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Title: Largo leader
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00099643/00030
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Title: Largo leader
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Tampa Bay Newspapers
Place of Publication: Largo, Florida
Publication Date: October 14, 2010
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Bibliographic ID: UF00099643
Volume ID: VID00030
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
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    Section B
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Volume XXXIII, No. 13 www.TBNweekly.com October 14, 2010


A blessed dragon?


V leWS Vary on


Office terms for


COmmissioners
By TOM GERMOND

IARGO To piggyback or not to piggyback that is the
question in a roundabout way.
More specifically, city voters will be asked in the general
election Nov. 2 whether to extend commissioners' terms from
three to four years.
Commissioners have repeatedly said they put the pro-
posed city charter amendment before the voters because of
the costs associated with holding stand-alone elections.
In other words, holding the city elections in conjunction
with the countywide elections piggybacking is basically a
mechanism to allow for the costs savings.
According to the county supervisor of elections office, a
stand-alone election in Largo costs about $72,400. A Largo
election held in conjunction with a county election is esti-
mated to cost $5,860 if all races fit on a single ballot card,
which is usually the case.
Even though the proposed charter amendment will save
money, former Largo Mayor Bob Jackson spoke out against
the measure at a recent City Commission meeting.
Spending $70,000 every other year equates to $1 per resi-
dent, Jackson said.
See TERMS, page 4A


Photo by BRANDEN BELL
Tom Kurt, the music director at St. Jerome Catholic Church, brought his bearded dragon to the "Blessing
of the Animals" ceremony at the church Oct. 2. He is shown with Erica Deceglie in the foreground and
her daughter, Erica, 3.


CO UNTY

Helping hands
Neil Lauritsen of Clearwater is the
local Amateur Radio Emergency Services
emergency coordinator. Neil has had an
interest in public service since he was in
his teens, when he worked as a volun-
teer firefighter,
The interest in amateur radio opera-
tion followed closely behind.
"The technology has always fascinated
me, and I have always felt the need to
help through serving my community,"
said Lauritsen. "Putting the two together
was just natural."
... Page 8A.
ENTERTAINMENT

IR B to celebrate

annual Oktoberiest
INDIAN ROCKS BEACH A barrel full
of German fun is on tap at the ninth an-
nual Indian Rocks Beach Oktoberfest
Saur~day, Oct. 16, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., in
The Indian Rocks Beach Rotary Club,
Action 2000, and the city of Indian
eokslBeachr nvit Gronenro enjtoor
berfest beverages and other treats from
localviend include the polka dancing
contest with live German music from
Cathy's Lorelei Band from 11 a.m. to 5
:s.and mui fo8m Jumadrhe Han'
ties for the kids will be from 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. There also will be arts and craft
tents, a silent auction, and the stein-car-
rying and keg-throwing contests. The
day's grand finale is the drawing for a
46-inch wide screen TV.
Kolb Park is on Bay Palm Boulevard at
15th Avenue in Indian Rocks Beach.
LARGO

Robbery thwarted
Action by Cpl. Nicholas Bedy with the
Pinellas County Sheriffs Office prevented
a robbery of a Largo gas station on Oct.

The suspect, Jake Nowling, 22, of
Whispering Drive East in Largo, allegedly
admitted he was there to commit a rob-
bery when questioned by Bedy. Nowling
was arrested and charged with attempt-
ed robbery with a weapon, felon in pos-
session of a concealed weapon and
violation of probation.
... Page 5A.

PET CONNECTION

Speaking of Pets
Kim Donovan
D.V.M. has tips
for keeping the
peace when an-
Other cat is added
to the household.
... Page 12A.




VIE WPO INTS

Ironic pentameter
Columnist Ju-
liana A. Torres
recounts the shat-
tered casualties
that have character-
ized her relocation L~F
to Pinellas.
... Page 15A*




Business .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .14A
Classifieds .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .5-7B
Community . ..... .10-11,13A
County .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .5-9A
Entertainment .. .. .. .. .. .1,3-4,8B
Just for fun .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .2B
Outdoors ................... .16A
Pthconnection ........ 12

Viewpoints .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .15A
Call 397-5563
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By TOM GERMOND

LARGO A new concept has
been proposed for the develop-
ment of a shopping center site at
U.S. 19 and East Bay Drive.
The Sembler Co. is working
with KB Crossroads LLC to rede-
velop the property as an open-
air retail center that would be
built in two phases. The first
phase on the project, called
Largo Commons, includes a
large retail store, about 124,000
square feet, on the western por-
tion of the property along with a
Pinellas Suncoast Transit Au-
thority transfer station.
The City Commission ap-
proved an agreement in March
2008 for the development of the
Largo Towne Center, which was
planned to replace the former
Crossroads Mall. City officials
said that because of economic
conditions, the previous develop-
ment site is no longer feasible
and one of the investors is no
long aepcn phase would in-


clude additional retail stores on
the eastern portion of the prop-
erty with two outparcels.
Commissioners basically au-
thorized staff Oct. 12 to work
with the developers to modify
the new plans for the project.
Pedestrian access to the build-
ings on the site was among com-
missioners' chief concerns.
Commissioner Robert Murray
asked how will the city be as-
sured that the second phase will
be completed if the economy gets
worse.
city officials are not proposing
a specific deadline for the sec-
ond phase, Community Develop-
ment Director Carol Stricklin
said.
"We do believe there is sub-
stantial market interest in phase
two" and there's a substantial
likelihood that the second phase
would move forward, she said.
Some commissioners wanted
to see design changes. They


Photo by TOM GERMOND
Members of the Pinellas Park Blue Star Band perform Oct. 9 at the Golden Invitational Event.
Several area bands competed in the 38th annual event at Largo High School.


See CITY, page 4A


as I work for you," he said.
Asked what the city can do to help businesses dur-
ing these tough economic times, Lardner said the city
has a reputation of making it difficult for businesses to
open.
He said a deli that moved to Clearwater-Largo Road
couldn't open for months because of the red tape.
*If they (city officials) could make the process go a
little faster," he said.
.He said at a recent forum that the city should con-
sider reducing the speed limit downtown and address
the parking situation. Lardner also believes the city
should have more events downtown to attract people to

eA ke how aggressive the city should be in support-
ing mass transit improvement and whether he favors
an increase in the sale tax to fund such project, Lard-
ner was skeptical.
"I personally don't think it's a good time to raise peo-
ple's taxes when they are in such tough economic
times," he said.
"I don't think that 1 percent tax increase is going to
come so I would say not that aggressive."
Lardner doesn't think the Highland Recreation Com-
plex and Community Centers are necessary under cur-
rent economic conditions.
"Not at this present time. I think that as I'm walking
out and knocking on people's doors the voters and
getting some input from them, I'm finding that people
are expecting the city to cut back as they have to cut
back," he said.
He said he recognizes that now is a good time to
spend because prices are low, but he's frugal; he said
it wasn't an appropriate time to borrow $10 million for
the community center.


By TOM GERMOND

LARGO -Three candidates for City Commission Seat
6 have diverse backgrounds and viewpoints on the is-
sues facing Largo.

Doug Lardner
Doug Lardner, 31, is married and has lived in Largo
for five years. He is owner of Doug the Bug Terminate
and Pest Control on East Bay Drive, and has worked in
the family business for more than 10 years. Lardner is
a certified pest control operator. A founder of the Largo
Roller Hockey League, Lardner has been a league coor-
dinator and referee, scorekeeper. He has been on the
Community Development Advisory Board since Octo-
ber. He is married.
"'Tm running because I love the city of Largo," he
said.
Lardner said he had a good opportunity to leamn how
government works through playing street hockey on a
basketball court. The ball would roll onto East Bay
Drive. So he and others asked city officials several
years ago to build a hockey rink for his league.
"As soon as they did that, I knew I wanted to be a
part of this community," he said. "I lived in the com-
munity, had a business in the community, but I really
wanted to be a part of it ...This will be my next step."
He said at a recent forum that he brings "out of the
box thinking" to the table, and he's from the working
class.
"Every day I'm going into people's homes where they
couldn't solve the problem themselves so they come to
Doug the Bug and they call us. I would like to think I
would bring that attitude and that mind into City Hall


Doug Lardner


"If I already have a shirt as we already have a com-
munity center I might not buy that shirt, even
though it's a phenomenal deal because I know that I
have a closet full of shirts back home. So even though
you know it may be good because the price is low, you
sti ll have to evaluate and say is now a good tune?" he


John tanaSIO
John Atanasio, 85, is a widower with four children.
He is president of Alba Consulting, a commercial real
estate company specializing in shopping centers. He
has lived in Largo since 1976, has been involved in
manufacturing and is a World War II veteran. He has
served on the Largo Community Development Advisory
Board the Largo Finance Advisory Board, Largo Down-
town Mainstreet Committee and Largo Downtown Ad-
visory Board and graduated from the Largo Citizens'
Academy.
Addressing the budget is one of Atanasio's top priori-
ties. He said he wants to scan the budgets line by line
and not favor any department.
*I honestly feel that a definite change must come
about. Not so much the total amount of the Largo


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City gets new



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Largo candidates discuss issues


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Candidates differ on several issues


By TOM GERMOND

LARGO City Commission candidates
didn't see eye to eye Oct. 6 on a variety of
issues during a Largo Mid-Pinellas Cham-
ber of Commerce forum at city hall.
Candidates for seat 5 also asked what
they would do to help businesses and
"jump-start" development downtown.
Robert Avery, an activities bus driver
and public safety instructor, said he and
his buddy moved his business to the Largo
area and encountered "so much red tape
involved for starting or moving a business
into the city it's no wonder why we can't fill
the downtown district."
After six months of red tape just trying
to moving tables, chairs, laptops and other
equipment used to teach firefighters CPR,
first aid and other skills, "we had to pull
the same permits for the same processes
as a builder that wants to build on vacant
land," Avery said.
"It's ridiculous all the bureaucracy in
the city," Avery said. "It's just so much the
businesses don't want to come here."
After six months, Avery said, he and his
partner moved his business back to Pinel-
las Park.
Commissioner Harriet Crozier said that
recently the business community and
downtown merchants asked for signage
changes. The commission changed the or-
dinance to allow temporary signage to help
businesses.
As far as spurring downtown business
growth, she said the city's economic devel-
opment department went to the Interna-
tional Council of Shopping Centers trade
show, which was held in Kissimmee Aug.
16 through Aug. 18 and attended by devel-
opers, Realtors and retailers.
"They were coming over 5,000 people
and we were one of seven communities in
the state of Florida that went (to the show)
to draw people who want to develop or
bring their business to Largo," she said.


Commenting on the city's regulations
pertaining to businesses, Crozier said there
are numerous state rules the city has to
follow.
"We also have to make sure the facility
that you are going to go in as a resident is
safe," she said. "I'm sorry for the inconven-
ience that some of the people have had ...
We are working with the chamber to come
to the table and see what do we need to
change to make it easier for the community
but to follow the law."
Robert Hunsicker, a semi-retired au-
tomation specialist, said "the best thing the
city can do is just get out of the way."
"During my tenure on the planning
board, I got to know some of the people in
community development," he said. "They
are good people, but they are not business
people. We need a business advocate in
this building that can expedite these rules
and cut through the red tape and expedite
the process."
Businesses also need temporary help to
allow them to increase their visibility, he
said.
"If people cannot see a business, it will
fail; it's common sense," he said.
Candidates for seat 6 were asked what
specific issue they would want to see im-
mediately addressed if they were elected.
John Atanasio, president of a commer-
cial real estate company, said he wanted to
spend time examining budgets for each de-
partment.
... looking at the various departments
that we have and the budgets of each and
every one of those departments, I have
deep, deep questions ... but being on the
outside and not knowing the inner work-
ings of that budget it would be unfair to
say whether it is good, bad or indifferent."
Doug Lardner, owner of a termite and
pesticide control business, said that when
city commissioners decided against fund-
ing an outreach program this year "my
heart was really heavy."


He said he is involved in the Big Broth-
ers program and engages in activities every
week with a child.
"I was deeply sorrowed. I really like to
see funding for the outreach program rein-
stated," he said.
He said he was knocking on doors in an
area served by an outreach program that
had many families living in low-income
housing. He was told by a resident who
has lived there for 20 years that "the differ-
ence that it brought to that community
was remarkable, and he told me he was
kind of scared now to see what can hap-
pen."
Commissioner Woody Brown said his top
priority is to continue increase safety for
pedestrians and people who use alternative
forms of travel in Largo.
Four people were killed, he said, while
crossing Missouri Boulevard in front of
Walmart last year.
City community development officials are
working on better design standards, such
as a buffer between the travel lanes and
sidewalks so people are safer.
"'There are more and more people using
alternative forms of travel, whether it's bik-
ing or walking ... to make it safer for those
people to get around the city of Largo is one
of my most important concerns."
He also wants to encourage police de-
partment efforts to educate pedestrians,
drivers that don't yield to pedestrians in the
crosswalks and children walking to school.
"At Mildred Helms Elementary I see peo-
ple every day stopping short just before hit-
ting kids going to school because they are
not paying attention; they are on cell
phones, they are looking forward and not
looking for pedestrians that are crossing
when they are supposed to be crossing,"
Brown said.
Dan Flynn, chairman of the chamber's
government action committee, was the
moderator of the forum. The election will be
held Nov. 2.


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Parents take their children on one of many rides at the 2010 Fun Fair at St. Patrick's Catholic Church Oct. 9. A flea market, bingo, food
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Briefs

City seeks grant for brownfield work
IARGO City commissioners authorized staff Oct. 5 to apply for
funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for grants of
up to $400,000 related to brownfield sites, land where environmental
contamination may occur.
The city received a Florida Brownfield Designation in 2008 for areas
that encompass the city's community redevelopment districts, the
commercial corridor of Missouri Avenue and city-owned property ad-
jacent to Largo Central Park.
The grant the city is seeking provides applicants with up to
$200,000 for assessment of hazardous substance sites and $200,000
for petroleum sites. The program does not require any matching funds
from the city.
The city's proposals include underwriting the costs for property
owners to conduct environmental testing to support redevelopment
within the city by offsetting some development costs associated with
perceived brownfield properties.
City officials expect to find out in the spring whether they have re-
ceived funding.

Firefighters' union votes against
labor agreement
IARGO The International Association of Firefighters Local 2427
voted 104-0 against ratifying a new labor agreement, including the ar-
ticles imposed by the City Commission through the impasse proce-
dure. The terms and conditions of the expired contract, including the
new range pay plan as imposed by the City Commission, will continue
in effect until a new agreement is reached, city officials said.
Assistant City Manager Henry Schubert will contact the union lead-
ership to schedule bargaining sessions and an executive session will
be scheduled with the City Commission later this month. The union
represents Largo firefighters.

Largo Nature Preserve temporarily closed
IARGO The Largo Central Park Nature Preserve will be closed to
the public starting Oct. 25 for 120 days. The park will be closed due to
a engineering project that will dredge the Alum collection pond, add a
boat launch and restructure the existing boardwalk.
The project will take up a significant portion of the existing open
area of the park due to dredging and pumping to a nearby city-owned
lot. While the park is closed, the parks division will take the opportuni-
ty to plant about 400 trees in the grass sections at the front of the
park.
This will reduce fertilizer and chemical use in the park and provide
for more tree canopy in the often wet areas in the front of the park.
Trails will be left for public access in the newly forested areas. Interest-
ed parties can contact Leland Dicus at 587-6713.


OTampa Bay
Living Green

ExpoTM


New event in Dunedin this Fall.

Oct 1 6-1 7, 2010
Dunedin Community Center
1 920 Pinehurst Road

Save Money.
Save the Environmlent.

The Tampa Bay Living Green Expo is a FREE,
fun-filled educational family event helping Tampa Bay
residents make informed decisions and take action to
lead more healthy and sustainable lives with less impact
on the environment. Join us in Dunedin at the Dunedin
Community Center. This two-day event will provide
information, ideas, resources, products and motivation to
live more sustainably.

Full weekend of events scheduled:





Alejandro LeBron, 8, from Largo, climbs down from the city of Largo's recycling truck Oct. 6 at the
Mildred Helms Elementary's Walk to School Day. More than 480 children and parents participated
in wellness activities, learned about healthy diets and honked the horns of big rigs, a city fire truck
and other city vehicles in the parking lot of the Publix on Clearwater-Largo Road and West Bay
Drive.


CANDIDATES, from page 1A

budget, but it's the distribution numbers the police and fire depart-
ment have a budget about $18 million each. Parks and playgrounds,
$25 million. That doesn't seem to weigh low with me."
He also believes too much emphasis is being put on programs for
senior citizens.
"I think the senior citizens are being overplayed. Whenever they
want to pass something or discussing a particular situation. Well,
that's best for our senior citizens or that's best for our little ones. How
about those in between that work hard each and every single day,"
Atanasio said.
He said he has experience besides his committee work in Largo. He
served one unexpired term and two three-year terms in Bergenfield,
which is northwest of New York City.
Commenting on business growth, Atanasio said "I don't think the
city of Largo is a business-friendly town for whatever reason."
He said a committee, "which there was at one time," should be
formed to be a liaison between downtown businesses and the city.
Atanasio also is in favor of having one-way streets in both direc-
tions downtown.
"~The one thing that should be done is to create downtown as a
pedestrian-friendly area and have traffic move through First Avenue
North in one direction and First Avenue south in the other direc-
tions," he said.
Though state officials might not approve of such a plan, he said "it
hurts no one to try."
He also said the city should have an area downtown, three or four
blocks, set up just for pedestrian traffic with benches and trees.
"Leave the main downtown area three or four blocks as strictly
pedestrian traffic set up benches trees."
Atanasio said he supports enhanced mass transit for Largo and an


4A


Leader, October 14, 2010


City receives grant for energy improvements
SEMINOLE The City Council voted unanimously Sept. 28 for the
city to enter into an agreement with the Florida Energy and Climate
Commission to receive a $290,076 Energy Efficiency and Conserva-
tion Block Grant.
Combined with a $130,324 match from the city's capital improve-
ment fund, the city will have $420,400 to work with on three projects
and a pair of studies related energy efficiency improvements.
One project will include LED upgrades for indoor and outdoor light-
ing at all city-maintained parks and facilities with a projected cost of
$254,000.
Another project involves the installation of occupancy sensors in
City Hall at a cost of $5,400 and another will upgrade lighting on
sports fields for $145,000.
One of the two studies is to analyze a possible solar photovoltaic
retrofit to the Seminole Recreation at a cost of $3,000.
Another study will be an HVAC audit to identify energy efficiency
needs at the recreation center. The cost is $8,000.
The LED lighting upgrades will include the installation of 1,548
LED fixtures at three fire stations, City Hall, Fleet Services, and vari-
ous parks and recreation facilities.
The LED lighting upgrades are expected to save the city an estimat-
ed 842,163 kilowatt-hours per year with an estimated cost savings of
$953,169 over 10 years.
The recreation center HVAC system failed last spring and the city
has been operating the facility since with a rental unit.
A new, more efficient HVAC system is being designed and expected
to be installed after the first of the year. It will likely be paid for by a
grant the city has applied for.

Redington Shores picks special magistrate
REDINGTON SHORES Earlier this year, the town commission de-
cided to hire an attorney to fill the newly created position of special
magistrate.
The special magistrate would have one function, to hear and decide
all applications for variances. That process was previously handled by
the planning and zoning board. A separate special master handles
code enforcement cases.
An ordinance was also passed putting a time limit of one year on
variances granted, and canceling existing variances if no action is
taken within a year.
The ordinance takes effect upon the hiring of a special magistrate,
giving some urgency to the selection process.
That was addressed at the Sept. 29 commission workshop with the
selection of James Yacavone, a Dunedin attorney with extensive expe-
rience in municipal law. Thomas Trask, a law partner of Yacavone's,
was chosen as backup special magistrate.


Potential new investors tour Biltmore property
BELLEAIR The big question on everyone's mind in Belleatr these
days is, "What's happening with the Biltmore?"
Belleair's iconic centerpiece, the 20-acre spa and resort, has de-
fined Belleair since its construction began in 1897.
Last week, "Rumors began to fly," said Town Manager Micah
Maxwell, after he received a call from Ron Weaver, a Tampa lawyer
specializing in land use and former attorney for DeBartolo Develop-
ment.
"Weaver made some inquiries about what might be allowed for de-
velopment of the property," Maxwell said.
Reached at his office late last week, Weaver would neither confirm
nor deny he was representing any party in the matter, saying only, "I
have no comment at this time regarding the Biltmore."
In 2005 DeBartolo acquired an option to purchase the property
and, in a move that caught preservationists as well as town officials
off guard, proposed replacing a substantial portion of the historic
hotel with condos. The proposal failed.
That moment was recalled by Mayor Gary Katica at Tuesday's Town
Commission meeting.
"I was here during the DeBartolo debacle, and it was quite a
shock," he said.
Last month the town received another shock when it became ap-
parent that the Biltmore's new owners, Latitude Management Real
Estate Investors (formerly Legg Mason Real Estate Investors), had
failed to raise sufficient capitol for the project, with LMREI's Joseph
Penner admitting in August, "We're looking for investors now."
The proposed $112 million project for renovation had finally been
given the go ahead by town officials two years ago. Renovation was
due for completion in 2012. Little if any progress has been made to-
ward accomplishing that schedule since the hotel closed in 2009.
Maxwell estimates that LMREI is now close to $70,000 in arrears for
town fines imposed on the deteriorating condition of the structure's
roof.
Penner has since announced his resignation as active manager of
the development fund.
Referring to the ongoing construction delay, Katica remarked to a
meeting Aug. 4, "It looks like we've been had."
Reached by phone last Friday, Katica had no information regarding
the possibility that new investors were actively exploring development
options for the Biltmore property or that Weaver might be represent-
ing a potential investor/developer group.
"As far as I'm concerned all options are now on the table except the
golf course," Katica said.
The hotel and spa sits surrounded by a popular golf course that is
part of the town's open space formula.
"Belleair is one of the few towns to have its own well field," Katica


explained. "iThe golf course is the primary reason we have that water
supply. The golf course is nonnegotiable."

