration


Lower than normal tides.
Outgoing tides will always be ex-
treme when the wind is blowing
out of the north and transverse-
ly the incoming tide will be
weaker than normal as the wind
will hold the water back. The
benefit of this phenomenon is
that with all the exposed areas
you can easily see the deeper
troughs that fish will use to
make their way on and off the
flats and also will allow you to
find the deeper holes that the
fish might bunch up in as they
wait for the water to come back
in.
Clear blue skies. When all
the clouds finally move out and
high pressure builds back in on
the backside of the front, the
sky is often bright blue and
completely cloudless. This might


and payment is Dec. 3. Call
Southwest Pool at 518-3126.

Pickleball comes to
Pinellas Park
PINELLAS PARK Broderick
Recreation Center, at 6101 66th
Ave. N., introduces adult pickle-
ball beginning Nov. 29.
The center will host an ongo-
ing drop-in format of the sport
every Monday and Wednesday,
from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Hours
could be extended into lunch
hours if an interest exists. The
fee will be $2 with a recreation
card or $3 without one.
Pickleball, invented in 1965,
was named after a Washington
congressman's dog Pickles. It
combines elements of bad-
minton, tennis and ping pong
into a sport that is great fun and
great exercise. Call 541-0844.

Volkssport club
plans walks
The Suncoast Sandpipers
Volkssport Club, a Tampa Bay
walking club, will host four non-
competitive walks along the Gulf
beaches Nov. 20-21.
Walkers will be given written
directions and maps, with water
and snack stops along the
routes.
On Saturday, Nov. 20, a
5/11-kilometer walk will start


look pretty enough but can
make for some tough fishing.
Shallow water fish become very
wary under these conditions and
will often lay on the bottom mo-
tionless and wait for more favor-
able conditions. Slow down your
presentation when casting artifi-
cial lures, or switch to cut bait
instead of live bait. This will give
predatory fish a better opportu-
nity to find your bait.
Until next week, get bent!
Tyson Wallerstein can be
reached at capt.tyson@hot
mail.com. To get a fish photo
in the paper, send the photo
along with your name, when
and where it was caught to ed
itorial@TBNweekly.com or
mail it to Tampa Bay Newspa-
pers, 9911 Seminole Blvd.,
Seminole, FL 33772.


from Paradise Lutheran Church,
10255 Paradise Blvd., Treasure
Island, at 8 a.m. Walkers will go
to John's Pass Village and re-
turn by the Sanding Ovations
sand sculptures.
Also on Nov. 20, two walks are
offered in St. Pete Beach. Regis-
tration for both walks will be in
Horan Park at the St. Pete
Beach Community Center, 7701
Boca Ciega Drive, at 7:30 a.m.
Walkers can do one or both
walks but must be finished by
3:30 p.m. One walk is a 6/11-
kilometer trek to Sunset Beach.
The second St. Pete Beach walk
is a 6/10K stroll through Pass-
a-Grille.
On Sunday, Nov. 21, a 6/10K
walk will be held in Indian
Shores, beginning at 8 a.m. at
Indian Shores Town Hall, 19305
Gulf Blvd. Other activities at
Town Hall will include a library
book sale and a mayor's pan-
cake breakfast.
All walks can be done for free.
Participants are asked to
bring toiletries and dry foods for
the Paradise Lutheran Church's
pantry for the needy. A part of
the proceeds from the book sale
and pancake breakfast will be
given to the Suncoast Seabird
Sanctuary.
For more information, contact
Alice Lawrence at 595-2173 or
e-mail pipers@tampabay.rr.com.


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division title
The Largo Little League Gators
won the Florida District 12
Classic Fall Major's Tournament
Nov. 7. The championship
started with 32 teams and two
Largo teams made the top
eight. There were two
divisions. The Gators won the
championship in the red
division and Holiday won the
blue. The boys played a total of
six games from the evening of
Nov. 5 to the afternoon of Nov.
7. Three of the Gators hit out-
of-the-park homeruns, and two
boys each had three home
runs.


I Reverse Mortgages with More I










Leader, November 11, 2010



Tax vote not



the last word


As disappointing as the vote was in Hillsborough County to reject a
1-cent sales tax increase for transportation improvements, area lead-
ers should continue to be aggressive in their support for ways to in-
crease mobility.
The Tampa Bay Area Regional Transportation Authority, which was
established by the state Legislature in 2007, is leading the most ambi-
tious and thorough approach to solving traffic gridlock ever undertak-
en in the seven-county area it serves.
Numerous reports have shown that the area lags behind almost all
other metropolitan areas in transportation improvements. Business,
community and government leaders have embraced the need to im-
prove the transportation system and see it as a catalyst to create long-
term economic development opportunities for the area.
Along those lines several entities in Pinellas County are laying the
groundwork for enhanced mass transit, such as commuter rail. Offi-
cials in Pinellas, too, have been considering an increase in the sales
tax to fund mass transit.
That's logical, since the sales tax has proven to be a solid source of
funding to build infrastructure, as evident by the Penny for Pinellas.
Tourists also pay a substantial amount of sales taxes annually to the
county, reducing the tax burden on local residents.
Nevertheless, the defeat of the sales tax proposal in Hillsborough
County should be scrutinized carefully before Pinellas and other coun-
ties put a similar proposal before the voters especially in a weak
economy that's contributing to anti-tax sentiment.
Spurred by the defeat of the tax, the transportation authority wants
to help other counties learn from Hillsborough's experience as they
move forward with their own initiatives. That's a step in the right direc-
tion, one that will help ensure that regional transportation remains a
priority.
Whether it's public education or more planning that's needed to
come up with a funding source to develop a more efficient transporta-
tion system, area leaders should consider the defeat of the sales tax
measure as just that not a referendum or the last word on rail sys-
tems or another transit option, as expensive as they may be.
Officials have worked too hard and have come too far in their efforts
to develop a regional transportation system to be dissuaded by one
vote on a funding source.


LETTERS
Remembering John Wolbert
Editor:
As friends of John and Linda Wolbert for the past 15 years, my wife
Barbara and I were deeply saddened when we learned of John's pass-
ing.
Reflecting on our relationship with John after reading the news
made us aware how fortunate we were to have had the privilege of as-
sociating with him and enjoying his company and council. However, it
also made us aware of the fact so many people who were affected by
the contributions John made to the community were either unaware of
them or worse took them for granted.
For all the years we knew John, his plate was full yet he always
found time and space to do more. Though his family always came first,
he never failed to be there as a friend or confidant. His "other family,"
those at the Dolphin where Linda and John shared a labor of love, cer-
tainly knew the pleasure of being a part of something far more than a
simple business. What they enjoyed was a partnership built of concern
for those laboring with a common purpose.
It is the citizens of the community who benefited so much from
John's time that I fear knew far too little of John and Linda's contribu-
tions and personal sacrifices on their behalf.
Time spent in community service is time taken away from one's fam-
ily and personal life. Worse, one who chooses to serve, not as a profes-
sional politician whose motives may be questioned but as a citizen
fulfilling a civic obligation, soon find themselves subjected to attack
and criticism. John knew this but still accepted the challenge.
As a member of the Madeira Beach (City Commission), he was the
best kind of officer. I am referring here to the fact that John served not
out of choice but because he was drafted by a group of his fellow citi-
zens, of which I was a part, to run for office. Together, we contrived to
convince John it was important to have someone with no ax to grind -
just an ordinary citizen of the community on the board. I will never for-
get how reluctantly he acquiesced.
It was not a case of unwillingness to serve that made John reluc-
tant. At the time Linda was fighting a debilitating and persistent ill-
ness. This, coupled with an increased share of the responsibility for
running a business on which several people depended, was taking
more and more of John's time and energy. Then there was the matter
of the constant problems of rebuilding their home that had been de-
stroyed by a hurricane. John found himself in the middle of a constant
struggle with government agencies, the insurance company and the
contractor. If this was not taxing enough, there was also the time de-
manded by his service on the library board.
Only those who invested heavily in community service will ever truly
understand the sacrifices demanded not only of the person who choos-
es to get involved but equally of their family. However, all of us, and es-
pecially those who were John's detractors, should take a moment and
reflect on what this kind and decent man, as well as his family, sacri-
ficed for us.
Robert Shaw
Madeira Beach

Opposed to killer shelters
Editor:
To quote Lillian Jackson Braun on cats: 'These intelligent, peace-
loving four-footed friends who are without prejudice, without hate,
without greed." These peace-loving animals are being killed in shelters
at a great number. The SPCA of Tampa Bay being one of the culprits -
their crimes: They just dare to live in a world dominated by the human
race with its rules and regulations. As a member of this race, I am
strongly opposed to these killer shelters that destroy our pets at will.
There are times when an animal, like a human, becomes so old or sick
that keeping it in a cage/bed for months on end, without hope of ever
leaving that cage/bed, would be highly cruel.
However, these shelters are making up their rules as they see fit, to
satisfy their financial needs, on which pet will live and which one will
die, all based on their arrogant ignorance of the right to all beings to
live their lives to their fullest, being human or animal. These shelters
must be forced to abandon their mass abuse of pets/animals.
There are proven methods to "limit" the number of pets, although
most of them are not enforced to their fullest potentials for a number
of reasons. I was advised by an organization that laws permitting these
abuses/cruelties must be changed. Myself, I will try to change them;
But I will need help from all decent humans to achieve these changes.
In memory of my two cats, "Mustache" and "Bunny."
Pierre Henrion
Clearwater


Enjoyed Torres's column on rally
Re: 'How I attended the rally to restore sanity,' Viewpoints column by
JulianaA. Torres, Nov. 4.
Editor:
An entertaining and factually correct story as my wife and I were in
the middle of the rally also. We were there as a preplanned holiday fol-
lowing my class reunion in Ohio. The mostly under-30 crowd was well
behaved and easy to talk with. As we stayed in Rockville, Md., we too,
had a fun metrorail ride down to the mall. The trip back was a night-
mare. Chatted with people on the motel shuttle ride, on the metro and
at the mall. Comments were: "I like to go to any rally" from California,
it's Halloween, "can wear a costume," "party time." But most were seri-
ous and mostly neutral to left, but open to discussion. To this end the
name is Jon Stewart not Steward.
Kenneth Kastor
Seminole


Viewpoints 1 5A


Needed: more psychic readers


A few days ago I was thumbing through a
Pinellas County phone book looking for "pub-
lications." Along the way, I ran across the list-
ing "psychic readings."
As a lifelong fan of spooky-doo, I took time
to count the listings. Turns out there were
only about 20 psychic readers, some local
and some nationwide. Since Pinellas County
has about 930,000 residents, this comes out
to one psychic reader available for every
42,000 persons.
That's a much lower ratio than for doctors,
lawyers or plumbers. That's a disgrace. A
county that cannot support several hundred
psychic readers is a county filled with persons
who have no concern for the future, space
aliens, dream analysis, the welfare of their
dead loved ones or for where local murder vic-
tims may be buried. Psychics are interested in
all these vital issues and more.
Psychic readers vary in their skills and
honesty. A good one can shake hands with
you, ask your first name, and then tell you all
sorts of facts about your past and present.
However, a phony psychic will ask you lead-
ing questions, such as "Is there someone in
your family named Gwendolyn? No? How
about Doris?" In the end you will tell the psy-
chic more about yourself than he/she does.
Other psychics will predict your future.
"You will go on a trip, by car, train or aircraft.
Perhaps on foot. You will meet a suave, smil-
ing man who will ask you to try out a new
bed. His name will be Pierre. He will be a mat-
tress salesman."
My father was psychic. When I was 16, he
told me, "Son, you will never amount to a hill
of beans. Your church will expel you. Women
will scorn you. You will drive a series of Sub-
aru's.





Driver's Seat
Bob Driver


Your hair will turn white. Your knees will
disintegrate. You will write silly essays con-
taining the word 'behoove' more than neces-
sary."
What a guy. After seeing most of these pre-
dictions come true, my father died. I would
ask a psychic to contact him on the Other
Side, but he'd probably refuse to answer the
phone.
The Pinellas psychic readers in the phone
book are mostly women Cynthia, Angela,
Stephanie, Doreena, Pauline, and so forth.
This is because women are more sensitive
than men, from birth onward. They weep eas-
ily. They love kittens and babies. They can tell
when their boy friends or husbands are lying
to them. By the time a woman reaches age
30, her psychic intuition is tuned up like one
of Yo-Yo Ma's cello strings.
Male psychics are rare. Who in their right
mind would pay good money to a psychic
reader named Bubba? Or Chester? Admitted-
ly, the late Edgar Cayce was an esteemed psy-
chic, at least when it came to diagnosing
physical ailments like hyphenated stomach
fissures. Cayce never charged for his read-
ings.
Most psychics do, however. If I ever get a
few hundred bucks saved, I plan to visit five
or six psychic readers all on the same day. It


will be fun to see if they agree on who I am,
what is my future, and did any of them know
about that naughty game Millie Zellquist and
I used to play in her father's attic. If all the
psychics agree on these things, then I'll be-
come a true believer. If they don't I'll return to
my present attitude, which is that of benevo-
lent skepticism.
Despite that mindset, I'd still feel more at
ease if Pinellas County could increase its total
number of psychic readers. We must attract
more of them here, and urge them to settle.
But first we must attract a larger customer
base of persons who might be described as
flaky, oddball, eccentric, balmy, sensitive, off-
center or (at the least) open-minded. This has
been accomplished in Sedona, Ariz., Taos,
N.M., and a few other places. Why can't we do
it here?
An alternative would be to persuade exist-
ing residents of Pinellas to become enamored
of psychic readings. Now that the midterm
elections are over, I'm sure there are many
political fanatics from far left to far right -
who are feeling empty and directionless. They
should be sitting ducks for a charismatic psy-
chic reader to recruit.
A third idea is for us to start a college to
teach local residents how to become a psychic
reader. All around us are for-profit schools
training folks to become dental technicians,
chefs and private investigators. So why not
psychics? All an applicant would need is a
dreamy disposition, a high degree of sug-
gestibility and maybe an Irish aunt who could
hear dead children singing "Galway Bay." Is
that asking much?
Send Bob Driver an e-mail at tralee71 @com
cast.net


The time is now for leadership


Dr. Johnson famously said, "When a man
knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it con-
centrates his mind wonderfully." Those of us in
leadership positions with transit-oriented
agencies and committees on both sides of the
bay understand that our bus systems are
slowly strangling due to declining revenue
sources, a situation primarily attributable to
our reliance on property taxes for operating
funds.
The fact that both the Pinellas Suncoast
Transit Authority and Hillsborough Area Re-
gional Transportation Authority cannot provide
service adequate to the needs of a major
metropolitan area no matter how efficiently
and enthusiastically these agencies conduct
their business with the resources currently at
hand points to a bigger issue of stagnation
that plagues the Tampa Bay region. To put it
bluntly, unless we work diligently to create a
truly modem, multi-faceted transportation sys-
tem for the benefit of the citizens (and tourists)
of this region, we will see the area slide into
second rate status, and we will become known,
for all intents and purposes, as a metropolitan
backwater.
Our business community understands this
intuitively, for it knows that a dynamic econo-
my, in today's steeply competitive climate,
must depend on the backbone provided by a
variety of transportation options. To simply
close our eyes to this reality will not make it go
away. For the younger generation, quality of life
goes hand in hand with quality of transporta-
tion, yet the importance of this fact is somehow
eluding us, or at least we are not adequately re-
sponding to this growing need.
The defeat of the Hillsborough transportation
ballot proposal is only a temporary setback,
and may in fact be a blessing in disguise if it
leads to a revised plan that will be embraced by
the majority of the electorate the next time
around and I believe that there must be a
next time and a next opportunity for our lead-
ers to do their duty by their communities. It is
up to these leaders to mold plans with input


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As I See It
R.B. Johnson


from a wide variety of community sources -
that will provide the desired forms of trans-
portation for our region deep into the century.
Pinellas County has been working on a new
vision for transit that features light rail and a
vastly expanded bus system. A crucial aspect
of this vision is the linking of our system (both
rail and bus) with those of adjoining counties. I
have no doubt whatsoever that we in Pinellas
will continue our efforts with the goal of asking
the voters to approve a proposal that is de-
tailed and comprehensive in scope and one
that will provide a map for future transporta-
tion improvements (including roads, sidewalks
and biking trails) in every comer of the county.
When will voters finally see this on their bal-
lots? The most likely date will be in the fall of
2012, because by then the Alternatives Analy-
sis the project at the center of our planning
process will have been long completed, and
its conclusions thoroughly integrated into our
new plan. If at that time Hillsborough County
is also ready, we will have an excellent oppor-
tunity to coordinate the formulation of these
proposals with the support of the Tampa Bay
Area Regional Transportation Authority with
whom the PSTA, the Pinellas Metropolitan
Planning Organization and Florida Department
of Transportation are already partnering on
our Alternatives Analysis. This partnership, by
the way, has earned us plaudits from the Fed-
eral Transit Administration for unprecedented
and innovative regional planning. If the econo-
my is finally showing signs of strengthening in
the period leading up to 2012, there will be no
reason why we should not bring our proposals
to the electorate two years from now. I believe


that Pinellas and Hillsborough counties going
forward simultaneously opens up regional
planning possibilities that will both help garner
funding support from the Federal Transit Ad-
ministration and capture the imagination and
enthusiasm of voters on both sides of the bay.
The bottom line is that we cannot simply
wave a magic wand and expect our trans-
portation system to suddenly and providen-
tially improve. Transportation is an
investment, and we will not achieve a signifi-
cant return for the community as a whole un-
less the pump is adequately primed. And that
means money, enough of it to build and oper-
ate a substantially larger and more varied sys-
tem across the region than we have -
unfortunately gotten used to seeing. I am a
supporter of the notion that tax reform (via a
swap of the PSTA millage for a sales tax,
which would lighten the load on property own-
ers) is better than merely adding one tax to
another. At 1 cent, the revenue that this sales
tax would generate would build a transit sys-
tem in Pinellas County exponentially better
than what we have now, but without it there
is no hope of any substantial improvement be-
cause of the relative meagerness of other po-
tential funding sources. There's no need to
sugarcoat here: Only greater funding leads to
greater service.
If there was ever a time for bold and deter-
mined leadership in Pinellas County, that time
is now. We do not have to consign our com-
munity to a state of gradual and perpetual de-
cline, but that is what we will be doing if we
neglect to address, in a serious manner, our
future transportation needs. Take it from
someone who understands transit from the
inside out: The crisis is here. I urge our lead-
ers, in all sectors of our community to step
forward and illustrate by their actions the
truth of the old adage, that crisis brings out
the best in the best.
R.B. Johnson is chairman of the Pinellas
Suncoast Transit Authority and is mayor of In-
dian Rocks Beach.


9911 Seminole Blvd., Seminole, FL 33772
727-397-5563 Fax: 727-397-5900 www.TBNweekly.com


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Clearwater Beacon: Alexandra Caldwell
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Executive Editor: Tom Germond Belleair/Beach Bee: Chary Southmayd
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16A Viewpoints


Leader, November 11, 2010


Down with urns, open caskets and deathmobiles


I'll never have one foot in the grave.
That's because the only thing I expect to be
buried under is paperwork. Funerals are for the
living, and I don't want any stinking flowers sit-
ting on top of me.
Forgive my rant, but death has been on my
mind lately.
You see, today is the day that the last of the
great cheapskates is finally going to march down
the street and see somebody about getting a will
and a living will. I also need to fill out other pa-
perwork to make sure my 1966 football cards
don't fall into the wrong hands.
How do you go about getting your bucket list
approved? Have to do that, too.
My dear mom has scolded me for years about
my failure to look after my estate. She doesn't
want the government to rob me when I'm gone.
Actually, I'm not concerned much about what
people do to my estate; I'm more concerned
about what they do to me.
First of all, I don't want an open-casket funer-
al. To me, it's an atavistic custom. Just the


Tom
Germond


thought of lying in a crate while people say
things about me and stare at my pallid face gives
me the willies.
'Tom looks dead."
"He sure does."
"Dead as a doorknob."
"Did that cheap #X$! ever get around to get-
ting a will?"
"Yup. Didn't leave anybody with a dime. Gave
it all to the University of Florida."
"For scholarships?"
"Nope to help buy out the head coaches' con-
tracts if they lose more than three games in a
season."


I'm also worried what some juvenile delinquent
will do to me while I'm lying helplessly in a cas-
ket such as put a set of fake vampire teeth in
my mouth. Or sneak a cell phone in my pocket
and dial the number.
I don't want to have a funeral, period. Too
much wailing, too much ceremony, even though
I know funeral homes do everything they can to
make families comfortable.
For instance, years ago a funeral home in Cen-
tral Florida took the departed's family to the
cemetery in a recreational vehicle.
We talked about it in the newsroom.
"Who's going to do the story on the new RV at
the funeral home?"
"Germond is. Said something about going for a
ride in the deathmobile."
Mardi gras, it wasn't.
When I die, I don't want anybody to waste any
money on flowers, unless you want to send them
to a fan of a team that the Florida Gators beat.
Funny, too, what people ask for in lieu of flow-
ers. A good friend died after suffering from a


long, painful bout of cancer several years ago. He
was only 48. Never sure how he died, but I have
a hunch.
He asked that in lieu of flowers, donations
should be made to the Hemlock Society. Don't
put me in an urn, either. That's boring. Make it a
beer stein.
Epitaphs? The only one I've ever liked is on a
Key West gravestone "I told you I was sick."
I guess I want my ashes scattered over the sea.
But I have some reservations about that, too. I
don't want to be part of a remake of a scene in
the "Big Lebowski." At the end of the movie, Wal-
ter Sobchak tries to scatter the ashes of the poor
Donny Kerabatsos over the Pacific Ocean and
the ashes got caught in the wind and hit Jeffry
Lebowski square in the face.
Be gentle with me.
T-minus one hour and counting until I see
what it costs to get a will and other documents
prepared. Should be able to save some money.
I have a beer stein.


So long to one of major league baseball's good guys


By now, most of us have read quite a bit about
the life and career of former Major League Baseball
manager Sparky Anderson.
But probably not enough could ever be written.
George "Sparky" Anderson, who died last week at
the age of 76, was one of the dynamic personalities
in baseball from the early 1970s through the late
1980s. His persona was evident early on as manag-
er of the Cincinnati Reds when he directed the Big
Red Machine to back-to-back World Series titles in
1975-76, and later when he skippered the Detroit
Tigers to a five-game sweep of San Diego in the
1984 World Series.
The Hall of Famer with the trademark white hair
was simply a winner. He was the first manager to
win World Series titles in both the American and
National leagues and in the process won 2,194
games over a 27-year career as a manager.
Sparky was one of the good guys in baseball. I
was fortunate enough to get to know him as a
young writer a few years back covering the Tigers in
spring training.
It was easy to spend hours in his office following a


meaningless spring exhibition game an
his brain.
Sparky loved baseball and never lef
until the last writer was gone. He love
and loved to talk about it.
His laid-back demeanor worked wonder
clubs he managed. But it was his wit an
earth style that pulled people in like a
one-liners were about as good as Yog
Casey Stengel.
Some of them included:
"Me carrying a briefcase is like a hot
earrings."
"I've got my faults but living in the pa


of them. There's no future in it."
"Losing hurts twice as bad as winning feels
Bob good."
McClure Fortunately for Sparky and the teams he man-
aged, the wins far outnumbered the losses.
He was a brilliant manager who got the most out
of his players and earned the nickname "Captain
Hook" for his quick changes of starting pitchers.
Sparky was almost like a father to many of his
id just pick players and quickly gained their respect if they did-
n't already have it.
ft his office Each spring, he created a stir by anointing a
d the game young rookie as the next Mickey Mantle or the next
Bobby Murcer. His predictions never came to pass
ers with the but they gave writers something to write about. It
nd down-to- put a little added spin into the spring.
magnet. His An otherwise boring spring training always had a
gi Berra or few extra wrinkles, thanks to the commentary of
Sparky.
I recall one particular year when Sparky showed
dog wearing up and there wasn't a future star on his radar
screen. Instead, Anderson spent the better part of
ast isn't one two or three hours talking about how his wife made


him paint his home in California during the offsea-
son and the calamities that went with it.
You had to be there to get the full effect of
Sparky's dissertation because Sparky was just a
regular guy in a baseball uniform. He was like your
next-door neighbor. You just felt like you could con-
fide in him but at the same time he was very enter-
taining.
Anderson was truly a leader but he did it without
a strong command of the English language.
He once told Sports Illustrated, "I truly don't
know the language. I wish I could know the differ-
ence between a noun and a pronoun and an adverb
and a verb, but I don't know. And you know, I don't
want to know. Why do you have to know English?"
Sparky didn't need it. When it came to communi-
cation, he was among the best with giving umpires
a piece of his mind. But he seldom, if ever, dis-
played that type of image to his players.
He was humble and always said he won games
because he had good players.
Sparky Anderson was a character a good char-
acter. Baseball will miss him.