Beach parking once again
on City Council agenda
CLEARWATER If somebody with nothing better to do reviewed the
meeting minutes of the City Council and its predecessor, the City
Commission, for the past three decades, he or she would likely find
that beach parking was the topic most frequently discussed. The
council's combination work session and meeting on Oct. 5 was no ex-
ception.
After decades of trying, the council reached an agreement for LOM
Inc. to build a 300-space public garage at its Surf Style Condominium
site. The deal won't cost the taxpayers a cent, although the city did set
aside $9.3 million from its parking fund to purchase the structure if
LOM defaults in the first five years.
The agreement reached on Feb. 18 called for construction to com-
mence on Sept. 30 and be finished by Sept. 30, 2012. But a glitch
arose.
"LOM is requesting an extension of the construction start date due
to (the) economic impact of the Gulf oil spill on their retail stores along
the Gulf Coast," a staff memo to the council explained. "LOM has sub-
mitted a claim to BP that is being processed. The time and effort re-
quired to deal with the oil spill has caused a delay in the
commencement of the project. Branch Bank and Trust Company, the
construction lender funding the project, has orally committed to ex-
tend the commencement date to Feb. 28, 2011."
City Attomney Pam Akin told the council members that they were
not obligated to extend the commencement date because the oil spill
was not an "act of God," which the contract considered a valid excuse
for starting late.
"I would like to believe that He (God) had nothing to do with the in-
competency of BP and its partners," Councilman George Cretekos
said.
"I've heard that they think they are a deity," Councilman Paul Gib-
son added regarding the BP partnership group.
Mayor Frank Hibbard said that he would be willing to extend the
commencement date until Feb. 28, 2011 but was reluctant to extend
the completion date to Feb. 28, 2013. That would reduce the allow-
able construction time to 19 months instead of 24. An LOM
spokesman said that arrangement would be agreeable to his compa-
ny.
"~This is it for me," Vice Mayor John Doran said as he joined his col-
leagues in unanimously approving the five-month extension of the
commencement date. "I've already exhausted my patience. I'd like to
see this start, not just in my lifetime but in the next few months."
TBN staff


TERMS, from page 1A


"What this does is give us an op-
portunity to boot somebody out if
they are not doing a good job."
Brown said because of the cost
savings, he can support four-
year terms.
"I think it's a good solution. I
don't think that going to two
years is a good idea simply be-
cause it would make an unstable
situation for the City Commis-
sion. The stability that is with
three or four years is much bet-
ter than two years," Brown said.
Robert Avery, who is running
against Crozier and Robert Hun-
sicker for seat 5, said he is in
favor of the proposed amend-
ment.
"iThe cost savings will be very
beneficial," he said.
Avery also is opposed "to going
backwards."
"It takes about a year to accli-
mate yourselves, and after that,
then a year to proceed with what
needs to get done," Avery said.
"So if you go to two years, the
city will slow down and nothing
will get done because for the first
year everybody will be uncom-
fortable with what's going on."
Atanasio supports three-year
terms. He called the belief that
new commissioners need a year
to be prepared "hogwash."
"If you are going to run for the
city commission, you had better
be involved in the city way prior
to your intentions of running," he
said.
When he hires people, it is
based on their experience or
knowledge they have, he said.
"Three years is plenty and I
love to see new faces on the com-
mission every three years,"


Atanasio said.
Hunsicker said there "are a lot
of smart people in Largo. I'm
sure they will make the right
choice."
"Since my term would be di-
rectly affected, I will stay neu-
tral," he said.
Under the amendment, four-
year terms for commissioners
who are elected to seats 5 and 6
will begin in November 2010;
seats 3 and 4 and the mayor,
November 2012; and seats 1 and
2, November 2014. The amend-
ment will require an election in
2011 to elect seats 1 and 2 to
three year terms.
Proponents of extending terms
have also pointed out that
turnout in city elections is higher
when held during countywide
elections.
City commissioners have had
several tedious discussions over
the past several months on how
to stagger their terms so that
they are held in conjunction with
countywide elections, which are
held in even-numbered years.
In June City Attorney Alan
Zimmet said city officials did
some research as to how other
cities addressed the issue, "and
it's kind of all over the map."
"Some have granted (term) ex-
tensions; some have not," he
said.
Lengths of terms vary in Pinel-
las County. Clearwater and st.
Petersburg Council members
have four-year terms. Pinellas
Park City Council members have
four-year terms; the mayor has a
two-year term. Seminole City
Council members have three-
year terms.


"Democracy is not the place to
start cutting money, cutting peo-
ple's ability to have input in their
government and say who and
how it's going to be run. I'm real-
ly disappointed that that's up,"
he said.
'... I'm really disappointed that
the people say that it is saving
money when in fact, if you want
to save money, cut the commis-
sion down to five members or do
the election with one voting
place," Jackson said.
Candidates were asked their
opinions on the issue at the
Largo Mid-Pinellas Chamber of
Commerce's forum Oct. 6.
Commissioner Harriet Crozier
said she supports four-year
terms.
"Not only are we thinking
about saving money each year.
What we will be spending if we
have an election each year, that
is going to continue to grow," she
said.
When people run for office, by
the third year they are just "get-
ting into knowing what they need
to do. So this would give them an
extra year to try and accomplish
something ... ," she said.
Doug Lardner, who is running
for seat 6 against Commissioner
Woody Brown and John Atana-
sio, said he likes the costs say-
ings associated with the charter
revision, but he would prefer
rolling three-year terms back to
two years, the same as for the
state and federal Houses of Rep-
resentatives.
"W~hat that brings is accounta-
bility to commissioners," he said.


CITY, from page 1A


streets. It also has a heavy em-
phasis on pedestrian features.
Commissioner Harriet Crozier
said she couldn't envision peo-
ple getting off a bus, walking
across the parking lot to the
large retail store, buying what-
ever they want and walking
back to the transit station. She
also suggested changes in the
parking configuration.
"I don't want to be walking as
everybody has said through
parking lots to get to whatever,"
she said.
Commissioner Mary Black
suggested that the developers


may want to consider having a
trolley that makes regular stops
from the PSTA transfer station
to "the various stores and just
circle around."
"It would encourage people
who do come and park to spend
more time shopping around be-
cause they know they don't
have to carry all those bags
back to their cars. Just hop
aboard and ride," she said.
Commissioner Curtis Holmes
said the parking lot may be
"store friendly, but it's not going
to be customer friendly."
"I don't think that's what you


really want to see a massive
parking lot like that," he said.
Commissioner Woody Brown
said he liked the efforts to make
the parking lots more pedestri-
an friendly, "but I think it could
be much, much better."
He suggested moving the row
of retail establishments to the
middle of the development and
putting the parking lots above
below it. However, he said he's
glad that developers were talk-
ing about building on the site.
"We certainly don't want to
scare them away," Mayor Pat
Gerard said.


Largo Commons is expected
to have shopping and dining
opportunities with shaded seat-
ing areas.
"A consistent landscape and
streetscape design is proposed
along with unified architectural
design, colors and materials for
the buildings," a city memo
said.
The Sembler Co., based in st.
Petersburg, has developed, re-
developed, leased and managed
numerous retail projects
throughout the southeastern
United states, including more
than 130 shopping centers.


"Despite the current de-
pressed retail estate market, a
unique opportunity still exists
to attract to this site retail uses
not currently represented in the
surrounding trade area. The
modified [Largo Towne Center]
project seeks to attract these
limited retail users to the city of
Largo and concentrate them in
One location designed to be an
integrated, quality, sustainable
and traditional open-air, one-
level retail project," said Tom
Hareas, vice president of devel-
opment for sembler, in a letter
to city officials.


were unhappy that a huge
parking lot separated the anchor
store on the west portion of the
property with the PSI'A station
and a 20,569-square-foot build-
ing.
'Tro me it looks just like an-
other typical mall we have,"
Murray said. "It goes along the
lines of the Largo Mall and
Clearwater Mall. It would have
been nice to have something
with a little bit different design."
stricklin said the Largo Com-
mons has a system of internal


increase in the sales tax to finance improvements "if need be."
He is opposed to the relocation of the Community Center and High-
land Recreation Complex.
"I think it's a total waste of money," he said. "We have a community
center right in downtown Largo. Yet we are now going to relocate it,
and we're going to kill whatever traffic you have in downtown. It will
become a dead area."

Woody Brown
Woody Brown, 40, is married and has one child. He grew up in In-
dian Rocks Beach and is a Largo High School graduate. He has a
bachelor's degree in biology from the University of Central Florida and
a doctor's degree from Life University, the College of Chiropractic, Ma-
rietta, Ga. He has served on the city Recreation Parks and Arts Advi-
sory board, chair 2005-2007; Rotary Club of Largo, president
2006-2007; Clearwater Jazz Force; Citizens Academy Class of 2005;
University of Central Florida Alumni Association, Tampa Bay Regional
Planning Council and Agency on Bay Management. He established
Main street Chiropractic in Largo in 2002.
"I've decided to live in Largo, raise a family here. I have my business
in Largo. I'm really invested in the city of Largo. I want to be a part of
making sure it's a great place to live and raise a family."
Addressing business growth in the city, Brown said he has worked
a lot with the Largo Mid-Pinellas Chamber of Commerce to help the
relationship between the city and businesses.
"One of the things that has been done basically is develop a pham-
plet that is a new business guide. It breaks down the steps for a new
business. This is something they can walk into city hall and say, 'I'm
a new business. Is there one way I can find out what I need to do?' "
Asked about some candidates' remarks that Largo isn't business
friendly, Brown said in the past three years he's looked into many
problems businesses have had.


"Sometimes it's (the problem) on the business end. Sometimes it's
on the city hall end," Brown said.
"Sometimes the city takes the heat on things because there's a
third party involved; that it's a lot easier to say 'we're having trouble
pulling permits than it is to say we have two projects going on and we
put yours on the back burner right now.'
Brown supports the city's involvement in efforts to bring improved
mass transit to the county.
"I think that mass transit is coming to Pinellas County whether the
city of largo encourages it or not. I think for the city not to be in the
forefront of the discussions is a real big mistake," Brown said. "And
we are in the forefront."
He said if a countywide committee studying mass transit recom-
mended an increase in the sales tax to fund improvements, he would
probably support it.
"First of all, something has to pay for it," he said. "You are not going
to pay for it with ridership fees."
It is a better source of revenue than property taxes to finance mass
transit improvements because tourists pay sales taxes, he said.
"~That's the only way to do that," he said.
Regarding some candidates' opposition to borrowing money backed
by sales tax revenue for the Community Center and Highland Recre-
ation Complex, Brown said, he doesn't think there will be a less ex-
pensive time to build a new Community Center.
"Construction is cheap; materials are cheap," he said. "The Com-
munity Center is coming in well under budget."
The new Community Center will have more space and programs, he
said.
The Highland Recreation Center is a "bigger ticket" but it is needed
more than the Community Center was, he said.
"~The Highland Recreation Center is really in bad shape; it's really
heavily used."


Around Pinellas


Big rigs and more














































;i~r


Leader, October 14, 2010


Deputy foils gas station robber
IARGO Action by Cpl. Nicholas Bedy with the
Pinellas County Sheriffs Office prevented a robbery
of a Largo gas station on Oct. 8.
According to the sheriffs re-
port, Bedy, 31, responded to a
call at the Citgo station at 8195
Ulmerton Road about 11:18
a.m. to check out a report of a IErg
suspicious person.
Deputies said witnesses re-
ported that a man wearing a
black and white bandana cov-
ering his face and a hoody aeNwng
sweatshirt and a knit cap was Jk oln
trying to conceal himself be-
hmnd an ice machine and a rack of propane tanks
in front of the store. Witnesses also said the man
was holding something in his hand they could not
see.
Bedy was the first deputy on the scene. He saw
the suspect hiding behind the ice machine and or-
dered him to get down on the ground. According to
the report, Bedy saw a bulge from under his shirt
in his waistband. A search revealed the suspect
was concealing a black air soft pistol, which resem-
bled a semi-automatic handgun.
The suspect, Jake Nowling, 22, of Whispering
Drive East in Largo, allegedly admitted he was
there to commit a robbery when questioned by
Bedy. Nowling was arrested and charged with at-


tempted robbery with a weapon, felon in posses-
sion of a concealed weapon and violation of proba-
tion. He was on probation related to charges of
leaving the scene of an injury crash in 2008. He
also was arrested for DUI on Christmas Day 2007.
The investigation continues.
He was booked into Pinellas County Jail under
$30,000 bond.

County shuts down alleged
pill mill
PINELLAS PARK Investigators served a search
warrant on the Dollar Medical Clinic in Pinellas
Park Oct. 5, after receiving numerous complaints
that the clinic, along with a similar one in Lehigh
Acres in Lee County, was operating as a "pill mill."
Dr. Jacinta Gillis, who owns and operates both
clinics, voluntarily surrendered her privileges to
prescribe controlled substances in Pinellas and Lee
counties after she was interviewed by a U.S. Drug
Enforcement Administration agent, according to a
report from the Pinellas County Sheriffs Office.
Pinellas County Justice and Consumer Services
cited Gillis for operating a pain management clinic
without a permit, as required by county ordinance.
As a result, Gillis can no longer operate a pain
management clinic in Pinellas.
The warrants, served at 10 a.m. that day, came
at the end of a several-month criminal investiga-
tion, started when Gillis, 41, was accused of operat-
ing a medical practice below the standard of care.


Investigators served the warrants on the clinics
and Gillis' home in Fort Myers to recover additional
evidence in their case. The search warrants affi-
davits have been sealed per court order. No arrests
have been made in the ongoing investigation.
Gillis was arrested in Lee County for possession
of a concealed firearm in February.
Several agencies contributed to the investigation,
including the Pinellas County Sheriffs Office
Strategic Diversion Task Force, the Lee County
Sheriffs Office Narcotics Unit, the Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement, the Office of Attorney
General Statewide Prosecutors Office Tampa Bu-
reau, the Florida Department of Health and Drug
Enforcement Administration.
Anyone with information on the investigation
into the Dollar Medical Clinic can call the Pinellas
County Sheriffs Office Narcotics Division at 582-
2828

Accused car burglars arrested for
fatal stabbing
PINELLAS PARK Richard Levo, a 51-year-old
Pinellas Park resident, was beaten, cut and fatally
stabbed after confronting two "youths" he found
breaking into a car at the Whetstone Apartments
early in the morning of Oct. 7.
The accused car burglars, Aaron Cook, 20, of
Largo and Tiffany Ann Mitchell, 19, of Clearwater,
were arrested for first-degree murder the following
night, according to Pinellas Park Police.


After initially fleeing to the apartment of an ac-
quaintance in the west end of the Whetstone com-
plex, they ended up in a hotel in New Port Richey
and taken into custody by New Port Richey police
at 11:10 p.m. Oct. 8.
Police and paramedics responded to Whetstone
Apartments, at 8400 49th St. N. in Pinellas Park,
shortly after 1:30 a.m. Though the stabbing took
place near Building 2 of the apartments, the 911
call for help came from the second-floor balcony of
Levo's apartment.
'Oh my God," Levo could be heard repeating in
the 911 recording, breathing heavily. "'They were
trying to steal a car. One black youth and one white
youth. They were teenagers."
They kicked and beat him, he told the emergency
dispatcher. The car wasn't his, but one of the neigh-
bors.
"Please get an ambulance here, would ya?" he
pleaded in between describing his ordeal. "I'm losing
lots of blood. I really am.
Paramedics found Levo with multiple cuts and
stab wounds around his upper torso and legs. He
was losing consciousness as they transported him
to a local hospital. He died from his injuries at 4:30
a.m. The department's K-9 unit tracked the sus-
pects, but did not find them.
Mitchell and Cook had stolen stereos from at
least six cars, Pinellas Park police reported. Detec-
tives found some of the stolen items from the bur-
glaries behind one of the buildings in the apartment
complex.


INPI(IOPI


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Earl Pruitt tells us that his dad Buck, started the
--- WELLcompany in 1962. It was called "Pruitt Pump Co." In
4 PMP SRI 1971 Buck's son Earl Sr. started "Earl's Well Drilling."
Now Earl Sr. and sons James, Earl Jr., and David run
Jr., and youngest son David all work full time in
Pinellas County. Earl's son Christian Wayne runs the
Municipality & Industrial part of the business across
the United States. We were impressed by the
knowledge and depth of experience this family has of
the weHl and pump business. They know exactly where
46 years of family running this Well & Pump you can put a shallow or deep well and where you
business gives you the best service available. can't in aHl of Pinellas County. Is your pump noisy or
producing low pressure? We reconunend you caHl Earl at 727-544-0718, or 727-439-2300, if you need a
weHl on your property. They wiHl give you an estimate on a weHl, jet pump and submersible pumps.
They do water weHl repair, water weHl cleaning and repair and water weHl pumps for irrigation. They
accept Visa & MasterCard. www.wellandpumpexperts.com.


Gregors Marine Has the Spirit of a Glorious History and a
Passion for Modern Boating
If you want experienced outboard motor repair,
superior quality services with the highest level of
customer care and individual attention, you're "In I,
Luck," The Best is right here in your own backyard.
Gregors Marine is owned and operated by Louis Gregor
& family and they have over 35 years experience in
outboard motor repair. Year after year they have Gregors Marine: Outboard motors and boat
ranked among the highest level in Customer storage specialists and much more!
Satisfaction Scores in surveys. Gregors Marine also provides goods/services for boat dealers, boat
repairing & service, boat yards & storage. The storage facility is convenient, safe and affordable and can
easily acconunodate boats 10' to 31'. All boats can be accessed 365 days a year and you can launch and
have gulf access in minutes. Facilities are electronically monitored with secured alarmed fencing. The
Sales & Parts Dept. features an extensive line of Mercury, Mercruiser, Magictilt, and Quicksilver parts
and products. The Service Dept is factory authorized and certified to perform repairs on aHl Mercury
and Force outboards and Mercruiser sterndrives. Gregors Marine is an award-winning service
establishment and fully certified by Mercury Marine for: organization, cleanliness, maintaining state-of-
the-art equipment and tools necessary to perform repairs to factory specifications. Go by and check it
aHl out at 12800 Walsingham Rd. in Largo. Phone: 727-596-5929. www.gregorsmarine.com.

Home Improvement Source Has Everything For Your
Home Including FREE Estimates!
The Home Improvement Source is your one stop shop for all of
your remodeling needs. The Home Improvement Source is not
only a Class A general contractor, but also state certified electrical
and plumbing contractors. Specializing in kitchen and bath
remodeling, they manufacture their own cabinets and
countertops, including granite, and silestone, and laminates. Their
state-of-the-art 18,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility is located in
Pinellas Park. Employing over 30 fuHl time factory workers and
craftsman, their philosophy is simple, they keep all work in
house, not relying on subcontractors and their delays. This
-- ensures not only the quality of the work, but also the timeliness in
which each project is completed. Their unique online
management system ensures accuracy in scheduling, which
They'II meet your needs and surpass aHows them to provide daily e-mail notification reports to all of
your expectations. their customers. Their professionally trained staff is helpful and
courteous, and will maintain a clear line of conununication throughout your project. Their showroom
located at 30333 U.S. 19 N, in Palm Harbor has all of the accessories needed to complete your project. The
Home Improvement Source provides you with a free budget analysis/estimate in your home. Find them at
www.homeimprovementsource.net or phone them at 727-789-1112 for your FREE ESTIMATE.

Paradise Worldwide Transportation Handles Large
Company Outings, Weddings, a Fun Night Out or Just a
Trip to the Airport with Ease!
At Paradise Worldwide Transportation they are dedicated to making your
travel experience as seamless, convenient and memorable as possible.
From the advanced reservations and dispatch systems to the highly
trained chauffeurs and professional staff, they are at your service 24/7 to
take care of your transportation needs anywhere in the world. The All
Inclusive Price policy ensures that you can stay within your budget
without any unexpected charges. Paradise Worldwide is the top choice "
with businesses, whether they need luxury shuttle buses or a trip to the Girls Night Out can be fun,
airport in a sleek sedan. How you get to that special occasion is as hassle free and safe!
important as the event itself. Let them create the perfect memory for you of your special event. For
instance ... a birthday, anniversary or just to party they can create the whole affair with their "Ride and
Dine For $349. Package". Package includes Limo transportation for 3 hours 4 salads 2 appetizers 4
entrees of choice 2 complimentary bottles of wine. Go online www.paradisewt.com for Quick
Reservations, to see the magnificent fleet options, Group Discounts and more. CaHl 727-542-5240 to
speak to a live person about trips outside this area or to reserve locally.
Kimberly Home Thrift Shoppe Holds a 50% OFF Sale Everyday!

in unplanned or troubling pregnancies. Since 2001 The Kimberly Home Thrift
Shoppe has been a vital part of this organization. They provide funding through
the sale of new and gently used merchandise to help support programs for
moms and their babies. In addition, the store provides employment
opportunities within the community. The Kimberly Home Thrift Shoppe is
Visit, Shop or Browse always in need of new, chery, friendly and enthusiastic volunteers. They also
The Thrift Shoppe at welcome students needing to fulfiHl service hours for school requirements or
1601 Clearwater/Largo scholarship programs. CaHl 727-587-6900 for volunteer information. Shop here
Rd. in Clearwater. for the best deals in town on gently used furniture, home accents, clothing and
accessories for women, men, and children. You'Hl also fmnd vintage jewelry, collectibles, electronics
and every household item you can imagine. Each Day there is a Special 50% OFF SALE: Monday:
Clothing & Pictures, Tue: Electrical & Baskets, Wed: Housewares & Arts & Crafts; Thurs: Collectibles &
All Clothing, Fri: Books, Music, Videos & Linens, Sat: Toys, Games & Kids Clothing, Sun: Shoes,
Handbags & Jewelry. www.kimberlvhome.org/thriftshoppe. What you no longer need may be a
treasure to someone else. PH: 727-587-6900 FOR FREE DONATIONS PICKUP.


Leader, October 14, 2010


Briefs~-

New assistant county
administrator anointed
CLEARWATER Pinellas County Administrator
Bob LaSala announced the selection of Carl S. Har-
ness as assistant county administrator. Harness
currently serves as assistant county administrator
for Hillsborough County and has been in that posi-
tion for the last seven years.
Harness has nearly 27 years of experience in city
and county management. For 13 years, he held ex-
ecutive level positions in Florida local govermnent
and has been responsible for a wide array of opera-
tions and administrative functions.
He earned a master's degree in public affairs and
has held leadership positions in professional and
civic organizations. He is the president of the Florida
City County Management Association.
LaSala said, "Carl has broad experience in county
government functions and demonstrates strong
management and leadership skills. I believe we are
fortunate to secure a professional executive with Mr.
Harness' background. I am confident he will make a
positive contribution to Pinellas County."
Harness will begin working on Nov. 14, filling a
vacant assistant county administrator's position, re-
sulting from the retirement of Elithia Stanfield.


Program aims to
prevent homelessness
Eligible citizens who need short-tenn help to find
or keep rental housing may be able to receive assis-
tance with rent and security deposits, thanks to a
program that is funded through the American Re-
covery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
The Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-
Housing Program offers financial help and services
to Pinellas County residents who are homeless or at
risk of becoming homeless. It is administered by the
Pinellas County Department of Health and Human
Services.
Households applying for assistance must meet in-
come guidelines and have a plan for remaining sta-
bly housed after receiving assistance. All household
members must be U.S. citizens.
For more infonnation on the program or to deter-
mine eligibility, visit Pinellas County Health and
Human Services or call 464-8452.

Dunedin reef cleanup set
CLEARWATER Reef Monitoring Inc. will host its
second reef cleanup, planned for the Dunedin reef,
Saturday, Oct. 23, 8 a.m. to noon.
Participants will meet at the city of Clearwater


Seminole boat ramp. The clean-up is open to all
boat owners and certified divers that are interested
in volunteering their time.
The purpose of the cleanup is to remove debris
that can be potentially life-threatening to marine
animals. Items such as fishing line, plastic bags,
six-pack holders and other plastics can be mistaken
for food or cause severe entanglement. Most of these
plastic items will not decompose for hundreds of
years and will be an ongoing threat to the marine
animals that seek sanctuary in Pinellas County's ar-
tificial reef system.
"Our first cleanup was very successful with al-
most 700 pounds of crab trap rope and other debris
removed," said Dennis Kellenberger, president of
Reef Monitoring Inc., in a recent press release. De-
bris removed from the first cleanup is currently on
display at Mac's Scuba Clearwater.
Volunteers for the reef clean-up can preregister at
Mac's Scuba in Clearwater, Sunshine Scuba in
Largo, or Ocean Sports in Dunedin for a $20 fee.
Registration will cover administrative costs, lunch,
an event T-shirt and a free tank of air. Following the
cleanup, debris collected will be weighed, then
placed on display at one of the dive shops to give
people a visual of just how much trash and harmful
debris ends up in the water.
A $50 event sponsorship will be recognized on the
banner, T-shirt and website. All sponsorships need
to be in by Monday, Oct. 18, to be placed on the
banner and shirt.
For information on how to volunteer, or, to be-
come a sponsor for the reef cleanup, call 798-3070
or visit www.reefmonitoring.org.

Credit, debit cards accepted at
county jail
CLEARWATER Credit and debit cards are now
accepted at the Pinellas County Jail as a fonn of
payment for child support purges.
The agreement was entered into through the co-
ordinated efforts of Pinellas County Sheriff Jim
Coats, Pinellas County Clerk of the Court Ken
Burke and Govemnment Payment Service Inc. CEO
Mark E. MacKenzie.


The agreement, which is in effect now, will allow
an imnate or person acting on their behalf to access
cash through a debit or credit card to purge their
child support arrearage. The Pinellas County Jail
will be able to accept such payments on behalf of
the Clerk of the Court.
The payments will be made through the Govem-
ment Payment Services system which is authorized
to accept debit and credit card payments for the
purge of child support arrearages in the amount of
the required purge.
The acceptance of credit and debit cards as a
form of payment for child support purges follows
and comes as an extension to an agreement reached
by these same parties in August that allowed the jail
to begin accepting credit and debit cards as a fonn
of payment for posting bonds.
Bond payments of up to $750 are accepted
through Govemnment Payments services or the Gov-
PayNow program. The $750 limit is on a per charge
basis and not applicable to any charge with a bond
over $750.
An inmate or someone acting on their behalf can
post bond to facilitate his or her release if the in-
niate's charges have a bond amount set. The imnate
or the person posting the bond on an imnate's be-
half can visit www. GovPayNow. com to pay the bond.
The person must have the defendant's name, docket
number and the cash bond amount. The designated
pay location code for the transaction is 6343. A non-
refundable service fee to GovPayNow will be added
to all transactions.
Credit or debit card bond payments also can be
made in person at the bond counter in the jail's
public lobby; or by phone at 1-877-EZBAILS (1-877-
392-2455).
This form of payment is added to the previously
established and traditional methods of payments in-
cluding cash and surety bonds. Cash bonds are ac-
cepted in the full amount of the bond. To post a
cash bond a valid photo ID must be presented.
Surety bonds are accepted from registered bonding
agents. For more information, visit www.
pesoweb.com and click on the Need to post a bond?
link.


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Leader, October 14, 2010

Dentist forms foundation to


help domestic violence victims


By BOB McCLURE
SEMINOLE A local dentist
has teamed up with Community
Action Stops Abuse to provide
free dental services to victims of
domestic violence.
Dr. Paul Eckstein, who oper-
ates E-Dental at 6019 Seminole

roigte 1en edheat oaoot
office manager, Nicki Willman of
Seminole.
woI la, 30 died of gunsshut
cide that involved her husband.
Willman worked for Eckstein
seven years, first as a dental as-
sistant and later as office manag-
"Over the years, we had talked
about doing something like this,"
said Eckstein. "Unfortunately, it
wasn't until after she passed
away that we decided to go ahead
with it. It's a way to honor her
and keep her name out there."
Eckstein said the concept
began about four years ago when
he was contacted via letter by a
woman in jail who needed dental
care. The woman was a victim of
domestic violence who was later
living in halfway house.
"That's probably when it all
started," Eckstein said. "It didn't
cost much to help her and we
decided it would be a good
thing.
Dawn Harger, the front desk


~3~:


The Park Collection
11218 Park Blvd.* Seminole, FL*398-5574
Open Mon-Fri 9-5pm WWW.wildlifewonders.com


Photo courtesy of DR. PAUL ECKSTEIN
The staff of E-Dental, front row, from left, are Brandon Gimlin and
Dawn Harger. In back are Melissa Mariani, Talia Lotito, Dr. Paul
Eckstein and Kyrene Vanderpool.


receptionist at E-Dental, said
Willman was well-liked and pro-
vided a glow to the office.
"She was my sister-in-law,"
said Harger. "She always wanted
to make you laugh. She was en-
ergetic and excellent at her
work. She had a beautiful smile
that would light up a room."
About a month after Will-
man's death, Eckstein contacted
officials at CASA about forming
a partnership to provide dental
services to victims of domestic
violence.
"He lost an employee to do-
mestic violence, which gave him
the initiative to step forward to
help other victims of domestic
violence," said Tuesday Dyer,


development director of CASA.
"He's been very generous to pro-
vide services to victims in our
residential program."
Dyer said between 25 and 30
women would likely qualify for
Eckstein's services.
"He's really stepped forward in
a longterm relationship to pro-
vide these services," said Dyer.
"He is really dedicated to this."
Eckstein has formed the
Nicki Willman Foundation.
For more information or to
make a contribution, visit www.
edentalonline.com.
All contributions go to pay
for supplies, lab fees and costs
incurred to deliver the free
services.


ELECTIONS


NOVEMBER 2, 2010


Make sure the Elections Office

has yo ur current nam e,
addre ss & s ig nature


~ Vote by Ma iI

To request a mail ballot,
VISit WWW.VOtepinel las.com
Or call (727) 464-6788
Deadline to request a ballot
be mailed to you: October 27

BallOt Dropoff Locations Available:
October 18 November 2
Days and Times Vary -
Check Locations Below

Tarpon Springs Tax Collector Office Seminole Community Library
743 Pinellas Ave. S., Tarpon Springs 9200 113th St. N., Seminole
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
(Election Day, 8 a.m.-7 p.m.) Saturday, 10 a.m.-Noon
(Election Day, 9 a.m.-7 p.m.)
East Lake Community Library
4125 East Lake Rd., Palm Harbor Pinellas Park Public Library
Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 7770 52nd St., Pinellas Park
Saturday, 10 a.m.-Noon Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
(Election Day, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.) Saturday, 9 a.m.-Noon
Palm Harbor Community Activity Center (EeioDa,9am-pm.
1500 16th St., Palm Harbor
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. South County Tax Collector Office
Saturday, 8 a.m.-Noon 1800 66th St. N., St. Petersburg
(Election Day, 8 a.m.-7 p.m.) Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
(Election Day, 8 a.m.-7 p.m.)
North County Tax Collector Office
29399 US Hwy. 19 N., Clearw~ater
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. James Weldon Johnson Branch Library
(Election Day, 8 a.m.-7 p.m.) 1059 18th Ave. S., St. Petersburg
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m.-Noon
400 ~ldsarbubl L r~mar(Election Day, 9 a.m.-7 p.m.)
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m.-Noon Skyway Plaza Tax Collector Office
(Election Day, 9 a.m.-7 p.m.) 1067 62nd Ave. S., St. Petersburg


Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
(Election Day, 8 a.m.-7 p.m.)

Sueir iso rof Eeci tn
13001 Starkey Rd., Largo
(Starkey Lakes Corporate Center)
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday/Sunday, 8 a.m.-Noon
(Election Day, 7 a.m.-7 p.m.)
(Drive-Through Available: Front of Building)
Supervisor of Elections St. Petersburg Office
501 1st Ave. N., St. Petersburg
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday/Sunday, 8 a.m.-Noon
(Election Day, 7 a.m.-7 p.m.)


Gulf to Bay Tax Collector Office
1663 Gulf to Bay Blvd., Clearwater
Mon DayFiday, 8a m. p m


If you want to drop off your ballot before
October 18, you can bring it to any
Supervisor of Elections Office:
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Supervisor of Elections Clearwater Office
315 Court St., Room 117, Clearw~ater
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday/Sunday, 8 a.m.-Noon
(Election Day, 7 a.m.-7 p.m.)


Freedom Village I
7700 66th St. N.
Pinellas Park
(727) 541-6620


Freedom Village 11
5002 S. Bridge St.
Tampa
(813) 831-6988


Freedom Village Ill
1167 Turner St.
Cleanrwater
(727) 433-6799


For adults who have disabilities and limited income

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2351 Alderman Rd., Palm Harbor
(727) 787-0792
For people 62 and older who have disabilities or limited income


Track your ballot online at
WWW.VOtepinellas.com or call (727) 464-6788


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ELECTION DA;Y:

NOVEMBER 2, 2010

Remember to bring photo and
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Polls are open 7 a.m. 7 p.m.







Make Freedom Coun~t

Deborah Clark,
Pinellas County Supervisor of Elections
(727) 464-6788
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Leader, October 14, 2010


By PINELIAS COUNTY
COMMUNICATIONS

When it comes to keeping the
lines of communication open
after a hurricane or other disas-
ter, Pinellas County Emergency
Management turns to a team of
amateur radio operators to sup-
plement and provide redundan-
cy to the varied methods of
emergency communications.
Leading this team is Neil
Lauritsen of Clearwater, the
local Amateur Radio Emergency
Services emergency coordina-
tor. Neil has had an interest in
public service since he was in
his teens, when he worked as a
volunteer firefighter. The inter-
est in amateur radio operation
followed closely behind.
"The technology has always
fascinated me, and I have al-
ways felt the need to help
through serving my communi-
ty," said Lauritsen. "Putting the
two together was just natural."
Lauritson has even used his
amateur radio to contact astro-
nauts on the MIR space station
and on Space Shuttle missions.
The need for a well-trained
amateur radio communications
cadre has been recognized as
an essential communications
bridge since the inception of
Civil Defense during the Cold


want to make sure that we
apply them in future events."
"The work Neil does coordi-
nating the efforts of our ama-
teur radio operators is
tremendous," said Sally Bishop,
Emergency Management direc-
tor. "He's working tirelessly
with other volunteers to ensure
everyone is up-to-date on the
latest technology and require-
ments. He's truly an asset to
the residents of Pinellas Coun-
ty"
Even in an age of cell phones
and wireless Internet, the work
the radio operators do is as
valuable as ever, said Bishop.
"One of the important tasks
for the operators is to provide
additional communication ca-
pabilities from our public shel-
ters. Should we lose standard
communication links to our
shelters, the volunteers can
provide vital communication
and coordination assets," she
said. "Even if standard lines of
communication are not lost
with shelters the operators can
provide a variety of additional
communication services that
are tremendously useful to us
and evacuees."
Lauritsen and his team are
also looking to the future of the
amateur radio program.
"I serve as a mentor and on-


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War. However, it took Hurri-
cane Elena in 1985 for local
disaster planners to fully incor-
porate the operators into the
emergency response system.


Helping


standing volunteerS

Hurricane Andrew experiences
in south Florida and a series of
tornadoes which touched down
in Pinellas County in 1992 fur-
ther made the case.
That's what really motivated
me to get off the sidelines and
get involved with emergency op-
erations and communications. I
thought I could use my experi-
ence to help others," said Lau-
ritsen
Members of the local ARES
network are required to attend
mandatory classes and take a
series of tests to become part of
the network.
"Our members are fully
trained in the National Incident
Management System estab-
lished by the Department of
Homeland Security," he said.
"As we learn new lessons from
previous disaster responses, we


.. .
: *


line instructor for the program,
helping to certify budding ama-
teur radio operators. As many
of our more senior members
look to step down after many
years of service, we need fresh
faces to keep the program run-
ning. Besides," he said, "It's a


of their community while ex-
ploring interests, sharing
knowledge, assisting others and
making friends. For more infor-
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other health issues," Osmund-
son said. "If we prevent domestic
violence, that is often a reason
for these issues. I have met
women who have literally died
because of domestic violence."
Christine Warwick, executive
director of the Haven of RCS,
said society needs to tackle the
issue of domestic violence in the
same way it tackled smoking.
First, people could smoke any-
where, from office buildings to
airplanes. Then people decided
that they can't smoke cigars on
airplanes. Then there was a lim-
ited smoking section. Then
smoking was not allowed at all.
And then that spread to other
areas of society. People realized
this was a public health hazard
that needed to change, she said.
Domestic violence is just as seri-
ous of an issue, she said, and
change can come if factions of
society come together to make it
a priority.
One way Pinellas County is
working toward change is with a
batterer's intervention and pre-
vention program at the Pinellas
County Jail. The class is open to
all inmates at the jail, whether
they themselves are batterers, if
their lives have been affected by
domestic violence, or they just
want to learn more. This is a
great way to help people learn
bete wa n tondal with dfe

not it will help a current rela-
tionship, Osmundson said.
"Once you throw that first fist,
I think that relationship is pretty
much over," Osmundson said.
"Now, women choose to stay for a
number of reasons, but that rela-
tionship is done. They will never
have thathkind of tre t ohsatipn

truly make it a healthy one. But I
can almost guarantee you that
those guys are going to go out
and have other relationships. So
if they complete the batterers' in-
tervention programs, the next re-
lationship they have may not be

ma 1e abe th weaae oe san.oca


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The Races for Governor and U.S. Senate
Florida voters have key decisions to makce in the races for Governor and U.S. Senate. Read
continuing coverage in this newspaper and tune-in to the statewide debates to learn more
about the candidates and where they stand on the issues that matter the most to you. For more
information and to submit questions to the candidates visit www.beforeyouvote.org.
General Election Debates



Tues., October 19, 2010 | :00 8:00 pm ET
Broadcast live from Nova Southeastern University





Charlie Crist Kendrichr Meek Marco R~ubio
Confirmed Confirmed Confirmed



Wed., October 20, 2010 | :00 8:00 pm ET
Broadcast live from Nova Southeastern University






Rick Scott Alex Sinkr
Confirmed Confirmed
Th~e debates are produced by W~fOR-TV/Ch. 4, the 1Miami-Dade/Bmwardr region's CBS affiliate.
Watch the LIVE debates on these stations on Oct. 19 and 20: Miarni-Dade/Broward WFOR-TV *
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Leader, October 14, 2010


By ALEXANDRA CALDWELL

CLEARWATER Decorated
fabric squares come together to
form a quilt with a message. On
one patch: "A child should never
know the Boogey Man is
REAL!!!" On another: "Pain is
not love." Another square reads
"No More" in the center in color-
ful letters, with the following
scattered across the blank
spaces: Scars. Bruises. Blood.
stitches. Insults. Threats. A
drawing of a Band-Aid.
The quilt is the newest addi-
tion to the National Domestic Vi-
olence Awareness Month display
that is up in the lobby of the
Pinellas County Jail and will
travel to other Sheriffs Office fa-
cilities throughout October. It
was made by juveniles who are
in jail and have been affected by
domestic violence. A Unity Day
presentation was held on Oct. 1
at the jail to kick off the aware-
ness month.
One in four women are affect-
ed by domestic violence, and its
effects permeate all of society,
said Linda Osmundson, execu-
tive director of CASA. Osmund-
son was one of the speakers at
the presentation. Domestic vio-
lence can happen to anyone
"When you think about (do-
mestic violence,) it colors all of
"ou ocie, dOsmdundsnn soa d
two three, four. One, two, three,
four. Think about how many of
us it affects. It affects the chil-
dren that your children go to
school with. It affects the fami-
lies that you socialize with. It af-
fects the people that you go to
your religious worship service
w th affects people that you
Osmundson came from a
good family in a small town,
were regular church-goers and
believed women are important
and are equal to men. Even still,
both Osmundson and one of her
sisters became domestic vio-
lence itsimsviolence is at the
root of so many problems that it
is the reason why we have such
huge prisons and jails, Os-
mundson said. About 90 per-
cent of women in jail are
domestic violence victims, she
said, and at least 85 percent of
men in prison grew up in violent
homes. It is also a major reason
why women, men and teens
drink and do drugs, she said.
"We spend a lot of money on


change in our community if we
hold these batterers account-
able."
The next crucial step is to
make these programs mandato-
ry as consequences of one's ac-
tions, she said, just like people
are required to take driving
courses after certain driving of-
fenses. This will set a sense of
accountability as well as edu-
cate people on other solutions
that they may not have been
taught.
"The fact is that the people
who do the work really do make
some changes," Osmundson
said. "TThere is hope. And that's
why we need to do this. We
could save the lives of women
who are dying because of do-
mestic violence. And we could
save the lives of the men who
are also dying because of do-
mestic violence and who are
killing their children."
The haunting displays
throughout the lobby brought
the presenters' words to life.
Cherry-red, wooden cutout sil-
houettes that represent domes-
tic violence victims who have
been killed, line the walls. Sto-
ries of other victims are tacked
to them. A female inmate, 62,
wrote about how she remembers


waking up in the middle of the
night when she was 5 to hearing
her parents fighting about sex.
Both of them thought the other
was cheating. Her father seemed
to lose interest in his family and
kept finding other women to oc-
cupy him, along with constant
drinking and work, she wrote.
At age 14, she wrote that she
was taken out of the state in the
middle of the night and forced to
get married because she had
run away.
"When I looked at my own life
after I was 59 years old, I al-
ready had my fourth husband,"
the woman wrote. "'They were al-
ways drunk and abusive. It took
me meeting CASA friends here
in jail to realize that I've been
looking for something I will
never get now. You see, I'm sen-
tenced next month to life. Why,
because my last husband was
drastically killed because he
never gave up his other women,
no matter if they were married
too. What a joke!"
Another female inmate, age
55, wrote that she was 15 years
old and pregnant and was ig-
nored by her irresponsible hus-
band. All she wanted was a
happy marriage with children,
but her violent husband chose


Photo by ALEXANDRA CALDWELL
Displays, artwork and stories made by inmates about domestic violence
are on display in the lobby of the Pinellas County jail all month to
celebrate National Domestic Violence Awareness Month.


golf and beer instead. She didn't
notice the warning signs. One
day his violence caused her to
drop her infant. Even still, she
stayed with him for 30 years
due to her religion.
"I raised my two daughters by
myself and educated them," the


woman wrote. "At this point, it
was either get arrested or die!"
Drawings on a wall depict
other inmates' experience with
domestic violence.
The display is currently in the
public lobby at the Pinellas
County Jail, 14400 49th st. N.


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Leader, October 14, 2010


Pink in the Park benefit
set for Oct. 24
LARGO Pink in the Park will be held
Saturday, Oct. 24, 2 to 6 p.m., at Serenity
Gardens in the Sturgeon Rose Garden Area
at 13401 Indian Rocks Road.
The benefit, which will include music, re-
freshments and raffle, is for Susan G.
Koman for the Cure, an organization that
supports breast cancer awareness.
Call Annie O'Mara, 562-2080.

Veggie Tales Live set
LARGO Veggie Tales Live is set to come
to town on Thursday, Oct. 21, 1 p.m. and 6
p.m. at First Baptist of Indian Rocks,
12685 Ulmerton Road. Cost is $15 general
admission, $25 gold circle, or $12 for
groups of 10 or more.
Bob the tomato, Larry the cucumber and
the whole crew will take the stage with the
silliest Silly Song Countdown ever. They
will sing the best of the best, the classics,
and the silliest of the silly. But Archie as-
paragus also will sing lesson songs, and
Mr. Lunt the Spanish gord will sing about
food
Visit www.itickets.com or call 800-965-
9324.

Pinellas Animal Hospital to
host expo, open house
PINELLAS PARK A pet health expo and
open house will take place Saturday, Nov.
6, 2 to 6 p.m., at Pinellas Animal Hospital,
7791 52nd St. N.
The event will feature a educational ac-
tivities, a bounce house and face-painting


for the kids, a popcorn machine, hot dogs,
refreshments and raffle prizes.
The Pinellas Park Police K-9 unit and
mounted police will be in attendance. The
behavioral team from Pet Peeves training
will be on hand to give demonstrations and
advice.
The staff of Pinellas Animal Hospital will
present educational talks on subjects such
as vaccinations, spaying and neutering,
companion animal parasite control, dental
cleaning and nutrition and weight man-
agement.
A behind-the-scenes tour of the boarding
and grooming area, along with the surgery'
treatment, radiography, ICU and isolation
rooms, will be given. There also will be cats
and kittens available for adoption.

Shelter gets help from
a local cychist
DUNEDIN The 2010 Ride 4 the Animals
will leave from Highlander Park in Dunedin
Saturday, Nov. 13, cycling across Florida to
benefit the Suncoast Animal League.
This small, caring shelter is a nonprofit,
no kill shelter that takes in abandoned,
abused, homeless and unwanted animals.
They are often called to participate in na-
tional and local rescues and their ultimate
mission is to open a low cost spay and
neuter clinic to humanely control our grow-
ing animal population.
After Tropical storm Faye hit, Suncoast
safely transported 57 animals from Mel-
borne to Palm Harbor.
The Ride 4 the Animals will leave from
the third annual Dogtoberfest and continue
through to the final destination of Key


West. The ride will have no support vehi-
cles to accompany, and will be covering ap-
proximately 100 km (62 miles) a day.
The ride was created by local cyclist,
Laura Hoffman, to help spread the word of
hope that inhumane puppy mills will all be
closed, that animal neglect and cruelty will
end and that animals will no longer need to
live in the streets fighting and begging for
their next meal.
Call 251-1966 or visit www.Ride4theAni
mals.com.

BusineSS WOmen's association
to hold Halloween party
LARGO The Suncoast Charter Chapter
of the American Business Women's Associ-
ation will hold an annual Halloween card

anpm. mat te Pi~n das illag Cm uito
Center, 8384 Bayou Boardwalk.
Bring your favorite board or card game to
play. There will be an auction, food and a
prize for best costume.
Cost is $10 per person, which will help
support the association's education fund.
Call Bobbie Stockslager at 546-6322 for
tickets.

Social Security seminar set
A free, educational workshop entitled
"Social Security Planning for Boomers:
What Everyone Needs to Know" has been
scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 26, 6:30 p.m.,
at the Clearwater Campus Library of St. Pe-
tersburg College, 2465 Drew St.
Seating is limited, and reservations are
recommended. Reserve a spot by calling
799-0551.


on Monday nights for stories,
crafts and family fun! Pajamas
and slippers are recommended."
Monday, Oct. 18
English as a second language
conversation hour, 6:30 p.m.
Description: "This English
Conversation Group is for
adults who speak English as a
Second Language (ESL)."
Tuesday, Oct. 19
Itsy bitsy baby time, 10 a.m.
Description: "Join Ms. Cyn-
thia in songs, rhymes, finger-
plays, and a few surprises! For
parents and caregivers with ba-
bies up to 18 months."
Tuesday, Oct. 19
Tosho-Con Event Planning at
5 p.m.
Description: "Become a vol-
unteer for this yearly event.
Meet each month to participate
in the planning process for our
very own teen anime conven-
tion."
Wednesday, Oct. 20
Toddler tales, 10 a.m.
Description: "Join Ms. Angela
for themed stories, music, and
extended story activities for chil-
dren ages 18 months -3 years
old."


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Thursday, Oct. 14
Brown bag movies, 12:30
p~m.
Description: "Bring your own
lunch and watch movies from
every era. Popcorn and soda are
provided. This week's movie is
'Rebecca' (1940)."
Saturday, Oct. 16
Description: ESL tutor train-
ing, 1 to 4 p.m.
"Are you interested in helping
others learn English? If so,
please join us for this training
opportunity."
Sunday, Oct. 17
Description: Ready readers'
book club, 2 p.m.
"Ready, set, read! Participate
in a talk about, and activity
based upon, Beginning Reader
and Chapter Books that com-
bine short sentences with pic-
tures. For children ages 5-7
years old. Register at the chil-
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Family fun-o-rama at 6:30
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Leader, October 14, 2010


By DONA FAIR

LARGO For the daughter of a Largo
woman, summer vacation means rising at 4
a.m. each day to start a rigorous, daily rou-
tine that most sophomore and junior college
students would cringe at the thought of hav-
ing to do.
Ashley N. Lonergan, daughter of Darla Lon-
ergan of Largo, is currently an Air Force
ROTC cadet participating in field training, as
well as a mock Air and Space Expeditionary
Force deployment, mandatory for all individu-
als pursuing a commission as an officer
through Air Force ROTC.
During this 28-day training, the cadets are
pushed to the limit through stressful and
physical situations that evaluate their ability
to become an officer and help develop their
team building skills.
"Myself and nearly 400 other cadets are
being put in high stress situations to learn
how to become better leaders and cadets in
order to become outstanding officers in the
future," said Lonergan, who graduated in
2007 from Largo High School Magnet Pro-
gram, and received an associate degree in


2009 from the University of south Florida,
Tampa. "It was a crafty first week, but I have
definitely learned that communication and
time management are very important with
large groups of people who are all dependent
upon you."
Lonergan is one of almost 2,400 cadets
from colleges and universities nationwide that
will participate in one of six rotations at
Maxwell this summer. The course is divided
into three phases: The first 11 days are devot-
ed to classroom work, drill, dorm mainte-
nance, and time management. They also
participate in a leadership reaction, assault,
and obstacle course; try to qualify on an M-9
pistol; and learn hand-to-hand combat with
trained Air Force Combative instructors.
The cadets are then airlifted by a C-130 air-
craft to Camp Shelby, Hattiesburg, Miss.,
where they will experience a mock deploy-
ment, simulating what it would be like in Iraq
or Afghanistan. Here Lonergan and the other
cadets will conduct convoy missions, learn
basic warfare tactics, shoot the M-16 assault
rifle, and march over enemy terrain.
For Lonergan, the transition from cadet to
eventual commissioning as a second lieu-


tenant will be a challenging one.
"T~his course has been very challenging. At
home, we are in our comfort zone in our de-
tachments. But here we are pushed to limits
that pressure us to make on-the-spot deci-
sions and hope that the people following us
listen and back us up 100 percent," said Lon-
ergan. "Delegating jobs to other people and
actually getting the mission accomplished has
been the most difficult thing so far because
we are still learning to be a team."
Upon returning to Maxwell, Lonergan and
the others will put their newly learned march-
ing skills into work and perform a graduation
parade. When they return to their colleges
and universities in the fall, they will become
leaders of their detachments, and bring them
one step closer to an Air Force career.
"In the Air Force, we will be leaders of peo-
ple we don't know just like we are here," said
Lonergan. 'Whe will deploy with total strangers
and need to learn the fundamentals of group
leadership before we earn our spots as com-
missioned officers."
"I would like to work in intelligence. I am
currently a Russian language and culture
major, so I would absolutely love to go back to


Photos by AIR FORCE SENIOR AIRMAN CHRISTOPHER GRIFFIN
Air Force ROTC Cadet Ashley N. Lonergan is currently attending the
28-day summer camp at Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. The camp is
preparing current college sophomores and juniors to become
commissioned officers in the Air Force upon their graduation from
college.