*






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Leader, November 11, 2010 17A


Church news


St. Dunstan's Church
LARGO St. Dunstan's Anglican Church will have a craft sale, Satur-
day, Nov. 11, and Sunday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 401 West Bay
Drive.
The sale features quilts, books, soy candles and decorative holiday
items -jellies, jams and pickles- woodwork and many other handcrafted
items. Coffee, cold drinks, snacks and pastries also will be served.
The sale is open to the public. Call 581-1435.

First Baptist Church of Indian Rocks
LARGO A night of comedy and music will be presented Friday, Nov.
12, at Smiley's Coffeehouse at First Baptist Church of Indian Rocks,
12685 Ulmerton Road, Largo.
Doors will open at 8:30 p.m. with the show starting at 9 p.m. A gather-
ing place for college-age audience and those in their 20s, the show will
feature parodies in the vein of "Saturday Night Live," satire as seen on
"Mad TV" and improve comedy as featured on "Who's Line is It Anyway?"
For more information, visit www.smileyscoffeehouse.com. For general
information about the church, call 595-3421 or visit
www.indianrocks.org.

Westside Church of the Nazarene
LARGO Westside Church of the Nazarene is serving as a drop-off
point for Operation Christmas Child gift-filled shoe boxes in the Largo
area.
The church is hoping for 25,000 shoe box donations. Donations will be
accepted Nov. 15-22.
Through Operation Christmas Child, Largo residents are helping send
shoe box gifts this year to more than 8 million children in 100 countries
suffering from natural disaster, war, terrorism, disease, famine and
poverty. From Largo, the shoe box gifts will be sorted and sent using
whatever means necessary.
Operation Christmas Child uses tracking technology that allows
donors to follow their donations to the destination country where it will
be hand-delivered to a child in need.
To register shoe box gifts and find out what country they are delivered
to, use the EZ Give donation form found at www.samaritanspurse.org.
Local collection sites include the following:
Westside Church of the Nazarene, 11633 137th St., Largo. Hours are
Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, 9 am. to 3 p.m.; Wednesday, 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. and 7 to 8 p.m.; Friday and Sunday, 9 am. to 1 p.m.; and Satur-
day, 9 am. to noon. Call 595-6338.
Chick-Fil-A, 10790 Park Blvd., Seminole. Hours are Monday and
Saturday, 6:30 to 10 p.m.; Friday, 6 am. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 3
p.m. Donations will not be accepted on Monday, Nov. 22. Call 398-0777.
Countryside Christian Center, 1850 N. McMullen Booth Road, Clear-
water. Hours are Monday, 7:30 a.m. to noon; Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Wednesday, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.; Saturday,
8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; and Sunday, 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Call 799-1618.

Lake Seminole Presbyterian Church
SEMINOLE A community food drive will take place Saturday, Nov.


13, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Lake Seminole Presbyterian Church, 8505
113th St., Seminole.
This event will be outside on the church lawn near the 86th Avenue
entrance. Those interested in donating may bring nonperishable food
and household items. Suggested items for donation include juice, coffee,
tea, bath soap, laundry detergent, Band-Aids, oatmeal, cereal, pasta,
pasta sauces, rice, soup, tissue, canned meats and tuna, canned fruits
and vegetables, peanut butter, jelly and clean plastic containers with lids
(peanut butter or jelly jars, soft butter or instant coffee containers, etc.)
All items are appreciated.
Donations will be delivered to the Interfaith Food Pantry at Aldersgate
United Methodist Church. The number of individuals and families served
increases each month and the food pantry is in desperate need of dona-
tions.
For information, call 391-5509 or visit lakeseminolepc.info.

Peace Memorial Presbyterian Church
CLEARWATER The Peace Memorial Concert Series will continue with
Pipes, Piano and Patriots, presented Sunday, Nov. 14, 3 p.m., at Peace
Memorial Presbyterian Church, 110 S. Fort Harrison Ave.
Attendees will hear Peace Memorial's magnificent Cassavant pipe
organ and Baldwin concert grand piano. From some classics by Bach,
Widor and Mussorgsky to a variety of American themed solos and duets,
performing artists will feature American composers such as Joplin,
Gershwin and Ives, and selections such as "An American in Paris," "Fan-
tasia on America the Beautiful" and a medley of service songs to honor
veterans.
Rita Rostron will perform on the Cassavant pipe organ and Rebecca
Lind will play the Baldwin concert grand piano.
No tickets needed and seating is first come, first served. An offering
will be taken with a $5 minimum suggested. Doors will open at 2:30 p.m.
A light reception will follow the concert in the fellowship hall.
Call 446-3001 or visit www.peacememorial.org.

Temple B'Nai Israel
CLEARWATER The Clearwater chapter of Hadassah will meet
Wednesday, Nov. 17, 11:30 am., at Temple B'Nai Israel, 1685 S. Belcher
Road, Clearwater.
The guest speaker will be the Rev. Abhi Janamanchi. A dairy lunch
will be served. The public is encouraged to attend.
Call Claire at 393-7417.

Calvary Episcopal Church
INDIAN ROCKS BEACH A two-part class on Microsoft Office Suite
2003 and 2007 will be offered in November at Calvary Episcopal
Church, 1615 First St., Indian Rocks Beach.
The church's learning center will present the two-part class on Satur-
days, Nov. 13 and 20, 10 to 11:30 a.m.
Attendees will learn how to work with Microsoft Word and Microsoft
Excel. Subjects covered will include how to create a letter, copy and
paste data, perform spell check and use other features, create a basic
budget worksheet, work with cells in Excel and perform automatic cal-
culations.


Leslie and Marie Roe
Leslie and Marie Roe of Seminole celebrated their 70th wedding
anniversary Oct. 24, 2010.
They were married in 1940 at the Church of Christ of Largo by
brother Cameron. Both Leslie and Marie are long-time Largo resi-
dents. Before retiring, Leslie was a general contractor for more
than 60 years in the Tampa Bay area.
The couple has three sons, one daughter (now deceased), six
grandchildren and one great grandchild.

This class is designed to help a mid-level computer user work with
Microsoft Office Suite tools.
Cost is $20 for the class. Each student will be given a folder with in-
formation covered in the class in order to take the newly learned skills
with them. There will be two one-and half hours of hands-on classes in
the parish's lab. To register, call 595-2374.

Temple Ahavat Shalom
PALM HARBOR A Chanukah concert and artisan fair will be pre-
sented Sunday, Dec. 5, Temple Ahavat Shalom, 1575 Curlew Road,
Palm Harbor.
The fair will begin at 2 p.m. The concert will start at 3:30 p.m.
Led by Cantor Deborah Jacobson, the concert will include the tem-
ple's choirs, children and teenagers, special guests and a full band. The
fair will feature holiday foods, a silent auction, raffle, Menorah lighting,
crafts for children, a ballon artist, a charicature artist. Every child will
receive a special Chanukah gift.
Cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children in advance. Cost is $13 for
adults and $7 for children the day of the event.
Call 785-8811.


Calendar of events


Kiwanis Clubs:
Countryside Clearwater meets Tuesdays, 7:30 a.m., at Eve's
Family Restaurant, 3150 State Road 584, Oldsmar.
Dunedin meets Thursday, 7:30 a.m., at Meeting Room 1 at
Mease-Morton Plant Hospitla in Dunedin.
Greater Clearwater meets Thursdays, 7:30 p.m., at the Golden
Coin Restaurant, 1844 N. Highland Ave.
Gulf Beaches meets Thursdays, 6:30 p.m., in the training room
upstairs at the Madeira Beach Publix, at 662 150th Ave.
Holiday meets Tuesdays, 7:15 a.m., at Four Seasons Restau
rant, 3350 Grand Blvd., Holiday.
Largo/Mid-Pinellas meets Fridays, 7:30 a.m., at Largo Commu
nity Center, 65 4th St. NW, Largo. Call 744-1400.
Midtown meets Wednesdays, 7:30 a.m., at St. Petersburg Yacht
Club, 11 Central Ave.


Obituaries
Lynn Marie REID
Lynn Marie Reid, 59, of Largo, Fla. passed
away November 6, 2010. She was born in
Cleveland, Ohio and moved to Largo in 1984
where she and her family enjoyed many happy
years. Lynn was a loving mother, daughter, sis-
ter and friend. She was a faithful believer in
our Lord Jesus Christ and she is now with
Him. She leaves behind her loving husband of
40 years, James Robert Reid, Jr; son, James
Robert Reid, III; daughter, Genieve Rose Pettyjohn; two sisters,
Donna Wiegle and Betty Hortitz and four beauti-ful grandchildren,
Jordan, Sabrina, Benjamin and Allison. A service will be held at Sat-
urday, November 13, 2010 at 2:00 p.m. at the Memorial Park Funer-
al Home, 5750 49th St. N., St. Petersburg, Fla. All who knew Lynn
are welcome to attend. She will be greatly missed by all who knew
her, because to know her was to love her.


SSt. Matthew Catholic Church\
9111 90th Avenue Seminole
Mass Daily Monday Saturday 8:30am
Saturday Vigil 4pm Sunday 7:30am, 9:00am & 11:00am |
Interpreted Mass 9am
Rev. Patrick Rebel, Pastor 727-393-1288


Holy Spirit Ecumenical Catholic Church
Because it's ant about the rules.
It's about relationships!

Sunday Mass, 10:30am
Come, share ourjoyl

6152 126th Ave (Oaklefe Center), Largo
727.232.3918 HolySpiritECC.org



Friday Nights 7:30pm
Largo Community Center
65 Fourth Street N.W., Largo
Internationally known Minister
Musician Vocalist Songwriter with over 40 years of ministry.
Praise & Worship Prayer for Those in Need.
102810 Everyone Welcome! Rev. Harold Lewis


F FOR PEOPLE THAT ARE
S AD POB. PEOPLE
0o WOULD
HURTING w..ELP I
PROGRAMS AND SERVICES FOR CHILDREN, YOUT
YOUNGG ADULTS, SENIORS, DEAF, RECOVERY AN
| FRIDAY 7:
SUNDAY -
10:30 AM


Palm Harbor area meets Tuesdays, 7:30 a.m. at Tiffany's
Restaurant, 35000 U.S. 19 N.
Pinellas Park meets Thursdays, 12:15 p.m., at Park Station,
5851 Park Blvd.
Safety Harbor meets Wednesdays, 7:30 a.m., at Paradise
Restaurant, 443 Main St.
Seminole meets Thursdays, 6:15 p.m., at Freedom Square Town
Hall. Call 394-2582.
Seminole Breakfast meets Tuesdays, 7:15 a.m., at Seminole
Family Restaurant, 6864 Seminole Blvd., Seminole. Call 319-8343
or e mail drtslsmn@msn.com.
Springtime City meets Thursdays, 6 p.m., at Oriental Super
Buffet, 2456 Gulf to Bay Blvd.
St. Petersburg meets Tuesdays, 12:15 p.m., at The Orange Blos
som, 220 Fourth St. N.
Sunshine City meets Friday, 12:15 p.m., at Piccadilly, 1900
34th St. N.
West Pasco meets Thursdays, 6:30 p.m., at Demetri's Restau
rant, Sunset Road, New Port Richey.
Key Club meets Fridays, 12:30 p.m., at Largo High School,
Room D-23.
Knights of Columbus meets Fridays, February through April,
4:30 to 8 p.m., at 512 S. Lincoln Ave., Clearwater. Call 504-9389.
Korean War Veterans Associations:
Sunshine State Chapter meets second Thursdays, 7 p.m., at
American Legion Post 252, 11433 Park Blvd. Call Peter Palmer at
584-7143 or Tony Lemons at 736-1993.

CHANGE YOUR THINKING
C CHANGE YOUR LIFE!
i YOU ARE A SPIRITUAL BEING ENDOWED WITH THE POWER TO
T "oscoUs CREATE A LIFE OF LOVE, ABUNDANCE, HEALTH AND JOY THROUGH
II/ 1ivil THE USE OF THE MIND GOD GAVE YOU. WE'LL SHOW YOU HOW
THROUGH CLASSES AND SUNDAY SERVICES.
| CENTER FOR CONSCIOUS LIVING
SUNDAY SERVICES 10AM
6152 126TH AVE., #501 727-538-0900
LARGO, FL 33773 WWW.CONSCIOUSLIVING.ORG


Heirs of Promise Church Y
"A Non Denominational / Spirit Filled Church"
8771 Park Blvd. Seminole
Corner I ..i Blvd. & Starkey Rd. next to Save-a-Lot


Sunday Service..............................10:30 AM
Children's Church........................................... 10:30 AM
Pastor Jim & April Thursday Midweek Service...............................7:00 PM
Licensed &
Ordained Bible Foundations Class Nursery
Through Contemporary Worship Prayer
g Rhema Bible 397-0806 www.heirsofpromise.com


St. Catherine of Siena
Catholic Church
DAILY MASS: Monday Friday 7:00am
Monday & Wednesday 11:00 am Saturday 8:00 am
4 CONFESSION SCHEDULE:
SL Monday & Wednesday 10:30 am 10:50 am
Saturday 3:00 pm 3:50 pm
WEEKEND MASS: Saturday Vigil 4:00 pm
Sunday 7:00 am & 9:00 am (Family Mass)
S 11:00 am (Traditional Choir) 6:00 pm (Contemporary Choir)
S Parish Administration Office 727-531-7721 www.SCOSParish.org
80510 .- 114.,FIR 11"
sosP n o P a Lu e nC r




Candlelight Service with Acoustic Music
Sunday @ 5:15pm
Sunday Morning Services:
@ 8:45am* & 11am*
*nursery available
455 Missouri Ave. Largo, FL
across from Largo High School
727-585-9969 www.DoDlarao.ora


Tell the Public
About Your Services
C: ll-3%-5I ` -4 3


Suncoast Chapter 14 meets third Thursdays, 7 p.m., at VFW
Post 4364, 5773 62nd St. N., Pinellas Park. Call 538-9504.
La Leche League International meets third Wednesdays, 7 p.m.,
at the Church of the Good Shepherd Nursery, 639 Edgewater Drive,
Dunedin. All breastfeeding mothers welcome. E mail
subiewon@tampabay.rr.com.
Ladies Auxiliary to the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4364
meets first Mondays, 7 p.m., at the post, 5773 62nd St. N., St. Pe
tersburg. Call 546-5525.
Ladies Auxiliary to the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10304
Bingo meets Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. at 724
Tuskawilla St., Clearwater. Call 443-7473.
Largo Bible Study Meetup Group meets Sundays, 11 a.m., at
The Hampton Inn, 100 East Bay Drive, Theatre B, Largo. Verse-by
verse Bible study and coffee. Sponsored by West Bay Community
Church. Call 687-1318 or e mail StudyTheBible@verizon.net.
Ladies Coffee Club meets last Fridays, 8 a.m., at the Sun Trust
Building, 601 Cleveland St. Call 462-2308 or e mail
candicelooney@ml.com.
Largo Art Association meets Fridays, 9 a.m. to noon, at Largo
Community Center, 65 Fourth St. N.W. E-mail temcola@aol.com.
Largo Founding Group meets Mondays at 8:30 a.m. at Acropol
Family Restaurant, 1170 Starkey Road, Call Nancy Giles at 776
9888.
Largo Historical Society meets second Mondays, 6:30 p.m., at
the Historic Largo Feed Store, Largo Central Park Drive. The club
has a pot-luck dinner and speakers discuss historical topics. Any
body interested in the history of Largo and the surrounding area is
invited. Guests are asked to bring a main dish, vegetable and
dessert to share, plus their own place setting. Call Marilyn at 581
0111.
Lions Clubs:
Clearwater noon meets the first and third Tuesdays, 11:45 a.m.,
See EVENTS page 18A


S iIglianb re bpterian Cburcb of largo
Celebrating the Annual Kirkin o'the Tartans
Sunday, Nov. 14 10 a.m.
Pipes & Drums, Scottish Refreshments & Hospitality
rT he modern KIRKIN 0' TH' TARTAN,
although established in North America,
is based on an old Highland tradition.
After the defeat of the Scots by the English in
1746, the wearing of the tartan and the
keeping of any Highland ways or culture were
forbidden in hope that this would forever
subdue the rebellious Scottish spirit. However,
the Scots were fervent Christians, and canny as
well. They clung to their ancient traditions by
putting them underground, so to speak. The
people went to church wearing a concealed
piece of tartan and at a certain moment set
aside in the service, the tartan was touched
while the minister pronounced a blessing on all in attendance
and the Scots once more pledged their loyalty and respect for
their old traditions and their faith. 111110
Smal no gh o aeFiedies Curh inTw
185 ighlnd vene (bov Roery
72-8419 -ww ihanpusg r
Revred indsy raePato


70th anniversary


ILR SERVICES, CALL 397-5563
TELL THE PUBLIC ABOUT YOUR SERVICES, CALL 397-5563


10


ou caoY all the Ial;,,
you can'tot le~~e










Leader, November 11, 2010


EVENTS, from page 17A
Stacy's Buffet, 1451 Missouri Ave. Call 386-5161.
Clearwater evening meets the first and third Thursdays, 6:30
p.m., Golden Coin Restaurant, 1844 N. Highland Ave. Call 216
3759.
Largo meets on the first and third Wednesdays, 6:30 p.m., at
Thirsty Marlin, 351 W. Bay Drive. Call 586-4344.
Largo Republican Club meets third Mondays, 6 p.m., at Al
fano's Restaurant, 1702 Clearwater-Largo Road, Belleair. Regis
tration starts at 5:30. The evening includes dinner and an
informative meeting with various speakers of interest to the com
munity. Cost is $18 for dinner, tax and tip. To R.S.V.P., call 687
1318.
Largo-Seminole Community Chorus meets Mondays, 7 to 9
p.m., at Imperial Palms East Clubhouse, Largo. No audition is
necessary; the group sings upbeat Broadway tunes, standards, in
spirational and seasonal music. Call 393-4843.
LIADO, the Italian-American Women of Today, meets third
Tuesday, 6 p.m., at Our Lady of Lourdes Father Conmy Center,
750 San Salvador Drive, Dunedin. Call 443-5414.
Living Information For Today, a social and educational sup
port group for widowed people, meets second Fridays at the
Dunedin Country Club, 1850 Palm Road, and the third Thursdays
at Alfano's, 1702 Clearwater-Largo Road, Largo. There are no
membership dues. Call 446-2375.
Madeira Beach Seniors Club meets first Mondays, 1 p.m. at
the Madeira Beach City Hall Auditorium. Meetings feature a guest
entertainer or speaker and refreshments are served. The club also
provides opportunities for seniors to travel as a group to various
events and places at reduced rates. Seniors aged 50 and over are
invited.
Magic Keys Organ Club meets third Saturdays, November
through March, at Bickley Park, 5640 Seminole Blvd. This social
group gathers to listen to an organ program followed by coffee,
cookies and social chatter. Call Jim at 398-3918.
Mary Custis Lee Chapter 1451 UDC meets third Saturdays, 10
a.m., at 3158 Gulf-to-Bay, Clearwater. Call Ms. Mallonee at 394
2720.
Marine Corps League, Morris F. Dixon Jr. Detachment meets


second Mondays, 7 p.m., at VFW Post 2473, 1401 N. Hercules Ave.,
Clearwater. Call 392-2329.
Masonic Lodge 291, Gulf Beaches, meets Thursdays, 7:30
p.m., at 14020 Marguerite Drive, Madeira Beach. A breakfast is
served to the public first Sundays, 9 to 11 a.m. Call 391-8073, visit
www.gulfbeachlodge.org or email '-- !- I I !-,, L,!i i.ll... lil...'i .. i
Metropolitan Amateur Radio Repeater Association meets sec
ond Mondays at the Pinebay Clubhouse, 5330 77th St. N., St. Pe
tersburg. Call Herb at 501-5519.
Microcomputer Users Group meets first Wednesdays, 6 p.m., at
the Largo Library, 120 Central Park Drive. Call 535-1044.
Michigan Association of Retired School Personnel meets sec
ond Tuesdays, 11:30 a.m., November through April, at Piccadilly
Cafeteria, 1900 34th St. N. Call Wendy Risk at 572-9854.
Mid Singles Groups meets second and fourth Thursdays, 7:30
p.m., at Blessed Trinity Catholic Church, 1600 54th Ave. S., St. Pe
tersburg, in the library by the fountain. The group is for ages 40 to
65. Call Hank Mays at 867-8516.
Military Officers Association of America meets fourth Wednes
days, 11 a.m. for social hour, followed by lunch at noon, at Cove
Cay Country Club, 17556 U.S. 19 N., Clearwater. Call Skip Hart
nett at 733-8646.
Minnesota Club meets the first Monday of the month, October
through April, at Sam Seltzer's, U.S. 19 North and Belleair Road,
Clearwater. Call Marquetta Origer 517-0874.
Moms' Club of Seminole meets first Mondays, 10 a.m., at Semi
nole Community Library, 9200 113th St. N. E-mail
jenn.hornyak@verizon.net.
Mothers and More of Largo/Seminole meets last Mondays, 7
p.m., at Seminole Community Library, Room A, 9200 113th St. N.
E-mail creativemommy2@yahoo.com.
Multicultural Bible Study and Prayer Fellowship meets Sun
days, 11 a.m., at the Comfort Inn, 26508 U.S. 19 N., Clearwater.
Free. Call 352-684-6970.
National Alliance on Mental Illness support group meets third
Thursday, 7:30 p.m., at Hospice, 5771 Roosevelt Blvd., Building
100, Clearwater. The group also hosts an education meeting on first
Thursday, 7 p.m.; and a consumer support group on Mondays,
6:30 p.m., at Hospice. Call 731-3434.
National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association,


Clearwater Chapter 259, meets for refreshments and socializing
first Wednesdays (except July and August), 1 p.m., at the Clearwa
ter East Library, 2251 Drew St. Meeting begins at 1:30. Blue
Cross/Blue Shield Rep will cover FEHBP changes. Call 599-2031.
National Association of Retired Federal Employees, Largo-
Seminole Chapter 845, meets first Tuesdays, at Stacey's Buffet,
1451 Missouri Ave., Largo. Speakers begin at 12:15 p.m., followed
by a business meeting. Guests may eat lunch before or after the
meeting. The May 4, 2010 meeting will take place at Tampa Bay
Downs. Call 517-0389.
Native New Yorkers of Tampa Bay meets monthly on different
Sunday at various locations. Call Arlyne Popick at 345-5558 or e
mail ATP1946@aol.com.
Navy SEABEE Veterans of America meets second Saturdays,
12:30 p.m., at the Largo Library, 120 Central Park Drive. Call 391
7889.
New Neighbors meets first Tuesdays, 7 p.m., at Kissin Cuzzins
Restaurant, 28910 U.S. 19 N., Clearwater. This is a woman's group
for meeting new friends, social activities and informative programs.
Cost is $4.50 and includes dessert, beverage and program. Call
796-2006.
Newcomer Club of Pinellas, a social club for persons new to the
area, or those who are recently widowed, divorced or retired, meets
first Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m., at various restaurants and clubs
throughout Pinellas. Call Vivian at 569-8869.
Newcomers Club of Greater Dunedin meets second Thursdays,
11:30 a.m., at various locations. For information on the next meet
ing, call Rosalin Dano at 733-1942.
North Pinellas All Children's Hospital Guild meets third Mon
days, at Palm Harbor Parks and Recreation Center, 150 16th St. So
cial time begins at 9:30 a.m. followed by the meeting at 10. Call
943-2464.
North Pinellas County Democratic Club meets second Wednes
days, 7 p.m., at the Clearwater Countryside Library. Call Joyce at
538-0043.
Announcements are submitted by the public; information is subject
to change. To place an item in the ongoing calendar or networking
leads, send it at least two weeks in advance to Calendar-Leads,
Tampa Bay Newspapers, 9911 Seminole Blvd., Seminole, FL 33772,
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Diversions