Russia and become a regional affairs specialist."
Although Lonergan and her fellow cadets won't get much rest and
relaxation this summer, their futures are looking a lot more brighter
like the yellow bars they will be wearing upon their shoulders in a cou-
ple of years as second lieutenants in the Air Force.


GoRAND OPoENINGi;
IFREE lst 50 Patients
$255 value!
Initial Iosutatio XRy tneded
Notuald w th person nl ni, wry~ marls compensation and ned care
-----------~~~~li.31i ~~


* Auto Accidents
* Back/Head Pain
* Migraine Headaches
* Work Injuries


Flea Market Hours
Thurs. 5- 9pm ~Fri. Noon- 10pm
Sat. 7am- 10pm ~Sun. 8am- 5pm


'-7-
c...,m. 21~


Sponsored by:


thisr community Hi uu, epra a g''rtgd\ ~lc, gcr,,\ oir(luntrr ie a(lre lus

what we need.
-"CDO"'" KIN1SEI, Retired~ Semninole Firetfigh~ter Formernt
Sensinole Chamnb~r Pretsidentr C'ornrnanrity Yolunrteer~

'Larry Ahern usede~~rr toods h~lo tI business~ peplcll, ied tO beI surc-c-sfl l

- KEVIN KRA USS~j. Owner~, of Sem,,,inole Lane~s used .j'l ur~ise Lane~s



He really 'Gets it H, is SUTo Crer po .1 16lti ion. 11I lus t acu its to g't
our state governitn bod:~i on t~r-,Orod;l.'"
DONNA fT'A-REHEIRI, ('o-host of INl THE IV1t'01 TAMlPA BAY'
1250) amr II'HNLZ arrid ('o-ownerltr of Iirrarehe~im Inlsurcrance

'Larry Ahern is o thoughlltfull itedu idulrc wh IsO, c~ite ofi um be(com of~



ROGER II'ILSON,'
Sta~te Hourse Replretset'lative,, 1968-1976








LESLIiIE It'- TERS,
SJtarte Hourse Dist. 51 Re~pretsenrltativet. 1998j-2006i


COmmunity 11 A


ROTC cadet strives to become officer


* Slip and Fall injuries
*Personal Injury
* Family Care
* Sports Injuries















LAKE SEMINOLE
ANIMAL HOSPITAL
Thank you to Pinellas County for voting for us
in The Readers' Choice Awards!
"Devoted to more waas and aurrs."


Dr. Michael Rurnore Dr. Suzanne Britton
We Welcome Dr. ZoL; Wilkinson
CareCredito **27) **746
11 <| HOURS: IJ1
Mon. 7am-6pm, Tues. 7am-7pm, 8578 Park Blvd., Seminlole
Wel.-Fri. 7am-6pm, Sat. 8am-1pm w ar.Lake SeminoleAH. com


JllWe specialize in mall Animal,
3Avian &~ Exotic Pet Health Care.

We Have full Service Medical Care Including:
* Professional Dental Cleaning5 Extend the life of your pet
* Vaccinations & Parasite Checks
* Wellness Exams with Preventative Blood Workups
* Surgical Services including Spay/Neutering
* * *

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A NEW AlttYI~athl/C -fo thC


* Routine Surgery, X-Rays,
Vaccines & Dentistry
* Acupuncture,
Chinese Mledicine a
& Food Therapy www.mad rive ran imal.com
* Senior Weliness & Preventative Mledicine

Shawna Green, DVM Call for appt. 727-299-9029
14995 Gulf Blvd., Suite J. Madeira Beach, FL 33708


Speaking of Pets
Kim Donovan, D.V.M


"3* S ae ,* .* #fe



go? We come to your doggie's door eg

(e Ceebatin 8 Yars!** *
THANK YOU FOR C
~~r~ n YOUrr R BUSINESS!;
'Voted #1 Groomer
I .- ngies List P~~f ages of Happiness

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ifReliable & Caring~ 787-735-31882*2
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391-9784 7785 Oakhurst Road
www.oa kh urstvetce nte r.co m
Mon. Fri. 7am 6pm Sat. 8am Noon


LOVE DOGS?
Considering a career in dog Grooming?
Academy~ of Animal Arts Inc.
(Pet Grooming School)
Grooming Specials
*20 for NEW Clients Includes:
Bath, Nails, Ears Cleaned, Blow Dry & Haircut
All Work Guaranteed


13890 walsingham Road, Largo
School: 866-517-9546
Grooming Appointments: 727-596-2547
ww.AcaclemyofAnimalArts.com


Leader, October 14, 2010


OPENl HOU5E a PET HEALTH EXPO
Join the Community Fun Nlov. 6th 2-6pm at
Pinellas Animal Hospital!
Food, Prizes, Face Painting & Bounce House for the kids!

educational talks &~ demonstrations on various health issues,
vaccinations, spaying/neutering, behavorial issues &~ more! Go on a
behind the scenes tour of the boarding, surgery &~ treatment rooms, etc.
Meet and talk with the doctors, techs and staff!
ADOPTION1S: Cats &~ Mittens looking for their forever
home with that special someone.


Reba
Reba is a 1-year-old female bloodhound. She is a typical hound dog
with her nose to the ground, constantly exploring. She enjoys people
and does well with other dogs, but due to her size would do best in a
home without small children. Reba has been spayed, microchipped and
vaccinated. For more information, call Pet Pal Animal Shelter at 328-
7738. The shelter is at 405 22nd St. S. in St. Petersburg. Visit
www. petpalanimalshelter.com.


Lucas
Lucas is a 7-month-old male gray tabby. He is very sweet and loving.
He will do fine with other pets. He is neutered and up-to-date with his
vaccinations. If interested in adopting Lucas, call Pat at Second Chance
for Strays at 535-9154.


Phoenix
Phoenix is a 1-year-
old American Pit
Bull Terrier mix and
tips the scales at 59
pounds and has an
attention-grabbing
red and white coat,
so he will make a
statement at a local
dog park or while on
a walk around the
neighborhood. If you
bring this article
with you to Pinellas
County Animal
Services, Phoenix
can be yours for just
$20. The shelter is at
12450 Ulmerton
Road in Largo. Call
582-2600.


COttOR
Cotton is a handsome 3-year-old male kitty who is very sweet and
affectionate. He gets along great with other cats. Cotton does require a
special diet to maintain a healthy urinary tract. Adopt sweet Cotton at
the Humane Society of Pinellas, 3040 S.R. 590 in Clearwater. Call 797-
7722.


Adding another cat to your
household should never be done
on impulse. The personality and
temperament of your cat(s) at
home and the cat you plan to
bring home should play a big
part in your decision.
You should always consider
that the more cats you add to a
household the more likely you
are to experience behavioral is-
sues like avoiding the litter box,
urine marking, anxiety, and ag-
gression. Introducing a new cat
to the household may take quite
a bit of time and patience on
your part. Most cats can learn to
co-exist as long as they have
plenty of vertical and horizontal
space, food and water bowls,
and litter boxes. Some house-
holds may do well with a few
cats using one litter box, but
there should be one more litter
box than the number of cats in a
household that is having prob-
lems with the cats using the lit-
ter box.
If you have a cat that was so-
cialized well as a kitten and


will greatly improve your
chances of success. By placing
the new cat in a room with the
door closed and the other cats in
the main house, the cats can get
used to each other's smells un-
derneath the door without direct
contact. It is not a bad idea to
do this anyway to quarantine
the new cat for a little while to
make sure they do not give your
other cats any diseases. When
you have time to supervise di-
rect contact then you can see
how they respond to each other.
Hissing and batting at each
other is a normal occurrence
with new introductions. You will
even see this after bringing one
cat to the veterinarian. When
you bring him/her home the
other cats start hissing like they
have never met because they
smell like the veterinary hospi-
tal.
There may be some cats that
will never get along and may get
into spats once in awhile but
can be content to co-excist. How-
ever, a cat that is constantly at-


tacking another may not be a
cat you want in a multi-cat
household. The constant attacks
can cause enough stress to the
passive cat that it can cause ill-
ness.
You should make sure your
cats spend most of their time
being content and not constant-
ly hiding from an attacker. One
cat playing victim for a lifetime
is not fair to the cat. You can
use behavior modification tech-
niques to hinder fights between
cats and add medications to de-
crease anxiety while they are
being trained.
Ask your veterinarian for ad-
vice and/or for a referral to a be-
haviorist before these behaviors
become a serious problem. Do
not let unacceptable behavior go
on for too long. It is easier and
better to nip these behaviors in
the bud early.
Kim Donovan, D.V.M/., is an as-
sociate veterinarian at Oakhurst
Veterinary Hospital in Seminole
with 12 years experience and a
special interest in feline medicine.


* Risk Based Vaccinations
* Early Detection Screenings
*Weliness Examinations
* Parasite Prevention Programs


* House Calls
* Surgery, Dentistry &Radiography
* Boarding & Doggie Daycare
* Bathing & Grooming


doesn't hide when people come
over then this may be a cat that
will have no problems being in-
troduced to another cat. Howev-
er, the timid, shy, irritable cat
may not do as well with a new
cat around. If the new cat has a
history of living with other pets
then this may help the situation.
Introducing the cats slowly


Mall to host pet costume contest
CLEARWATER Paw Paws, the New Barker and Westfield Country-
side Mall will present a Spook-tabulous Pet Costume Contest satur-
day, Oct. 23, at the mall, 27001 U.S. 19 N.
The event will benefit the Humane Society of Pinellas. Registration
will begin at 10:30 a.m. at Paw Paws. The show will begin at noon.
Cost is $10 to participate in the show.
Home Shopping Network host Alicia Perez will sit on the judges
panel to score the show based on attire, originality and "purr-sonality."
Prize packages will be awarded to the top three contestants.

SPCA to host annual Pet Walk
ST. PETERSBURG Walk your tail off at SPCA Tampa Bay's 3K Pet
Walk saturday, Oct. 16, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., in straub Park in downtown
St. Petersburg. In addition to the walk, activities include canine agility


demos, vendor shopping, food court, doggie day spa, clowns, face
painters, costume contests, gift drawings and the awards ceremony.
All proceeds benefit the SPCA Tampa Bay. For additional information,
visit www.3KPEtwalki.org.

Suncoast Animal League to host Dogtoberfest
DUNEDIN The Suncoast Animal League will host its third annual
Dogtoberfest on Nov. 13, 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., at Highlander Park in
Dunedin. This years event includes an attempt to break the Guinness
World Record for Most Dogs in Costumes, costume contest, pet-
themed vendors, rescue groups, pup art, $15 microchip clinic, yodel-
ing contest for dogs and humans, food and beverages, send off for Ride
For the Animals, crowning of king and queen and court and the Run-
ning of the Wieners. For more infonnation, call the Suncoast Animal
League at 786-1330 or visit www. suncoastanimalleague. org.


1 2A Pet connection


Looking for a home


How to achieve harmony when adding another cat

to the household


COpyCat


Henry, a 12-year-old tuxedo
cat, decided he is cute enough
to duplicate, so he hopped on
his mom's home office copy
machine. Henry lives with
Monica and jason Edwards in
Seminole, along with their
thr e othaerrtcats, Luado Dora
Henry when he was a kitten
from the SPCA Tampa Bay in
Largo. As our precious pet
photo winner for October,
Henry wins $25 in cat
grooming services at Debi's
Puppy Love in the Bay Pines
Plaza. November's precious pet
photo winner will receive a
$25 gift certificate toward dog
grooming from Classy Canine
Mobile Putr Gr oming alotno

csouthmayd@TBNweekly.com.


Dig this g~ ~g 8Q g Y gi gtQg Q Q Q E,- 8 ~ t r Q E,










Leader, October 14, 2010

Church news


10:30 a.m., at Historic Chapel, 5400 Seminole Blvd. E-mail
marciey@aol.com.
Christian Celebrate Recovery Program meets saturday, 7 p.m., at
seminole United Methodist Church, 5400 Seminole Blvd. The program
includes worship, lessons, speakers, personal sharing and discussion
and concludes with coffee and fellowship. Call 391-9781.
The Clearwater GFWC Community Woman's Club meets third Tues-
days, September to May, 10 a.m., at Cleanvater Main Library, 100 N.
Osceola st. Call 394-2229.
Church and Community Outreach meets third Thursdays, 4 p.m., at
the Safety Harbor Library, 101 Second st. N.
Church of the Isles Men's Prayer Breakfast meets Tuesdays, 7:30
a.m., at the Village Inn, 13105 Ulmerton Road, Largo. Call 595-1038.
Church of the Isles Golf Group meets Tuesdays, 9:15 a.m., at the
Pineerest Golf Course, 1200 Eighth Ave. S.W. Call 595-1038.
Clearwater Civitan Club meets first and third Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m., at
the Countryside Country Club, 3001 Countryside Blvd., Cleanvater. Call
584-0461.
clearwater Amateur Radio Society meets second Thursdays, 7:30
p.m., at the Cleanvrater Fire Training Facility, 1716 N. Belcher Road,
Cleanvater. Call 415-1657.
clearwater Chapter of Military Officers Association meets fourth
Wednesday, 11:30 a.m. for lunch at the Cove Cay Country Club, 2612
Cove Cay Drive. All military officers, active duty, fonner or retired, and
their spouses are welcome. Call Polly Tappa at 733-9405 for reservations.
Clearwater Networking Group meets Thursday at 11:30 a.m. at Joe's
Crab Shack, 2730 Gulf-to-Bay Blvd. Call Naiyana Nernginn at 298-0320.
Announcements are submitted by the public; information is sub-
ject to change. To place an item in the ongoing calendar or network-
ingr leads, send it at least two weeks in advance to
Calendar-Leads, Tampa Bay Newspapers, 9911 Seminole Blvd.,
Seminole, FL 33772, or e-mail editorial@TBNweekly.com. Please in-
clude date, time, place and phone number and don't forget to send
a notification when the information changes, or the group stops
meeting.




Obituaries

Mary "Polly" GALLUPE
89, of Belleair, Fla., died Wednesday,
September 29, 2010. She was born in Sagi-
naw, Mich., and moved to Belleair in 1970.
She was active in real estate sales with Bobby
Byrd Realty, and a former member of Belleair
Country Club and Clearwater Country Club.
Polly was predeceased by her husband,
. Thomas, in 1987. She is survived by her
brother-in-law, Gary W. Gallupe of Belleair;
~. tWO SiSteTS-in-laW, CarOl Clair Of CaliStOga,
Calif. and Mona Watson of Fort Fairfield, Maine; and several
HieCeS and nephews. A Memorial Service was held Monday, Oc-
tober 11, 2010, 2:00 p.m., at National Cremation Society, 4945
East Bay Drive, Clearwater, Fla. In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to the Morton Plant Mease Foundation, 1200 Druid
Road S., Cleanvater, Fla. 33756.


the Largo Community Center, 65 Fourth st., Largo. Call 518-3132.
Bay Area Macintosh User Group, Cleanvater chapter, meets fourth
Monday, 1 to 3 p.m., at Cleanvater East Library, 2251 Drew st., Clear-
water. E-mail vicepresident@bamcentral.org.
Bay Area Macintosh User Group meets second Wednesdays, 6:30 to
8:30 p.m., at Largo Cultural Center, 105 Central Park Drive, Largo. E-
mail president@bamcentral.org.
BayBouquet Garden Club meets the third Wednesday September to
May, 9:30 a.m., at Dunedin Library, 223 Douglas Ave. Call 736-5593.
Bayside Choirs, for kids who love to sing, meets Mondays, 5:30 to
8:30 p.m., at The Piano Company, 1710 N. Hercules, Cleanvater. New
singers in grades three to 12 welcome. Call 447-9683.
Bay Sailors Sailing Club for Singles meets first Wednesdays, 6 p.m.
for dinner; 7 p.m. for meeting, at Tuscon's southwestern Grill, 13563
ICOT Blvd., Cleanvater. Call 865-0345 or visit www.baysailors.org.
Begin With Me AFG meets Sundays, 7:30 p.m., followed by a regular
meeting at 8 p.m., at the Lutheran Church of the Palms, 2250 Nebraska
Ave., 2nd Floor, Room 10, Palm Harbor. Call 548-6811.
Beta Beta Chapter Epsilon Sigma Alhpa Intemnational meets first
Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., at various locations. Call 460-6176 or e-mail pkel
ly4@tampabay.rr.com.
British Floridian Club meets the first saturday of the month at VFW
Post 10174, 10997 72nd Ave., Seminole. All people of British heritage
are invited. Call Vera at 394-2767 or Dorinda at 578-5471 for details.
Central Pinellas Republican Club meets second Thursdays, 11:30
a.m., at Super Buffet, seminole Mall (Park Boulevard and 113th street).
Luncheon meeting features speakers and timely political topics. Call
Karen Donovan at 687-1318.
CHADD: Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivi-
ty Disorder meets first Tuesdays, 7 to 8:45 p.m., at Bay Pines VA Medi-
cal Center, 10000 Bay Pines Blvd., Building 20, in the medical
auditorium. Call 572-8082 or visit www.chaddonline. org/chapters/
chadd601.html.
Children's Art Classes, for children ages 6 to 12, meets saturday,
9:30 a.m. to noon, at the suntan Art Center, 3300 Gulf Blvd., st. Pete
Beach.
Christ the King PCA Women's Bible Study meets Thursdays, 9 to


Peter Kwoks Kung Fu Academy
Traditional Teaching, Shaolin & Tai Chi
Group classes or private lessons
Call about Seniors' Tai Chi classes
9210 727-559-7757


CHANGE YOUR THINKING

E for
9 oncous U ARE AISPIRITUAL BE NBG E DOWEDHWITH THEDPOWER TROOUH
L Urb THE USE OF THE MIND GOD GAVE YOU. WE'LL SHOW YOU HOW
THROUGH CLASSES AND SUNDAY SERVICES.
B CENTER FOR CONSCIOUs LIVING
~SUNDAY SERVICEs 10AM
6152 126TH AVE., #501 727-538-0900
LARGo, FL 33773 www.CONSCIOUSLIVING.ORG


Heirs of Promise Church Y
"A Non Denominational / Spirit Filled Church"
8771 Park Blvd. Seminole
Corner of Park Blkd. & Starkey Rd. next to Save-a-Lot


:~~(1)1 r~I(I)~1lI111~1~


Sunday Service........................................10 0 AM
Children's Church......................................10 0 AM
Pastor Jim &t April Thursday Midweek Service...............................7:0 PM
Licensed &I
Ordained Bible Foundations Class Nursery
8Through Contemporary Worship Prayer
2 Rhema Bible 397-0806 www~heirsofprmise~com


St. Cat herine of Siena
Catholic Ch Lirch
DAILY MASS: Monday Friday 7:00am
Monday & Wednesday 11:00 am*r Saturday 8:00 am
4 CONFESSION SCHEDULE:
SMonday & Wednesday 10:30 am 10:50 am
Saturday 3:00 pm 3:50 pm
VYEEKENDOMASS: Saturday Viagili4*00 pm
Suda 7: a : a Fml s)
ET11:00 am (Traditional Choir) 6:00 pm (Contemporary Choir)
SParish Administration Office 727-531-7721 www.SCOSParish.org
sosl o ?~~




Candlelight Service with Acoustic Music
Sunday s @ 5: 15 pm
Sunday Morning Services:
@ 8:45am* & 11am*
*nursery available ~


Actors Networking Group meets Mondays, 6 p.m., at 1653 Monterey
Drive, Cleanvater. The meetings are open to anyone interested in getting
started in movies or commercials. Call 581-1677.
Aglow International meets Thursdays, 10 a.m., at st. Pete Dream
Center, 4359 35th st. N., st. Petersburg. Call 709-0627.
All Children's Hospital Guild, Beach Branch, meets second Monday
in September and first Mondays from October through May, 10:30 a.m.,
at Shell's Restaurant, 6300 Gulf Blvd., st. Pete Beach. Call Claudia
Roberts at 360-4408.
Alpha XI Delta Pinellas County Alumnae meets third saturday at
varIying times and locations. Call 391-0878.
AARP
*55 Alive Mature Driving Classes, for drivers over 50, are taught by
trained volunteers in two four-hour sessions. Graduates may be eligible
for auto insurance discounts for the following three years. Cost is $10.
Call 888-227-7669.
*Seminole Chapter 2569 meets fourth Tuesdays, 11:15 a.m., at
Roskamp Auditorium at Freedom Square, 7800 Liberty Lane. Noon meet-
ing, guest speakers and entertainment. Call 393-0561.
*Forever Young/AARP meets second Tuesdays, noon for lunch at Ban-
quet Masters, 8100 Park Blvd., Pinellas Park. Cost is $9. Usually there is
a speaker and entertainment. Reservations required. Call Mary at 398-
1613.
*st. Petersburg chapter meets fourth Thursdays, noon, at Piccadilly
Cafeteria, 34th Ave. and 22nd Ave. Call Nancy Arasa at 864-6380.
American Legion Post 7 plays bingo on Tuesdays, 6 p.m., and Thurs-
days, noon, at 1160 Turner st., Cleanvater. Cef Alteri serves dinner on
Monday, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and saturday, 4 to 8 p.m.
Music for dancing is offered Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and satur-
days, 7 to 11 p.m. Call 447-9204.
American Legion Post 273, 600 American Legion Drive, Madeira
Beach, hosts a fish and fry on Fridays. Call 391-3670.
American Legion Post 119 hosts dances featuring music from the
'50s second and fourth Wednesdays, at the Post, 130 First Ave. S.W.,
Largo. Call 585-1225.
American Legion Post 104 serves dinner Fridays, 5 to 7:30 p.m., at
the post, 7550 60th st. N., Pinellas Park. Call 544-5137.
American Sewing Guild Advisory Board meets second Tuesdays, 10
a.n6 Oat the Cleanvater Countryside Library, 2731 state Road 580. Call
Artists in Action Poetry Reading Series takes place first Sundays, 1
p.m., at Cleanvater Main Library, 100 N. Osceola, Cleanvrater. E-mail
stazja@yahoo.com.
Association of Late-Deafened Adults meets third saturday, 3 to 5
p.m., at the Safety Harbor Library, 101 Second st., safety Harbor. Call
724-1525.
Ballroom Dances and Instruction, meets Mondays, 2 to 4 p.m., at the
Treasure Island Community Center, Gulf Boulevard at 106th Ave.; and
Thursday, 7:45 to 9:30 p.m., at City Hall Auditorium, 120 108th Ave.
Cost is $5 a session. Call John Tebo at 410-0251.
Bay Area Electric Boaters meets to run radio-controlled model boats
on second and fourth Sundays, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Lake Seminole Park,
10015 Park Blvd., Seminole. The club also meets every third Thursday at


TELL TH E PUBLIC ABOUT YOU R SERVICES, CALL 397-5563


/St. Matthew Catholic Church
9111 90th Avenue Seminole
Mass Daily Monday -Saturday 8:30am
Saturday Vigil 4pm Sunday 7:30am, 9:00am & 11:00am i
Interpreted M/ass 9am
Rev. Patrick Rebel, Pastor 727-393-1288 /


Holy Spirit Ecumenical Catholic Church
Because it's not about the rules.
It's about relationships

Sunday Mass, 10:30am
Corne, share our joyl

6152 126" Ave (Oaklefe Center), Largo
1~727.232.3918 HolySpiritECC.o g


h
C
1
,



coola aoora


First Lutheran Church in Clearwater
CLEARWATER The Lutheran Women's Missionary League will
host its annual holiday bazaar Saturday, Nov. 6, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., at
First Lutheran Church, 1644 Nursery Road.
The bazaar will include arts and crafts, various vendors and a huge
bake sale. Freshly prepared salads and sandwiches will be available
for lunch.
Tables may be reserved for $20 each. Call 462-8000.

Calvary Episcopal Church
INDIAN ROCKS BEACH The MacMillan Trio will perfonn Sunday,
Oct. 24, 4 p.m., at Calvary Episcopal Church, 1615 First st.
The trio will perfonn scottish fiddle music of the 18th century. The
lively and entertaining program will include authentic scottish homn-
pipes, airs, jigs and reels. A reception will follow the concert. A free win
offering will be collected. Proceeds will help support the student choral
section leader program at the church.
Call 595-2374 or visit www. calvaryirb.org.

First Baptist Church of Indian Rocks
IARGO The annual jamboree will take place Thursday through
Sunday, Nov. 4-7, at First Baptist Church of Indian Rocks, 12685 Ul-
merton Road.
Carnival hours will be Thursday, 3 to 10 p.m.; Friday, 3 p.m. to
midnight; Saturday, 1 to 11 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 9 p.m.
The jamboree will feature Christian music, comedy, carnival, shop-
ping, games and food. Entertainers will include God's Country, musi-
cians, Friday, 7 to 8:30 p.m.; Dennis Swanberg, comedian, Saturday,
6 to 7:30 p.m.; and Guy Penrod, musician, Sunday, 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Carnival tickets will be sold beginning saturday, Oct. 23, before and


after services and weekends in the church's finance office. Wristbands
are $40 each and offer four-day unlimited rides.
After Nov. 5, ticket are $1 each and daily wristbands will be sold for
$25 a day for Thursday, Friday, saturday or Sunday.
Food Court vendors will include The Smokin' Rib Shack, Road Trip
Cafi, Super Sardo's Pizza and Crabby Bills.
Call 595-3421 or visit www.indianrocks.org.

Oakhurst United Methodist Church
SEMINOLE A new contemporary worship service will be offered
Sunday, noon, beginning Oct. 17, at Oakhurst United Methodist
Church, 13400 Park Blvd.
The services will be led by Sr. Pastor Tim Ehrlich together with Chris
Harper, contemporary worship leader, and Tony Barner, director of
youth ministries. These three will share responsibility for the weekly
messages that will be shared during worship time.
The service will feature up-tempo music, videos, and a revolutionary
message. Musical selections will be a mix of contemporary worship
choruses and secular music with a Christian purpose. The worship
wilfeature a s cial mission emphasis each sunda wth over a doz n

care for the homeless to teaching English as a second language. Child
care will be provided and there will be coffee and donuts before the
service.
Call391-4769 or e-mail revolutionOUMC@rocketmail.com.

Lake S miol
Presbyterian Church
SEMINOLE There will be a free health fair Tuesday, Oct. 19, 10
a.m. to noon, in smead Hall at Lake Seminole Presbyterian Church,


ueolut onupdrea rsetam r dbr satMOrakkhustb ited Mnthohdi
guitar; and Danny Alles, bass guitar.
8505 113th st.
Sponsored by Freedom Square, the fair will feature free screenings
for vision and glaucoma, video ear scan and hearing check, blood
sugar balance, blood pressure, BMI, memory, and leg vein circulation.
There will be infonnation about diabetes, home health services, retire-
ment living, Hospice, volunteer opportunities, nutrition and fitness.
Nonperishable canned goods also will be collected for the Interfaith
Food Pantry. Call 391-5509 or visit www.1akeseminolepc. info


Friday Nights 7:30pm
Largo Community Center
65 Fourth Street N.W., Largo
Internationally known Minister
Musiij jg Vocaljgg Songwriter with over 4() years of ministry
IUChuceS Of allI Faiths are Welcome! FREE ADMISSION!
Come expecting aI miraclle for you antI your family!


455 Missouri Ave. Largo, FL
across frorn Largo High School
727-585-9969 wvww.r


IF FOR PEOPLE THAT ARE

HURTING ^EMS f` II
PROGRAMS AND SERVICES FOR CHILDREN, YU
OUGADULTS, SENIORS, DEAF, RECOVERY A

IUNDAY :
10:30 AM


NEWSPAPERS
BEACON LEADER BEE


sosio


COmmunity 1 3A


Clubs


Recognizing that some readers wish to share the
life and loss of a loved one with the community,
Tampa Bay Newspapers publishes paid obituaries
in our weekly papers.
The deadline for submitting obituary
information is
9 a.m. on Monday, for that week s papers.
Obituaries will publish in all six of our papers.
Obituary information should include:
full name, age, city and date of death. You may
also choose to include the names of living and/or
predeceased relatives, work history, clubs and/or
activities that they participated in. If you wish to
include the name of the funeral home handling
arrangements keep in mind that we are a weekly
publication and the paper may publish after the
services have taken place.
SFor further inf rmation,llincluding cost,
Tampa Bay Newspapers at 727-397-5563,
or you can submit your information
through our Web site, www.TBNweekly.com,
Sor by e-mail at- obits@TBNweekly.com.


bOut Yor ~p~Vup















On the Rocks opens


k


Photo courtesy of BOB GRIFFIN
Celebrating the opening of On the Rocks, their new restaurant and bar in Indian Rocks Beach are,
from left, Darrel Heard, Allan Crawford and Gary Adkinson Sr. Not pictured is the fourth owner,
Gary Adkinson Ir. More than 200 people attended the special opening party on Oct. 5.


SBe ng Cancelled?
Rates Too High?
reat Auto Rates!

Compare and Savel*




1001 Highland Ave. N.E., Largo, FL 33770



Man Goes "TOAD-AL" at High School Reunion

BEXAR COUNTY After using Thera-Gesic" on aching joints,
Tom W. attended last Friday's reunion where, according to 5 amused and
concerned classmates, he went TOAD-AL. He squatted, extended both
arm to thae grund, arched his back and did his best to hop numerous times

When asked to explain his behavior, he painlessly replied,
"N~one ofyour dang business!"


What You Don't Know and W~hat Your Doctor Doesn't Know to Tell You ...

... Can Be Harmful to Your Health

DID YOU KNOW ... that a man with gum disease is 60% more likely to develop
pancreatic cancer than a man with a healthy mouth? ;I*= ;
DID YOU KNOW ... that a pregnant woman with gum disease is twice as likely tO *
have a pre term low birth weight baby than a woman who doesn't?
DID YOU KNOW ... that 1 American dies every hour from Oral Cancer of = b
which gum disease plays an important role?
According to the American Academy of Periodontology, these and many other health risks go
along with gum disease and poor oral health. It is estimated that 80% of ALL ADULTS have
some form of gum disease. Most of the time, the average person perceives no symptoms. Gum
disease is rarely painful and is almost impossible for the layman to diagnose without X-Rays and
propr intrumnts.Paul F. Eckstein, DMD
Gum Disease isn't just about tooth loss and bad breath anymore. While some physicians advise their patients about the
relationships with diseases like Heart disease, Stroke and Diabetes, it is more common than not for them to skip this process. If
you have a family history of heart problems, cardiovascular problems, diabetes, Alzheimer's, pancreatic cancer or are
pregnant, it is important that you be screened by a dental professional. Damage in the mouth caused by gum disease can never be
reversed, but it can be treated and maintained! A healthy mouth can mean a healthy life!

We focus on making beautiful smiles & building healthier lives. We perform a thorough examination & communicate with
your physician if necessary to help minimize PERIODONTAL DISEASE as a possible health risk for you.


130+ Florida Home Auctions Oct 18th 27th


*


Bid Date November 2
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1
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Leader, October 14, 2010


Curves of Clearwater to open
CLEARWATER Curves of Clearwater will host
an open house and ribbon-cutting ceremony to
introduce its new owner, Debbie Scarbrough-Da-
harsh, on Monday, Oct. 25, 5 to 7 p.m., at 1488
S. Belcher Road.
The Clearwater Chamber of Commerce will
take part in the ribbon-cutting ceremony. The
event will include door prizes. Refreshments will
be served.

State recognizes TSE Industries
CLEARWATER The state of Florida recently
recognized a number of businesses for being ex-
ceptional employers of people with disabilities.
TSE Industries of Clearwater was one of the
award-winning businesses.
Jim DeBeaugrine, director of the Agency for
Persons with Disabilities; John Clarkson, deputy
director of Blind Services John Clarkson; and
Bill Palmer, director of vocational rehabilitation,
handed out the awards honoring the businesses
for their commitment to hiring people with dis-
abilities. Tallahassee Mayor John Marks wel-
comed people to the event and spoke about the
city's efforts to have a diverse work force.
plT El nus~tries of Clearwa er employs 80 peo
ployees, five are people with disabilities. Initially
starting in custodial positions, TSE opens other
positions to those who show interest and ability,
such as one individual who was recently promot-
ed to an operator position in the Engineered
Polymers Division.

Casa Tina's to host fundraiser
DUNEDIN A Cirque Fundraiser will take
place Thursday, Oct. 14, at Casa Tina's Mexican
Restaurant, 365 Main St.
The cast of "Fairies, Inc." will present a free
cirque show while diners enjoy food and liba-
tions. The event will raise funds to help the
Fairies cast with costumes, scenery and lighting
for their upcoming production in March 2011 to
be presented at the Conmy Center at Our Lady
of Lourdes Catholic Church.
The show will run from 5 to 9:30 p.m.
Casa Tina's owners Javier and Tina Avila will
donate all proceeds from Casa Tina's, Pan e Vino
&r Cabana, their three eateries in downtown
Dunedin, on this evening to help the Fairies cast.
"Fairies, Inc." is produced by Dance &r Circus
Arts of Tampa Bay, located in Clearwater, and is


the only circus arts training facility in the Tampa
Bay area. Their professional aerialists perform
weekly at Casa Tina's Mexican Restaurant and
have been seen throughout the Tampa Bay area
at private and corporate events.
For reservations, call 734-9226.

Chamber to host
networking event
LARGO The Largo/Mid-Pinellas Chamber of
Commerce will host its monthly Business After
Hours networking event Thursday, Oct. 21, 5:30
to 7 p.m., at O'Houston's Restaurant, 518 West
Bay Drive.
Cost is $10 for chamber members and $20 for
nonmembers. Advance registration is recom-
mended. To register, call 584-2321 or e-mail
events@largochamb er. org.

Chamber to host Learn @ Lunch
LARGO Tampa Bay Beaches Chamber of
Commerce will host its next Learn @ Lunch ses-
sion Thursday, Oct. 28, at Palms of Largo, 200
Lake Ave. NE.
October's Learn @ Lunch will explore trans-
portation topics such as potential rail develop-
meSt npuic transit, and tlhe0Wa chseProgram.
gram set to kick off at noon. Cost is $15 for
members and $20 for nonmembers. To R.S.V.P.,
call Amanda Page at 360-6957 or e-mail aman
da@tampabaybeaches. com.

Old Northwest meeting set
LARGO The next Old Northwest meeting will
take place Monday, Oct. 18, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., at
Garden Gate Home De~cor, 1931 West Bay Drive.
Residents and business owners who would
like to know more about the Old Northwest
neighborhood in Largo are welcome to attend.
Old Northwest in downtown Largo is located in
the central portion of Pinellas County and
stretches for nearly 1.8 miles along both sides of
t Ws ay Drive corri or.
Call Joseph Stefko at 581-6134 or visit www.
discoverlargo.com.

Corey Sunday European style
market returns
ST. PETE BEACH The Corey Sunday Market
resumed Oct. 3.
Running Sundays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the mar-


ket boasts two produce vendors, local arts and
crafts, live music and a variety of food. Located
between Blind Pass Road and Boca Ciega Drive,
Corey Avenue will be blocked off for a safe shop-
ping day at the market. Corey merchants and
restaurants also will be open for business.
Parking is free.

Robinson elected
Goodwill board chair
ST. PETERSBURG The Board of Directors of
Goodwill Industries-Suncoast Inc. recently elect-
ed Charlie Robinson Jr. as its new chair during
the board's annual business meeting Sept. 23.
Robinson is a senior vice president for Wells
Fargo Insurance services.

Goodwill elects three directorS
ST. PETERSBURG Three members were re-
cently elected to the all-volunteer Goodwill In-


dustries-Suncoast Board of Directors.
New to the board is Steven M. Erickson, opera-
tional risk manager for Raymond James Finan-
cial Inc. in St. Petersburg.
Returning to the board after a one-year man-
dated hiatus are Oscar J. Horton, president and
CEO of Sun State International Trucking LLC
and Robert G. Stern, a partner and board certi-
fled real estate attorney with the Tampa law firm
Trenam, Kemker, Scharf, Barkin, Frye, O'Neill &
Mu lis.

Chamber to host golf outing
CLEARWATER The Clearwater Beach Cham-
ber of Commerce will host its annual golf outing
Friday, Oct. 29, at the Clearwater Country Club,
525 N. Betty Lane.
The chamber is seeking additional event spon-
sors. Publix has signed on as the lunch sponsor.
Call Bruce Szabo at 446-3772 or Marysia
Coates at 365-8527.


Nominal Opening Bids
Start at $1,000
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HE'S SPENDING A GAZLLION BUCKS TO GET ELECTED.


Tewly ~bvrs Haul #hr~-c cwl dhastcrs


Tampa a
NEWSPAPERS
BEACON LEADER BEE

Publisher/President: Dan Autrey
da utrey@tbnwee kly.co m
Accounting Manager: Andrea Marcarelli
tbniandy@yahoo.com
Retail Advertising Manager: Jay Rey
jrey@tbnweekly.com
Classified Advertising Manager: Shelly Fournier
sfournier@tbnweekly.com
Executive Editor: Tom Germond
tgerrnond ~tbnwee kly.cor m


Leader, October 14, 2010


A fortune awaits the computer whiz who
devises the following game: A TV viewer sits
with a plastic gun in hand. When a stupid or
offensive advertisement appears on the TV
screen, the viewer points his gun, pulls the
trigger and the offending screen image is
blasted into a million pixels. I would gladly
pay $500 for such a play tool.
I don't dislike all TV ads. Just most of
them. They treat the viewing public as fools.
The Amica insurance company, for example.
For months Amica has been running ads
showing several home or car owners atremble
with praise for their Amica coverage.
I ask you: Have you ever, in your entire life,
seen anyone stand up in public and compli-
ment his insurance company?! Of course not.
Buying insurance is a giant crapshoot in
which the best you can hope for is (A) not to
be overcharged on the premiums, and (B) that
the insurance company pays off when you
have a bona fide claim. Only then might you
say a kind word for the company.
Other insurance companies are just as of-
fensive. For years the Geico people have been
feeding us a cutesy green lizard, or gecko, or
whatever varmint it is, with a Brit accent, as a
way to win our approval and our dollars.
Can you imagine anyone with an ounce of
sense purchasing a car insurance policy be-
cause of a lizard?
Lately the Geico company has compounded
its insult by featuring a slick, smirking man
who oils his way across the TV screen while
asking, "Is it really true that you can save 15
percent on your car insurance by turning to
Geico?" He then says, "W~as Abe Lincoln hon-
est?" I suppose the next pitch will be a varia-
tion on that old question of what a bear does
in the woods.
Some of the more eye-and-ear-catching TV
ads are those featuring the veteran comic
Jerry Spiller, screaming the virtues of getting


beer drinkers will do exactly that, regardless
Sof how brave they feel. But other men (and
women) will deliberately switch to Guinness
to show their friends how tough and rugged
they are. Back in my youth, Heineken's ful-
filled all my beer-drinking needs. It quenched
my thirst and made me bold, with occasion-
ally catastrophic results.
I can recall the happ da s when the Cor-
poration for Public Broadcasting had no ad-
vertismng. They just sat there and pumped out
one uplifting, prize-winning documentary and
BBC play after another. Today it's different.
Most of the CPB programming is still high
quality, but now we have many commercials,
even if they're not as noisy as the ones on net-
work TV.
Even more irritating are the long, graphics-
saturated promotional slots telling about the
fabulous CPB programs coming up next week
or next month.
I'11 say little here about the PBS fund-rais-
ers, because I've ranted about them before. I
foresee the day when PBS will have ten per-
cent actual programming, and ninety percent
fund-raising specials starring waltz king
Andre Rieux, you-can-do-it speaker Wayne
Dyer and the 1988 black-and-white perfonn-
ance of singer Roy Orbison and Friends.
Since time began, the least imaginative ads
have been those of the automobile industry.
Most of the advertisements show a passenger
car, at rest or in motion, plus a few hundred
words of copy. Real zippy. The best ads (for
any product) are the funny ones. Not just
clever, but out-loud funny. A current exam-
ple: the diapered infants telling us why we
should invest with E*Trade.
The ads' only defect is that they don't last
long enough. I would stay tuned even if those
kids were reading the phone book.
Send Bob Driver an e-mail at trarlee71@Qcom
calstret.


a Capital One credit card. I like Spiller's work
as George Costanza's father on "Seinfeld," but
I'm unsure whether his high-pitched rants
would tilt me toward Capital One even if I

Buying insurance is a giant
crapshoot. Can you
imagine anyone with an
OURCe Of sense purchasing
a Car inSurance policy
because of a lizard?

were in the market.
One of the unintentional funny commer-
cials is the Cialis pitch, aimed at men with
sporadic or undependable erections. One re-
cent ad shows a man and woman doing yard
work. They glance at each other, and sudden-
ly the scene is turned into a camping adven-
ture, with a tent to shelter them as they
presumably pitch woo. The commercial ends
with a warning of what a man should do if his
erection lasts four hours or more. Not a word
is said about what the woman should do in
such a situation.
The Guinness beer people have a new slo-
gan: "Only for the bold." This implies that if
you're a courage-deficient wimp, you should
give your beer money to Coors, Budweiser
and other sissified brews. I imagine many


i~B


SPCA Tampa Bay is broken and
needs to be "fixed"
Editor:
Those that work there have titles, but many have no experience to
handle the roles of those titles.
Recently, it seems as though any animal that walks through their
doors is treated as an imposition. Working in an animal shelter is
stressful and frustrating, but this should not be taken out against the
animal which had no control over why he/she appeared at the shelter.
Each arrival should be given respect and a chance for a new home (if
possible) and treated as a challenge to try to get that animal the best
home possible. It may take some extra time and the staff and volun-
teers might have to work a few extra hours but if the staff and volun-
teers are truly passionate about the animals that come into their care,
you really can't put a price on a life can you?
If you have volunteered there or plan to please don't stop the ani-
mals need your extra care and TLC. Don't let your ego or opinions stop
youlfrom helping the animals. Remember it needs to be about the ani-
People at the SPCA have gotten lazy and complacent and the shel-
ter's reputation and the animals have suffered.
The entire staff needs to sit down, take a few minutes and try to look
at the shelter, its procedures and policies and try to imagine what an
animal coming there goes through.
I think that it is a wonderful new start for Dr. James Lutz and Mr.
Mark Taber to take the reins of SPCA Tampa Bay, until a qualified ex-
ecutive director and other key staff are hired. There has been a lot of
damage done to the SPCA (volunteers, donors, reputation, services,
animal care, etc.) and I hope that the SPCA can be "fixed."
Pam Burns
Belleair Bluffs


Production Manager: David Brown
p rod auction @tbnwee kly.co m
Internet Services Manager: Suzette Porter
we bmaster@tb nweekly.co m
Seminole/Beach Beacon: Bob McClure
bmcclure@tbnweekly.com
Largo Leader/Dunedin Beacon: Tom Germond
tg ermo nd @tbnwee kly.com
Belleair/Beach Bee: Chary Southmayd
cso uth mayd @tb nwee kly.com


Clearwater Beacon: Alexandra Caldwell
acaldwellI@tb nweekly, co m
Pinellas Park Beacon: Juliana A. Torres
jto rres@tb nwee kly.com
General Editorial
ed ito rial @tb nweekly, co m
Circulation: L. Shiflett
Phone: 727-397-5563

` PF 0*IPuperchain


Viewpoints 15A


EDITORIAL







Voters in two Pinellas County cities will be asked in the Nov. 2
election whether they favor extending the terms of their city com-
missioners from three to four years.
The proposed charter amendments will appear on the ballots for
residents of Dunedin and Largo.
For the simple reason that the amendments will save money for
taxpayers in both cities, voters should approve them.
According to the county supervisor of elections office, a stand-
alone election in Largo costs about $72,420. A Largo election held
in conjunction with a county election is estimated to cost $5,859 if
all races fit on a single ballot card, which is usually the case.
That's a substantial savings, particularly if considered over many
years. Another argument for voting for the charter amendments is
that turnout is substantially higher in county elections. The higher
the turnout, the better democracy is served.
True, some voters may not pay as much attention to city races
when they occur on the ballot with numerous other county, state
and other races, but community organizations, through well-publi-
cized debates and forums, can help ensure that voters are infonned
about candidates for city seats.
By requesting mail ballots, voters are able to become familiar
weeks ahead of election about issues and candidates instead of
going to the polls and hesitating to vote in a particular race because
they don't know enough about a candidate. The betting line here is
that a number of voters using mail balloting will continue to in-
crease.
Critics might contend that proposing to extend their terms from
three years to four years is self-serving on the part of the elected of-
ficials. Since terms would only be extended for one year, that, in it-
self, is hardly a strong argument to vote against the proposals.
It certainly doesn't stack up against the cost savings of having
city election piggyback on the county elections.
Largo and Dunedin residents should vote to extend their com-
missioners' terms.



On the perils and


pitfalls of moving

I awoke one
morning to find a Io i
favorite purple vase iO I
shattered on the pentameter
floor of my recently- Juliana A. Torres
decorated living
room.
It was the fifth
glass object to meet its demise in the process of moving into and deco-
rating my new apartment in Largo. Among the other casualties: the
glass of a 8x10 picture frame I dropped while unloading it from my car,
one in a pair of matching mirrors that tipped over and fractured short-
ly after I leaned it against the wall; a black plate that banged rather
abruptly against the sink while I was washing it, and a prism I've had
since childhood that managed to slip from my fingers as I was hanging
it in the kitchen window.
That's not even listing the nonglass objects which have found them-
selves in some way distorted, bent or warped after an encounter with
my clumsiness.
Each time something breaks, I swear to be more careful with fragile
memorabilia I handle in the future. And each time, while I moumn my
loss, I take comfort in having learned a valuable lesson in the frailty of
transparent objects, the cruelty of gravity and my own impatience.
But then, it's usually not long before my blundering butterfingers
manage to lose their grip on some item I cherish, or something that I
at least would have liked to keep around longer than it takes a 6 year
old to break a crayon. Glass, in general, should be warned away from
me.
This time, however, I maintain that the broken vase was not my
fault. My alibi is solid. The cat will attest to the fact that I was asleep
all night. And I place the vase's time of death as sometime before I
woke up, considering I never heard what would have been a very loud
crash at the point of its demise.
An investigation of the aforementioned crime scene revealed that the
vase murderer was one of three suspects: the painting that came un-
secured from the wall and pushed the vase from its perch, the silver
candlestick that slid off with it and put a dent in the bookshelf on its
way down, or the brutal impact of the vase hitting the uncompromis-
ing, albeit carpeted, floor.
My money's on the candlestick. Maybe I've played too much Clue in
my day, but it just looks guilty lying on its side, next to the tragic
shards of what was the perfect accent to my black bookshelves. Plus,
I'm upset that I have to paint over the glaring dent it most certainly
caused in the third shelf of the bookcase (the shape of the dent match-
es the edge of the candlestick perfectly, I checked).
Of course, one could argue that it was my poor method of affixing
the painting to the wall that caused the entire calamity. This same log-
ical person may wonder how I intend to punish the candlestick's vio-
lence once its guilt is proven (because it will be!). But let me just say, I
resent this person's grip on reality. He or she probably has a better
grip on everything else too.
I should be pleased, at least, that I had the sense to purchase a vac-
uum before I began breaking things in earnest. But to be honest, I've
had to use it too often to revel much inmy foresight.
Still, I remain hopeful that with the majority of the moving and deco-
rating concluded, I'm at the end of my destructive tendencies. But just
ao tercl ear i the event of any other glass disasters, I intend on


NOtes on the advertising industry


Driver's Seat
Bob Driver


I WHO'S HIS INVESTMENT


A bVISER?3


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Briefs
Chesnut Park to host guided walk
PALM HARBOR A free, guided walk will be offered Saturday,
Oct. 16, 9 to 10:30 a.m., at Chesnut Park, 2200 East Lake Road.
Participants will explore the outdoors and discover plants natu-
rally found in wetlands and pine flatwoods while learning how these
plants have been used over the years. Guests will visit points along
Brooker Creek and enjoy the view of Lake Tarpon.
Registration is required. To register, call 669-1951.