Things to do around Pinellas County


* Classifieds

* Events

* Movies

Leader
Section B
November 11, 2010
Visit www.TBNweekly.com


Led Zeppelin Experience


coming to Clearwater


By LEE CLARK ZUMPE


CLEARWATER Jason Bonham's Led Zeppelin
Experience will celebrate the music of this iconic
English rock band in a performance Sunday, Nov.
14, 7 p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall, 1111 McMullen
Booth Road, Clearwater.
Ticket prices range from $32.50 to $59.50. Call
791-7400 or visit www.rutheckerdhall.com.
For classic rock enthusiasts, the name Led Zep-
pelin immediately calls to mind Robert Plant's soul-
ful, wailing vocals; Jimmy Page's sizzling, inventive
guitar work; as well as John Paul Jones' talented
bass playing and John Bonham's thunderous per-
cussion.
The band is considered a pioneer in heavy metal
and hard rock. Best known for their innovative and
influential approach to heavy blues-rock, Led Zep-
pelin cut eight studio albums. A ninth album,
"Coda," was released after the group disbanded and
featured a collection of outtakes from sessions
recorded during the band's 12-year career which
ran from 1968 to 1980.
A number of Led Zeppelin tribute bands have
surfaced since the 1980s, reproducing the sounds
and images that made the band so memorable. This
concert, though, is much more than just a standard
tribute band playing a collection of greatest hits.
Jason Bonham is the son of legendary Led Zep-
pelin drummer John Bonham.
For Jason a renowned kitman in his own right
who performed as part of Led Zeppelin during the
band's historic, heralded December 2007 reunion
show in London this tour is more than just an an
opportunity to pay tribute to the pioneering hard
rock foursome.
JBLZE is billed as "a unique and deeply personal
reflection of Jason's life with the music of Led Zep-
pelin and how it influenced him."
"Since the 02 Arena show in 2007 with Jimmy,
John Paul and Robert, I've been thinking about
doing something like this," Bonham explains in his
biography, supplied by the Mitch Schneider Organi-
zation. "I knew if I did decide to go forward with it, I
wanted to make it count. I went and saw the Beatles
tribute 'Rain' and it opened up a new avenue for me
of using home movies and now, there's even a part
where I'm playing with Dad in our show, where we
play off of each other. I wanted to make it a bit more
than just a rock concert. So I have a section where
there's some storytelling and some insightful history
to accompany the music."
The tour is timed to take place just after the 30th
anniversary of his John Bonham's passing. John
died Sept. 24, 1980. Following his untimely death,
the remaining members of Led Zeppelin chose to
disband a decision made official in a press state-
ment dated Dec. 4, 1980.
What can concertgoers expect to see and hear at
this show?
Jason will be joined on stage by his band, which
features guitarist Tony Catania, vocalist James
Dylan, bassist Michael Devin and
keyboardist/pedal-steel guitarist Stephen LeBlanc.
Together, they will rock through Led Zeppelin's hal-
lowed catalog on a state-of-the-art sound system.
The accompanying light show will bring their live
performance onstage to an atmospheric level creat-
ing a stunning multimedia concert.
Giant screens will display art and Bonham's own
historical video footage and photos will set the


mood. The band's powerful live performance of Led
Zeppelin's classics will take concertgoers through a
personal journey of Jason's past with the unforget-
table blues-rock of Led Zeppelin.
Jason has teamed with Annerin Productions, the
company behind The Pink Floyd Experience and
Rain, a Tribute to the Beatles. He didn't anticipate
that putting on such a spectacle would evoke such
a flood of thoughts and emotions. He realized early
on that he would need to narrate the storytelling
part of the show separately.
"Just telling a couple of the stories, I got choked,"
he says. "I don't want to do that every night and be
an emotional wreck each night. So I'm going to
record the storytelling part of the show so that I can
focus on what I want to do. Because it is so person-
al in so many parts."
For instance, there's a memorable bit in "The
Song Remains the Same" where Jason and his fa-
ther appear together that has been incorporated
into the show.
"I actually just got sent a clip of that, with sound,
which is hilarious, because it's me, at 6 years old,
selecting Dr. John on the jukebox," Jason says. "I
just thought it would be a great interlude to give
people a laugh. And what comes after the drum-
ming sequence, is me dancing. When my own chil-
dren saw it they just roared about it. They were on
the floor, laughing. When I look back at it, I just see
my Dad laughing. It's a great moment."
A partial set list for Jason Bonham's Led Zeppelin
Experience includes the following:
"Your Time Is Gonna Come" and "Babe I'm
Gonna Leave You," from "Led Zeppelin," 1969
'The Lemon Song," 'Thank You," "Whole Lotta
Love," and "What Is and What Should Never Be,"
from "Led Zeppelin II," 1969
"Celebration Day," from "Led Zeppelin III," 1970
"Black Dog" and "Rock and Roll" from "Led Zep-
pelin IV," 1971
'The Song Remains The Same" and "No Quar-
ter," from "Houses of the Holy," 1973
"Sick Again" and "Kashmir," from "Physical
Graffiti," 1975
"I'm Gonna Crawl," from "In Through The Out
Door," 1979
According to his publicist, Jason has been hands
on with everything from set design to repertoire.
"I haven't delegated anything, because the show
really is that special to me," Jason said. "I don't
want anyone else to blame. If something goes
wrong, I want it to be my fault."
As for the particular songs, some were chosen be-
cause they have stories behind them while others
might recall a specific moment which means
songs from 1976's "Presence" that were never
played live have been rehearsed. Of course, many
favorites from Led Zeppelin's phenomenal catalog
will be played because of the sheer joy and exhilara-
tion they elicit.
According to Jason, the entire experience has
helped him realize the depth of his father's legacy.
"He'll be probably remembered as one of the
greatest drummers ever," Jason says. "And to know
that more people have picked up sticks and more
kids have tried to throw televisions out of windows
makes him unforgettable. Nowadays, all hotel
rooms have reinforced glass, you can't throw a TV
out a window, trust me, I've tried. He was indeed
one-of-a-kind and this show is my way of honoring
him."


Jason Bonham presents his Led Zeppelin Experience Nov. 14 at Ruth Eckerd Hall.


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1 12 3 14


17


Crossword

5 16 17 18 M


.IL


- -


Across
1. Bust maker
5. 'That was a close one!"
9. Wombs
14. "I had no !
15. Exude
16. Hose material
17. Escape, in away
18. Ride the waves
19. March of
20. Method of military attack
23. "Bill & Excellent Adventure"
24. George Bums liked them
28. Republic in western Balkan Peninsula
31. Masked critter
33. Edible mushroom
34. Printing in italics
36. "Bingo!"
37. Inclines
38. Animal house
39. Cicatrix
40. Clobber
41. Defeating
45. _Wednesday
46. Charge
47. Bring to a boil?
48. Stones lined with crystals
50. Computer info
51. Restore to good health
57. Dry, tuberous plant root
60. Central points
61. "-zoic" things
62. Cartoon art
63. A chip, maybe
64. Hair goops
65. "M*A*S*H" role
66. Back
67. Its motto is "Lux et veritas"


Sudoku


8 2 7

1 9 5

5 7 6 2

6 3 4

2 3 5 7 9

9 4 2

3 5 4 1

5 4 9

4 6 8

Place a Number in the empty boxes in such a way
that each row across, each column down and each
9-box square contains all of the numbers from one
to nine.


10 11 12 13

6


SLI


Down
1. Not yet final, at law
2. Gulf of off the coast of Yemen
3. Atoll protector
4. State legislature buildings
5. Type of grant
6. 24 in a day
7. 'The Snowy Day" author Jack Keats
8. Fabric
9. Bringing to ruin
10. Drawing
11. "A Nightmare on Street"
12. v. Wade
13. and outs
21. Dolly of "Hello, Dolly!"
22. Clickable image
25. Greenish yellow redder than liqueur green
26. Move, as a picture
27. Sprinkle
28. Soldier's knapsack
29. Good-for-nothing
30. Greek poet
31. Language of Bohemia
32. Farm call
35. Bad day for Caesar
39. Approach
41. Type of vine
42. "Pipe down!"
43. Spottier
44. The "A" of ABM
49. Excitement
50. Fiats
52. Way, way off
53. Cram, with "up"
54. Site
55. Farfetched
56. "_ quam videri" (North Carolina's motto)
57. Bump
58. "_ Ng" (They Might Be Giants song)
59. Ceiling


Sudoku
answers
from last week


2 5 6 4 1 3 7 9 8
256413798
387926541


7 6 2 3 4 1 8 5 9
762341859
948275316
875694132
423158967
619732485 1 3 2
4 2 3 1 5 8 9 6 7


Crossword
answers
from last week
A NS 0EE FF A N U S
SN E W O IVU L L E VI I
D E E E D A Y

C APE TRO S
S A N N RO W

SEE M AH

E S S E G I L E S E N D S
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Leader, November 11, 2010


Horoscopes
November 11, 2010

Capricorn
December 22 January 19
Go ahead, Capricorn, and
raise a fuss at home. That is the
only way you are going to get
anything done. A small risk pays
off in a big way.

Aquarius
January 20 February 18
You can salvage a project, but
it will take work, Aquarius. Don't
take a stab at it unless you are
willing to put in the time. A
health concern resurfaces.

Pisces
February 19 March 20
Your ego takes a beating this
week, but you're tough and re-
bound with ease. A home im-
provement project turns out
beautifully. Good job, Pisces.

Aries
March 21 -April 19
Personal conflict cannot be
avoided. Be rational and realistic,
Aries, and you just might learn a
thing or two. Travel plans get un-
derway. Bon voyage!

Taurus
April 20 May 20
If you aren't careful, Taurus,
you could get bogged down
in the details and miss out on
the big picture. Your finances
improve with the tiniest of
changes.

Gemini
May 21 June 21
Stop it, Gemini. You have
placed the happiness of others
above your own for far too long.
Focus on yourself for a change. A
truce is reached at home.

Cancer
June 22 July 22
Pipe down, Cancer. Something
is on your mind, but before you
say anything more, make sure
you have your facts straight. You
don't want to make a serious
error.

Leo
July 23 -August 22
While actions typically speak
louder than words, that is not
the case this week, Leo. Speak
up and make your opinions
known. A deadline is extended.

Virgo
August 23 September 22
Old haunts call out to you to
explore them. Go forth with zeal,
Virgo. There are old memories to
revisit and new ones to make. A
gift arrives.

Libra
September 23 October 22
You receive the support of sev-
eral influential people. Put it to
good use, Libra. A letter packs a
lot of punch. Learn from the ex-
ample set by a loved one.

Scorpio
October 23 November 21
You reap the rewards of your
good deeds and hard work this
week. Enjoy the accolades, Scor-
pio. A peek into your financial
standing reveals an unsightly
error.

Sagittarius
November 22 December 21
Work now, Sagittarius, and
relax later. A deadline is moved
up, and you must scramble to
meet it. An old family friend
doles out some much-needed ad-
vice.


-- i i i i i


0 0 A


4L










Entertainment 3B


Leader, November 11, 2010


Opening this week


Ford and McAdams star in 'Morning Glory'; Balfour tries to evade aliens in 'Skyline'


Compiled by LEE CLARK ZUMPE

A number of new movies will hit theaters this
week, including the following films opening in wide
release:

'Morning Glory'
Genre: Comedy
Cast: Harrison Ford, Rachel McAdams, Diane
Keaton, Jeff Goldblum and Patrick Wilson
Director: Roger Michell
Rated: PG-13
Local news producer Becky Fuller (Rachel
McAdams) has finally landed her dream job in the
big city taking the reigns of the national morning
news show "Daybreak" in New York.
However, from day one, the dream threatens to
become a nightmare. She's got all the spunk, grit
and skills a girl could ever need for success but
one huge obstacle stands between Becky and her
rise to the top: the legendary Mike Pomeroy (Harri-
son Ford), the cranky, cocky, completely uncoop-
erative anchorman who is about to become her
biggest curse ... and her only hope for turning
around the fate of the last-place morning news
program in America.
When Becky arrives at "Daybreak," even the
network has given up on the desperately down-
ward-trending show, which has a reputation for
eating up and spitting out even the most seasoned
producers before the sun even rises. Even though
she doesn't have any national news experience,
Becky is determined that she will be different. Set-
ting in motion a hilarious battle of wits, she de-
cides to try something new: merging the gruff,
self-serious style of former evening newsman
Pomeroy with the babbling banter and diva-esque
confidence of long-time morning host Colleen Peck
(Diane Keaton).
It has all the makings of a major disaster as
egos clash and Pomeroy purports to be above
doing any weather, celebrity gossip or, heaven for-
bid, cooking and soon Becky is struggling to save
her reputation, her job, and the blossoming ro-
mance with a fellow producer (Patrick Wilson) she
thought she'd never find. Yet, the more Becky
faces off with the cynical and the jaded, the more
she begins to believe in herself, and in the poten-
tial for "Daybreak." The result is a smart, sexy
comedy about a working girl's first taste of tri-
umph, as she discovers that no matter how impos-
sible the people might seem to be ... anything is
possible.

'Skyline'
Genre: Science fiction and thriller
Cast: Eric Balfour, Scottie Thompson, Donald
Faison and Brittany Daniel
Director: Colin and Greg Strause
Rated: PG-13
In the sci-fi thriller "Skyline," strange lights de-
scend on the city of Los Angeles, drawing people
outside like moths to a flame.
Once outdoors, a terrifying extraterrestrial force
begins to swallow the entire human population off
the face of the Earth. In a matter of hours, we will
all be gone.
Jarrod (Eric Balfour) and Elaine's (Scottie
Thompson) trip to Southern California was sup-
posed to be a simple weekend away to visit Jar-
rod's best friend, Terry (Donald Faison) and Terry's
girlfriend, Candice (Brittany Daniel), for his birth-


day.
But when sunrise arrives two hours early in the
form of a haunting light from an unknown source,
life as they know it is finished. As they watch in
terror from Terry's penthouse windows, people
across the city are drawn outside and swallowed
into massive alien ships that have blotted out the
L.A. skyline.
Now, it will take every survival instinct they have
to elude capture from the thousands of monstrous
creatures that are sweeping the city and searching
for all humans in their path. From tankers to
drones and hydra-like extraterrestrials, the aliens
are inescapable and seemingly indestructible. In
the sci-fi thriller Skyline, the end of the world has
come ... and it's just outside the window.

'Unstoppable'
Genre: Action, adventure and drama
Cast: Denzel Washington, Chris Pine, Rosario
Dawson, Kevin Dunn and Kevin Chapman
Director: Tony Scott
Rated: PG-13
Imagine: There's a million tons of steel speeding
along a railroad track, the lives of 100,000 people
are at risk ... and impact is expected in 100 min-
utes.
A veteran engineer (Denzel Washington) and a
young conductor (Chris Pine) try frantically to stop
a half-mile-long freight train carrying enough com-
bustible liquids and poisonous gas to wipe out a
nearby city.
Inspired by actual events, "Unstoppable" is an
adrenaline rush fueled by director Tony Scott's sig-
nature mark of propulsive action rooted in the real-
ity of ordinary people placed in extraordinary
circumstances.

The following will open in limited release. It may
be several weeks before these films appear in local
movie theaters.

'Cool It'
Genre: Documentary
Director: Ondi Timoner
Climate catastrophe? The end of civilization as
we know it?
"Cool It" is based upon the book of the same
name and lectures by Bjorn Lomborg, the contro-
versial author of 'The Skeptical Environmentalist."
Award-winning filmmaker Ondi Timoner travels
the world with Lomborg exploring the real facts
and true science of global warming and its impact.
Lomborg is the founder and director of the Copen-
hagen Consensus Center, a globally respected
think tank that brings together the world's leading
economists to prioritize major global problems -
among them malaria, the lack of potable water and
HIV/AIDS based upon a cost/benefit analysis of
available solutions.
Amidst the strong and polarized opinions within
the global warming debate, "Cool It" follows Lom-
borg on his mission to bring the smartest solutions
to climate change, environmental pollution, and
other major problems in the world.

'Tiny Furniture'
Genre: Drama
Cast: Lena Dunham, Laurie Simmons, Grace
Dunham, Rachel Howe and Merritt Wever
Director: Lena Dunham
Not rated


I -,=l-- I AV
The morning national news program, "Daybreak," has a new producer, Becky Fuller (Rachel McAdams), who
must contend with the show's gruff host Mike Pomeroy (Harrison Ford) in Paramount Pictures' comedy
"Morning Glory."


Denise (Crystal Reed) can't believe what she just witnessed in "Skyline."


Winner of the best narrative feature at the
SXSW Film Festival, "Tiny Furniture" is an en-
dearing film that explores the depths of romantic
humiliation and the heights of post-college confu-
sion.
Writer/director/star Lena Dunham is being
called one of the most exciting new voices in Amer-
ican independent cinema and critics are hailing
her film as "irresistibly funny", "unnervingly hon-
est" and "near perfection." "Tiny Furniture" also
stars Dunham's real-life sister, Grace, and real-life
mother, Laurie Simmons, the celebrated artist and
photographer.
When 22-year-old Aura (Dunham) returns home
to her artist mother's TriBeCa loft, she carries with


inolo counesy iuIut I-'l I untI-


her a useless film theory degree, 357 hits on her
Youtube page, a boyfriend who's left her to find
himself at Burning Man, a dying hamster and her
tail between her legs. Luckily, her trainwreck child-
hood best friend never left home, the restaurant
down the block is hiring, and ill-advised romantic
possibilities lurk around every comer. Surrounded
on all sides by what she could become, Aura just
wants someone to tell her who she is.

For more movie news including what's playing at
local theaters, trailers and an opportunity to pur-
chase tickets online, visit www.TBNweekly.com.
Click on the "Movie News & Reviews" link on the
left-side menu..


Looking ahead

Clearwater
S"How the Other Half Loves," by Alan Ayckboum, through Dec.
26, at Early Bird Dinner Theatre, presented at the Italian-American
Club, 200 S. McMullen Booth Road. Seating for performances Thurs-
day through Sunday is 4 p.m. Seating for matinees Thursday and Sat-
urday is 11 a.m. Admission is $29.90 a person. Call 446-5898 or visit
www.earlybirddinnertheatre.com.
"Reckless," by Craig Lucas, through Nov. 21, at West Coast Play-
ers, 21905 U.S. 19 N. Performances will be Friday and Saturday, 8
p.m. Matinees will be Sunday, 2 p.m. Admission is $18 for adults and
$15 for members of the military. Call 437-2363 or visit www.wcplay-
ers.org. Directed by Janice Creneti, the play is a comic fairy tale with
an ear for the absurd. "Reckless" is a satirial look at what happens
when people leave their comfort zone and discover themselves.
An evening with Jethro Tull's Ian Anderson, Thursday, Nov. 11, 8
p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall, 1111 McMullen Booth Road. Reserved tick-
ets range from $43.50 to $69.50 and are available at the ticket office,
by calling 791-7400 or online at www.rutheckerdhall.com or www.tick-
etmaster.com. Anderson returns to the United States with more good-
ies from the Tull back catalogue, featuring many of the acoustic tracks
from the early albums as well as some new solo material specially writ-
ten for these shows. The evening will include electric and acoustic per-
formances. Joining Anderson will be Florian Opahle on guitars, John
O'Hara, accordion and piano, David Goodier, bass guitar and Scott
Hammond on drums.
Jason Bonham's Led Zeppelin Experience, Sunday, Nov. 14, 7
p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall, 1111 McMullen Booth Road. Tickets range
from $32.50 to $59.50. Limited VIP packages are $160. Call 791-7400
or visit www.rutheckerdhall.com. Bonham will celebrate the life and
music of his father the legendary Led Zeppelin drummer John Bon-
ham. Timed to take place just after the 30th anniversary of his father's
passing on Sept. 25, 1980, Bonham who has teamed with Annerin
Productions, the heralded company behind The Pink Floyd Experience
and Rain, A Tribute to the Beatles is anxiously anticipating the
show's opening night. Bonham and his band will rock through Led
Zeppelin's hallowed catalog, backed by a state-of-the-art sound system
and light show to enhance the live performance onstage and to create
an awe-inspiring multimedia concert experience.
Author event, Friday, Nov. 19, 7 p.m., at Main Library of the
Clearwater Public Library System, 100 N. Osceola Ave. This will be a
ticketed event sponsored by the Clearwater Community Women's
Club. For information, call 562-4970.
Suncoast Dixieland Jazz Classic, Friday through Sunday, Nov.
19-21, at Sheraton Sand Key Resort, 1160 Gulf Blvd.; and Marriott
Suites on Sand Key, 1201 Gulf Blvd. The Suncoast Dixieland Jazz
Classic will continue the fine tradition of Dixieland fun in the Florida
sun. The Sheraton Sand Key Resort will be transformed into the head-
quarters hotel for this year's festival, which will feature bands such as
Barbary Coast Dixieland Band, Bill Allred's Classic Jazz Band, the
Coast to Coast Jazz Band, Comet Chop Suey, Dave Bennett and the
Festival All-Stars, the Dixie Chaps, the Galvanized Jazz Band, the
Jerry Krahn Quartet, the Midiri Brothers Jazz Band, Mighty
Aphrodite, Red Lehr's Powerhouse Five, Sonny LaRosa and America's
Youngest Jazz Band and the Tarpon Springs High School Jazz Ensem-
ble. A weekend badge costs $100. Daily badges for Friday and Sunday
are $40. Daily badges for Saturday are $50. Call 536-0064 or visit
www.jazzclassic.net.
Diana Ross, Saturday, Nov. 20, 8 p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall, 1111
McMullen Booth Road. Tickets range from $63 to $129. Call 791-7400
or visit www.rutheckerdhall.com. Ross will bring her More Today Than
Yesterday tour to the area, pulling out all the stops with breathtaking
costumes and stage designs, along with a live string and hor section.
The legendary icon will perform her greatest hits in a spectacular live
show. Ross has had a profound influence on American popular culture
and has become an icon in the entertainment industry. She has sold
more than 100 million records and recorded 18 No. 1 hits songs. Her
music became the sound of young America in the '60s soon after she


signed with Motown Records in 1961 with The Supremes. She em-
barked on her extraordinary solo career in 1970, and has not stopped
since.
"King Kong" double feature, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 1 p.m., at the
Main Library of the Clearwater Public Library System, 100 N. Osceola
Ave. The featured movies will include "King Kong" and "Son of Kong."
Call 562-4970.
Joe Satriani, Saturday, Dec. 4, 8 p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall,
1111 McMullen Booth Road. Tickets range from $39 to $69. Call 791-
7400 or visit www.rutheckerdhall.com. Satriani is touring in support
of his 14th studio album, "Black Swans and Wormhole Wizards," pro-
duced and recorded by Mike Fraser and Satriani. Satriani is joined by
former bandmate Jeff Campitelli as well as newcomers, keyboardist
Mike Keneally and bassist Allen Whitman. Satriani's classic sound is
accompanied by a surprisingly rich texture of new material as well.
Over the last two decades, Satriani has traveled the world, playing to
sold-out crowds as both a headliner and as founder of the all-star












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2008 at The Grand Rex Theater in Paris, France. The live two-disc CD
and DVD was released in February 2010 through Epic Records and
contained such memorable songs as "Surfing With The Alien," "Flying
in a Blue Dream," "Super Colossal" and "I Just Wanna Rock." In
2009, Satriani joined with former Van Halen front man Sammy Hagar,
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4B Entertainment


Leader, November 11, 2010


LOOKING AHEAD, from page 3B

* NBC's Last Comic Standing
Live Tour, Thursday, Dec. 30, 8
p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall, 1111
McMullen Booth Road. Reserved
tickets range from $29.50 to
$49.50 and are available at the
ticket office, by calling 791-7400
or online at www.rutheckerd
hall.com or www.ticketmast
er.com. The evening will feature
stand-up comedy with the final-
ists from NBC's popular laughfest
"Last Comic Standing."
Jerry Seinfeld, Saturday,
Jan. 8, 7 and 9:30 p.m., at Ruth
Eckerd Hall, 1111 McMullen
Booth Road. Tickets range from
$69 to $84. Call 791-7400 or visit
www.rutheckerdhall.com. Sein-
feld has an uncanny ability to
joke about the little things in life
that relate to audiences every-
where. Seinfeld now sets his
sights on performing his material
across the country in 2011.