Philippe to host nature walk
SAFETY HARBOR A free guided nature walk will be offered Sat-
urday, Oct. 23, 9 to 10:30 a.m., at Philippe Park, 2525 Philippe
Parkway.
Attendees will learn park history while exploring nature. Closed-
toe shoes, water, sunscreen, a hat and insect repellent are recom-
mended.
Registration is required. To register, call 669-1947.

Weedon hosts guided hikes
ST. PETERSBURG A free, guided hike is offered Saturdays, 9 to
11 a.m., at Weedon Island Preserve, 1800 Weedon Drive NE.
Participants learn about the coastal environment and the early
resident of Weedon Island Preserve as they hike through the man-
groves and upland ecosystems. Hikers should bring water and a
snack. A hat and closed-toe shoes are recommended. This hike is
suitable for ages 6 and older.
Registration is required by 2 p.m. on Friday prior to the hike. Call
453-6500.

Weedon to host Wee-time
ST. PETERSBURG Wee-time at Weedon will be presented
Thursday, Oct. 14 and Oct. 28, 10:30 to 11:15 a.m., at Weedon Is-
land Preserve, 1800 Weedon Drive NE.
Designed to introduce preschoolers to the wonders of the natural
world, the program will feature a children's book and will include a
craft, game or other hands-on activity related to the story. The free
program is best for children ages 3 to 5. Registration is required.
Call 453-6500.

Weedon to host bat program
ST. PETERSBURG The program Florida's Fabulous Bats! will be
presented Saturday, Oct. 23, 1 to 2 p.m., at Weedon Island Pre-
serve, 1800 Weedon Drive NE, St. Petersburg





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Leader, October 14, 2010


Florida is home to 13 species of bats that are year-round or sea-
sonal residents. All these bats devour insects and are beneficial to
the environment. Attendees will meet some of these live animals at
this fascinating free program presented by Cynthia and George
Marks of the Florida Bat Conservancy. The two are authors of
"Bats of Florida."
All ages are welcome. Registration is required at least 24 hours
prior to the program. To register, call 582-2100 or visit www.pinel
lascountyextension. org, click on the Online Class Registration
button and then click on the Weedon Island tab.

Photography hike set
ST. PETERSBURG A photography hike will be offered Satur-
day, Oct. 30, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., at Weedon Island Preserve, 1800
Weedon Drive NE, St. Petersburg.
Attendees will hike the preserve in search of that perfect shot.
This free program provides great opportunities for photographers
of all levels to hone their skills. After a brief classroom session,
center volunteers highlight seasonal features of the preserve, as
well as specific wildlife behaviors that help participants capture
the natural beauty of Weedon Island Preserve.
The program is recommended for adults. Registration is re-
quired at least 24 hours prior to the program. To register, call
582-2100 or visit www.pinellascountyextension. org, click on the
Online Class Registration button and then click on the Weedon Is-
land tab.

Brooker hosts guided hikes
TARPON SPRINGS A free, guided 0.7-mile hike is offered Sat-
urdays, 9 to 10:30 a.m., at Brooker Creek Preserve, 3940 Key-
stone Road in Tarpon Springs.
Participants explore how the land has changed over time and
discuss the ecological footprints left by those changes. Hikers
should wear sturdy closed-toe shoes. Water and a hat are recom-
mended. Children younger than age 6 may find the hike challeng-
mng.
Registration is required by noon on the Friday prior to the hike.
Call 453-6800.

Brooker to host Book Time
TARPON SPRINGS Book Time at Brooker Creek will be pre-
sented Thursdays, Oct. 14 and Oct. 28, 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. at
Brooker Creek Preserve, 3940 Keystone Road.
Designed to introduce preschoolers to the wonders of the natu-
ral world, the program will feature a children's book and will in-
clude a craft, game or other hands-on activity related to the story.


The free program is best for children ages 3 to 5.
Registration is required. Call 453-6800. Visit www.brooker
creekpreserve. org.

Brooker to host bat program
TARPON SPRINGS The program Florida's Fabulous Bats! will
be presented Saturday, Oct. 30, 1 to 2 p.m., at Brooker Creek Pre-
serve, 3940 Keystone Road.
All ages are welcome. Registration is required at least 24 hours
prior to the program. To register, call 582-2100 or visit www.pinel
lascountyextension.org, click on the Online Class Registration
button and then click on the Brooker Creek tab.

Fort De Soto to offer guided walk
TIERRA VERDE A free, guided nature walk will be offered Sat-
urday, Oct. 24, 10 to 11 a.m., at Fort De Soto Park, 3500 Pinellas
Bayway S.
Guests will enjoy the beauty of Fort De Soto Park with a one-
hour nature walk great for the entire family. A guided bird tour is
planned.
To register and for tour information and meeting locations, call
552-1862.

Audubon Society to host armchair event
CLEARWATER The Clearwater Audubon Society will host a
free armchair birding event Saturday, Oct. 16, 10 a.m., at John R.
Bonner Park, 14444 143rd St. N., Largo.
Attendees should meet in the parking lot for a short lecture
which will be followed by a short walk to a dock overlooking the
Intracoastal Waterway. Participants should bring an armchair and
binoculars.
Call Lynn Sumerson at 596-8822 or visit www.clearwater
audubon.org.

Audubon Society to host walk
CLEARWATER The Clearwater Audubon Society will take part
in a birdwatching walk Saturday, Oct. 23, 8 a.m., at Fort De Soto
County Park, 3500 Pinellas Bayway S., Tierra Verde.
Attendees should meet at the ranger's station. The park is home
to a tremendous variety of migratory songbirds, raptors, water and
shore birds. The prime location makes it the first stop for migrants
from South and Central America.
Attendees should bring binoculars and field guides. There is a
fee to enter the park.
Call Lynn Sumerson at 596-8822 or visit www.clearwater
audubon.org.


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Until next week get bent!
Tyson Wallerstein can be
reached at capt.tyson@hot
mail.com. To get a jish photo in
the paper, send the photo
along with your name, when
and where it wats caught to ed
itorial@TBNweekly.com or mail
it to Tampa Bay Newspapers,
9911 Seminole Blvd., Semi-
nole, FL 33772.



The $35 entry fee will include
breakfast, captain's T-shirt and
dinner and live music saturday
night. Keg beer and prizes will be
sponsored by Budweiser, West Ma-
rine, The Wharf Restaurant, Bare
Bottoms Hull Cleaning, SailTech
and Merry Pier.
For information and entry forms,
visit www.sailbeyc.org.


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Sports 17A


Leader, October 14, 2010


Dropping water temperatures
have brought new species to our
near-shore waters including;
Bonita, cobia, kingfish and
grouper.
Water temperatures have gone
from about 82 degrees a week
ago to 72 degrees now. Migratory
species such as kingfish and
Bonita travel the gulf following
this optimal feeding temperature.

Briefs~-
St. Jerome hosts
golf tOuYne
IARGO The st. Jerome Men's
Club will hold the Fr. Sean O'Sulli-
van Iegacy 2Golf Tom-nament, Fri-
B more Golf Club course eiw
The mixed scramble format
entry fee is $95 per player with a 1
p.m. shotgun start. The event will
benefit the st. Jerome building
"Father Sean O'Sullivan was
,or anCuty Kero eleland, ie
or9, n nt ssro e new re .

56 years "

Bayt r Returits aspdo psoso s
Dew Luxury Bonefish Grill, Am-
bassador Limo, Solar Sanitation
and Jiffy Re rgahics
Call Bob Rog 1piat 515-0994

Gulf Coast United
plans Gala Auction
BELLEAIR The Gulf Coast
United Soccer Club plans an Auc-
tion Gala saturday, Nov. 13 at the
Belleair Recreational Center.
The event will raise money for


Last weekend's cold front is an
indicator of things to come, and it
won't be long before we start get-
ting slammed every fifth or sixth
day. Winter is definitely taking
hold throughout most of the
country but for us it's just now
becoming prime season. As you
make your way out on the water
in between fronts it will be hard
not to notice all the life along our



player scholarships and facility im-
provements. Tickets will cover a
night of dancing, comedy, food,
drinks and a live and a silent auc-
tion with generous donations from
our community, such as an auto-
graphed baseball by Tampa Bay
Rays center fielder B.J. Upton, a
ruby and diamond ring, Florida
Orchestra tickets, Westchase golf
outing, Celebration station passes
and more.
A portion of each entry ticket will
benefit the Florida Suncoast Race

buaseoss serste i s mao tl a
event or purchase entry tickets


ed.com.

Half Century Softball
plans tryouts
The st. Pete Half Century soft-
ball Club will conduct tryouts
Monday, Wednesdays and Fridays
at 9:30 a.m., at North Shore Park
in st. Petersburg.
Ages 49 to 74 are eligible to try
out for the modified fast-pitch soft-
ball season. The 60-game season


beach should stay clean. With all
the baitfish stacked right up
along the beach, the Spanish
mackerel are taking advantage.
Shadowing the mackerel will be
the kingfish. Plenty of big kings
were caught right up along the
beach last week. Big baits paid
off for anglers trolling live mack-
erel and blue runners. The key is
to stay with the schools of mack-



preciated.
The SCLEC was fonned to aid in
the advancement of charitable,
benevolent, educational and ama-
teur athletic purposes donating to
officers and their families in need,
scholarship donations, and local
elementary and high school athlet-
ic leagues.
Contact tournament coordinator
Mike Eaton at 410-2001 or by e-
mail at meatonl@tampabay.rr.
com, or Cara Buttram at the
SCLE off at 532- 72 ornby e-


Turkey Trot set
CLEARWATER The st. Peters-
b rgrTme 5ue Trot set fo
Clearwater High School stadium,
540 S. Hercules Ave
Cost for the 1-mile Gobbler is
$10 in advance, $12 on race day;
the 5K Wingding is $15 in ad-
vance, $20 on race day; the 5K
Fun Run is $15 in advance, $20
on race day; and the 10K Turkey
Trot is $15 in advance, $20 on race
day.
The Turkey Trot is the largest
running event in the Tampa Bay
area, with more than 15,000 par-


erel.
This is the time of year when
grouper establish themselves in
much shallower water than
they're nonnally associated with,
Water as shallow as 15 feet will
hold plenty of keeper-sized gags
over the next month or two.
Trolling with deep diving plugs or
heavy jigs will help you in finding
good bottom grouper.



ticipants. This road race is for com-
petitive runners, recreational run-
ners and walkers of all ages. The
Gobbler begins at 8:30 a.m., the
5K Wingding is at 7 a.m., the 5K
Fun Run is at 7:30 a.m., and the
10K Turkey Trot is at 8:45 a.m.
The fees include an event T-shirt.
Proceeds benefit local charities.
All canned goods and nonper-
ishable food items collected in the
stadium on race day are donated
to the Food Panty Program at Reli-
giouss tommnt a p les, It m/
turkeytrot.

BCYC to host
annual 'unregatta'
GULFPORT The second annu-
al Bait and Tackle Unregatta will
be saturday, Nov. 13, at Boca
Ciega Yacht Club, 4600 Tifton
Drive S.
Hosted by the club, the event
will be a racing-like regatta in the
Gulf of Mexico that throws in the
sport of fishing as the wild card.
Sailboats complete a random leg
course while trawling for fish and
finish times are adjusted for fish
caught.


Fish Tales
Capt. Tyson
1Vallerstein


bays and near-shore waters.
It looks like the winds will have
an easterly component to them
this week, so with any luck, the



starts Oct. 25.
Contact Joe Hannah at 394-
8040 or 420-8102 for further infor-
mation.

Sponsors sought for
gOlf tourney
LARGO Sun Coast Law En-
forcement Charities is looking for
sponsors and participants for its
charity golf tournament this year.
The tournament is set for sun-

dR3, Nv 1 but Bardmool 31f al

four-person scramble with a 12:30
p.m. sOtgun start.
S dnsos ripe payet it ud
equal sponsorship value, moneta y
payments or a combination.
Sponsorships are platinum:
$4,000, own banner, website and
newsletter ad; gold: $1,000, ad on
shared banner, hole sign, website
and newsletter ad; sliver: $500, ad
on shared banner, hole sign, web-
site and newsletter ad; bronze:
$200, hole sign, website and
newsletter ad; corporate, $500, golf
for four, hole sign, website and
newsletter ad. Any donation is ap-


A Personal Injury
A Bankruptcy
Call for a FREE
Consultation at
vour Convenience.


^uanar maperienner
Former City Judge


seminole office center
Ist clor Se oa
Seminole, FL 33772
E~~z~e-_


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Fax 397-4405 Ava~beg e po oi


Cool water brings new opportunities for anglers


)11
IRB Action 2000, Inc.


IRB Rotary


City of
Indian Rocks Beach


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* Stein Carrying Contest 4:00 pm


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NO 0pet s.
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Senokot Natural Vegetable Laxative
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Tablets 30 ct.3os:er .9



We carry _
Sundown iji
Vitamins !(I


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1 8A


Leader, October 14, 2010


1II'I I'~ IIIIr rrr
i91 r-'


Your Choice
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."I'','i-S.Hto~m Cold
Day & Night Relief 24 ct. or
Chest Congestion & Cough
20 ct. For people with high
blood pressure


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3H Ils Cough Drops
Assorted Flavors


Your Choice
$3.99


Vicks
DayQuil or NyQuil
Liquid 6 oz.
Assorted Varieties


Pepto-Bismol
Upset Stomach Relief
Reg. Strength 12 oz. or
Max Strength 8 oz. Liquid


Your Choice
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Saline Nasal Spray
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For dry nasal passages
Compare to Ocean


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Medicine Shoppe @
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10 mg. Tablets 14 ct.
I Compared to Zyrtec

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$5.99
Dr. Scholl's
Tri-Comfort Orthetics
For Men or Women 1 Pair
Clinically proven heel,
arch and ball of foot
pain relief


Medicine Shoppe@ AII Day
Pain Relief
Naproxen Sodium
220 mg. Caplets 100 ct.
Compare to Aleve




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Medicine Shoppe@
Tussin DM
Cough Suppressant/Expectorant
Liquid 8 oz.
Compare to Robitussin DM


Your Choice
$7.99


Your Choice
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Naphcon-A
Eye Allergy Relief Drops 5.oz
Systone or Systone Ultra
Lubricant Eye Drops.33-5 oz.


: Qi $49.99


SDigital Blood Pressure Monitors
Automatic Deluxe
Automatic or Automatic Wrist $39.99
Manual $29.99
Compare to HoMedics


- $2.99


Your Choice
$2.99


Zoo Friends
Complete Children's Multivitamin
Chewable Tablets 60 ct.
Compare to FLINTSTONES


Disposable Gloves
Latex 50 ct.
Vinyl 50 ct. $2.49
Compare to B-D


Insulin Syringes
29, 30 or 31 Gauge
100 ct Compared to B-D


i Transfer 3 or more Prescriptions from |
I another Pharmacy and Get a I



GIFT CERTIFICATE i
Gift Certificates may be used on second visit to pay for an~ Il
cr iiaee Ntstald s tht sn ohepr ffeorsre Lmoe I
coupon per customer per year. xpi res 10/31/1 O


Transfer 2 or Less Prescriptions from
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GIFT CERTIFICATE
IGift Certificates may be used on second visit to pay for any a
purchase. Must present this coupon to receive gift
certificate. N~ot valid with any other offers. Limit one I
cou pon pe r customer r pe r yea r Expi res 10/31/10o
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Di rso


Looking ahead

Clearwater
*"Lovers and Other Strangers," by Renee Taylor and Joseph
Bologna, through Oct. 31, at Early Bird Dinner Theatre, present-
ed at the Italian-American Club, 200 S. McMullen Booth Road.
Seating for performances Thursday through Sunday is 4 p.m.
Seating for matinees Thursday and Saturday is 11 a.m. Admis-
sion is $29.90 a person. Call 446-5898 or visit www.earlybirddin
nertheatre.com.
*Clearwater Jazz Holiday, Thursday through Sunday, Oct.
14-17, at Coachman Park, on the waterfront in downtown Clear-
water. The event is free to the public and administered by the
Clearwater Jazz Holiday Foundation, the city of Clearwater and
its volunteers. This year's lineup will include performances by Lit-
tle Feat, Kyle Wolverton, Norman Brown Storming Jazz with
Brenda Russell and Jessy J, Tizer, Soulive and Eric Darius.
Homeowner's Choice Inc. will sponsor a fireworks display Satur-
day, Oct. 16, 10:45 p.m.
*The third annual Clearwater Jazz 'N Art Walk, Saturday
and Sunday, Oct. 16-17, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., in downtown Clear-
water. The Clearwater Jazz Holiday Foundation will host this art
show on the 500 & 600 block of Cleveland Street from Fort Harri-
son to East Avenue. Artwork from different mediums will be on
display and for sale to the general public. The Clearwater Jazz 'N
Art Walk will offer a $5,000 total purse for the top three artists se-
lected. Admission is free to the public. Along with the art dis-
played, performances will take place each day on the GTE Federal
Credit Union Stage. Artists scheduled to perform include The New
York Guitar Cats, Night Train, Ruth Eckerd Hall Jazz Lab Band,
Honkabilly Blues, Ray Olan & the Jazz O'le Band and The Hy
Notes. Call 461-5200 or visit www.jazz.nartwalk.com.
*Styx, Saturday, Oct. 23, 7:30 p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall,
1111 McMullen Booth Road. Tickets range from $39 to $79. Call
791-7400 or visit www.rutheckerdhall.com. Tommy Shaw, James
"JY" Young, Lawrence Gowan, Todd Sucherman and Ricky
Phillips will hit the road this year. Along with the classic hits, the
band will be performing 1977's "The Grand Illusion" and 1978's
"Pi::on O ih n hei entiey B h alussawn d such his
"Renegade," "Blue Collar Man" and "Fooling Yourself (The Angry
Young Man)."
*Tampa Bay Symphony, Monday, Oct. 25, 7:30 p.m. at Ruth
Eckerd Hall, 1111 McMullen Booth Road. Tickets are $20 for
adults and $5 for students. Call 595-0345 or visit www.tam
pabaysymphony.com. The organization is celebrating the 25th
and final season of Jack Heller, music director and conductor.
Heller's long tenure at the podium of the Tampa Bay Symphony
has brought music and musical awareness to the Tampa Bay
community through performances of some of the greatest works
of orchestral literature. The symphony will perform Beethoven's
Symphony No. 8 and Mikhail Glinka's Overture to Ruslan and
Ludmilla, based on a magical plot from a poem by Pushkin. Also
on the playbill will be Finlandia by Sibelius, Essay No. 2 by
Samuel Barber and Howard Hanson's Love Duet from Merry
Mount Suite.
*"How the Other Half Loves," by Alan Ayckbourn, Nov. 4
through Dec. 26, at Early Bird Dinner Theatre, presented at the
Italian-American Club, 200 S. McMullen Booth Road. Seating for
performances Thursday through Sunday is 4 p.m. Seating for
matinees Thursday and Saturday is 11 a.m. Admission is $29.90
a person. Call 446-5898 or visit www.earlybirddinnertheatre.com.
*Benise, Thursday, Nov. 4, 8 p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall, 1111
McMullen Booth Road. Reserved tickets range from $42.50 to
$78.00 and are available at the ticket office, by calling 791-7400
or online at www.rutheckerdhall. com or www.ticketmaster. com.
Bringing the Spanish Guitar Tour to REH, Benise and his en-
chanted Spanish guitar will travel through time and space to Old
Havana, an Arabian desert, Italy, Spain, France and India. This
epic journey includes tales of glory and tragedy told through
video, music, dramatic and ever-changing sets, and dance.
Benise's inspiration is his guitar as he becomes a troubadour for
the ages. Breathtaking costumes add to the impact of brilliant

See LOOKING AHEAD, page 3B


See OPENING, page 8B


* Classifieds





Leader
Section B
October 14, 2010
Visit www.TBNweekly.com


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Photo by FRANK MASI/SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT LLC.
From left, Bruce Willis, John Malkovich and Helen Mirren star in the action-adventure movie "Red."





Willis, Freeman, Malkovich and Mirren star in 'Red'


Compiled by LEE CLARK ZUMPE

A number of new movie releases will hit theaters this week, in-
cluding the following films opening in wide release:

'Red'
Genre: Action, adventure and comedy
Cast: Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich, Helen
Mirren, Karl Urban and Mary-Louise Parker
Director: Robert Schwentke
Rated: PG-13
Based on the cult D.C. Comics graphic novels by Warren Ellis
and Cully Hamner, "Red" is an explosive action-comedy starring
Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Helen Mirren.
Frank (Bruce Willis), Joe (Morgan Freeman), Marvin (John
Malkovich) and Victoria (Helen Mirren) used to be the CIA's top
agents but the secrets they know just made them the agency's
top targets. Now framed for assassination, they must use all of
their collective cunning, experience and teamwork to stay one step
ahead of their deadly pursuers and stay alive. To stop the opera-
tion, the team embarks on an impossible, cross-country mission
to break into the top-secret CIA headquarters, where they will un-
cover one of the biggest conspiracies and cover-ups in government
history.

'Jackass 3-D'
Genre: Comedy and documentary
Cast: Johnny Knoxville
Director: Jeff Tremaine
Rated: R
Johnny Knoxville and his buddies are up to their daredevil
comic antics again in their third theatrical outing.
This time, the pranksters are coming at audiences in 3-D. The
stunts depicted in this movie were performed by professionals and
should not be attempted.


The followfug will open in limited release. It may be several
weeks before these films applear in local movie theaters.

'CaRYOS'
Genre: Foreign, drama and biopic
Cast: Edgar Ramirez, Alexander Scheer, Christoph Bach and
Julia Hummer
Director: Olivier Assayas
Not rated
"Carlos" tells the story of Ilich Ramirez Sanchez who, for two
decades, was one of the most wanted terrorists on the planet.
Between 1974, in London, where he tried to assassinate a
British businessman; and 1994, when he was arrested in Khar-
toum, he lived several lives under various pseudonyms, weaving
his way through the complexities of international politics of the
period.
Who was Carlos? How did his various multi-layered identities fit
together? Who was he before engaging body and soul in a never-
ending struggle? The drama is built around these questions.
A myth in his own lifetime, Carlos is a central figure in the his-
tory of international terrorism in the 1970s and 1980s, from pro-
Palestinian activism to the Japanese Red Army. He was at once
both a figure of the extreme left and an opportunistic mercenary
in the pay of powerful Middle Eastern secret services. He formed
his own organization, based it behind the Iron Curtain and was
active during the final years of the Cold War.
This film is the story of a revolutionary internationalist, both
manipulator and manipulated, carried along by the currents of
contemporary history and his own folly.


LCOHViCtiOR'
Genre: Drama and biopic


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Leader, October 14, 2010


capricorn
December 22 January 19
Great minds think alike,
so don't go it alone, Capri-
corn. If you do, you will
make a mess of things. A
major scoop gets the rumor
mill going.
Aquarius
January 20 February 18
You're a mover and a
shaker this week, Aquarius.
There is no stopping you. A
relative brings home quite
the gift. View it through
rose-colored glasses.
Pisces
February 19 March 20
Believe in yourself, and
nothing is beyond your
reach, Pisces. A breach of
confidence turns out to be a
blessing in disguise. A new
wadmbe cal for a change

Arie5
M ar ch 21 A ril 19
Your softer side comes
out when a friend faces a
health crisis. Be there for
them in full force, Aries. An
announcement gets the
part started.S
fa r

April 20 May 20
You must overcome some
serious objections in order
to implement a plan at
work. Don't worry, Taurus.
You will succeed. An old
friend drops by for a chat.