Dunedin
The fifth annual Senior Tal-
ent Show, Friday, Nov. 12, 6:30
p.m., at the Dunedin Community
Center, 1920 Pinehurst Road.
Hosted by the City of Dunedin
Parks & Recreation Department,
the show is an eclectic combina-
tion of talent by performers over
the age of 50. In the past, acts
have included spoon players,
banjo players, ballroom dancers,
comedians and vocalists. Tickets
are $5. Visit www.dunedin
gov.com.
Wine tasting, Friday, Nov.
12, 5 to 8 p.m., at Cappuccino's
Altro Posto Cafe, 733 Broadway
St. The event will include music
by Jerry Chase. Admission is
free. Call 738-8009.
Dunedin Wines the
Blues, Friday and Saturday,
Nov. 12-13, in downtown
Dunedin on Main Street be-
tween Louden Avenue and
Broadway. Event hours will be
Friday, 5:30 to 10:30 p.m.;
and Saturday, 5 to 11 p.m.
This signature event for
Dunedin is an upscale festival
combining top-notch blues
music from all over the coun-
try with wine from all over the
world. Wine tasting will be of-
fered from more than two
dozen vineyards spanning
many varieties. Music will be
performed on the main stage
at Pioneer Park. This year's


event will include performanc-
es by Willie "Big Eyes" Smith
and Legendary JC's Jake
Mackey. Admission is free.
Beer, wine, food and souvenirs
will be available for purchase.
Visit www.dunedinwinesthe
blues.info.
Jimmy Griswold, Friday and
Saturday, Nov. 12-13, at Jolli
Mon's Grill, 941 Huntley Ave. In
conjunction with the Dunedin
Wines the Blues, JolliMon's will
host a weekend-long celebration
featuring performances by Gris-
wold. Performances will be Fri-
day, 7 p.m.; and Saturday, 8
p.m., on the Pinellas stage. Pro-
ceeds from the barbeque will go
toward the construction of a com-
munity garden in Dunedin. Call
902-1671 or visit www.JolliMons
Grill.com.
"Don't Be Afraid of the
Dark," by Tim Kelly," presented
by the Dunedin Showcase The-
ater, Nov. 18-21, at Dunedin
Community Center, 1920 Pine-
hurst Road. Show times are
Thursday and Friday, 7 p.m.; and
Sunday, 1 p.m. Tickets are $10
Thursday and Friday; and $20
Sunday, which includes a dinner
show. Call 812-4530 or visit
www.dunedingov.com. Directed
by Mike Cote, the mystery spoof
stars Todd Moore, Victor Carr,
Linda Hamrell, Roger Steinruck,
Susan Carr, Tom Gannon, Suzy
Fritz, Susan Dearden, Grace Coll,
Tammy Folstad, Diane Lynne and
Ingrid Steele. The setting is the
creepy mansion of mystery play-
wright, Sebastian Sly, whose
death has brought together his
only relatives and staff for the
reading of the will. Interrupting
the festivities is the appearance of
The Creeper, a mysterious es-
capee from the neighboring asy-
lum. The search for The Creeper
involves staff from the asylum, as
well as local law enforcement.
Shifting walls and electrical prob-
lems make finding the escapee
more difficult. Add in a caustic
critic of Sly's work and all man-
ner of hilarity and chills ensue.
The Dunedin Celtic
Festival, Saturday, Nov. 20,
noon to 9:30 p.m., at Highlander
Park, 1920 Pinehurst Road. The
featured bands will be Seven Na-
tions, Rathkeltair and Brother.
Also performing will be Scottish
Highland dancers, Irish dancers,
Dunedin Highland Middle School
Band, Dunedin High School Scot-


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tish Highlander Band and the
City of Dunedin Pipe Band.
Heavy athletics demonstrations
will take place throughout the
day. Attendees will find food and
drink as they browse Celtic craft
vendors and enjoy the music at
this family event. Admission is
free. Parking is $10 a car. All pro-
ceeds benefit the three Scottish
bands of Dunedin. The festival is
sponsored by the Dunedin High-
land Games and Festival Com-
mittee Inc., a nonprofit. Visit
www.dunedinhighlandgames.com.
"Harry Potter and the
Deathly Hallows" Celebration,
Saturday, Nov. 20, 2 p.m., at
Dunedin Public Library, 223
Douglas Ave. Designed for chil-
dren ages 10 to 15, the event will
celebrate the upcoming release of
the next installment of the Harry
Potter franchise. Registration is
required. Call 298-3080.

Indian Rocks Beach
Home for the Holidays, an
open holiday show and sale,
through Dec. 22, at the Beach Art
Center, 1515 Bay Palm Blvd.
Submissions are open to experi-
enced artists, including painters,
potters, silk artists, quilters, jew-
elers and photographers. Delivery
dates are Thursday and Friday,
Oct. 28-29; and Monday and
Tuesday, Nov. 1-2; 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. The cost to submit two
pieces is $20 for members and
$30 for nonmembers. Call 596-
4331 or e-mail arts1515
@aol.com.

Largo
S"Big River," with William
Hauptman and lyrics by Roger
Miller, through Nov. 14, at the
Largo Cultural Center, 105 Cen-
tral Park Drive. Call 587-6793.
Performances will be Thursday
through Saturday, 8 p.m. Mati-
nees will be Sunday, 2 p.m. Tick-
ets are $25 for adults and $12 for
students. Mark Twain's timeless
classic will sweep audiences
down the mighty Mississippi as
the irrepressible Huck Finn helps
his friend, Jim, a slave, escape to
freedom at the mouth of the Ohio
River. Their adventures along the
way are hilarious, suspenseful
and heartwarming, bringing to
life favorite characters from the
novel-the Window Douglas and
her stem sister, Miss Watson; the
uproarious King and Duke, who


may or may not be as harmless
as they seem; Huck's partner in
crime, Tom Sawyer, and their
rowdy gang of pairs; Huck's
drunken father, the sinister Pap
Finn; the lovely Mary Jane Wilkes
and her trusting family.
"All Aboard," Sunday, Nov.
14, 3 p.m., at St. Dunstan's An-
glican Church, 403 First Ave.
SW. Tickets are $15 each. Group
tickets are $12 each for a mini-
mum 10 and seasonal tickets -
good for three shows are $30.
Presented by the Sunsation Show
Chorus, this show will present a
musical trip to places such as
Kansas City, Phoenix, Old Cape
Cod, San Francisco, China, Paris,
Rome, Egypt, Rio, Brazil and Ar-
gentina. Call 541-4501.

Pinellas Park
"The Man with the Plastic
Sandwich," by Roger Karshner,
through Nov. 21, presented by
Venue Ensemble Theatre at
Venue Actors Studio, 9125 U.S.
19 N. Performances are Thurs-
day through Saturday, 8 p.m.
Matinees are Sunday, 3 p.m.
Tickets are $15. A portion of tick-
et sales from each show is donat-
ed to a benefit organization. Call
822-6194 or visit www.venueac-
torstudio.org.
Theater Pipe Organ Perfor-
mance, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m., at the City Audito-
rium, 7690 59th St. Attendees
will relive the golden years of the-
ater as melodies are played on
the Mighty Wurlitzer Theater
Organ. Performances are present-
ed third Tuesdays. Admission is
free.
Movies in the Park, Satur-
day, Nov. 20, at England Broth-
ers Band Shell, 5121 80th Ave.
The movie will start at dusk. Con-
cessions will include popcorn,
candy, hot dogs and soda. Pro-
ceeds from the concessions will
benefit the Firefighters' Benevo-
lent Fund. The fund is used for
holiday toy and dinner giveaways
and to assist fire victims in Pinel-
las Park. Call Nick DelGrosso at
687-4494 or e-mail ndelgrosso
@pinellas-park.com.
Pinellas Park Civic Orches-
tra, Sunday, Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m., at
the Pinellas Park Performing Arts
Center, 4951 78th Ave. Admis-
sion is free but donations will be
accepted. The orchestra will per-
form light classical, show tunes
and pop selections. Performances


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will continue first Sundays
through April. Call Dick Van-
Dommelen at 415-9650 or visit
www.pinellasparkorchestra.com.
Theater Pipe Organ Perfor-
mance, Tuesday, Dec. 21, 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m., at the City Audito-
rium, 7690 59th St. Attendees
will relive the golden years of the-
ater as melodies are played on
the Mighty Wurlitzer Theater
Organ. Performances are present-
ed third Tuesdays. Admission is
free.

Safety Harbor
Author event, Saturday,
Nov. 13, 1 to 3 p.m., at Safety
Harbor Public Library, 101 Sec-
ond St. N. Rosemary Potter, au-
thor of "Collecting Adventures
Sampler, Vol. 1," will share her
experiences and offer free five-
minute consultations on one an-
tique item per guest on a
first-come, first-served basis. Call
724-1525.
"Prelude to a Kiss," by Craig
Lucas, presented by the Players
of Safety Harbor Theater Troupe,
Nov. 14-21, at the Safety Harbor
Resort and Spa's Baranoff The-
atre, 105 North Bayshore Drive.
A dinner performance will be Nov.
21, 6:30 p.m. Brunch perform-
ances will be Nov. 14 and 21,
1:30 p.m. Tickets for all shows
are $39.95 a person and are
available at the Safety Harbor
Public Library, 101 Second St. N.;
Safety Harbor Resort and Spa;
and the Safety Harbor Chamber
of Commerce, 200 Main St. Call
724-1525, ext.104.

St. Pete Beach
Sundaes on Friday Family
Movie Night, Friday, Nov. 12,
6:30 to 8:30 p.m., at Horan Park,
7701 Boca Ciega Drive. This free
family event will feature a show-
ing of 'Toy Story 3" on the recre-
ation center's inflatable screen.
Attendees can enjoy dessert from
an ice cream sundae station,
sponsored by Working Cow Ice
Cream. Moviegoers may bring
blankets and chairs. Call 363-
9245.

St. Petersburg
S"Opus," by Michael
Hollinger, through Nov. 28, at
American Stage Theatre Compa-
ny, Raymond James Theatre,
163 Third St. N. Performances
will be Tuesday through Thurs-
day, 7:30 p.m.; and Friday and
Saturday, 8 p.m. Matinees will be
Saturday and Sunday, 3 p.m.
Tickets range from $29 to $50.
Call 823-7529 or visit
www.americanstage.org. After fir-
ing one of their founding mem-
bers due to his erratic behavior
after coming out of the closet, a
world-class string quartet takes a
chance on a gifted, but relatively
inexperienced, young woman.
With only a few days to rehearse
a grueling Beethoven master-
piece, the four struggle to pre-


pare for their highest-profile per-
formance ever-a televised cere-
mony at the White House. Their
rehearsal room becomes a pres-
sure-cooker as passions rise,
personalities clash and the play-
ers are forced to confront the
ephemeral nature of their life's
work when their former member
returns.
Ribfest 2010, Friday
through Sunday, Nov. 12-14, at
Vinoy Park, 701 Bayshore Drive
NE. Tickets are $10 in advance
or $15 the day of the show. The
event will include ribs, music
and a family fun zone. The three-
day fundraiser now in its 21st
year of helping a variety of
youth-oriented causes will fea-
ture performances by the Doobie
Brothers, Rick Springfield,
Grand Funk Railroad, Phil Vas-
sar and Eric Church. Hell on
Wheels, one of the nation's lead-
ing BMX action stunt show, will
be performing throughout the
weekend. On Saturday, atten-
dees will see a classic car and
truck show, presented by Tires
Plus. On Sunday, there will be a
motorcycle show, presented by
Full Throttle Magazine. Visit
www.ribfest.org.

Tampa
Roger Waters, Tuesday,
Nov. 16, 8 p.m., at the 1-800-
ASK-GARY Amphitheatre at
Florida State Fairgrounds, 4802
U.S. 301 N. Tickets range from
$49.75 to $189.75. Call 813-
740-2446 or visit www.livena
tion.com. Waters, co-founder
and principal songwriter of the
archetypal progressive band
Pink Floyd, will commemorate
the 30th anniversary of the origi-
nal release of 'The Wall" with a
monumental tour featuring a full
band and a newly-mounted
state-of-the-art production of his
epochal masterpiece of alien-
ation and transformation per-
formed in its entirety. 'The Wall"
has been previously performed
live in its entirety by Waters just
31 times including Pink Floyd's
1980-81 tour in support of the
album.

Tarpon Springs
Brendan Nolan, Friday, Nov.
12, 8 p.m., at Tarpon Springs
Cultural Center, 101 South
Pinellas Ave. Tickets are $13 for
adults and $11 for members and
students. Call 942-5605 or visit
www.tarponarts.org. Nolan, an
Irish folk singer-songwriter, will
perform. Born and raised near
Dublin, this Irish singer-song-
writer brings the joy, humor, tri-
umph and longing of traditional
Irish folk music to the stage. He
has been based in St. Pete Beach
for nearly 15 years and has been
featured several times on WMNF
Live in Tampa.


LF!' The lWusieal
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Leader, November 11, 2010 5B


Cumberland Gap important in history, genealogy


During my travels this past
summer, I visited the Cumber-
land Gap National Park. It is lo-
cated at the intersection of
Tennessee, Kentucky, and Vir-
ginia. The gap is a unique place,
both historically and geographi-
cally. Right off I will tell you, if
you have any sense of history at
all, the gap should be on your
list of places to visit.
I have said before in this col-
umn that to be a good genealo-
gist you also need to be a good
historian. That is because only
by understanding historical
events on a broad scale can we
understand the events in our an-
cestors' lives on an individual
scale. This is certainly true
about understanding the history
of the Cumberland Gap.


The gap is the best natural
opening through the Appalachi-
an Mountains allowing travel
from east to west. It has been
used for centuries for that pur-
pose: first by Native Americans
and then by early continental ex-
plorers and then by westward-
migrating American pioneers.
When it was used by Native
Americans, the trail through the
gap was called the Warrior's
Trail because bands of Indians
east and west of the Appalachi-
ans would use it to conduct
raids against each other. When it
was used by migrating pioneers,
it was called the Wilderness
Road.
About 1775 Daniel Boone got
involved in the development of
the trail. He was contracted by


Genealogy exposed
Peter Summers


the Transylvania Company to
widen it from a mere footpath
into something that could allow a
wagon to pass. He and his men
did that and ultimately estab-
lished a couple of forts on the
western side of the gap. It was
about this time that the trail be-
came known as the Wilderness
Road. Because the gap was the
best route for settlers expanding
to the west to use to get through
the Appalachian Mountains,
many of our ancestors who trav-
eled west from about 1780


through 1810 used it. In fact,
about 300,000 did so.
Other means of getting west ul-
timately overshadowed the im-
portance of the gap ... first the
construction of canals (the Erie
Canal being a prime example in
1825), and then the development
of railroads. But for a significant
period, the Cumberland Gap was
our nation's doorway into the
west and many of our ancestors
went through it.
Today you can visit the Cum-
berland Gap National Park and,
after a short hike, actually stand
in the gap itself. I have to admit
to being something of a romantic
about things like that, so I will
tell you that I actually got goose
bumps as I stood on that very
point that played such an impor-


tant role in our nation's history,
and upon which Daniel Boone
himself actually stood and
worked to develop it into a use-
able road.
There are no formal records of
those pioneers who used the
Wilderness Road, but if your an-
cestors made the trek west early
in our nation's history, the odds
are that they went that route.
This knowledge can be helpful as
you try to trace a path to show
how an ancestor got from Virginia
to Missouri, for instance. Once
you have an idea of the path he
and his family followed, you can
start to look for other evidence of
their passing along that route ...
census records, land transac-
tions, etc.
When the National Park Ser-


vice took over the gap and the as-
sociated land that now represents
the national park, they rerouted
the highway that had been built
right on top of the Wilderness
Trail through the gap and then
reformed the landscape to most
accurately reflect how it looked in
the late 1700s. When you stand
in the gap today, you are stand-
ing in the actual historic Cum-
berland Gap and looking at
surroundings that are close to
what they were when Daniel
Boone and thousands of others
stood in that same spot.
Peter Summers is an amateur
genealogist who has been work-
ing on his family history since
1972. He is currently the presi-
dent of the Pinellas Genealogy So-
ciety.


Music scene
By LEE CLARK ZUMPE

In November, music lovers will find plenty of op-
portunities to sample a broad spectrum of artists as
the Tampa Bay area music scene heats up.
The Dunedin Wines the Blues Festival will be
presented Friday and Saturday, Nov. 12 and 13, in
downtown Dunedin on Main Street between Louden
Avenue and Broadway.
Event hours will be Friday, 5:30 to 10:30 p.m.;
and Saturday, 5 to 11 p.m. This event blends top-
notch blues music with wine from all over the world.
Wine tasting will be offered from more than two
dozen vineyards spanning many varieties. Music
will be performed on the main stage at Pioneer Park.
Performers will include Willie "Big Eyes" Smith and
Legendary JC's Jake Mackey. Admission is free.
Visit www.dunedinwinestheblues.info.
The Northeast Exchange Club will present
RibFest 2010 Friday through Sunday, Nov. 12-14,
at Vinoy Park, 701 Bayshore Drive NE, St. Peters-
burg. Gates will open at 11 a.m. daily. The event will
include ribs, music and a family fun zone. Perform-
ers will include Dave Mason, the Doobie Brothers,
Rick Springfield, Grand Funk Railroad, Phil Vassar,
Lee Brice and Eric Church. Online advance tickets
are $10 plus service charge. Tickets are $15 at the
gate. Children 12 and younger will be admitted free
when accompanied by an adult. Visit
www.ribfest.org.
The Suncoast Dixieland Jazz Classic will run
Friday through Sunday, Nov. 19-21, at Sheraton
Sand Key Resort, 1160 Gulf Blvd., Clearwater; and
Marriott Suites on Sand Key, 1201 Gulf Blvd.,
Clearwater.
The annual event will feature bands such as Bar-
bary Coast Dixieland Band, Bill Allred's Classic Jazz
Band, the Coast to Coast Jazz Band, Comet Chop
Suey and Dave Bennett and the Festival All-Stars. A
weekend badge costs $100. Daily badges for Friday
and Sunday are $40. Daily badges for Saturday are
$50. Call 536-0064 or visit www.jazzclassic.net.
Dunedin's annual Celtic Festival will be Satur-
day, Nov. 20, noon to 9:30 p.m., at Highlander Park,
Dunedin Community Center, 1920 Pinehurst,
Dunedin. This year's outdoor celebration will feature
Seven Nations, Rathkeltair and Brother. The festival
serves as a fundraiser for Dunedin's Scottish bands
and is promoted, organized and managed by the
Dunedin Highland Games and Festival Committee
Inc. Visit www.dunedinhighland games.com/celt-
fest.html.
Following is a list of other concerts scheduled in
November:

Capitol Theatre
Sutton Foster, Saturday, Nov. 20, 8 p.m.
Capitol Theatre is at 405 Cleveland St., Clearwa-


The Gathering


"We Love to Cook and it Shows"
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Frequent Diner Coupon
J 1" Visit 10% OFF Up to
j 2"" Visit 15% OFF 45% OFF
] 3rd Visit 20% OFF PresentCoupon with each visit.
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ter. Call 791-7400 or visit www.rutheckerdhall.com.

Cricketers British
Pub & Restaurant
Hope Darling, Saturday, Nov. 13, 9:30 p.m.
Kenny McGee Band, Friday, Nov. 19, 9:30 p.m.
Joe Sanders Band, Saturday, Nov. 20, 9:30 p.m.
SEl Matamugu, Friday, Nov. 26, 9:30 p.m.
Full Fledged Unit, Saturday, Nov. 27, 9:30 p.m.
Cricketers British Pub & Restaurant is at 2634
Bayshore Blvd., Dunedin. Call 736-1322 or visit
www.cricketerspub.com.

David A. Straz Jr. Center
for the Performing Arts
Fantasia and Eric Benet, Friday, Nov. 12, 8
p.m., in Carol Morsani Hall
Jazz at the Straz: Ken Loomer Big Band, Satur-
day, Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m., in TECO Theater
The Florida Orchestra, Masterworks: Mozart's
Eine Kleine Nachtmusik; Friday, Nov. 19, 8 p.m., in
Ferguson Hall
The Florida Orchestra, Pops Series: Wicked
Divas on Broadway; Friday, Nov. 26, 8 p.m., in
Carol Morsani Hall
The David A Straz Jr. Center formerly the
Tampa Bay Performing Arts Center is at 1010 N.
W.C. Maclnnes Place, Tampa. Call 813-229-7827 or
visit www.tbpac.org.


Dunedin Brewery
Dave Korman, Thursday, Nov. 11
Lefty Williams, Friday, Nov. 12
Joey Gilmore, Saturday, Nov. 13
Seven Nations, Friday, Nov. 19
Earth Bombs Mars, Saturday, Nov. 20
*Brother, Sunday, Nov. 21
Aquaphonics, Friday, Nov. 26
Dunedin Brewery is at 937 Douglas Ave.,
Dunedin. Call 736-0606 or visit
dunedinbrewery.com.

Jannus Live
Social Distortion, Friday, Nov. 12, 7 p.m.
Better Than Ezra, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 8 p.m.
Toots and the Maytals, Friday, Nov. 19, 8 p.m.
Jannus Live is at 16 Second St. N., St. Peters-
burg. Call 896-1244 or visit www.jannuslive.com.

Jolli Mon's Grill
Jimmy Wines, Friday, Nov. 12, 7 p.m.
Brian Caudill, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 7 p.m.
Skull n Bone Band, Friday, Nov. 19, 7 p.m.
Christie Lenee, Saturday, Nov. 20, 7 p.m.
Rebekah Pulley, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 7 p.m.
Brian Caudill, Tuesday, Nov. 30, 7 p.m.


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Visit www.jollimonsgrill.com.

Largo Cultural Center
David Pack, Friday, Nov. 19, 8 p.m.
Glenn Leonard's Temptations Revue, Sunday,
Nov. 21, 7:30 p.m.
The Largo Cultural Center is at 105 Central Park
Drive, Largo. Call 587-6793 or visit
www.largoarts.com.

Mahaffey Theater
Lyle Lovett and His Large Band, Sunday, Nov.
21, 7p.m.
The Florida Orchestra, Pops Series: Wicked
Divas on Broadway; Saturday, Nov. 27, 8 p.m.
Progress Energy Center's Mahaffey Theater is at
400 First St. S., St. Petersburg. Call 892-5767 or
visit www.mahaffeytheater.com.

Orpheum
The Sleeping, Saturday, Nov. 13, 7 p.m.
Dax Riggs, Thursday, Nov. 18, 7 p.m.
Miss May I, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 6 p.m.
The Orpheum is at 1902 14th St. (Republica de
Cuba), Ybor City. Call 813-248-9500.