May 21 June 21

wo ms cer the a
They have pushed your but-
tons enough. Sit down, dis-
cuss your differences and
come up with a compro-
mise.


Cancer
June 22 July 22
You have the answer to a
recurring dilemma. You just
need to look inside, Cancer.
A home improvement plan
goes off without a hitch and
is picture perfect.
Leo
July 23 August 22
You may feel like your
family's punching bag this
week, but it won't be for
naught. Everyone will recov-
er in time for a pleasant
weekend, Leo.

virgo
August 23 September 22
Your intentions are good,
so don't fret if others don't
realize that. They will come
around, Virgo. A special oc-
casion calls for some special
activities.
Libra

September 23 October 22
Affairs of the heart are
top priority this week, Libra.
Find the time to re connect
with your loved ones. You
won't believe everything
you've missed out on.

Scorpio
October 23 -November 21
You're riding high for
many reasons, Scorpio. A
friend invites you over to try
out a new trend. Cast aside
your reservations and have
some fun.

Sagittarius
November 22 December 21
Travel plans stall, but not
for long, Sagittarius. You
become the go-to person at
work. Don't be shy. A home
improvement project con-
cludes.


Across
1. Bust maker
5. "That was a close one!"
9. Wombs
14. "I had no !"
15. Exude
16. Hose material
17. Escape, iaw y
18. Ride the waves
19. March of _
20. Method of military attack
23. "Bill & Extcellent Adventure"
24. George Burns liked them
28. Republic in western Balkran Penin-


2. Gulf of _, off the coast of Yemen
3. Atoll protector
4. State legislature buildings
5. Type of grant
6. 24 in a day
7. "The Snowy Day" author Jack
Keats
8. Fabic
9. Bringing to ruin
10. Drawing
11. "A Nightmare on Street"
12. v. Wade
13. and outs
21. Dolly of "Hello, Dolly!"
22. Clickable image
25. Greenish yellow redder than
liqueur green
26. Move, as a picture
27. Sprinkle
28. Soldier's knapsack
29. Good-for-nothing
30. Greek poet
31. Language of Bohemia
32. Farmecall
35. Bad day for Caesar
39. Approach
41.Type ofyine
42. "Pipe down!"


49. Excitement
50. Fiats

:" Ca, wt "m'up"
54. Site
55. Farfetched
mo ) "_ quam videri" (North Carolina s
57. Bump
58. "_ Ng" (They Might Be Giants
song)
59. Cemlng


31. Masked critter
33. Edible mushroom
34. Printing in italics
36. "Bingo!"
37. Inclines
38. Animal house
39. Cicatrix
40. Clobber
41. Defeating
45. Wednesday
46. Charge
47. Bring to aboil?
48. Stones lined with crystals

'1 Rso t od healh
57. Dry, tuberous plant root
60. Central points
61: Moi" tig
63. Achip, maybe
64. Hair goops
6 "M*W$S*H" role

67. ItS motto is "Lux et veritas"

Down
L.Not et fa, at aw


Crossword
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Crossword


Horoscopes
October 14, 2010


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LOOKING AHEAD, from page lB

choreography for Flamenco and
Broadway dancers.
*Levon Helm Band with Ray
LaMontagne and the Pariah
Dogs, Friday, Nov. 5, 7 p.m., at
Ruth Eckerd Hall, 1111 Mc-
Mullen Booth Road. Tickets
range from $39.50 to $69.50.
Call 791-7400 or visit www.
rutheckerdhall.com. Helm, a
two-time Grammy Award winner,
is best known as the drummer
and vocalist of the influential
rock group The Band. Their hit
songs include 'The Weight," '"The
Night They Drove Old Dixie
Down," "Up On Cripple Creek"
and "Ophelia." As a solo artist,
he earned a Grammy in 2008 in
the category Best Traditional
Folk Album for "Dirt Farmer,"
and again in 2009 for Best Amer-
icana Album for his most recent
album "Electric Dirt." LaMon-
tagne debuted on the music
scene in September 2004 with
the album 'Trouble," featuring a
cover of the Cat Stevens song by
the same name that was a hit on
the charts. The lineup of the
Pariah Dogs, and their alliance
with LaMontagne, is already well-
proven and familiar. Musicians
include Eric Heywood and Greg
Leisz on guitars, Jennifer Condos
on bass and Jay Bellerose on
drums.
*An evening with Jethro Tull's
Ian Anderson, Thursday, Nov.
11, 8 p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall,
1111 McMullen Booth Road. Re-
served tickets range from $43.50
to $69.50 and are available at
the ticket office, by calling 791-
7400 or online at www.rutheck
erdhall.com or www.ticketmas
ter.com. Anderson returns to the
United States with more goodies
feom th Tul bac khaaaloogs
tracks from the early albums as
well as some new solo material
special ly written for these shows*
The evening will include electric
and acoustic performances. Join-
ing Anderson will be Florian
Opahle on guitars, John O'Hara,
accordion and piano, David
Goodier, bass guitar and Scott
Hammond on drums.
*Jason Bonham's Led Zep-
pelin Experience, Sunday, Nov.
14, 7 p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall,


Leader, October 14, 2010


By LEE CLARK ZUMPE

CLEARWATER For veteran fans of Styx, a more appealing sce-
nario is difficult to imagine.
Along with other classic hits and new material, Styx will perform
1977's ''The Grand Illusion" and 1978's "Pieces Of Eight" in their en-
tirety on Saturday, Oct. 23, 7:30 p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall, 1111
McMullen Booth Road.
With a lineup that includes Tommy Shaw (vocals, guitars), James
"JY" Young (vocals, guitars), Lawrence Gowan (vocals, keyboards),
Todd Sucherman (drums) and Ricky Phillips (bass), along with the
occasional surprise appearance by original bassist Chuck Panozzo,
the band will present fans with a real treat. ''The Grand Illusion" and
"Pieces of Eight" both spawned hit singles and radio standards such
as "Come Sail Away," "Renegade," "Blue Collar Man" and "Fooling
Yourself (The Angry Young Man)."
Styx formed in a suburban Chicago basement back in the early
'70s, eventually transforming into the virtual arena rock prototype
by the end of the decade. Over the course of a 38-year career, the
band has released 15 studio albums, six best-of compilations and
four live albums, selling more than 30 million albums worldwide
and garnering eight top ten singles.
Styx has maintained its popularity through a rigorous tour sched-
ule. The band has performed more shows since 1999 than all of the
previous years of its career combined, including two Super Bowl ap-
pearances as well as Pollstar box office chart-topping tours with Def
Leppard, Journey, Boston, REO Speedwagon, Bad Company and
Foreigner.
According to bass player Ricky Phillips, the band has been keep-
ing up the pace in 2010.
"We just had our 90th show this year," Phillips said in a phone in-
terview Sept. 30. The band had three more shows in Canada and
another four or five before the current tour officially launches Oct.
14. "We tour pretty much year-round."
Of course, when "Grand Illusion" and "Pieces of Eight" were origi-
nally released, Phillips wasn't a member of Styx. In the late 1970s
and early 1980s, he played with The Babys.
''That was my first band, The Babys," Phillips said. The Babys fea-
tured a lineup including John Waite, Wally Stocker and Tony Brock.
A fortuitous meeting led to Phillips' introduction to the band. "I had
gone to L.A. with like $20 in my pocket and two guitars and a suit-
case and I was sleeping on couches. I got a gig with a band that was
kind of a hot band in L.A. at the time. The Babys' soundman saw
me playing in L.A. in this club. John Waite, who had been the bass
player in The Babys until that point was really just wanting to front
the band and be a lead singer."
Interestingly, that job led to his first meeting with Styx.
"I ended up joining The Babys," Phillips said, "That's when I first
met Styx because in 1979 we opened up for them. So, I feel a part of
the whole 'Grand Illusion' experience because they were playing
those songs and a lot of people were hearing them for the first time
and we were there." Phillips recounted how he and Waite had been
impressed by the "that little touch of prog" in the music Styx was
presenting at that time and how it made them stand out from other
bands. "I became a friend and a fan of the band in 1979."
Still, Phillips didn't exactly harbor secret aspirations of becoming a
member of Styx in those days. But when he was tapped to join, the
call came as a welcome surprise: It was an offer he couldn't refuse.


"When Tommy called me in 2003," Phillips explained, "I was in
the studio. I was doing a lot of work in Los Angeles for a number of
years." After The Babys split up, the bass player did a stint with
Bad English another band fronted by Waite and also recorded a
record with Jimmy Page and David Coverdale. "The flannel shirt
brigade came in from Seattle and everything changed musically,"
Phillips said, "which was good ultimately for music and it was a
necessary process but it kind of changed anybody that was at-
tached to anything with music before that for a while.
"So I'd kind of reinvented myself," he continued. Always a song-
writer, Phillips found himself leaning more toward working in the
studio and writing as well as developing a couple acts or artists
that he had found.
That's when the call from Styx came.
"So, when Tom called me up and said, 'look, I know you're busy
in your studio, but would you consider going back on the road,
we'd love to have you,' I had just finished a huge project and I was
getting ready to hit the wall from the burnout factor," Phillips said.
The bass player happily hooked up with styx. He must be having
fun, because time seems to be flying. "I just completed seven years,
just started my eighth year with the band. It seems, literally,
maybe like it was a year ago."
Styx had been around for more than three decades when Phillips
joined. For some, being the new kid on the block and living up to
the kind of legacy styx has achieved might be difficult.
"If I had never done anything if I didn't have a history of my
own that would probably be very, very, very overpowering,"
Phillips said. But the bass player had his own experiences. "The
first time I was in a recording studio was in 1977 so not being a
youngster to this whole process and having worked with what I
think are some of the best musicians in the world I was ready for
it," he said. Phillips didn't take the offer lightly, either. "I was so
honored to be asked because there's not very many of those situa-
tions that pop up in life and when they do to be the person that's
been chosen is an incredible feeling."
Phillips explained the philosophy behind the current tour and
how the band decided to perform ''The Grand Illusion" and "Pieces
of Eight" in their entirety instead of just doing a selection of great-
est hits.
"The idea to do this came from our manager and it hit our ears
just perfectly," Phillips said. "We'd been wanting to do something
different for us and for the fans. People over the years had been
sending in e-mails and requests for certain things and our manag-
er paid attention to all of this," the bass player explained. The con-
cept of playing the two albums struck a chord with the band. "It's
considered the 'sweet spot' of the band."
Performing all the tracks on the two classic albums presented
the band with both a challenge and an opportunity.
"Some of this material has never been performed by styx before
live," Phillips said. He described how the band hopes to recreate
the album-listening experience for audiences. "It kind of presents
that experience of how you used to buy an album which was a
big old thing, not a little CD. You'd open it up, fold it open, read the
liner notes, put on the first side, listen to that, get up, flip it over,
put on the second side," he said. "It was almost like two experi-
ences, like two acts."
In addition to the classic songs, Styx will perform new material
as well, including a piece from the upcoming "Regeneration: Vol-


Photo by ASH NEWELL/ALLIANCE ARTISTS
Ruth Eckerd Hall welcomes Styx Saturday, Oct. 23. The band will
perform the albums "The Grand IIlusion" and "Pieces of Eight" in their
entirety.

ume 1" EP. The EP will include re-recordings of classic Styx songs
as well as the new track "Difference in the World." The seven-
song EP will be available for purchase at the concert.
"Styx is a very unique band," Phillips said. "I'm thrilled to be
here every night getting up on stage and playing these songs and
writing new songs and just carrying on the whole experience," he
added. "The guys in the band they get it, they get what it takes
to be in a band. The bar is very high. They're performing nightly
at a high level and it's exciting. We don't take it lightly, we appre-
ciate where we are and we appreciate the fans. We want to pres-
ent the music every night the best that we possibly can."
On this tour, styx will offer something in addition to classic
hits and high-level performances: They'll recreate a moment in
history.
"We're trying to give the audience a little of what that was like
back in the day," Phillips said. "It's a really fun evening of music."


1111 McMullen Booth Road.
Tickets range from $32.50 to
$59.50. Limited VIP packages are
$160. Call 791-7400 or visit
www.rutheckerdhall. com. Bon-
ham will celebrate the life and
music of his father the leg-
endary Led Zeppelin drummer
John Bonham. Timed to take
place just after the 30th anniver-
sary of his father's passing on
Sept. 25, 1980, Bonham who
has teamed with Annerin Pro-
ductions, the heralded company
behind The Pink Floyd Experi-
ence and Rain, A Tribute to the
Beatles is anxiously anticipat-
ing the show's opening night.
Bonham and his band will rock
through Led Zeppelin's hallowed
catalog, backed by a state-of-the-
art sound system and light show
to enhance the live performance
onstage and to create an awe-in-
spiring multimedia concert expe-
rience.
*Suncoast Dixieland Jazz
Classic, Friday through Sunday,
Nov. 19-21, at Sheraton Sand
Key Resort, 1160 Gulf Blvd.; and
Marriott Suites on Sand Key,
1201 Gulf Blvd. The Suncoast
Dixieland Jazz Classic will con-
tinue the fine tradition of Dix-
ieland fun in the Florida sun.
The Sheraton Sand Key Resort
will be transformed into the
headquarters hotel for this year's
festival, which will feature bands
such as Barbary Coast Dixcieland
Band, Bill Allred's Classic Jazz
Band, the Coast to Coast Jazz
Band, Cornet Chop Suey, Dave
Bennett and the Festival All-
Stars, the Dixcie Chaps, the Gal-
vanized Jazz Band, the Jerry
Krahn Quartet, the Midiri Broth-
ers Jazz Band, Mighty Aphrodite,
Red Lehr's Powerhouse Five,


Sonny LaRosa and America's
Youngest Jazz Band and the Tar-
pon Springs High School Jazz
Ensemble. A weekend badge
costs $100. Daily badges for Fri-
day and Sunday are $40. Daily
badges for Saturday are $50.
Call 536-0064 or visit www.jaz
zelassic.net.
*Diana Ross, Saturday, Nov.
20, 8 p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall,
1111 McMullen Booth Road.
Tickets range from $63 to $129.
Call 791-7400 or visit www.
rutheckerdhall.com. Ross will
bring her More Today Than Yes-
terday tour to the area, pulling
out all the stops with breathtak-
ing costumes and stage designs,
along with a live string and horn
section. The legendary icon will
perform her greatest hits in a
spectacular live show. Ross has
had a profound influence on
American popular culture and
has become an icon in the enter-
tainment industry. She has sold
more than 100 million records
and recorded 18 No. 1 hits
songs. Her music became the
sound of young America in the
'60s soon after she signed with
Motown Records in 1961 with
The Supremes. She embarked on
her extraordinary solo career in
1970, and has not stopped since.
*Joe Satriani, Saturday, Dec.
4, 8 p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall,
1111 McMullen Booth Road.
Tickets range from $39 to $69.
Call 791-7400 or visit www.
rutheckerdhall.com. Satriani is
touring in support of his 14th
studio album, "Black Swans and
Wormhole Wizards," produced
and recorded by Mike Fraser and
Satriani. Satriani is joined by for-
mer bandmate Jeff Campitelli as
well as newcomers, keyboardist


Mike Keneally and bassist Allen
Whitman. Satriani's classic
sound is accompanied by a sur-
prisingly rich texture of new ma-
terial as well. Over the last two
decades, Satriani has traveled
the world, playing to sold-out
crowds as both a headliner and
as founder of the all-star "G3"
guitar extravaganza. As one of
the world's most renowned in-
strumental artists, Satriani
recorded "Live in Paris: I Just
Wanna Rock!" in 2008 at The
Grand Rex Theater in Paris,
France. The live two-dise CD and
DVD was released in February
2010 through Epic Records and
contained such memorable
songs as "Surfing With The
Alien," "Flying in a Blue Dream,"


"Super Colossal" and "I Just
Wanna Rock." In 2009, Satriani
joined with former Van Halen
front man Sammy Hagar, former
bassist Michael Anthony and Red
Hot Chili Peppers' drummer
Chad Smith, to form the stand-
out rock collaboration, Chicken-
foot. After a highly successful
U.S. tour, their self-titled debut
album was certified gold by the
Recording Industry Association
of America with over 500,000 in
album shipments.
*NBC's Last Comic Standing
Live Tour, Thursday, Dec. 30, 8
p.m., at Ruth Eckerd Hall, 1111
McMullen Booth Road. Reserved
tickets range from $29.50 to
$49.50 and are available at the
ticket office, by calling 791-7400


or online at www.rutheckerd
hall.com or www.ticketmaster.
com. The evening will feature
stand-up comedy with the final-
ists from NBC's popular laugh-
fest "Last Comic Standing."

Dune in
*Sing to the Sun, the art of
Ashley Bryan, through Oct. 17,
at Dunedin Fine Art Center,
1143 Michigan Blvd. Call 298-
3322 or visit www.dfac.org. De-
scribed by the poet Naomi
Shihab Nye as a "luminous force
of nature," Bryan's art is infused
with joy and imagination. Co-cu-
rated by Richard Entel, this exhi-

See LOOKING AH EAD, page 4B


Entertainment 3B


Styx to perform 'Grand Illusion,' 'Pieces of Eight' at REH





Parking is $5 at the park and $3 at the nearby Dunedin High School.
There will be food and beverage vendors on site, as well as a children's
tent with art projects provided for supervised children. Visit www.
jkcd.org.
*The fifth annual Senior Talent Show, Friday, Nov. 12, 6:30 p.m.,
at the Dunedin Community Center, 1920 Pinehurst Road. Hosted by
the City of Dunedin Parks & Recreation Department, the show is an
eclectic combination of talent by performers over the age of 50. In the
past, acts have included spoon players, banjo players, ballroom
dancers, comedians and vocalists. Tickets are $5. Visit www.dunedin
gov.com.
*The Dunedin Celtic Festival, Saturday, Nov. 20, noon to 9:30
p.m., at Highlander Park, 1920 Pinehurst Road. The featured bands
will be Seven Nations, Rathkeltair and Brother. Also performing will
be Scottish Highland dancers, Irish dancers, Dunedin Highland Mid-
dle School Band, Dunedin High School Scottish Highlander Band and
the City of Dunedin Pipe Band. Heavy athletics demonstrations will
take place throughout the day. Attendees will find food and drink as
they browse Celtic craft vendors and enjoy the music at this family
event. Admission is free. Parking is $10 a car. All proceeds benefit the
three Scottish bands of Dunedin. The festival is sponsored by the
Dunedin Highland Games and Festival Committee Inc., a nonprofit.
Visit www. dunedinhighlandgames. com.

Indian Rocks Beach
*Surfing the Surface: Tampa Bay Surface Design Guild Member
Show, through Oct. 22, at Beach Art Center, 1515 Bay Pahn Blvd.
Surface design is a way of manipulating fabric through dyeing, paint-
ing, stitchery, stenciling or screen printing to embellish or alter the
original surface. Artworks on display feature individuality in design,
beautiful color and variety in purpose. Four workshops are being of-
fered in conjunction with the exhibition, offered by exhibiting artists
and surface design notables Marlene Glickman, Linda Dawson and Pat
Lamb. Call 596-4331 or visit www.beacharteenter.org.

La o
*Howard Jones, Thursday, Oct. 14, 7:30 p.m., at the Largo Cul-
tural Center, 105 Central Park Drive. Tickets are $35 in advance'
$40 VIP and $40 the day of the show. Call 587-6793. One of the
most influential pop perfonners from the '80s, Jones will perfonn a
slacino hits such as m'~ig sCan Only Get Better," No One Is to
Blm," "Nw ng' an "Wa sLv?
*Brown Bag Movies, Thursday, Oct. 21, 12:30 p.m., at Largo
Public Library, 120 Central Park Drive. The featured presentation
will be ''The Black Stallion." Attendees may bring their own lunch.
Popcorn and soda will be provided. Call 587-6715.
PuBrown Bag1 Mv thr dar, nt T8 fe3 ep.m.,s nt Lag
will be "Hope and Glory." Attendees may bring their own lunch. Pop-
comn and soda will be provided. Call 587-6715.
Ot"Big River,"wt William HaL lanuan andllrc y stRo0 erC 1 e
Park Drive. Call 587-6793. Perfonnances will be Thursday through
Saturday, 8 p.m. Matinees will be Sunday, 2 p.m. Tickets are $25
for adults and $12 for students. Mark Twain's tuneless classic will
sweep audiences down the mighty Mississippi as the irrepressible
Huck Finn helps his friend, Jim, a slave, escape to freedom at the
mouth of the Ohio River. Their adventures along the way are hilari-
ous, suspenseful and heartwanning, bringing to life favorite charac-
ters from the novel-the Window Douglas and her stern sister, Miss
Watson; the uproarious King and Duke, who may or may not be as
harmless as they seem; Huck's partner in crime, Tom Sawyer, and
their rowdy gang of pairs; Huck's drunken father, the sinister Pap
Finn; the lovely Mary Jane Wilkies and her trusting family.
*Sunset Sounds, Friday, Nov. 12, 7 to 9 p.m., at Ulmer Park,
301 West Bay Drive. Featured artist The McMillans will perfonn. The
free concert series reveals the diversity of local musicians. Attendees
can eat dinner at an area restaurant or bring a picnic and dine
under the trees while enjoying live music perfonned in the gazebo.
Visit www.1largoevents. com.
*"All Aboard," Sunday, Nov. 14, 3 p.m., at St. Dunstan's Angli-
can Church, 403 First Ave. SW. Tickets are $15 each. Group tickets
are $12 each for a minimum 10 and seasonal tickets good for
three shows are $30. Presented by the Sunsation Show Chorus,
this show will present a musical trip to places such as Kansas City,
Phoenix, Old Cape Cod, San Francisco, China, Paris, Rome, Egypt,
Rio, Brazil and Argentina. Call 541-4501.

Pinellas Park
*Sacred Heart Fall Festival, through Oct. 17, at Sacred Heart
Catholic Church, 7809 46th Way N. Hours will be Wednesday
through Friday, 6 to 11 p.m.; Saturday, noon to 11 p.m.; and Sun-
day, noon to 8 p.m. Ride tickets cost $10 a sheet before the festival
or $20 a sheet at the festival. The event will feature food, music,
games and prizes. Call 541-4447.
*Theater Pipe Organ Performance, Tuesday, Oct. 19, 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m., at the City Auditorium, 7690 59th St. Attendees will
relive the golden years of theater as melodies are played on the





Wor ks
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Pepperoni, Sausage, Ham, Green Peppers, Onions & Mushrooms
(No substitutions please Deletions ok )


S4~;~10KACr1M~alf.1ialur agillill~Blr e~AKBM Zi-WF. Z8 I


Mighty Wurlitzer Theater Organ. Perfonnances are presented third
Tuesday. Admission is free.
*Pinellas Park Police Department Speed Show, Saturday, Oct.
23, 5 to 9 p.m. at Pinellas Park Equestrian Center, 6401 94th Ave.
N. Admission is free. Proceeds will go to the department's mounted
patrol unit and volunteer mounted unit. Call 547-8495.
*Bay Area Horseman's Association Horse Show, Sunday, Oct.
24, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., at Pinellas Park Equestrian Center, 6301 94th
Ave. N. Admission is free. Contests will include galloping, jumping,
trotting, turning and walking backward and forward. There will be
various types of vendors including food and drinks and an adjacent
playground. Visit www.bayareahorseshows. com.
*Movies in the Park, Saturday, Oct. 30, at England Brothers
Band Shell, 5121 80th Ave. The movie will start at dusk. Conces-
sions will include popcorn, candy, hot dogs and soda. Proceeds from
the concessions will benefit the Firefighters' Benevolent Fund. The
fund is used for holiday toy and dinner giveaways and to assist fire
victims in Pinellas Park. Call Nick DelGrosso at 687-4494 or e-mail
ndelgrosso@pinellas-park.com.
*Pinellas Park Civic Orchestra, Sunday, Nov. 7, 7:30 p.m., at
the Pinellas Park Perfonning Arts Center, 4951 78th Ave. Admission
is free but donations will be accepted. The orchestra will perform
light classical, show tunes and pop selections. Performances will
continue first Sundays through April. Call Dick VanDommelen at
415-9650 or visit www.pinellasparkorchestra.com.
*"All Aboard," Sunday, Nov. 7, 3 p.m., at the Pinellas Park Per-
forming Arts Center, 4951 78th Ave. Tickets are $15 each. Group
tickets are $12 each for a minimum 10 and seasonal tickets good
for three shows are $30. Presented by the Sunsation Show Cho-
rus, this show will present a musical trip to places such as Kansas
City, Phoenix, Old Cape Cod, San Francisco, China, Paris, Rome,
EgyIpt, Rio, Brazil and Argentina. Call 541-4501.
*Theater Pipe Organ Performance, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m., at the City Auditorium, 7690 59th St. Attendees will
relive the golden years of theater as melodies are played on the
Mighty Wurlitzer Theater Organ. Perfonnances are presented third
Tuesday. Admission is free.
*Movies in the Park, Saturday, Nov. 20, at England Brothers
Band Shell, 5121 80th Ave. The movie will start at dusk. Conces-
sions will include popcorn, candy, hot dogs and soda. Proceeds from
the concessions will benefit the Firefighters' Benevolent Fund. The
fund is used for holiday toy and dinner giveaways and to assist fire
victims in Pinellas Park. Call Nick DelGrosso at 687-4494 or e-mail
ndelgrosso@pinellas-park.com.
*Pinellas Park Civic Orchestra, Sunday, Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m., at
the Pinellas Park Performnn Arts Center, 4951 78th Ave. Admission
is free but donations will be accepted. The orchestra will perform
light classical, show tunes and pop selections. Performances will
continue first Sundays through April. Call Dick VanDommelen at
415-9650 or visit www. inella parkorchestra.com.

a.11. ela 1r pm teth Pe Ct uiooium, 769 59t StD Ate21{es 110
relive the golden years of theater as melodies are played on the
Mighty Wurlitzer Theater Organ. Perfonnances are presented third
Tuesday. Admission is free.
Safety H rbo
*Heart and Soul Cinema, Sunday, Oct. 17, 1:30 p.m., at Safety
Harbor Public Library, 101 Second St. N. The feature presentation
will be ''The Painted Veil, starring Edward Norton and Naomi Watts.
The film is based on the novel by W. Somerset Maugham. A discus-
sion will follow the film. Call 724-1525, ext. 112.