Palladium at
St. Petersburg College
O'Carolan's Farewell to Music with Patrick Ball,
Friday, Nov. 12, 7 p.m.
Battlefield Band, Sunday, Nov. 21, 7:30 p.m.
The Palladium at St. Petersburg College is at 253
Fifth Ave. N., St. Petersburg. Call 822-3590 or visit
www.mypalladium.org.

The Ritz Theater
Bring Me the Horizon and August Bums Red,
Thursday, Nov. 11, 6 p.m.
Badfish, a tribute to Sublime; Friday, Nov. 12, 7
p.m.
Atreyu, Monday, Nov. 15, 6:30 p.m.
Joanna Newsom, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 7 p.m.
Apocalyptica, Saturday, Nov. 27, 7 p.m.
The Ritz Theater is at 1503 E. Seventh Ave., Ybor
City. Call 813-247-2518.

Ruth Eckerd Hall
Ian Anderson, Thursday, Nov. 11, 8 p.m.
Jason Bonham's Led Zeppelin, Sunday, Nov.
14, 7 p.m.


Diana Ross, Saturday, Nov. 20, 8 p.m.
The Florida Orchestra, Masterworks: Mozart's
Eine Kleine Nachtmusik; Sunday, Nov. 21, 7:30
p.m.
Celtic Thunder, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 8 p.m.
The Florida Orchestra, Pops Series: Wicked
Divas on Broadway; Sunday, Nov. 28, 7:30 p.m.
Ruth Eckerd Hall is at 1111 McMullen Booth
Road, Clearwater. Call 791-7400 or visit
www.rutheckerdhall.com.

St. Pete Times Forum
Roger Waters: The Wall Live, Tuesday, Nov. 16,
8 p.m.
St. Pete Times Forum is at 401 Channelside
Drive, Tampa. Call 813-301-2500 or visit www.spti
mesforum.com.

Skipper's Smokehouse
WMNF 88.5 presents Tropical Heatwave featur-
ing Cosmic Chameleon, Crabgrass Cowboys, Ella
Jet, Parson Brown, The Funky Seeds, Sound Parlor,
Sunset Bridge, Radio Free Carmela and Too Many
Subplots; Saturday, Nov. 13, 7 p.m.
Shaun Hopper, Rob Tyre and Mike MacArthur
with Daniel B. Marshall; Tuesday, Nov. 16, 8 p.m.
Honey Island Swamp Band, Friday, Nov. 19, 8
p.m.
Jim Lauderdale with Blue Cypress, Saturday,
Nov. 20, 8 p.m.
Empty Hats with Celticopia, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 8
p.m.
Buffalo Strange with Baye Kouyate, Friday, Nov.
26, 8 p.m.
Beanstalk with John Wesley and The Spells,
Saturday, Nov. 27, 8 p.m.
Skipper's Smokehouse is at 910 Skipper Road,
Tampa. Call 813-971-0666 or visit www.skip
perssmokehouse.com.

State Theatre
Supervillains, Sunday, Nov. 21, 7 p.m.
Twiztid, Friday, Nov. 26, 7 p.m.
The Fearless Friends Tour with Mayday Parade,
Saturday, Nov. 27, 5 p.m.
State Theatre is at 687 Central Ave., St. Peters-
burg. Call 895-3045 or visit www.statetheatrecon-
certs.com.
For more music and concert information, visit TBN
weekly.com.


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6B Classifieds Leader, November 11,2010


To Place An Ad Call (727) 397-5563 Fax (727) 399-2042

or order your ad online 24/7 @ TBNweekly.com

Deadlines: Display, Friday-5 p.m. Line Ads, Monday-Noon


CLEARWATER: 3BR ON LARGE,
treed, corner lot. Well maintained.
New wood floors, eat-in kitchen,
fireplace. $126,900. Janet Elwood,
Prudential Tropical Realty.
(727)692-3331.
EVERYTHING NEW!
Largo, 4BR/2.5BA/2CG. Close To
Beach, Belleair Bluffs. $169,900.
Tammi Browning, Coldwll Banker,
(727)430-0019.

FOR SALE, $40,000 INTEREST
Only First Mortgage, On Home In
St. Pete. Pays 15% Interest
Monthly! (727)409-5252.
INDIAN ROCKS BEACH,
Short Sale, Won't Last!
Remodeled 3BR/2BA Pool Home.
Walk To Beach. Only $267K.
Davis Suncoast Realty,
(727)595-7592.

OPEN SUNDAY, 1-5 P.M.
Price reduced. 3BR/2BA, 75'x100'
lot. Fenced yard, $99,500. 11600
109th St. N. Seminole Realty.
(727)391-0197.


First Time m

SHomebuyer
Program*

Low Interest Rate
Mortgage
Down Payment Assistance
at 0% Interest 0

Housing Finance Authority
of Pinellas County o

1-800-806-5154 i
www.pinellascounty.org/community/hfa

SPrograms available in Pinellas, Polk I
and Pasco counties
If you have not owned a home
in the last years







EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal to
advertise "any preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race, color,
religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or
national origin, or an intention, to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status includes
children under the age of 18 living with
parents or legal custodians; pregnant
women and people securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this newspaper
are available onan equal opportunity
basis. To complain of discrimination call
HUD Toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The
Toll-free telephone number for the
hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.



CLEARWATER BEACH
440 West Condos, 2BR/2BA Split
w/Garage, Gulf front! 16th Floor
$329,900. Florida Dreams Real
Estate, Rebecca Henry,
(727)504-9490.
INDIAN ROCKS BEACH. WILL
trade for NC mountain home.
2BR/2BA home on large Bay.
Dock and 10K pound lift.
(727)560-1441.

NEW LISTING: Belleair Bluffs
WATERFRONT 2BR/2BA.
Water views from every room!
www.50HarborViewLane.com

Sue Dudenhoefer, (727)510 6642
Remax/ACR Elite Group, Largo


WATERFRONT VILLAS
All villas have 2 car garage, walled
private patio, pets welcome, dock,
clubhouse on Intracoastal.
www. 1 903randolphfarms.com
www. 1 904randolphfarms.com
www.601 randolphfarms.com
www.1402randolphfarms.com

Sue Dudenhoefer, 727 510 6642
Remax/Acr Elite Group, Inc.




BELLEAIR BEACH BUNGALOW
Steps to private beach. 2 units.
Live in one and rent the other.
$650,000. MUST SELL!
Georgette Gillis, (727)448-3533.
CLEARWATER BEACH: Beach-
front home next to public access.
750 EIDorado Ave. $1,200,000.
John Doran Realty. (727)461-9142
HUNDREDS OF
FORECLOSURES NEAR BEACH
Call for a list.
GULF-FRONT CONDO
2BR/2BA, great view, pool,
$360,000
Beach Place One Real Estate
(727)593-3000, (800)487-8959.
I.R.BCH. HOME, SALE / LEASE
3BR/2BA. 16th Avenue. Brand
new inside. Two blocks from boat
and beach access, park, tennis
courts, restaurants. Asking
$229,000. (727)244-4241.


SEMINOLE GARDENS
BUY WHILE PRICES ARE AT
AN ALL-TIME LOW!
BEAUTIFUL 52-ACRE
COMPLEX
2BR/2BA, 1,056 sq. ft.
3rd floor, 55+, Corner Unit.
Sunroom, elevator bldg.
Furnished! $39,900

2BR/1BA 1,012 sq. ft.
1st floor, 55+, Sunroom,
Newer A/C, Furnished!
Great shape! $26,000

1BR/1BA,712 sq. ft.
2nd floor, 55+, Pet Bldg.
Water view! $19,900
Ridge Seminole Mgmt. Corp.
Lynn Evans, Realtor
(727)397-2534
MySeminoleGardens.com

A PRISTINE, CLEAN, NEWLY
Renovated 2BR/1BA. Park-like
Setting. Move-In Ready. 55+ Com-
plex. Close To Every Conven-
ience. $29,900. (727)391-9235,
(352)584-4125.
CHATEAUX DE BARDMOOR
2BR, Garage, Granite, Oak Floors,
Formal Dining Room, Hurricane
Windows, Screened Lanai,
$145,000 w/$8,000 Rebate!
(727)394-4926, (727)612-4830.
FIVE TOWNS, ST. PETE, 55+,
1BR/1BA, 890SF, reduced,
move-in ready, full amenities,
small pets okay, near shopping,
restaurants, $44,900.
(727)547-6023.
IRB: Prestigious Dolphin Reef
Beautifully Remodeled, Gulf front.
First Offering @Only $447K. Davis
Suncoast Realty, (727)595-7592.
LARGO VILLAS
2BR/2BA, Pet Okay, Water View,
$79,900. 2BR/2BA +Bonus Room,
1,296SF, $75,000. Rentals Avail.
CLS Realty, Peg Decker,
(727)459-2598.
LARGO: LARGE 2BR/2BA, 55+,
Ground Floor, Covered Parking,
Heated Pool, Clubhouse, Close To
Beach. Paid $170,000, Sell
$98,000 Firm. (727)517-3898.
LONG BAYOU, GATED, 55+
community, 2nd floor, 1BR/1BA,
790SF, upgraded kitchen/ bath,
covered parking. $59,900.
Sandy, (727)391-7390
OAKHURST SPECIALS
2BR/2BA, End Unit, Overlooking
Small Lake, "over 55", W/D,
Covered parking.
Light and Bright.
$89,900.

1BR/1.5BA, First Floor,
Enclosed Porch.
$49,500.

No car needed, close to stores
and bus.

Maureen Stilwell
Rutenberg Realty
(727)596-2965
(727)458-2246
LARGO: PENTHOUSE GREENS
Golf Condo, End Unit. 3BR/2BA,
New Decor, Pantry, 7 Closets,
1,820SF, Pool, Clubhouse, Cvd.
Parking. $189K. (727)631-1997
SEMINOLE GARDENS!
Sales & Rentals
Robert G. Castles, PA, Broker
(727)595-8229
www.seminolegarden.com
SHIPWATCH
Nice Selection of Water-view Con-
dos from $200,000 to $249,900.
Shipwatch Realty. (727)596-6508.
www.ShipwatchRealty.com
SHORES OF LONG BAYOU,
Gated, 2BR/2BA w/garage. On
natural preserve. Pool, clubhouse.
Offered at $190,000.
MONTEREY at Lake Seminole,
gated, 3BR/2BA, 2,155 sq ft., 10'
ceilings, water view, pool, club-
house. Offered at $249,000.
Call Karen Vogel, (727)542-9384.
Prudential Tropical.


ATTRACTIVE, NEWLY
Renovated 1BR, Seminole, 55+.
A/C, W/D, Carport, Florida Rm.
Half Block To Buses, Shopping,
Dining, Doctors, Dentists. $4K.
(727)391-9235, (352)584-4125.


















LARGO: 5 STAR, 55+. 24'x44',
2BR/2BA, Hardwood Floors, New
A/C, Enclosed Florida Room.
$8,000/OBO. (727)424-9440.
STAR LITE MHP, HAMLIN Blvd.,
2BR/1.5BA, screened porch, car-
port, 47' long, 15 minute walk to
beach, $8,000. (727)595-4223.
WOW- Come Home To Paradise,
Clearwater 55+ Community,
Why Rent When You Can Own?
Starting At $3,999. (727)796-1364,
Evening (727)215-9553.
www.RegencyHeightsCoop.com


SELL OR RENT YOUR TIME-
share for cash! Our Guaranteed
Services will Sell/Rent your Un-
used Timeshare for Cash! Over
$78 Million offered in 2009! Call
(877)554-2430 or visit website:
www.sellatimeshare.com.


RENT ME FLORIDA
Full Service Property Management
& Collections Services.
ONLY $59 PER MONTH!
Rent Your Own Property
And Let Us Manage It!
877-400-0354



WANTED: MOBILE HOMES!
Must Be Under 50 Feet And
Moveable. Less Than $3,000.
Call Evon (813)789-8331.



HARD-TO-FIND B4 ZONING
property for sale or lease on High-
way 484 in South Marion County.
4,700SF building on one acre.
Great for church, clubs, meetings,
etc. For info, contact Realtor An-
thony White. (352)547-3137.
RUSKIN, FLORIDA: APPROX. 2
acres. 2511 River Bend Drive.
New well-septic & electric. Canal
in rear, Little Manatee River
across the street. $100K. Owner
financing. (740)260-2282.
RV SPOT FOR RENT ON
Hutchinson Island. Beach access,
heated pool, tennis court, marina
with boat slips. Great area, great
fishing. (352)347-4470.



INDIAN ROCKS BEACH. WILL
trade for NC mountain home.
2BR/2BA home on large Bay.
Dock and 10K pound lift.
(727)560-1441.
ALABAMA RIVERFRONT LOTS:
Final phase close-out sale, Nov.
20, 2010! Prices Reduced,
$19,900. Boat launch, sandy
beach. Ready to build. EZ terms.
Call for appt. (888)392-9944.
CAVENDER CREEK CABINS
Dahlonega, North Georgia Moun-
tains. 1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Cabins
with Hot Tubs. Take virtual tour at
www.CavenderCreek.com. or call
(866)373-6307.


























GEORGIA BLUE RIDGE MTNS:
10 acres with creek, $109K.
Homesites/Mini-Farms near
Augusta & Macon: 1.25 acs. to 20
acs. from $3,750/ac. Beautiful
weather, low taxes. EZ owner fi-
nancing. Call (706)364-4200.
GEORGIA LAND IRA / 401K?
(Pre-Tax Money). Use your retire
ment fund without penalty. Great
investment! Double your retire-
ment savings! Riverfront develop-
ment, private boat ramp, three
acre tracts, $4,950/ac. Call owner:
(912)529-6198.
LAND LIQUIDATION! 20 ACRES
$0 down, $99.00/mo. Near grow-
ing El Paso, Texas. Guaranteed
owner financing. No credit checks!
Money Back Guarantee. Free
Map/Pictures. (800)843-7537 or
www.sunsetranches.com.
NC MOUNTAIN LAND: MOUN-
tain top tract. 2.6 acres, private,
large public lake five mins. away.
Owner must sell, only $25,500.
(866)789-8535.
NC MOUNTAINS: CABIN SHELL,
two+ acres with great view, very
private, big trees, waterfalls &
large public lake nearby. $99,500.
Bank financing. (866)275-0442.
SOUTH CAROLINA: TWO ACS.
in the Santee, Cooper Lake area.
Near 1-95. Beautiful building tract,
$19,900. Ask about easy financ-
ing, low payments. Call owner:
(803)473-7125.
TENNESSEE MTNS: 435 ACS.
Timber, creek, river, natural gas
well, springs, city water, utilities,
trails. $1,800/ac. Two tracts possi-
ble. Good hunting. No state in-
come tax. Call (888)836-8439.
www.tnwithaview.com.



SERENITY GARDENS,
Gardens Of Meditation, Block K,
Lot 17, Lawn Crypt. $2,500.
(727)510-2575

S H R N T A
inteSneCoprLk ra


CLEARWATER DUPLEX, Great
Location, Repainted, 2BR/1BA,
Walk-in Closets, W/D Hook-up,
Fenced Yard. C/H/A. $700/Month.
(727)581-5221.
INDIAN ROCKS: GARAGE APT.
Close to shopping, beach, bus
line, $600 month +first/ last.
(727)596-7539.
PINELLAS PARK DUPLEX,
2BR/1BA, W/D Hook-Up, C/H/A.
$650/Month +Deposit. 3738 67th
Ave. Gary, (727)686-7357.
SUNSET BEACH: 1BR APT.
Steps To Beach, Cute, Cozy &
Clean. $650/Month, Includes
Cable, W/S/G. Don Taylor, Realty
Executives. (727)458-7828.
CHEAP APARTMENTS! FROM
$500/mo. Millions of rentals na-
tionwide. Low income and luxury
at discounted rates. Call now!
(800)805-6834.
FREE FORECLOSURE LIST-
ings! Over 400,000 properties na-
tionwide. Low down payment. Call
(800)498-8619.


FALL AT THE BEACH!
Cozy, Clean Cottages.
1-2BR: $290/week & up.
Steps to Beach. Pet Friendly.
www.UncleMiltsCottages.com
(727)595-8013.


BELLEAIR 2BR/2BA/1CG, NICE!
Clean & Spacious. Large Sunroom.
604 Mehlenbacher Rd. $895/Mo.
(Discounted rent). (727)586-2412.
2BR/1BA w/FLORIDA ROOM.
Tile, Laundry Room, Carport,
Large Backyard. Walk to Seminole
Mall. Annual. $895/Mo.
(727)488-1111.
Clearwater: 515 Yelvington Rd.
2BR/1BA, Large Yard. Inside W/D,
Fireplace. $750/Month +1st, Last,
Security. (727)586-6086.
HOME RENTALS
Across Pinellas. 3/2s, 4/2s, 5/2s,
starting from the $900s. Family
owned. (727)532-0020.
LARGO 3BR/2BA, FENCED
Yard, C/H/A, Carport. New Paint &
New Carpet. First, Security.
$950/Mo. (727)398-7445.
LARGO, HARBOR BLUFFS,
4BR/4BA/2.5CG. 2,917sf. Com-
pletely Remodeled '04. Fireplace,
Pool. Private, Fenced Backyard.
$2,600/Mo. (727)596-5127.
PINELLAS PARK
7168 59th St., 2BR/2BA, new
paint, new carpet, utility room.
$800/month. (727)954-7712,
(727)742-8529.
SEMINOLE: 2BR/2BA/1CG
+Family Room. Newly remodeled,
1,300 SF, nonsmoking, pet
considered, fenced. $1,200/Month.
Annual. (727)398-7550.



BAY PINES: 55+ CONDO,
2BR/1.5BA, Heated Pool, Rec.
W/D. Nonsmoking, Petless,
$925/Month +Security. Annual.
(609)412-4137.
LARGO, 2BR/1BA, 1ST FLOOR.
Minutes To Beach, Shopping.
Heated Pool, Clubhouse. Non-
smoking, Petless. (727)535-8251,
(727)512-5431.
SAND KEY, FULLY FURNISHED,
2BR + bonus room.
Available Seasonal or Annual.
Southbeach II Bldg.
24-hour security. Heated pool.
Penny, (727)459-0980.
SEMINOLE GARDENS
Furnished & Unfurn. 2BR/1BA,
2BR/2BA, Rent Negotiable. Pool,
Clubhouse, Walk To Mall.
(860)965-2467.
VILLA MILAN: ON LAKE
Seminole, 2BR/2BA, Great Views,
2nd Floor. $825/Mo. 1st/Last/Se-
curity. Best Beach Rentals.
(727)398-1200.



BAY PINES: 55+, 2BR/2BA,
1,200 SF, Just Renovated. Pool,
Clubhouse, $800/Month, Includes
W/S/G & Cable. Available 12/1/10.
No Pets. (727)239-8884.
BELLEAIR: 2BR/2BA, Extra
Nice, 1,200 SF, 1st Floor. Covered
Parking, New Carpet & Paint.
Pool. $800/Month, Includes Water.
No Pets. Call Dean,
(727)420-0094.
6165 58TH ST. N., 2BR/1BA,
Updated, Tile, Granite counter-
tops. W/D hook-up. C/H/A, 45+.
$700/month. (727)430-0607.
SEMINOLE: 2BR/2BA, TOTALLY
Remodeled. Living/ Dining Room,
Eat-in Kitchen, W/D, Pool, Spa,
Carport. $785/Mo. (727)482-9139.


^^*


Annual Rentals
MADEIRA BEACH
* 2/1.5 Condo, Ground Floor, Gated, Beach .....................$850
* 3/2/2 House, Pool, Dock. Wide-Water View .................. $1,950
REDIHGTOH BEACH
* 4/3/3 Single Family Home, Wide Water View, Pool, Dock. Luxury ...$7,000

TOTAL REALTY SERVICES, INC.
R Darren Sudnick, Realtor (,
S 13030 Gulf Blvd., Madeira Beach, FL 33708 ERA |
(727) 393-2534* 1-800-950-2534 www.trsinc.com


CLEARWATER SEVILLE Condos
55+. 1BR/1.5BA, 2BR/2BA.
Free cable, sewage, water.
Small pet OK. (256)442-4562.
Isowards@ charter., net.
CLEARWATER: GREENBRIAR,
1BR/1BA, remodeled, new wood
laminate/ tile floors, cable/ water
included, 55+, $545/month.
(727)734-0069.
DUNEDIN SECTION 8 OK
1BR/1BA. 55+, Petless.
$650/Month, includes water,
cable, trash. Covered parking,
pool, clubhouse. (727)641-4894,
(727)535-2722.
LARGO, GREAT LOCATION,
Near Largo Library and Cultural
Center. 2BR townhouse.
Yearly lease. Available Now.
$750/month. John Doran Realty,
(727)461-9142.
LARGO: 2BR/1BA w/BALCONY,
New Appliances Including Dish-
washer, Remodeled. Autumn
Chase. Minutes To Beach.
$585/Mo. (727)480-2467.
SHIPWATCH: 2BR/2BA (2 Units
Available). Ask About FREE Rent!
Walk To Beach. Pools & Tennis.
$1,200/Mo. Shipwatch RIty. Inc.
www.ShipWatchRealty.com
(727)596-6508.
SPACIOUS CONDO, BELLEAIR,
1 BR/1BA, Many Amenities, Close
To Shopping. $725/Mo. Must See!
(727)641-3094
ST. PETE: FIVE TOWNS, 55+,
Pristine 2BR/2BA, 2nd Floor. All
Amenities. No Smoking. $695/Mo.
(727)391-3551.


LARGO, 55+. 2BR/2BA, End
Unit, Carport, Porch, Pool. Beach
Nearby. Furn./ Unfurn., $698/Mo.
(727)812-1712.

170. Furn. Apartments
CLEARWATER, Small 1BR/1BA
Cottage. 450 SF, Furnished.
$150/Wk. Includes W/S/G.
(727)458-3477.
FACING EVICTION?
Move in today!
Studio apts. starting @$185/week.
Open 24/7. No credit check. No
security deposit. Free local phone
calls. Pets okay. (727)446-6560.
SEA TOWERS, 2BR/2BA. Gated
Community, Great Amenities, Re-
served Parking. Available Immedi-
ately. Seasonal $1,500/Mo. Will
consider long-term lease at re-
duced rate. Deposit Required.
(727)393-4812.
SEMINOLE. 8423 SEMINOLE
Blvd. 1BR/BA. $795/month,
2BR/1BA $945/mo. +Deposit.
NICE! 2BR Includes W/D. Both in-
clude Super Cable. No pets, No
smoking. (727)584-4707.
SEMINOLE: 1BR/1BA, Nicely
Furnished, Second Floor, Pool,
Clubhouse. Deposit required. No
Pets. $650/Mo (727)393-4812.


SEMINOLE GARDENS, 55+.
1BR Standard, All New, Unfurn.,
$525/Mo. 1BR Deluxe, Unfurn.,
$695/Mo. 2BR/1BA, $675/Mo.
Winter Rentals Available.
Robert G. Castles, P.A., Broker.
(727)595-8229.

Apartments

for Seniors
(New Building)
St. Giles Manor II
(Non-denominational)

Applications
will be available Starting
November 15th
10 AM to 1 PM
Monday thru Friday
At the
St. Giles Manor II
Rental Office
5851 Park Blvd
Suite 104
Pinellas Park, FL 33781

Opening February 2011
S1 BR Apartments
Rent based on income
Must be at least 62 years of age

(727) 623-9886
TTY 800-955-8771

BELLEAIR BLUFFS, COLONIAL
Bluffs Apts. 1&2BRs. Walk to In-
tracoastal, Shopping, Dining.
2942 West Bay Dr.
(727)501-5959.
BELLEAIR BLUFFS!
Near Beach, Shopping, Restau-
rants. 1BR/1BA, C/H/A, Ceramic
Tile, Vertical Blinds, Carport,
$550/Mo. (727)595-0212.
BELLEAIR GREENS APTS.
2BR units on Biltmore Golf
Course. Newly renovated. Across
from police, rec center. Starting
$875/month. (727)365-6821.
LARGO'S BEST Kept Secret
Beautiful Lake-View Apts.
Mile To Beaches. Pool, Hot Tub,
Tennis, Boating, Fishing,
Paddle Boats, More! Util. Incl.
Move-In Special Only $299.
(727)596-9133.
LARGO, EAST BAY
Ground-floor 2BR/1 BA w/tile.
$690/month +deposit. Water
included! Special first-month
discount!! (727)524-3137,
(727)515-1097
LARGO, 12015 117TH ST.
1BR, W/D. Petless. $650/month
includes utilities. (727)741-6222.


BELLEAIR PLACE APTS.
Month Of November
$199 Gets You In A 2BR
$299 Gets You In A 3BR
MUST HURRY WHILE THEY LAST!
(Offer Only Good On A Few Seled Apts.)
Spacious & Affordable,
Two & Three Bedrooms
Just Minutes To The Beach!
Featuring 2 Full Baths, W/D
Connections Or W/D
Rentals, Designer Kitchens,
Built-in Microwaves, Walk-in
Closets, Pool, Fitness Cen-
ter, 2 Playgrounds & More!

Call (727)581-9800

CENTRAL LARGO: 2BR Duplex,
Excellent Condition, C/H/A,
Smoke Free. Credit Check.
$675/Month. (727)584-6283
CENTURY OAKS IN LARGO
Affordable, Luxury 2BRs, From
$850/Month. ONLY 2 LEFT!
W/S/G, Cable Included. Russell
Property Mgmt. (727)420-7822.
CLEARWATER, 2BR/1BA/2CG,
W/D Hook-ups. Includes W/S/G.
Small Pet Okay. Nonsmoker.
$600/Mo. (727)434-5800.

DOWNTOWN CLEARWATER,
Unfurnished 1BR. Close To Beach
& Bus Terminal. $450/Mo. +Secu-
rity. Call Bob, (727)515-0994.

LARGO, 1 BEDROOM, $140/WK.
Clearwater Efficiency, $425/Mo.,
624 Woodlawn. Dunedin Room,
$75/WNVk. Call (727)586-2412 or
Click www.586-2412.com

LARGO, EAST BAY/ US 19
LIKE NEW, BEAUTIFUL, Upscale,
Quiet 1BR/1BA, 2nd Floor
Walk-Up. Free Water. $575/Mo.
NO PETS. (727)461-1177.

LARGO: 1BR/1BA, BEAUTIFUL
Landscaped Courtyard, W/D.
Petless. $700/Mo. Includes All Util.
(727)586-1566 Or (727)586-2419.

LARGO: 4TH AVE. NW: Cozy,
1BR/1BA, Quiet Area. $495/Mo.
+1st/ Last/ Security. Best Beach
Rentals. (727)398-1200.
LARGO: VERY CLOSE TO
Transportation, Shopping, Hosp-
ital. 1BR/1BA, $600/month,
2BR/1BA, $675/month, 2BR/2BA,
$725/month. (727)280-5005.
***$350 MOVES YOU IN***
Largo, 2BRs, Updated, Clean
Spacious, C/H/A, Laundry, Pool,
Small Pet OK. W/S/G & Cable In-
cluded (727)533-0667.

4 o0 110410


IMPERIAL PALMS
APARTMENTS


SEMINOLE: 55+, 1BR/1BA, ALL
NEW Kitchen, Bath, Carpet, Tile,
Paint. Great Location, Amenities.
$650/Month. Incl. W/S/G, Cable.
(727)639-9801.
S.W. LARGO: LG. 1BR/1BA,
Quiet. Laundry on Premises.
Petless. $500/mo., $400 security.
Yearly lease. (727)595-2228. Last
Month FREE!
BELLEAIR BLUFFS: 2BR/1BA,
Clean & Quiet, Inside Laundry,
Carport. Cats OK. $750/Mo. Incl.
W/S/G. (727)455-2260.


FALL AT THE BEACH
Cozy, Clean, Furnished Cottages.
1-2BR: $290/week & up.
Steps to Beach. Pet Friendly.
www.UncleMiltsCottages.com.
(727)595-8013.
CALL FOR MOVE-IN SPECIALS
N. Redington: Steps To Beach
Large, Updated 2BR/2BA, C/H/A,
Laundry. W/S/G, Cable Included.
Pets Welcome. (727)533-0667.
CLEARWATER BEACH
Sand Key Ultimar II. Furnished
1&2BR/2BA, extra Murphy bed,
Pool, Sauna, (813)245-7877,
(813)949-8855.
CLEARWATER BEACH NORTH,
1BR +Foyer, +Storage, W/D
Hook-ups, Secluded Courtyard,
Parking, $700/Mo. Includes Utili-
ties. (727)442-8916.
CLEARWATER/ SAND KEY
Landmark-1, Gulf-front 2BR/2BA,
Intracoastal Views, Nicely
Furnished. 24/7 Security. All
Amenities. No Pets. Available
Monthly or Long Term. Owner,
(813)431-9381, (813)909-9370.

raiiiiI k. 1=1 .i


LIVe me l orlna uream!
Just steps from the beach
Large 1 bedroom, 1 bath $920
Bright, clean 2 bdrm, 2 bath $1,000
Spacious 3 bedroom, 2 bath $1,125
Free: Cablevision, Pest Control, A/C Filters,
Carpet Cleaning, W/S/T
No Fees! Heated Pool (55+)
13 month lease w/the 13" Month Free
Lease now to move in
November, December or January
17105 Gulf Blvd., NRB
727-392-0753 I

INDIAN ROCKS: 1BR/1BA,
Unfurn. Duplex. Blocks To Beach.
$725/Month, Annual. Best Beach
Rentals. (727)398-1200.
IRB: 2BR/1BA DUPLEX, BLOCK
to beach, Nature Preserve.
Laundry, small pet OK. $825/mo.
+security. (727)709-5743.
IRB: BEACH ACCESS, NEWLY
Decorated 1BR/1BA, $660/Month.
W/S/G Included. Annual Lease.
2400 1st St. (727)586-6086.
MADEIRA BEACH: EFFICIENCY
w/Kitchen, Furnished, Phone, Ca-
ble, Laundry, Pool, Across From
Beach. No Pets. $250/week, FL
Residents. 14711 Gulf Blvd.
(727)394-0751.
REDINGTON SHORES: NICE
3BR/2BA/1CG, Unfurn. House.
Plenty Of Parking. Walk to Beach.
$1,000/Month. (727)432-2452.


175. Unfurn. Apartment


ANNUAL RENTALS

TREASURE ISLAND
1/1 Treasure Island apartment, terrazzo floor, small pet OK...........$750
2/2 Furnished waterfront condo, fishing dock, walk to beach.........$1,000
3/2 Isle of Capri waterfront home, great neighborhood, pet OK ...... .$1,800
3/3 Paradise Island waterfront, pool home, 2,400 sq. ft., large dock ...$2,500
3/2 LaBelle Vita, 3,000+ sq. ft., luxury wtrfrt condo, boat slip, pet OK .$3,300
MADEIRA BEACH
1/1 Shores of Madeira, Direct Gull-front condo, pool ............. $1,000

WE NEED YOUR RENTAL!!!
For the BEST property management along the beaches call us today
MATTHEW WORKMAN
'727-367-1223

SANDCASTL 201 108th Ave.,
i REALTY INC. I Treasure Island


Cls ifieds Index








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30 u hnsT o 1 asg hrpy57Cis&Sap







310 ood hins ToEat420 abyittig 59 RetalEquimen


1 & 2 Bedroom Homes
Starting at $599/month
Smoke-free & Pet-friendly Available
-- I &&
f 1 -i Vegas
-Some restrictions apply. Callfor details.


101 Imperial Palm Drive
Lurgo, Florida 33771
(727) 585-3723
www.ImperialPalms.com

175. Unfurn. Apartments


1185. Beach Rentals I


115.BechRetas












Leader, November 11,2010 Classifieds 7B


MADEIRA BEACH YACHT CLUB
1BR/1.5BA Unfurnished Town-
home, Waterfront Complex,
Heated Pools, Billiard, Weight
Room, Docks. $800/Month. Sun
Beach Properties, (727)393-5555.
MADEIRA BEACH: 1BR/1BA
Apt., furnished. C/H/A, newly
remodeled, $750/month includes
W/S/G. Small 1BR/1BA,
$600/month +electricity.
Short term okay (813)748-2940.
Treasure Island: Isle Of Capri,
1BR/1BA, Unfurnished Apt. 2nd
Floor, Dock. $650/Mo. +Deposit.
(727)381-9714.


BEACH CONDOS, FANTASTIC
views! Direct beach front,
Redington Shores. 2BR, 3BR.
1,250-2,00SF, Furn. /Unfurn.
Heated Pool. Pets OK.
$1,375/month. (727)490-2765.
ISLAND ESTATES CONDOS
3BR/2BA 1,800SF 2/CG
2BR/2BA 15th Fl., Water View
Balcony, Pool, Spa.
Vangie (727)447-6852
Pappas Realty & Mgmt Co.
JOHN'S PASS: 1BR/1BA
Cottages. Fully Furnished, On-site
Laundry, BIk. To Beach. $250NVk.
Includes Electric, Water, Cable.
Dock Available. (727)392-5378.
MADEIRA BEACH 3BR/2BA
house on the water,
walk to beach. $1,500/Month.
RentingTampaBay, (727)735-8532
TREASURE ISLAND,
105 110th Ave. 1BR, Dock, Laun-
dry, From $675/Mo. Walk To
Beach. Credit Check. Pets OK.
(727)367-9474.


CLEARWATER BCH/SAND KEY
2BR/2BA, Furnished Condos
Available: 1-12 Months. Florida
Dreams RE Sales & Rentals, Inc.
(727)595-5774.

LAKE SEMINOLE: 1BR
Furnished Apt. Clean, Quiet.
Dock/ Pool. W/D. Non-smoking.
Convenient Location. $900/month.
(727)392-1149.



MADEIRA BEACH, Remodeled
1BR/1BA Furnished Apt. On-site
laundry. Walk to Beach and John's
Pass. $1,200/month, includes
utilities +WiFi. (727)686-8900,
(727)391-3993.
NORTH CAROLINA MTNS:
Spend the holidays in the moun-
tains and start a family tradition!
Even the family pet is welcome!
Foscoe Rentals (800)723-7341.
www.foscoerentals.com.


AFFORDABLE
Starting $105/week. 28 week
lease includes W/S/G. Move-in
specials include FREE first week
on approval. Monthly rates avail-
able. Gulf Breeze. (727)559-8644
BLUE SKIES M.H.P., LARGO.
Mobile Homes For Rent. Move-In
Special, $199. One Bedroom. Call
Lee, (727)657-2104.
1BR: NEAR BAY PINES VA &
Madeira Bch. $545/Month +$425
Security, Includes: W/S/G & Ca-
ble. Pets OK. (727)393-1628.


CLEARWATER: Efficiencies
starting at $185/wk. No security,
no credit check. Free WiFi access.
Pets okay. Move in today!!
(727)445-7134.



LARGO: 1019 3RD AVE. SW
2BR/1BA/1CG, Tile Floors, New
Kitchen, W/D. $750/Month.
(727)465-8998.


ROOMS AVAILABLE IN Private
Homes From $400-$500/Month.
Applications & Criminal
Background Checks Required.
Contact: Home Share Pinellas.
www.homeshareprogram.org
(727)945-1528
SAFE, CLEAN, QUIET.
Fully Furnished. Utilities, Cable In-
cluded. Deposit, References, ID
Required. From $130/Week.
(727)547-1199.
SEMINOLE/ BAY PINES, Furn.
Clean, Quiet, Safe Area. Refrig-
erator, Microwave. $125/Week.
(727)433-1445.


EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES ON
Indian Rocks Road, Largo. Furn/
Unfurn. 120 SF & Up, From
$299/Mo. Includes Utilities & Inter-
net. Easy Terms. (727)455-2260.

FAMOUS JOHN'S PASS, Retail
Shop, 1-2-Units Available,
450-1,000 SF, Water view, Across
From Boardwalk. Rent Negotiable,
Move-In Ready. Annual
(727)580-7320.
HWY 19 Showroom/ Warehouse
near East Bay, 7-14,000SF retail
+23,000SF warehouse. Will divide.
Great visibility, condition, terms.
From $5/SF. Bob Burk, CCIM,
West Side Realty, (727)462-9700.
IDEAL FOR SMALL
BUSINESS OR STORAGE
Lease/ Rental (2 UNITS) 2,000
SF with 20' Garage Door. Ware-
house with Office & Restroom. Off
Bryan Dairy Road. (727)667-1647
JOHN'S PASS BOARDWALK
450 SF, Retail Shop, East End,
Overlooking Pristine Gulf Waters.
Annual Lease, Rent Negotiable,
Move-In Ready! (727)580-7320.
LARGO: 220 13TH ST. SW.
Near Diagnostic Clinic.
Office/ Workshop/ Storage.
(727)584-6283.
OFFICE & RETAIL SPACE
From $385 $630 Per Month.


Ample Parking. Madeira Beach.
(727)641-6465.
STOREFRONTS or OFFICES
Main Street Dunedin.
Move-In Ready! From $625.
(727)389-1069.


SAFE BOATING CLASS
December 6th-15th
Monday & Wednesday Evenings
Boca Ciega Sail And Power
Squadron, 130 126th Ave., T.I.
For Info & To Reserve A Seat Call
Kenneth Dodge, (727)398-1996.
EVERY BABY DESERVES A
healthy start. Join more than a mil-
lion people walking and raising
money to support the March of
Dimes. The walk starts at:
www.marchforbabies.org


LOOKING FOR JD. I REALLY
want you to call me again, Sheri.



A CHILDLESS, MARRIED, LOV-
ing couple seeks to adopt. Finan-
cial security. Large extended fam-
ily, nurturing home. Expenses
paid. Vicky & Rob (800)556-1809.
FL Bar #0150789.
ABORTION NOT AN OPTION?
Consider Adoption. It's a wonder-
ful choice for an unplanned preg-
nancy. Living and Medical ex-
penses paid. Loving, financially
secure families await. Call Attor-
ney Ellen Kaplan, (877)341-1309.
#0875228.
ABORTION NOT AN OPTION?
Consider Adoption. It's a wonder-
ful choice for an unplanned preg-
nancy. Living and Medical ex-
penses paid. Loving, financially
secure families await. Call Attor-
ney Ellen Kaplan, (877)341-1309.
#0875228.
ADOPTION (866)633-0397:
Unplanned Pregnancy? Provide
your baby with a loving, financially
secure family. Living/ Medical/
Counseling expenses paid. Social
worker on staff. Call compassion-
ate attorney Lauren Feingold, (FL
Bar #0958107) 24/7.
ADOPTION A WARM, LOVING,
financially secure home awaits
your newborn. Expenses paid.
Call Barbara at (888)908-9078 or
Attorney Charlotte Danciu,
(800)395-5449. Bar #307084.
ADOPTION IS LOVE! Absolute
devotion, close-knit family, lots of
love, security awaits first baby. Ex-
penses paid. Call Margie:
(800)552-0045.
ADOPTION: 888-812-3678. All
expenses paid. Choose a loving,
financially secure family for your
child. Caring & confidential. (24/7)
Attorney Amy Hickman. Lic.
#832340.
ADOPTION: GIVE YOUR BABY
the Best in Life! Living expenses
paid. Many loving, financially se-
cure couples waiting. Call Jodi
Rutstein, an Attorney/Social
Worker who truly cares about you.
Call (800)852-0041. #133050.
ARE YOU PREGNANT? A SUC-
cessful, financially secure, married
couple seeks to adopt. Will be
full-time mom and devoted dad.
Expenses paid. Call Mindy & Rich
(ask for Michelle/Adam). Call
(800)790-5260. FL Bar #0150789.
PREGNANT? CONSIDERING
Adoption? Talk with a caring adop-
tion expert. You choose from fami-
lies nationwide. Living expenses
paid. Abby's One True Gift Adop-
tions. (866)413-6298. Call 24/7.
PREGNANT? CONSIDERING
Adoption? A childless, successful
woman seeks to adopt and needs
your help! Financially secure. Ex-
penses paid. Call Margie (ask for
Michelle/Adam). (800)790-5260.
FL Bar #0150789.



BANKRUPTCY
17 Years. Exp. In Bankruptcy,
Over 15,000 Cases As A Chapter
7 Bankruptcy Trustee. Night &
Weekend Appointments Available.
I Will Come To You. Attorney Traci
Stevenson. (727)397-4838.
tstevenson@tampabay.rr.com
DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY Start-
ing at $65. 1-Signature Divorce,
Missing Spouse Divorce. "We
come to You." (888)705-7221.
Since 1992.
LOCALLY SERVING 40 STATES
Divorce $50-$300*. Money-back
guarantee! Covers children, etc.
*excludes Government fees.
(800)522-6000 x700. Baylor &
Associates, est. 1973.



A CAREER TO LOVE
Learn Dog Grooming.
Financial Assistance Available
For Those Who Qualify.
Vocational Rehabilitation.
Veteran Training Approved.
(866)517-9546
ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOL
Diploma. English/Spanish. Earn
your accredited high school di-
ploma fast! Not a GED.
(888)355-5650.
AIRLINES ARE HIRING: Train
for high-paying Aviation Mainte-
nance career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified.
Housing available. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
(866)314-3769.
EARN YOUR HIGH SCHOOL Di-
ploma at home in a few short
weeks. Work at your own pace.
First Coast Academy. Nationally
accredited. Call for free brochure.
(800)658-1180 x82, or visit
www.fcahighschool.org.
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA FAST!
Accredited! At Home! Call
(305)270-9830 or visit website:
www.worldhopeacademy.org.
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast,
Affordable & Accredited PACE
Program. Free brochure. Call now!
(800)532-6546 ext.16, or visit
www.continentalacademy.com
NEED YOUR HIGH SCHOOL DI-
ploma? Finish from home fast for
$399! Nationally accredited, EZ
pay. Free brochure. Call
(800)470-4723.


AIRLINES ARE HIRING! Train
for high-paying Aviation Mainte-
nance career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified.
Housing available. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
(866)724-5403.
APPROVED FOR V.A. Education
Benefits. Learn to operate a Crane
or Bulldozer. Heavy Equipment
Training. National Certification. Fi-
nancial & Placement Assistance.
Georgia School of Construction.
www.Heavy5.com, Use code
SAPCN. 888-278-7685


ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from home. Medical, Business,
Paralegal, Accounting and Crimi-
nal Justice. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available. Finan-
cial aid if qualified. Call
(877)206-5165 or visit website
www.Centura.us.com.
AVIATION MAINTENANCE and
Avionics. Graduate in 14 months.
FAA Approved. Financial aid if
qualified. Job placement assis-
tance. Call National Aviation Acad-
emy today! (800)659-2080 or visit
www.NAA.edu.


CLEAR WIRELESS INTERNET &
TV Bundle. Get super-fast speed
at home and on the go, on our 4G
Network! Starting at $25/month.
(727)470-1034.


CHRISTIE'S CHiLD CARE.
Temporary license #52-51-04714.
Loving child care in my Madeira
Beach home, infants- 4-years,
(727)481-1432.


DEVOTED CAREGIVERS
Senior Care Agency
Affordable Quality Care
You Deserve In Your Home.
Call Kevin For A Free In-Home
Assesment, (813)443-4800.









Appointment Setters Needed
$10 Per. Hour/ Comm. 26 Hour
Week. Sun. -Thurs. 4PM-9PM
Weekly Pay. American Travel,
(727)393-6000, Extension 0. 9195
Park Blvd. Near Starkey.
NOW HIRING: CNAs, HHAs,
24 Hour Shifts, Flexible Hours.
Harmony Home Help. Apply At:
harmonyhh.com
CNA/HHA NEEDED FOR
Live In. Respond to:
StJoe@comfortkeepers.com
DRUG INSPECTOR OPENING,
position #64052950, Pinellas
County with the Florida Depart-
ment of Health, Medical Quality
Assurance, Drugs, Devices and
Cosmetics, Bureau of Enforce-
ment. Applicant must be a FL
Licensed Pharmacist. The job
involves conducting inspections
and investigations under Florida's
Drugs and Cosmetic Act, Chapter
499, Florida Statutes. It is a
unique opportunity for someone
with pharmaceutical expertise to
expand their knowledge of medical
product manufacturing, the entire
prescription drug distribution
chain, while enjoying the job satis-
faction of public health protection.
Involves some travel. A back-
ground check and drug testing is
required. An online application is
required. To apply, please go to
https://jobs.myflorida.com. At the
Keyword Search field, enter the
position number "64052950" to
locate the Drug Inspector vacancy.
If you have any problems with the
application please call the People
First call center at (877) 562-7287.
For more information about our
program and the work we do,
visit our website at
http://www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/ddc
Should you have specific ques-
tions, you may contact Mary May-
leben, Program Manager, at
(727)552-2405.
LICENSED REAL ESTATE Agent
wanted, part-time, secretarial.
Listing, selling opportunities
with top team. (727)580-8126,
(727)418-2077.
RESTAURANT HELP
All positions. Experienced, break-
fast, lunch, dinner. Largo. Call Joe
(917)650-5621
AIRLINE MECHANIC: TRAIN for
high-paying Aviation career FAA
approved program. Financial aid if
qualified. Job placement assis-
tance. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance. (866)314-6283.
ANIMAL WORKERS NEEDED:
Adults asked to participate in a re-
search study to evaluate flu infec-
tions in agricultural workers and
household members. Must work
with swine, turkeys, ducks or
geese at least one hour per week.
Compensation available. Visit site:
gpl.phhp.ufl.edu/AgWorker.
ASAP! NEW PAY INCREASE!
37-43cpm. Excellent Benefits.
Need CDL-A and three months re-
cent OTR. (877)258-8782 or visit:
www.meltontruck.com.
BE YOUR OWN BOSS! EARN
extra cash working from Home in
your neighborhood. Sign up now!
www.CashStalls.com.
DRIVERS EARN UP TO .39CPM!
Home Weekends. One year OTR
Flatbed experience. Call
(800)572-5489, Susan, x227. Sun-
belt Transport, LLC.
DRIVERS NEEDED! ONE YEAR
OTR experience required and
good MVR. Regional, OTR, Dedi-
cated and Local available. Top
Pay! 80% Drop & Hook! Call
(210)455-4005.
DRIVERS: FOOD TANKER driv-
ers needed. OTR positions avail-
able now! CDL-A w/Tanker re-
quired. Outstanding pay & bene-
fits! Teams welcome! Call a re-
cruiter today! (877)484-3042 or
visit www.oakleytransport.com.

e EARN $1000s
* From Home? Be careful of
| Work-At-Home Schemes.
a Hidden costs can add up
S* Requirements may be
5 unrealistic.
L Learn howyou can avoid
| Work-At- Home Scams.
Call: Federal Trade Comm.
* 1-877-FTC-HELP.
I A message from |i
E Tampa Bay Newspapers"I
| and the FTC.

EARN EXTRA INCOME Working
from Home. $5.00 for every enve-
lope processed w/our sales bro-
chures. Guaranteed! Free Infor-
mation. Call (800)210-2686 or
visit: www.funsimplework.com
EARN UP TO $150 PER DAY.
Undercover Shoppers needed to
judge retail and dining establish-
ments. Experience not required.
(888)601-4861.
FREE TO TRAVEL? 18 OR
older? Travel Sales Jobs! No ex-
perience necessary! Commission
weekly. Daily Cash Bonuses! Call
Mr. Johnson (877)547-6927 x 1.
www.aniwehire.com..
HEAT & AIR JOBS: READY TO


work? Three-week accelerated
program. Hands-on environment.
Nationwide certifications and local
job placement assistance. Call
(877)994-9904.
INSURANCE REPRESENTATIVE
needed. Most earn $50K-$100K or
more. Call our branch office at
(407)296-5985 and ask for Steve
Landaal. Email or visit:
steven.landaal@inspherels.com.
www.inspherels.com/steven.landaal.
MOBILE TECHNOLOGY! SEND
& Receive Text by voice. Seeking
Leaders, earn $200-2,000 weekly.
Call (866)233-4215 or visit web-
site: www.HandsFreePays.com.
MOVIE EXTRAS TO STAND IN
the background for a Major Film
Production. Experience not re-
quired. Earn up to $200/day. All
Looks Needed. (888)664-5279.


OTR DRIVERS WANTED: FOOD
Grade Tanker Drivers Needed.
Class A-CDL w/tanker endorse-
ment. Competitive pay, Benefits,
Guaranteed time off. Prefer two
years experience. (800)569-6816.
www.otterytransportation.com.
THE JOB FOR YOU! $500
Sign-on Bonus. Travel the U.S.
with our young-minded, enthusias-
tic business group. Cash and bo-
nuses daily. Eli (888)890-2050.
TRAVEL, WORK, PARTY, PLAY!
Now hiring 18 to 24 guys/gals to
travel with fun, young biz group.
NY, LA, Miami. Two-week paid
training! Hotel & transportation
provided. Return guaranteed. Call
and start today! (800)245-1892.
TRUCK DRIVERS WANTED
Best Pay and Home Time! Over
750 Companies! One application,
hundreds of offers! Apply online
today: HammerLaneJobs.com.




St.petersburg qimes
BECOME A HOME Delivery
independent distributor for the
ST. PETERSBURG TIMES
See ad in Business Opportunity
section Or go to:
tampabay.com/contractor
MACHINIST FOR CNC MILLS &
lathes needed for evening work,
Monday- Thursday, 4pm-9pm. Call
(727)548-5040.


BE YOUR OWN BOSS!!
High Commissions Paid For
Experienced Only!
Timeshare Resale Phone Closers.
1(888)366-5670.

COLONIAL LIFE seeks entrepre-
neurial professional with sales ex-
perience to become a District
Manager. Life/Health license is re-
quired. Substantial earnings po-
tential. Please contact meredith.
brewer@coloniallife.com or call
(904)424-5697.


CNAs / HHAs & COMPANIONS
Needed. Live-in & Weekend
Availablity A+. Call GSC Today!
(727)547-7000

CNAs, HHAs NEEDED FOR
Pinellas County Area.
Choose Your Hours. $10-$13.50
Per Hour. (727) 822-3034



AVON, EARN 40%
Why Not You? Why Not Today?
Join Now!! $10 Start-Up Fee.
(727)215-6339


St. pJetrsbur' Timncs

BECOME A HOME Delivery
independent distributor for the
ST. PETERSBURG TIMES
Earn average of $600 $1,200 per
month, for a few early morning
hours and be your own boss!
Qualifications: Must be at least 18,
valid drivers license, reliable
vehicle and car insurance.
Contracts are 7 days/week 365
days/year For details go to:
tampabay.com/distributor
or call 1-866-498-4637.
OWN A COMPUTER? PUT IT TO
Work! Up to $1,500-$7,500/mo.
FT/PT. Free info! Established 30-
year old NYSE company.
(561)479-1373.
www.incomeinfobymike.com.
E-mail: mikal @bellsouth.net.
WISCONSIN ENTREPRENEUR
earns $40K/mo. from home and is
now expanding into Florida. Will
share his success secrets free!
(877)246-5035.


ACCESS LAWSUIT Cash Now!
As seen on TV. Injury lawsuit
dragging? Need $500-$500,000
within 48 hours? Low rates. Apply
now by phone, (800)568-8321.
www.lawcapital.com.
BEWARE OF LOAN FRAUD!
Please check with the Better Busi-
ness Bureau or Consumer Protec-
tion Agency before sending any
money to any loan company.
CASH NOW! GET CASH for your
structured settlement or annuity
payments. High payouts. Call J.G.
Wentworth. Rated A+ by the Bet-
ter Business Bureau. Call
(866)738-8536..
GOT A JOB BUT NEED MORE
Money? Struggling with $10,000+
in credit card debt? Settle your
debt now! Increase your income!
Free consultation and info. Call
(888)458-1454.


I *. S^^


TIRED OF BEING IN DEBT? De-
crease your debt, increase your in-
come. $10K+ in Credit Card or
IRS Debt. New Laws have passed
to protect you! Free consultation.
(888)482-1873.
TOO MANY BILLS? TOO MANY
credit cards, payday loans, medi-
cal bills? In financial distress? Call
A.D.S. for immediate help! Mem-
ber of BBB. Call (888)790-4660
x10, or visit www.mydebtfree.com.


NO CREDIT/BAD CREDIT, NO
Problem! Brand New Manufac-
tured Home in a Gated Commu-
nity, under $500/month. Open
Mon-Sat! Call (888)841-6091.
NOTES WANTED: Not Receiving
Payments on a Mortgage? Top
Dollar Paid for Nonpaying Notes
and Mortgages! Call Joel at
(888)296-8211 or e-mail:
joel@mdccapital.com


ART AUCTIONS
to benefit Children's Charity. No
Buyer's Premium and several art-
works with no reserve! Chagall,
Picasso, Dali, Miro, Max, Neiman,
Tarkay, Maimon, Pino, Agam and
more! Free food & drinks and raf-
fle prizes. Baterbys, Palm Beach,
Sat, Nov. 13th, 4PM Preview, 5PM
Auction, 13900 Jog Road, Delray
Beach, FL 33446. Baterbys, Or-
lando, Sat, Nov. 20th, 4PM Pre-
view, 5PM Auction, 9101 Interna-
tional Drive, Unit 1008, Orlando,
FL 32819. RSVP at:
www.baterbys.com. or call
(866)537-1004.
summerauction2010@baterbys.
AB #2746, AU #3750.
SOUTHEAST TENNESSEE: Vari-
ety of homes and land; mountain,
valley, farms, wooded tracts,
gated community. George Hamil-
ton Land & Auction. Call
(800)516-8387 or visit website:
www.hamiltonauction.com.
TAL #1557.


CARPET INSTALLER HAS Rolls
of UNUSED carpet, many colors
and sizes, also laminate, Save $$.
(727)535-8286
CRYPTS, 2 SIDE-BY-SIDE, In-
cludes 1 open/ close, on ground
level corner in Garden Sanctuary.
Asking $9,100. Call Tonya,
(727)458-7289.
DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
Needed: I pay for sealed,
unexpired boxes! Call Mike,
(727)378-2682.
TANNING BED, WORKS GREAT
with timer, new Voltek lamps,
$200 O.B.O. (727)480-3928 after
3:30pm.
DIRECT: SAVE $29/MO. FOR A
year! No equipment or start-up
costs! Free DVR/HD upgrade!
Other packages start $29.99/mo.
Ends 2/9/11. New customers only.
Qualifying packages. DirectStar
TV (800)203-7560.
SWIM SPA LOADED! THREE
Pumps, LED Lighting, OZ Cover.
Never used, $8,995. Hot Tub,
seats six, 5HP, 220, 28 Jets,
$2,695. Can deliver. Call
(727)851-3217.


WHIRLPOOL REFRIGERATOR,
Side-By-Side, White, Good Condi-
tion With Icemaker, Missing Tray.
$250. Call For Appt.
(727)446-3553.



2ND ANNUAL Christmas Bazaar
& Flea Market. Nov. 13th,
8am-3pm. Transfiguration Catholic
Church, 4000 43rd St. N. St. Pete


ESTEY FREEDOM II ORGAN &
Bench, beautiful. Plays various in-
strument and musical accompani-
ments. $100. (727)518-0809.



3 PIECE MIRRORED WALL Unit,
$250. (727)804-3553.
END TABLE UNIQUE. 4 Draw-
ers are actually TV trays. $199.
(727)448-7795.
MATTRESS SET, FULL, NEW,
$180. New Queen Set, Pillow Top,
$259. Warranty. Designer Shop.
(727)687-0213.


505. Pat-


PERSONAL CARE ASSISTANT
We are looking for experienced, dependable CNAs/HHAs
to help our clients in Pinellas and Pasco Counties.
We offer: Our Services Include:
* Competitive Pay Companionship
* Paid Trainings Bathing and personal care
* Flexible Schedules Light Housekeeping
* Mileage Reimbursement Meal preparation
* Employer Paid Life Insurance Shopping, Dinners and more
* Company Banking Benefits


Phone (727) 448-0900
Fax (727) 443-5258
HHA29992282


EASY


CHERRY BEDROOM SET: Solid
wood, never used, brand new in
factory boxes. English Dovetail.
Original cost, $4,500. Sell for
$895. Can deliver. (813)600-3653.
LEATHER LIVING ROOM Set in
original plastic, never used. Origi-
nal price, $3K, sacrifice $975. Can
deliver. Call Bill (813)600-3653.



CABLE PLAYER PIANO, CIRCA
1919. Works great. Music rolls and
bench included. $2,500.
(727)448-7795.



WE BUY HOT TUBS!
Up To $1,000 Cash Paid!
Running Or Not! (727)394-8036
SELL YOUR DIABETES Test
Strips: We Buy Any Kind/Any
Brand. Unexpired. Pay up to
$16.00 per box. Shipping paid.
Call (800)266-0702 or visit:
www.SellDiabeticstrips.com.
SELL YOUR DIABETES Test
Strips: Any Kind/Any Brand. Unex-
pired. Pay up to $16.00 per box.
Shipping paid. Call (800)267-9895
www.SellDiabeticstrips.com.
WANTED: OLD JAPANESE Mot-
torcycles. Kawasaki Z1-900
(KZ900) 1972-1976, KZ1000
(1976-1980), KZ1000R (1982,
1983), Z1R, S1-250, S2-350,
S3-400, H1-500, H2-750, Honda
CB750 (1969-1975), Suzuki
GS400, GT380. Cash paid. Free
Nationwide pick-up. Call
(310)721-0726; (800)772-1142.



WOMAN'S COMPLETE GOLF
Club Set, Power Glide Titianium
Fusion. Everything included. Used
twice, $250. (727)565-6009.



LOST DOG: GERMAN Rottweil-
ler, 7 year-old male, choker collar
and tag, Oct. 31st, in vicinity of
Lake and Nursery, Clearwater.
Owner heartbroken. Call with info:
(727)204-1787.



CATHETER USERS MEDICARE
Most private insurances pay for up
to 200 disposable catheters a
month. No more cleansing/reus-
ing. No more UTI's. Get your free
sample. Call LMC Medical now.
(877)855-6655.



METAL ROOFING & Steel Build-
ings. Save $$, buy direct from
manufacturer. 20 colors in stock,
with trim & access. 4 profiles in 26
ga. panels. Carports, horse barns,
shop ports. Completely turnkey
jobs. All Steel Buildings, Gibson-
ton, FL. Call (800)331-8341.
www.allsteel-buildings.com
STEEL BUILDINGS: 6 ONLY:
20X22', 25'X30', 30'x40', 40'x60',
45'x76', 50'x102'. Will Sell for Bal-
ance Owed! Must Move Now! Still
Crated. Free Delivery! Call
(800)411-5869 x79.


CASH FOR CARS
We come to YOU!
1998 and newer- MOST $$
run/not run. **(727)493-5302**
Hillsborough & Pinellas
Getthemostcashformvcar.com





CASH/CARS
JUNK OR USED
Honest, Free Towing.
$250 to $5,000.
(727)564-0831
$250 AND UP FOR JUNK CARS,
Free Towing. No Lies, No Games.
(727)458-7710, (727)458-3721.
WE BUY CARS
Any Condition. Top Dollar Paid
+ a 4 Day, 3 Night Vacation.
www.CashNowForCars.com
(813)410-9067 or (727)565-9320
DONATE VEHICLE, Receive
$1,000 Grocery Coupon. Noah's
Arc. Support No-Kill Shelters; Re-
search to Advance Veterinary
Treatments. Free Towing, Tax De-
ductible. Non-Runners Accepted.
Call (866)912-GIVE.
DONATE YOUR CAR, Truck or
Boat to Heritage for the Blind.
Free 3-day vacation, tax deducti-
ble, free towing. All paperwork
taken care of. Call (866)905-3801.
VEHICLE DONATIONS HELP
fight Breast Cancer. Receive
$1,000 Grocery Coupons. Help us
win Pepsi-Fresh Grant. Free Tow-
ing, Tax Deductible, Non-Runners
accepted. (888)468-5964 or visit:
www.ubcf.info. com.


2003 Glastron SX170 Runabout
(Bow Rider), 115HP Evinrude Out-
board (model E115FPLSN), EZ
Loader Trailer. Seats 8. Engine
starts easily, very dependable,
runs great! Engine fully serviced
in June, 2009 at Suncoast Marine
Center: Water pump service, new
bilge pump, new battery, new
spark plugs, everything checked
out. Has ski tow bar, new
AM/FM/CD player w/4 speakers.
Asking $7,900. (727)612-0745.
BOATS: 1000s FOR SALE!
Reaching six million homes
weekly throughout Florida. Tide
charts, broker profiles, fishing cap-
tains, dockside dining and more.
(800)388-9307



Suncoast Marine Installations
Power Poles, Trolling Motors, Jack
Plates, Live Wells, Pumps, Steer-
ing And Controls, Electronics,
Trailers, Electrical Repairs.
(727)460-9166.



2 WET SLIPS FOR RENT
From 25'-55'. Sail Or Power. From
$7.55 A Foot (727)641-6465

915.Ba aieS


L&M DOCKSIDE
Complete Boat Repairs.
Mercruiser, Crusader,
Volvo-Penta, etc. Electrical
and Engine Repair or
RReplacement! Mercury and
Yamaha certified.
JAYCO, 2005 TRAILER. Imdocksideboatrepair.com.
Jayfeather. Weighs only 4,000 Ibs. (727)501-1727.
Tow w/SUV. 1 slider, full bed/bath,
kitchen. Great condition. $11,000.
(727)543-0960.


CHEAP!
Quality Used Vehicles. Many 1
owner. LOW mileage new car
trades. LOW cash prices!
www.jdgossautohouse.com
(727)571-1753.
LINCOLN 1997 TOWN CAR
74,000 Miles, New Battery &
Newly Detailed. Excellent Condi-
tion. $4,500. (727)452-7028.



MERCEDES 1967 250SL, SOFT
and hard top, silver with red
leather interior. Price: $18,000,
(727)647-0469.



FORD 2006 F-150 King Ranch
4X4. One Owner. Only 31,600
miles. Very clean. Dark Copper
Metallic. Lots of extras. $27,500.
Clear title. Will accept reasonable
offer. (727)507-0235 or
(727)871-0075.



CHRYSLER 2006 TOWN AND
Country Wheelchair Van. 10" Low-
ered Floor With Ramp. Call Ben,
(727)644-6101.



THINKING ABOUT
SELLING OR TRADING?
I Will Pay More Than
Trade-in On Good, Clean,
Low-Mileage Vehicles
Harold Corey, Auto Broker
(727)595-9393.

$$$ CASH NOW $$$.
Top Dollar Paid For Clean, Quality
Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUVs.
(727)798-2921.

660.Waned t Bu


2-FAMILY, FRI.-SAT., 9AM-3PM.
Appliances, Collectibles, Tools,
Toys, Clothes. Everything Goes!
10949 90th Terrace N., Seminole.
AMERICAN WAY MOBILE
Home Estates, Park-Wide Sale!
730 14th Street NW, Largo.
Fri.-Sat., 8am-?
2ND ANNUAL Christmas Bazaar
& Flea Market. Nov. 13th,
8am-3pm. Transfiguration Catholic
Church, 4000 43rd St. N. St. Pete
ANTIQUES, FLEA MARKET,
Bake Sale. The Lake, 4591 Lakes
Blvd. (off 49th St. N.) Saturday,
November 13th, 9am-lpm. No
Early Birds!
CHAPEL TREASURES!
An Unusual Thrift Shop Full Of
Fine Things. Friday & Saturday,
8AM-12PM, 12601 Park Blvd.
Seminole. (727)391-2919. We
Accept Donations And Drop Offs
As Well. coth@coth.org


CLOSING OFFICE! THURSDAY,
Friday, & Saturday, 10am-3pm,
9190 Oakhurst Rd. Suite 2. Desks,
Chair, Filing Cabinets, Conference
Table & More.
FABRICS, CRAFT SUPPLIES,
crocheted afghans, Christmas
decorations. Friday, Saturday,
Sunday, 8am-5:30pm. 10382
111th Avenue North, Largo.
FRI.-SAT., 8AM-NOON. BIKES,
Electric Motor Scooter, Miscella-
neous Items. Seminole Oak Trails,
7007 Shelly Circle, Seminole.
LARGO FRIDAY & SATURDAY
8:00-4:00. Household items,
camping gear, clothes. 320 Patlin
Circle East.

660.Waned t Bu


t.pectersburg Times

The St. Petersburg Times, Florida's largest and best newspaper, is seeking
dynamic leaders for our Home Delivery department which is responsible for
delivering our newspaper products to subscribers.
Immediate part time openings available in
Pinellas, Hillsborough and Pasco counties!
Candidates must have good driving, criminal and credit records, must be able
to safely perform all physical and lifting aspects of position, such as ability to
safely and repeatedly push and pull carts, repeatedly lift newspaper bundles up
to 40 lbs and similar physical movements, be self directed, reliable and
perform with the highest levels of integrity, respect and urgency.
Field Assistant:
This key position will assist in the fulfillment of day-to-day business and
distribution operations in assigned geographical areas and distribution centers.
Assists in coordinating resources and relationships with customers, staff,
independent contractors, and public.
Starting pay of$11.22/hr with excellent benefits! Schedules are typically
5 days per week. Must be able to work weekdays and weekends between
midnight and 11:00am.
Product Coordinator:
Responsible for coordinating distribution activities and the correct staging of
various newspaper products to individual workstations in our delivery centers,
interacts with independent contractors, and maintains product control.
Starting pay of $10.24/hr! Schedules are typically 4 days per week. Must be
able to work weekdays and weekends between 11:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m.
To apply please visit www.Joinus.tampabay.com 8510


Silver, Gold & Diamonds, Antique, Estate & Fine Jewelry,
Coins, Currency & Tokens, Pocket & Wrist Watches
Sterling Silver, Silverware, Tea Sets & More
IG EST Rare, Designer& Luxury Items
HIGHESTl Rolex, G. Jensen, Tiffany, David Yurman

PRICES Decorative & Fine Art, Musical Instruments
PAINClocks, Antiques, Collectibles & More!
I YOUR UNWANTED ITEMS
WE COME COULD BE WORTH THOUSANDS!
TO YOU!! Free Verbal Appraisals, Fair, Honest Offers
Or You Come NO OBLIGATION TO SELL
To US!! www.TheTreasureTrader.com o
727-584-6300


1 525. Medical Help I


1 525. Medical Help I











8B Classifieds Leader, November 11,2010


HUGE SALE! SATURDAY,
7:30AM-3:00 PM. 8807 111th St.
N., Seminole. Proceeds Benefit
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

HUGE SALE!
Thur.-Sat., 8am-12pm. Something
For Everyone! Collectibles, Tools,
Household, Furniture, Pottery,
Sports, Fendi Bag, Barbie, Deco-
rative, Slot Machine, Small Boat,
Truck Tool Box, Etc. 7074 121st
Way N., Seminole.


LARGO NEIGHBORHOOD SALE
Friday and Saturday 8:00-3:00.
20th St SW, South of 8th Avenue.
MULTI-FAMILY: SAT., 8AM.
Christmas, Household, Golf Clubs
and Bags, MORE!! 7575 131st
Way North, Seminole.
SAT., 8AM-2PM. FURNITURE,
Unicycle, Kayak, Much More. 546
Palmer Rd., off Mehlenbacher Rd.,
Belleair Bluffs.
CALL EARLY
TO PLACE YOUR
CLASSIFIED AD


'Annual 'B1aaa'i

& 'Bake Sale
SAT., NOV. 13, 8:30-12:30
Heritage Presbyterian Apts.
10200 122nd Ave. N., Largo.
(Off Seminole Blvd.)
Handmade Crafts, Christmas
Items, Thrift Shop Items, Home-
made Baked Goods. Also Raffle.


LOOK FOR GREAT DEAS!


SATURDAY & SUNDAY, 9AM,
1801 Patlin Circle N. Largo. Furni-
ture, Household, Some Antiques,
Collectibles, Tools.
SATURDAY 8am-3pm. 9960 67th
Street, PPK. Furniture, clothing,
household items & more!! Every-
thing Must Go!!!
THE BIRD HOUSE
Annual Fall Sale
10%-60% OFF!!
Saturday, November 13th, 9-4.
11171 Seminole Blvd. Antiques,
Collectibles, Furniture & Jewelry.


[NEIGHBORHOOD SALE

I1
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13TH,
8:00AM-2:00PM. Wild Acres
Neighborhood. 8169 Wild Oaks
Circle. Off Starkey & 126th Ave.
Toys, Clothes, Furniture, Etc.
SEMINOLE, TARA CAY SOUND
Saturday 8:00am 4:00pm.
Household items, clothing, collecti-
bles. 14897 Seminole Trail.
I Call Classified 397-5563


COMMUNITY SALE]

TRADITIONS SUBDIVISION
Oakhurst Rd. One Block North of
Park Blvd. Gates Open,
Sat. November 13th, 8AM-2PM.





(727) 397-5563


ASK
ABOUT OUR
EYE
STOPPER
LOGOS


-re


Andy's Air. Inc
DEAL DIRECTLY WITH THE
Owner And Save! Honest,
Affordable. #CAC1814825.
Andy's Air, Inc. (727)447-1903.
Visa/MC/Disc/AmEx.
AIR-FLO/ ERWOOD
Htg. &A/C. CAC1816535
Repairs, Service, Sales.
We Can Stop Your Ducts
From Leaking! (727)528-1227


Comfortmaker'

Best Prices in Pinellas County
Carr Air Conditioning
& Heating, Inc.
Repair & Service, All Brands.
Call the Co. You Can Trust!
(727)447-7212 CAC045888
Senior & Veterans' Discounts

CRYSTAL A/C
Since 1953. 24/7 Service. All
Makes & Models. Free Estimates.
CAC-027361.
(727)449-1010, (727)326-2854.


TIANE


It's Hard To StopA Trane'
HALE'S A/C SERVICE INC.
Reliable, Same-Day Service
On All Brands. Free Est. On
Replacement. (727)398-5515.
#CAC055503 www.halesac.com
$19 SERVICE CALL
All Makes. Authorized Trane
Dealer. Why Pay More? Rick's Air
Conditioning, Inc. CAC1814441
(727)258-0015



NEED MORE RESPONSE? AD-
vertise in over 100 Florida Papers
reaching Millions of People. Ad-
vertising Networks of Florida. Put
us to work for you! (866)224-9233,
www.classifieds@tbnweekly.com.



KIMMIES APPLIANCE SVC.
A pleasant experience. In-home
repair services. 5-Star customer
approval rating
w/ServiceMagic.com.
Same-day service. Credit cards
accepted. (727)502-7320







MOBILE YACHT REPAIR
Power or Sail. Maintenance
Repairs, Cosmetics, Bright Work,
Electrical & Plumbing.
Licensed/ Insured, (727)239-6585



LEN ERICSON CONTRACTORS
All Phases Of Construction,
Remodeling & Roofing. 40+ Years'
Exp. #RR0033000. (727)522-5227

Avrii Sevc


DAVID R. DIROMA
Certified General Contractor
40 Years in Pinellas County
Remodeling, Additions, Windows
It's not just another job,
it's your home or business.
CGC020775, (727)524-9788.
McCONNELL CONSTRUCTION
SERVICES, INC.
Full Service Remodeling.
Windows, Doors, Roofing,
Additions, Driveways, Slabs,
Patios. We Install Pavers Too!
Professional, Affordable.
Free Estimates! CRC058463.
(727)539-0421


ALL WOOD Cabinets, Counter-
tops. Reface/ Replace. Free
Estimates, Computer Design.
30-yrs. #C9055. (727)391-0959.
MC/Visa/Discover.
www.kustomkitcheninc.com.
Complete Custom Cabinets:
Kitchens, Baths. Low Rates, Free
Estimates, All Work Guaranteed.
#C-8910. Call (727)367-1450.



Don Bolam Enterprises, Inc.
Carpentry, Refacing, Repairs,
Doors, Moldings, etc.
42 yrs. in Pinellas. (727)443-3811.
#CRC057276



CROWN MOLDING, REMODEL,
Trim, Doors, Decks, Cabinets,
Kitchens & Baths. 30-Years' Exp.
#C9294, Insured. (727)346-4361.



CARPET, TILE, UPHOLSTERY
Spotting, deodorizer, pet odor
treatment. ROTOVAC Profes-
sional. Pressure cleaning avail-
able. (727)331-0855. Lic/Ins.
FAMILY TIME CLEANING
Carpet, Tile, Upholstery.
For Those Who Insist On Quality!
Holiday Specials Available!
100% Money Back Guarantee!
(727)742-5677
FLAWLESS CARPET CARE
25 YEARS EXPERIENCE in
carpet, upholstery, tile and grout
cleaning. Call (727)596-1040.



CARPET REPAIRS BY TOM
Over 30-Years' Exp. in Pinellas.
Installation Available. Free Est.
(727)588-1591.



"QUALITY CARPET"
Repairs, Re-stretches. Wood
Laminate, Carpet, Tile. Sales/
Service. Credit-cards accepted
20-Years' Experience.
(727)527-1359.
CARPET CLEANING
DIVISION, (727)527-1088.



SYDOW CEILINGS,
Acoustical, Water Damage, Up-
grades, Repairs. 35 years. Prompt
And Professional. References.
(727)674-8826.

Avrii Sevc


POPCORN CEILING?
Removal & Re-Texturing.
Give Your Home A Fresh,
Contemporary Look!
(727)596-9006 #CBC1255512
ClassicFinishDrywall.com
B.B.B. Accredited Business.

QUALITY CEILING
REFINISHING. INC.
*Popcorn Removal
*Cracked Ceilings
*Plaster/Drywall Repair
*Water Damage Repair
*Outdoor Ceilings
Job completed in
one day with 'no mess!
100% Financing
Lic. #CRC-1326471 Bonded,
Insured, Free Est.
(727)446-3550
Established 1979



Bowes Expert Ceramic Tile
Company. Bathroom Remodeling
Specialists! "We install every-
thing." Pinellas-Family Owned, 30
years. Insured. Lic#C-6341. Kevin
or Mike: (727)946-8281.
Ceramic Life-Style Inc.
HUSBAND & WIFE TEAM
Low, Low Prices!! Repairs/ New
Installations. #C5760. WHY
WAIT? (727)399-0770. Visa/MC
BOB COTRONE TILE, INC.
Bathroom Remodel Specialist.
Quality Work Guaranteed!
C-7922. Call Bob, (727)423-3754
DEAN'S CUSTOM TILE, Inc.
Specializing in Remodeling,
Bath-to-Shower Conversions,
Floors, Kitchens, Backsplashes,
Repairs. C-5823. (727)546-6670.


FREE ESTIMATES.
If CLEAN Is What You Want,
CLEAN Is What You Get,
When You Call Georgette.
(727)391-7866.
A DEPENDABLE CLEANING
Service. Detailed Work. Houses,
Apartments, Condos. Beaches,
Belleair, Seminole, Largo. Refer-
ences, Exper'd. (727)422-4550.
ANGEL CLEANING
'We Clean Above The Rest"
Residential, Commercial,
Snowbirds. Competitive Rates.
Licensed. (727)244-7607.
CLEANBEST, FAMILY OWNED,
Insured. Commercial/ Residential.
100% Clean Right Everytime.
Betty & Bira, (727)593-7146.
CLEANING TO A PERFECTION
Excellent references, licensed,
insured. Home businesses
and rentals. Free Estimates.
(727)215-6081.
DEPENDABLE & AFFORDABLE!
Unhappy w/companies that start
out great then lose their cleaning
touch? Call Terri, (727)584-8285.
FREE ESTIMATES SUPERIOR
CLEANING Services. Bonded and
Insured. Residential, foreclosures,
move-in/ out. Honest, profes-
sional, affordable, experienced,
references. (727)565-9280.

Avrii Sevc


CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT


HOME CLEANING
Satisfaction guaranteed!
Reasonable rates
Excellent references. Reliable,
flexible and a pet lover.
(727)430-2685

Husband & Wife Cleaning Team
Homes & Offices. Top-To-Bottom
Cleaning. Move-Outs, Foreclo-
sures. Bonded, References.
(727)403-8051.
POLISH LADY WILL CLEAN
Your Home. Excellent References,
Good Prices! Free Estimates. Call
Aneta, (727)398-5702.
The Ultimate Housekeeper
Speaks English. Insured &
Bonded. Will Get The Job Done.
References. (727)254-6627.
TONY'S HANDS, INC. Cleaning,
Housekeeping. Commercial, Resi-
dential, Rentals. Excellent Work
Guaranteed! Licensed, Insured,
Bonded. (727)480-4475.



$25 In-Home Service.
David Archer, 366-6354.
20-Years' Experience.
COMPUTER SOLUTIONS
In-Home Services: Internet
Security, Training, Data Recovery,
Repair. (727)343-2838.
RELIABLE COMPUTER REPAIR
Free pick-up and delivery.
Virus/Malware removal, wireless
setup, upgrades, surveillance. Call
(727)470-1034.




Comput er ip r
Virus Removal, Data Recovery,
Laptop Repair, Security,
Custom/ Upgrades
Picture, Audio, Video
Copy, Scan, Fax
14219 Walsingham Rd., Suite Q
www.belltechcomputer.com
(727)595-5000
HELP PROTECT YOURSELF
from Identity Theft with LifeLock.
Call now! Free Document Shred-
der with enrollment. Use Promo
Code: Shredder. (888)457-9022.



CONCRETE 'N BLOCK
State Certified Contractor.
#CGC036131. Quality Work,
Reasonable Rates.
40-Years' Experience.
(727)393-7697, (727)459-8177.

CAVEMAN


CONCRETE
Complete Concrete, Block &
Paver Work. Driveways,
Sidewalks, Patios. Residential/
Commercial. David Will,
(727)459-9710. #C10222.
MIKE QUARANTO Concrete Inc.
20+ Yrs. Exp. Quality Service.
Driveways, Patios, Sidewalks.
#C-5640. Call (727)398-5160.



Patio Door Repair Specialist
"I Get Them Sliding Again"
No Installations. Angie's List
2007-2008 Super Service Award!
(727)733-4353.



CUSTOM DRAPERIES &
Valances, Bedding, Cushions,
Shades. Your Fabric Or Ours.
Since 1981. (727)397-5708.
Sewfinecustomsewing.com



Affordable Quality Work
24-Hour Service. Free Est.
Senior Discount. #ER0009230
STEVEN HOBBS ELECTRIC, INC.
(727)441-2788
B&B ELECTRICAL SOLUTIONS.
We Have The Solution! All Electri-
cal Repairs/Installs. "Fuses to
Breakers!" Senior Discounts!
#ER13012577. (727)546-7047.
ALL WORK DONE BY OWNER.
Repairs, Service Calls, Remodel.
Barnes Electric. Since 1980.
(727)409-4364. EC13002693.
ES ELECTRIC
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
Free Estimates. All Electrical.
Licensed & Insured. EC0001509.
(727)584-8961.
GABRIEL ELECTRIC
Rewires, Repairs, Upgrades. 24/7
Emergency Service. LOW Rates!!
Since 1986. Insured.
#ER0010733. (727)442-0845.
**$28 OFF REPAIR**
Same Day Service
We Specialize In Electrical
Repairs, Troubleshooting, New
Installs. No Job Too Small!
ER0013140. Insured. Visa/MC
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Military/ Senior Discounts.
ThetaElectric.com
(727)475-2923.
All Calls Answered.
RILEY ELECTRIC
For All Your Wiring Or Service
Needs. Generators, Panel
Upgrades, Circuits Added,
Remodeling, Marina & Dock
Wiring. #EC13001284. For FAST
Service Call (727)530-5041.


BRUCE'S FURNITURE
Repair, Refinishing, Stripping.
Specializing In Caning.
Don't Buy New, "Renew!"
Free Estimates. (727)439-7324.


FREE ESTIMATES!
Installations/ Repairs. I Fix It Or
It's Free!! C-8821/lns. Advanced
Garage Doors Services
(727)585-3525.


BarnettAluminum.com
Gutters, Soffit, Fascia, Siding,
Screening, Patios, Cages,
Awnings, Windows. Satisfaction
Guaranteed. #C9302. Charles
Barnett, Inc. (727)528-2449.


ABLE HANDYMAN MIKE
Many Skills, From St. Pete
Fix, Replace Or Create
Appointment (727)289-4809
DIAL-A-SERVICE
(727)458-4265
Constantine Roe
Home Repairs Transportation
HANDYMAN HUSBANDS
Skilled Men Looking For Work.
Interior or Exterior. Basic Labor.
Reasonably priced.
(727)580-7031.
"LET GEORGE DO IT!"
Retired contractor, ready to do
small repairs for you. Homes &
Mobiles, 40+ years' experience.
(727)596-6431.
LOWEST PRICED HANDYMAN
Offers All Types Of Minor Home
Repairs. 25-Yrs' Exp. Fully In-
sured. Anthony, (727)768-9820.
MACK'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
35+ Years' Exp. Reliable, Honest.
Insured. All Minor Repairs. Free
Estimates. (727)420-9703.
MIKE'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
Minor Home Repairs, Lawn
Clean-up, Trimming, Hauling,
Pressure Washing. 25-Yrs.' Exp.
(727)526-0408
RELIABLE HANDYMAN BILL
20-Years' Experience. Free Esti-
mates. No Job Too Small! 20%
Off w/Ad. (727)687-4565.
RETIRED HOME BUILDER.
All Kinds Of Minor Repairs,
Everything To "Everythink'.
Can-Do Attitude! Leon,
(727)481-4115.
TORNADO CONSTRUCTION
Water Damage Repairs, Painting,
Carpentry, Tile. European Crafts-
man. Excellent References. Fall
Specials! CRC-1328045
(727)239-3254


AJ'S AFFORDABLE HAULING.
Brush, Trash, Clean-Ups, Drop-Off
Service. We Haul It All! Free Esti-
mates. (727)504-2808.
BILLY'S HAULING
Small Jobs OK. Yard/ Garage
Clean-outs, Small Repairs.
Available 7 Days/Week.
(727)393-7567 (727)644-6037
MIDWEST HAULING
Clean Up, Clear Out, Any Size
Job. Fast, Reliable, Fair. Free Est.
(727)475-8103.


BETZ BUILDING Contractors,
Inc. All Phases Of Work. 35-Yrs.'
Local Experience. CGC036272
(727)384-0347 (727)644-8847





J&K REMODELING CO.
Affordable, Quality Remodels &
Rehabs. Call Today For Free
Estimate. CBC1253003.
(727)798-8775 (727)798-8772

















R.J. PATE CONTRACTING
Repair, Remodel, Update
Kitchens, baths, windows, doors
Free Estimates. CRC-1326585.
(727)320-0182 (727)424-2834.


FREE Rx CARD when you call
(877)433-2786 today. Medical In-
surance as low as $129.00 that
accepts most pre-existing condi-
tions.






OUT
what you can
find in the
CLASSIFIED!


Full Design & Install
Pit schen & Bath Remodeov l
LCustom Cabinets RTC
Ilst (Replace/Reface)
Floor/Wall Coverings, Countertops,
Custom Vanities, Tile,
Tub To Shower Conversions

727-258-9101 )
#C-8623



ALL BACKHOE/ BOBCAT Work.


(727)595-0429.
LANDSCAPING & DESIGN BY
Richard Story. Mulch, Sod, Trees,
Palms, Shrubs & Clean-ups.
(727)776-7022.
LANDSCAPING YOU CAN
Afford. Stone Patios, Palms,
Planting, Sodding, Clean-ups,
Tree/Palm, Hedge Trimming,
Stump-grinding, Xeriscaping.
(727)319-8195.
STEVE'S FULL SERVICE
Landscaping, Lawn Care, Tree
Trimming, Clean-ups. Enhancing
Curb Appeal! Free Estimates.
(727)687-6077.



A LAWN SERVICE YOU CAN
AFFORD! From $55/Mo. Hedge,
Tree, Palm Trimming, Leaf Rak-
ing, Clean-Ups. (727)319-8195.
A+ PROFESSIONAL LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Offering Dependable, Year-Round
Lawn Care. Landscape And Sod
Installation/ Removal.
(727)565-9989.


A-TROPICAL
Tral N Le



WEEKLY LAWN

SERVICE

SOD

LANDSCAPE
www.atropicalgreen.com

531-2886

EVERGREEN LAWNS
Monthly Lawn Maintenence, Trim
Hedges, Palms, Trees, Yard Leaf
Clean-up. Free Estimates.
(727)639-3596.
GULF COAST MOWERS
Dependable Year-Round Lawn
Care. Licensed & Insured, Free
Est. Call Rus, (727)644-2091.
HENRY'S LAWN SERVICE
Mow, Edge, Trim & Clean-Ups.
Free Est. Lic. /Ins. (727)688-4141.


I Moin & Shipn


KING'S KUT
Lawn Maintenance, Landscape &
Design. Complete Property Clean-
Ups. Free Estimates. Reliable,
Dependable. (727)392-8692
LEWIS LAWN SERVICE
Full, Basic, Monthly, Clean-Ups.
20 Yrs. Exp. Free Estimates.
(727)463-1219.
TIRED OF PAYING High Prices?
Quality Work At Reasonable
Rates! Diego's Lawn Care,
(727)560-7116.


BarnettAluminum.com
Soffit, Fascia, Siding, Gutters,
Screening, Patios, Cages,
Awnings, Windows. Satisfaction
Guaranteed. #C9302. Charles
Barnett, Inc. (727)528-2449.


A-2-Z MOVING, INC.
24' Box Truck. Est. Pinellas, 1986.
Local/ Statewide. FL#IM660. Free
Estimates. (727)584-2302.
DAINGERFIELD MOVING
Homes, Offices, Condos. Large or
Small. Furniture, Appliance
Deliveries. (727)392-5856
Local Mover. IM-1034.
EXPRESS LONG DISTANCE
Moving to New York, New Eng-
land and all states in between.
Customer Rated A+. Free esti-
mates and friendly service. Relo-
cation Specialists. Call
(800)941-3767. MC299938.


BURKE PAINTING CO.
Lic. #C-4641. When Quality &
Price Both Matter!
Int. /Ext. Painting &
Deck/ Paver Sealing.
We Want To Work For You!
(727)397-2284 Available 24/7.





A. BOYD FARMER. FAMILY
Business, 30+ Yrs. Residential &
Commercial. NO JOB TOO
SMALL! 2 Coats Paint, Power
Wash & Prep Work. Quality
Guaranteed. Senior Discounts.
#C-8626. (727)458-3650.
PETER PAPPAS PAINTING, LLC
FALL SPECIAL!!
2,000 Exterior SF for $1,300.
Wash, prep, seal & 2 coats paint.
Quality Guaranteed! #C5593.
(727)542-9547.
SPECTRUM PAINTING
Waterproofing, Home Remodeling,
Also Seamless Gutters. Residen-
tial & Commercial, Free Estimates.
CGC1508239, (727)525-8645.


PATIO DOOR REPAIRS
Get sliding doors rolling again.
Special Offer $95.95 per panel.
Call Ron at Ron's Windows.
#C-7023. (727)393-3792.

CLASSIFIED
DEADLINE:
Noon Monday
Call 397-5563


I oin ShippingS


Our Classified Dept. is
currently running great
advertising specials in:

REAL ESTATE SALES

REAL ESTATE RENTALS

HELP WANTED

ARTICLES FOR SALE

AUTO & BOAT SALES

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Call our Classified advisers
today for more details.
Deadline is noon on Mondays.

= (727) 397-5563 @


Tampa Bay

NEvWS PAPERS
BEACON LEADER BEE CITIZEN
II 10


To Place An Ad Call 397-5563 Fax 399-2042

24 Hour Classifieds www.tbnweekly.com


Deadlines: Display, Friday-5 p.m.

Line Ads, Monday-Noon


MARK'S GARDEN

& LAWN SERVICE
Mow Edge Small Tree Trimming
SGardening Mulching Yard Cleanup Hauling
"We Do the Work Other Gardeners Won't"
We Don't Just Mow, Blow & Go!
Free Estimates

(727) 345-3281
Ib-o


I


PROFESSIONAL





SERVICES I











Professional Services 9B


Leader, November 11, 2010


ROB'S PEST CONTROL
Roaches? Ants? Fleas? Serving
Pinellas since 1979. Call Now!
(727)392-2847 Cell (727)687-1730
JPM PEST SERVICES
Ants To Termites. Residential.
One-time Service, Quarterly,
Yearly. Free Est. Lic/Ins.
(727)519-5712.


DOG GROOMING, Only $20!
Any Small Breed. New Clients
Only. (727)596-CLIP (2547).
academyofanimalarts.com


TURNER WALL & CEILING, INC.
Wall & Ceiling Repairs. Water
Damage, A/C Holes, Plastering,
Drywall Repairs And Texturing.
#C-5129 (727)391-3569.
ANDY'S STUCCO & Plastering.
Small Plaster/ Stucco Jobs. Patch
Work. Lic#C-6903. Insured. Free
Estimates. (727)524-8140.


FAUCETS TO WATER HEATERS
No Job Too Small. Sewer/ Drain
Cleaning. Serving Pinellas 25
Years. #RF0049545.
Rick's Plumbing, (727)397-7809,
(727)595-9611.
James McDaniel Plumbing
Full Service Master Plumber. No
Overtime Or Hidden Cost! Water
Heater Repair/ Replace. Sewer &
Drain Line Cleaning, Faucet
Repairs. Lic/Ins. CFC1427191
(727)584-3046.
VALCO PLUMBING, INC.
*Discount on drain cleaning.
*Up-front pricing. *Faucets to
water heaters. No job too small.
RF11067030. Call (727)596-9500.
Small Job Specialist.
Senior Discount.
CFC1427888. Don-Charles,
(727)522-2508

DON'T
BE A
DRIP!
Marko Plumbing Systems Inc
Repair & Replacement Specialist.
Also Pumps & Sprinklers.
Lic#RF11067146. (727)235-2016
PETE'S CERT. PLUMBING
Repairs & Irrigation.
Owner operated. Low Rates. Free
estimates. 10% OFF W/AD!
CFC021491. Insured. Visa/MC.
(727)487-3645.

PoolCostruc


STEVE'S RIVER ROCK
Pressure Cleaning, Reseals,
Acrylics, Pavers, Garage
Floor Coatings & More.
DecksDone RightTam paBay.com
Since 1986, #C-8452, Insured.
Free Estimates (727)581-7902


A CABANA POOL SERVICE
Affordable, Reliable. Chemicals &
Maintenance. Free Estimates.
(727)365-4142.
BLUE BAYOU POOL SERVICE
Services as low as $60/mo.
Third month FREE!
Free Estimates. (727)812-6885.





FIRST TWO WEEKS FREE!
Weekly Pool Service, Monthly
Rates. Exceptional Customer
Service & Quality Pool Care.
www.CardinalPoolCare.com
(727)692-4232
HARTLEY'S POOL SERVICE
Dependable, Reliable.
Reasonable Rates.
Weekly service starting
@ $42.50/month. 20-years'
experience. Old-fashioned
service. (727)434-5300.
LIVING WATER
POOL SERVICE
Weekly Service Or Chemical
Check Only, Includes Chemicals.
Family Owned. (727)204-1387.
TRIDENT POOLS
Cleaning & Chemical Service
Serving Seminole & the beaches.
Free estimate. Jim, (727)410-1421



A XTREME Pressure Cleaning
Lic/Ins. We Clean Anything!!! Big/
Small Jobs, LOW PRICES! Free
Estimates. (727)585-2886.

SAFE
Roof & Exterior Cleaning
Established 1999.
www.saferoofclean.com.
(727)584-6622
HOUSE, DRIVEWAYS, DECKS,
Etc. Great Clean Work, Great
Price! Free Estimates. Call
(727)422-5416.





(727)345-9840
Serving The Bay Area. Lic/Ins.
u.,ii iutrh piuirUuIt l ybui I


TROPICAL HOWE ROOFING. NEW ROOFS,
POOLS AND PAVERS, LLC Re-roofing, Flat Roofs, Repairs.
Experience Makes The Difference Serving Pinellas Cty. 30+ Years!
New Pools/ Remodeling, Pavers, #RC0031425. (727)584-6387.
Driveways, Pool Repairs & More!
10% Off Winter Special!
(727)474-2142 CPC057338
TropicalPoolsAndPavers.com

/ DEAN WLSON ROOFING
There Is Nothing More Important
Than Quality For Our Customers!!
(727) 397-5563 CCC1327771. (727)320-7940.


Old Time
Workmanship
Old Time Integrity
Licensed & Insured
#CCC056850
A Christian Owned Co.
(727) 824-9996





ARK ROOFING
Re-Roofs, New Roofs,
Repairs. All Roof Types.
Licensed & Insured.
(727)793-4915
FL. Lic#CCC1326623
MAGYAR ROOFING
All Types Of Roofs & Repairs.
Contractor On Site. Free
Estimates. CCC1328213.
(727)687-1279



WEST COAST
ROOFING & CONTRACTING,INC.

WEST COAST ROOFING &
CONTRACTING, INC.
Call Us For All Your Roofing
Needs! (727)647-6470
www.WestCoastRoof.net
#RC-29027093
METAL ROOFING: 40 YR. WAR-
ranty. Buy direct from Manufac-
turer. 30 colors in stock with all ac-
cessories. Quick turn around. De-
livery available. Gulf Coast Supply
& Manufacturing, Inc. Call
(888)393-0335 or visit website:
www.gulfcoastsupply.com
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All Florida Weatherproofing &
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Check For Leaks, Adjust Heads,
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Call (727)424-1072.


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Serving Pinellas County 15 years.
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Residential, Commercial. Insured.
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CALL AL NELSON WINDOW
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Beacon Leader.
Bee Citizen


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Leader, November 11, 2010


Making This Right


Beaches

Claims

Cleanup

Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration

Health and Safety

Wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
restorethegulf.gov
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_america
youtube.com/bp


"Now Gulf seafood is coming back on the menu, so come on down,
we're open for business."
Bryan Zar
Co-owner, Restaurant des Families
Crown Point, LA



I grew up bussing tables at this restaurant. Last year, my wife,
Brooke, and I bought it. We were working hard to build a
business, then the spill hit. BP said they would try to make
things right. But how was an energy company going to help
our restaurant?

Keeping Businesses Open
We figured they would tell us to take a number and wait in line.
Instead, they asked us if we could serve food to the workers,
engineers, scientists, and local residents they had hired to
cleanup the spill. It kept us busy round the clock. And we
weren't the only ones. They hired a lot of local businesses and
kept a lot of people working. They have kept businesses up and
down the Gulf open and it's still making a difference.

Open for Business
BP asked us to share our story with you to keep you informed.
Our restaurant's open six days a week. Customers are filling our
restaurant again and we think it's a good time to come down to
the Gulf Coast. And if we could make just one request, please
think of us when planning your next vacation. We're still here
and while it's been tough, we are still cooking. And we are just
one of the hundreds of great places ready to welcome you when
you come down. So don't wait. We're looking forward to
seeing you.


For assistance, please call:
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
floridagulfresponse.com


2010 BP, E&P


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