St. Petersburg
*"The Hound of the Baskervilles," by Tim Kelly, through Oct.
17, at St. Petersburg Little Theatre, 4025 31st St. S. Perfonnances
are Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. Matinees are Sunday, 2 p.m. ''The
Hound of the Baskervilles" is the greatest of all Sherlock Holmes ad-
ventures. The play boasts a setting that takes literature's most
spine-chilling mystery and turns it into a play of suspense, humor
and ultimate terror. Sir Henry has become heir to the vast
Baskerville fortune, a legacy that comes complete with a family
curse death at the fangs of a living horror prowling the English
moor. Call 866-1973 or visit www.splt.org.
*"The Mystery of Irma Vep," by Charles Ludlam, presented by
American Stage Theatre Company, through Oct. 17, at the Raymond
James Theatre, 163 Third St. N. Performances will be Tuesday
through Thursday, 7:30 p.m.; and Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m.
Matinees will be Saturday and Sunday, 3 p.m. Tickets range from
$29 to $50. Call 823-7529 or visit www.americanstage.org. Ludlam's
Obie-winning comedy is a riotous Gothic spoof that satirizes every-
thing from Alfred Hitchcock's fihns to Victorian melodrama and the
movie ''The Mummy's Curse." It's also a quick-change marathon in
which two actors play a dozen roles: English newlyweds, a mysteri-
ous maid, a sympathetic werewolf, a vampire and an Egyptian
princess brought back to life. But just who was (or is) Inna Vep? Di-
rected by Todd Olson, the play stars Matthew McGee and Brian
Webb Russell.


Experience
scouting 4'
West Central Florida Council, BSA
727-391-3800
www.BeAScout.org





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4


Leader, October 14, 2010


LOOKING AHEAD, from page 3B


bition will present select illustrations from his celebrated books as
well as his handmade puppets created from found objects gathered
along the shores of Little Cranberry Island where he calls home. The
author or illustrator of more than 30 books, Bryan has won several
awards in children's literature, including the Coretta Scott King
Award and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal. He is one of the New York
Public Library's Literary Lions and the recent winner of a Golden Kite
award. A graduate of Cooper Union and Fulbright Scholar, Bryan re-
tired as emeritus professor from Dartmouth in 1988.
*Visions of Enchantmnent, work by Janny Wurts and Don Maitz,
through Oct. 17, at Dunedin Fine Art Center, 1143 Michigan Blvd.
Call 298-3322 or visit www.dfac.org. The museum will present the
works of two stellar artists in the reahn of science fiction and fantasy
art. This husband-and-wife creative team, based in Sarasota, are
highly regarded masters of the genre.
*Gulf Coast Artists' Alliance Inc. art exhibit, through Oct. 30, at
the GCAA Cooperative Gallery, in front of Rick's Picks Beads and Es-
sentials, 514 Skinner Blvd. The featured artist will be Janet Aponte,
painter and mixed media artist. The exhibit may be viewed during
store hours, Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Call 738-
8010 or visit www.geaa-fl.org.
*Stirling Art Studios exhibit, through Oct. 31, at the Dunedin
Fine Art Center's Stirling Hall Gallery, 730 Broadway. The show will
feature new works by the studio's artists. An opening reception is
planned for Friday, Oct. 8. Artists will be on hand to discuss their
work. The reception will include refreshments and music. Gallery
hours are Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Saturday,
noon to 3 p.m.
*Movies in Pioneer Park, Friday, Oct. 15, 7:30 p.m., at the comer
of Main Street and Douglas Avenue in downtown Dunedin. The fea-
tured fihn will be 1939's '~The Wizard of Oz." Visit www.dunedingov
.com.
*Fall Antiques Fair, Saturday, Oct. 16, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., along
Main Street in downtown Dunedin. The fair will feature many vendors
selling memorabilia, collectibles and antiques. In conjunction with the
fair, there will be a classic car show on Broadway. Call 812-4530 or
e-mailj sebald@dunedinfl. net.
*Taste of Dunedin, Sunday, Oct. 17, 1 to 5 p.m., in the downtown
district. Tickets are $10 each and are valid for five tasting and a raf-
fle entry. Tickets may be purchased Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 16-
17, at The Boxcar, 349 Main St., Dunedin; and the Chamber of
Commerce, 301 Main St., Dunedin. Attendees will enjoy an interactive
tasting tour of Dunedin restaurants paired with the downtown shops.
Participants may redeem tickets for a 3-ounce taste of signature items
from up to 30 locations.
*Movies in Pioneer Park, Friday, Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m., at the comer
of Main Street and Douglas Avenue in downtown Dunedin. The fea-
tured film will be 1953's 'iThe Beast from 20,000 Fathoms." Visit
wwd ndin o~cm
TMove ingPo c er Park, Friday, Oct. 29, 7:30 p.m., at the comer
of Main Street and Douglas Avenue in downtown Dunedin. The fea-
tured film will be 1931s "Dracula." Visit www.dunedingov.com.
*The 47th annual Art Harvest, Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 6-7, at
Highlander Park, 1920 Pinehurst Road. Presented by the Junior
League of Clearwater-Dunedin Inc., the free Art Harvest is a fine art
festival featuring more than 200 artists from around the country. This
year's featured artist is James Michael Nemnich. Nenmich resides in
Indialantic. Being a long time Floridian, his local environment and
close proximity to the ocean have heavily influenced his unique artis-
tic style. His work reflects his many travels throughout the world.


Music &c ILyics twBob Medl l
Book 1%. Michel Slewart
Ikised on Mated~al lwv Helen Deutchl
Odrg~inal P~mduction disectd and chlortographe tw Gowrer Ch~arplan
Pmdfucel for the Bmrroadwa Stge by David Merdck


NOvember 11, 12 & 13 at 7pm


Doors Open at 6:3o p.m.
Seminole High School Auditorium


House Draft
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Musical Show is produced by arrngement with, and the music and dialogue material fumished by TAMS.
WITMARK MUSIC LIBRARY. INC. 560 Lexin~gton Avenue, New York, NY 10022


776 Missouri Ave. N., Larg0 (Just North of W. Bay Dr.) o
727-584-5888
Outdoor Patio Great Bar Private Dining Hoom


4B Entertainment


'llcket Prices:
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For ticket information
at www~seminoledramr
call Kim at 727


I












Leader, October 14, 2010 ClaSsifieds 5B


To Place An Ad Call (72 7) 397-5563 Fax (727) 399-2042

or order your ad online 24/7 @ TBNweekly.com

Deadlines: Display, Friday-5 p.m. Line Ads, Monday-Noon


S. PASADENA
3/2 Polican Cree ltownhouse, furn/unfurn, golf course, pool, pet OK .$1,200
TREASURE ISLAND
1/1 Hidden Treasure apartments, tile floors, laundry on site .. .. .. .$675
1/1 Treasure Island apartment, terrazzo floor, small pet OK .........$775
C/ Il nl Cp~rl0 erfront home, garneal negbor~hood, pet 0K ... .$,0

MADEIRA BEACH
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WE NEED YOUR RENTAL!!!
For the BEST property management along the beaches call us today
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(727) 393-2534 1-800-950-2534 www.trsincrom


~-II



!II
111










Is!


;II


CLEARWATER BEACH: Beach-
front home, next to public access.
750 ElDorado Ave. $1,200,000.
John Doran Realty. (727)461-9142
WATERFRONT VILLA
2 Bedroom, 1,500 sq. ft., garage,
deeded boat slip
$245,000.
WATERFRONT TOWNHOME
Overlooks IC waterway
3BR/2BA/2CG, furnished

Beach Place One Real Estate
(727)593-3000, (800)487-8959.



SEMINOLE GARDENS
Sales & Rentals
DON'T LET THE PRICES

2oAOCRY OCUE A ICE
UNITS AT GREAT PRICES!

1BR/1BA, 712 sq. ft.
2nd fl., 55+, New A/C & Ap-
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2BR/2BA, 1,056 sq. ft.
2nd fl.,FEnd Uit, Upg ads,


1BR/1BA, 1,012 sq. ft.
3rd fl., Elevator bldg., 55+
End Unit, Sunroom $22,900
Ridge Seminole Mgmt. Corp.
Lyn. E...s, Realtor

MySmn le6 r~d~e~n.com

A PRISTINE, CLEAN, NEWLY
Renovated 2BR/1BA. Park Like
S ttingC.loove-In Ready. 55+ Com-
p xc. sese900. very)391-9' -
'(32)e584-4125. (2) ,
BUY OWNER. BEACH CONDO
Sand Key. 2BR/2BA, Completely
Remodeled, Furnished. $374,000.
No Realtors. (727)804-8689.

Gre VE TaOWS RADCIFCFoEno
w/Covered Parking. Nicely Up-
dated! Sellredr F nnoc ng $B8a4,9

(727)215-7722.
GORGEOUS 2BR/2BA/CP
1,245SF, $120,000. 2008 Granite/
Cherry Kitchen, Oak Floors,
Screened Porch. Gas Cooking/
Heat. Pools. Nelah Parker, Cold-
well Banker, (727)244-7600.
IRB: Prestigious Dolphin Reef
Beautifully Remodeled, Gulffront.
First Offering @Only $447K<. Davis
Suncoast Realty, (727)595-7592.

OPENSHOtUhS CLEARWATE ,
#D244. 2BR/2BA, 55+, $85,000.
Open 12-4, Saturday & Sunday.
$85,000. (727)586-0609.
SEMINOLE GARDENS!
Sales & Rentals
Robert G. Castles, PA, Broker
(727)595-8229
www.seminolegarden.com
SHIPWATCH
Nic Slec in of0Watter view Con-

Shipwatch Realty. (727)596-6508.
www.S h ipwatch Realty.com


BARDMOOR: 2BR/2BA VILLA
With Garage, Florida Room, Pool,
Rec., Washer/ Dryer. Great Buy!!
$102,000. Glen Webb,
(727)515-4443. C-21 Top Sales.


ATTRACTIVE, NEWLY
Renovated 1 BR, Seminole, 55+.
A/C, WID, Carport, Florida Rm.
Half Block To Buses, Shopping,
Dining, Doctors, Dentists. $4K.
(727)391-9235, (352)584-4125.
COME SEE THE DIFFERENCE!

3035 66th Ave. N., St. Petersburg.
Activities, Pool, Shuffleboard.
Homes From $500.
(727)527-2056.



















RANCHERO VILLAGE: LARGO,
55+ Nice, Pet Friendly Park. SW'
2BR/1BA. $7,500. (727)798-7816.


SELL OR RENT Your Timeshare
for cash! Our Guaranteed Serv-
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WANTED: MOBILE HOMES!
Must Be Under 50 Feet And
Moveable. Less Than $3,000.
Call Michelle (727)657-2104
or Evon (813)789-8331.



HARD-TO-FIND B4 ZONING
property for sale or lease on High-
way0 4F4in douth MarionnCaucnr
Great for church, clubs, meetings,
etc. For info, contact Realtor An-
thony White. (352)547-3137.



CAVENDER CREEK CABINS
Dahlonega, North Georgia Moun-
tains. 1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Cabins
with Hot Tubs. Take virtual tour at
www.3Ca e dCreek.com. or call

GEORGIA CRAWFORD CO, 85
acres, $1,125/ac. Where will you
Iun .hsseas is Ot~he acts
(478)987-9700. stregispaper~com.

GOE are w t 1E,0 0ft on r u
stream. Cutcane Road paved

oea y Rare fn $10K Owe fi
nancing, EZ terms, low down. Call
(706)364-4200.
GEORGIA MOUNTAINS NORTH
Income-aprdun ko decbilnst (3
nished, recently appraised. All for
$495K, or will sell separately. Call
(706)253-8000. npgbrokers.com.
GEORGIA: ESCAPE THE
Storms and Heat! Beautif ul
Heated esear 9 udm Lw Tax sd
to 20 acs, from $3,750/ac. Near
Augusta and Blue Ridge. Owner fi-
nancing from $199/mo. Call
(706)364-4200.
NC MOUNTAIN LAND: MOUN-
tain top tract. 2.6 acres, private,
large public lake five mins. away.
O ner7 mus sell, only $25,500.

NC MOUNTAINS: LOG CABIN
Liquidation. New 1,200SF genuine
log cabins w/acreage, $79,900.
Plenty of windows, decks. Need
finishing. (866)738-5522.
SOUTH CAROLINA: TWO ACS
in the Santee, Cooper Lake area'
Near 1-95. Beautiful building tract,
$19,900. Ask about easy financ-
ing, low payments. Call owner:
(803)473-7125.
TENNFSSEE -aOBEY RIVER B

deep swimming area. $19,900.
Owner financing. (931)839-6141.

Tim~be rSe rie~r natua ga
well, springs, city water, utilities,
trails. $1,800/ac. Two tracts possi-
ble. Good hunting. No state in-
come tax. Call (888)836-8439.

VRGInNI hav N INS: Galax
area. Six acres on river, great fish-
ing, private, reduced! $59,500.
Call owner now! (866)275-0442.


CLEARWATER 2BR/1BA, C/H/A,
Spacious Living Room, Carpet,
Tile In Kitchen. Clean! $645/Mo.
(727)458-3477.

CLEARWATER 3BR/2BA/2CG,
2 car carport, plus In-law apat-
ment, pool, fireplace, fenced yard.
$1,650/Mo. Annual.
(727)446-4830.
Cearwater:uSpaciours 2BR/1B

crest, Near Glen Oaks Park.
$700/Month. (727)581-5221.


Across Pn las. 3/2sA/ s 5/2s,
starting from the $900s. Family
owned. (727)532-0020.
PINELLAS PARK: 7275 62nd St.
3BR/1BA, utility room, $800/mo.
(727)954-7712, (727)742-8529.

+F miy R00 w Bewl remoed,
1,300 SF, nonsmoking, pet
considered, fencd 0/onh.

SEMINOLE: TWO HOMES NEAR
f oos. enR/ BA2CG, i e
12841 93rd Ave., $1,400/month.
13203 Dorchester, $1,300/month.
+security (727)515-5481.



Fu EhMIdNOLE GARDBERNSB,
2BR/2BA, Rent Negotiable. Pool,
Clubhouse, Walk To Mall.
(860)965-2467.
SEMINOLE GARDENS, 55+.
2BR/2BA, Extremely Clean.
$700/Mo., Yearly. (727)398-5037.
VILLA MILAN: ON LAKE
Seminole, 2BR/2BA, Great Views,
2nd Floor. $825/Mo. 1st/ Last/ Se-
curity. Best Beach Rentals.
(727)398-1200.

* llmm~~I s *
BARDMOOR: Cordova Greens,
2BR/2BA, Condo. Pool, Carport,
W/a~shr CD ee c$9 0Mo th
(727)515-4443. C-21 Top Sales.
BEAUTIFUL 2BR/2BA CONDO,
55+, $850/month includes W/S/T,
pest control, Long Bayou.
(813)-254-1600.
BELLEAIR: 2BR/2BA, Extra
Nice, 1,200 SF, 1st Floor. Covered
Parking, New Carpet & Paint.
Pool $280 W19tth, Includes Watenr


1BR/1BA & 2BR/2BA
13300 Walsingham Rd., pool,

7 Oc 00F. Uepadaed utrs, le
view, walk-in closets, $599/Mo.
(727)424-2945.
CLEARWATER: COZY, QUIET

wth elB aor n ar ludry du
sh ppig tse nes poolf golf. ra
water. Pets OK, (727)215-1034.
COVE CAY 2BR/2BA, Upgrades,



LAKEVIEW OF LARGO,
2BR/1.5BA, Ground Floor, New
Carpet, Fresh Paint, New Kitchen
Appliances, 55+ Community,
$600/Mo. Shipwatch Realty, Inc.
www.Ship~l~atch Realty.com
(727)596-6508.
LARGE 1BR/1BA IN BELLEAIR.
Nice Views, New Appliances,
Carport, Cable, Pool, Clubhouse.
$750/Mo. Kevin, (727)480-1055.
MODERN CONDOS, SEMINOLE
2BR BbAGae cl0 rutnity

Barcley Estates, 1BR/1BA, Tile,
Pool, 55+, $675/Month. Koenig
Property Mgmt. (727)452-1350
SEMINOLE, INTRACOASTAL
View! 2BR/2BA. Hurricane Shut-
ters. W/D. Microwave. Pool. Stor-
age, Exercise & Club room, FREE
Cable. Petless/ Non-smoking.
$1,200/month, (727)596-9656.


SEMINOLE:2BR/2BA, TOTALLY
Remodeled. Living/ Dining Room,
Eat-in Kitchen, WID, Pool, Spa,
Carpon. $785/Mo. (727)482-9139.
SHIPWATCH: 2BR/2BA (2 Units
Available). Ask About FREE Rent!
Walk To Beach. Pools & Tennis.
$1,200/Mo. Shipwatch Rlty. Inc.
www.Ship~l~atch Realty.com
(727)596-6508.


LARGO 1BR/1BA, NEWLY Tiled,
Plantation Shutters, well main-
sane qt 6 mmu it~y First, lat,



DOWNTOWN CLEARWATER
2SBR, W/G Inc In 80 Mlo. +3500
Beach. (727)455-7173.
FACING EVICTaON?

Studio apts, s arting @ 185kwee~k.

s cuit~yedep st. Fre 7lo~cal p6 ne


CrRer. Clo~se o LrgeoFed cR
Center. $650/Mo. Includes Cable.
Petless. (727)581-2103
SEA TOWERS, 2BR/2BA. Gated
Community, Great Amenities, Re-
served Parking. Available Immedi-

atuel S~easontl r$1,i5e0Mqouatr

(727)393-4812 -
SEMINOLE. 8423 SEMINOLE
Bvd 1B1ABR. m 795D/ionth
NICE! 2BR Includes W/D. Both in-
clude Super Cable. No pets, No
smoking. (727)584-4707.
SEMINOLE: Efficiency, $185/Wk.
1BR/1BA, $200/Week. Pool. Incl.
Utilities & Cable. No Credit Check.
(727)798-7816.
SEMINOLE: 1 BR/1BA, Nicely
Furnished, Second Floor, Pool,
Clubhouse. Deposit re uired. n
(727)393-4812.


$35MOVE-IN SPECIAL!
2BR/1-1 .5BA. Pool, Lau ndry
Room. Starting At$675/Month.
5290 70th Ave. N., Pinellas Park.
(727)526-2683.
SEMINOLE GARDENS, 55+.
1BR Standard, All New, Unfurn.,
$600/Mo.1IBR Deluxe, Unfurn.,

Ro65 M .2BR/1BA Or rM .

(727)595-8229.
BELLEAIR BLUFFS, COLONIAL
Blfsn ils n2g~s Wacte, Qruret,
coastal, Shopping. Overlooking
Beautiful Pool & Courtyard. 2942
West Bay Dr. (727)501-5959.
BELLE AIR BLUFFS! NEAR
Ba h, SH/png,CResta ranT
Vertical Blinds, Carport, $550/Mo'
(727)595-0212.
BELLEAIR GREENS APTS.

Corse uel I eovtd A rss

$875/month. (727)365-6821.

BELLEAIR PLACE APTS '
Month Of October
$29Gef's You In!
MUST HURRY WHILE THEY LAST!
(Offer Only Good On AFew SeleclApts.)
Look & Lease, We'll
Waive Application Feel
Spaiu & Alfordablacose,

Ju Mi ue eTeo Tehde Bahl
Featuring 2 Full Baths, W/D
Connections Or W/D
Rentals, Designer Kitchens,
Bui t-in Microwaves, Walk-in
Closets, Pool, Fitness Cen-
ter, 2 Paygroun s & More.
Call (727)581-9800


CENTURY OAKS IN LARGO
Affordable, Luxury, 1&2 BRs,
From $650/Month. ONLY 2 LEFT!
W/S/G, Cable Incl. I Rent Realty.
(727)420-7822.
CLEARWATER ON PINELLAS
Trail. Updated kitchen, end unit.
2BR/1BA, tile floors, pool, laun-
dry. Includes W/S/T. $700/Month.
Section 8 OK. (727)781-7665.
CLEARWATER, 2BR/1BA/2CG,
WID Hook-ups. Includes W/S/G.
Small Pet Okay. Nonsmoker.
$600/Mo. (727)434-5800.
CLEARIWATER Itrge ,eETBpA

Cable Included. $300 Security.
Background Check. Available Oct.
15th. (727)409-3391.


FABULOUS

FALL SPECIAL!

Clear Harbor Apts.
1 240 U.SrHFy '9 N

$292BDR O

$719/Mo. For A
Spacious, Stylish Apartment.
Close To Everywhere
You Need hoBe

W Da Cncti sn Gou met
Kicens, Wl- Coes,
Pool & Fitness Center
Call Now For Details
(727)545-1 440

LARGO 1 BR, PETLESS,
$500/mo. includes utilities, annual.
Background/ credit check req. Call
after 5pm, (727)452-0421.
LARGO'S BEST Kept Secret
Beautiful Lake-View Apts.
Mile To Baches.n Poo iot Tub,

Paddle Boats, More! Util. Incl.
Move-in 2S 1903lnly $299.

LARGO, leBEDROOM, $41 MoK.

624 Woodlawn. Dunedin Room
$75/Wk. Call (727)586-2412 or
Click www.586-2412.com
LARGO, EAST BAYOUS 19
LIKE NEW, BEAUTIFUL, Upscale,
Quiet 1BR/1BA, 2nd Floor
WalkOU~pE re Water. $575/Mo.
NOPT.(727)461-1177.

sLA O 4T AVE e C5 y
Rentals. (77398-1200.
LARGO: VERY CLOSE TO
Tarlansprorttion Ohop ing2BHosB -
$675/mo., 2Br/2Ba, $725/mo
(727)280-5005
NEWLY RENOVATED
Royal P60m Apartm nts Starting

Call S err tln (10d3)422-0235





APARTMENTS

55+ Communiy












1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
Small pets welcome
727-585-3723
Next door to
argo 's Brand New a
Community Center (

SEMINOLE: 55+, 1BR/1BA, ALL
NEW Kitchen, Bath, Carpet, Tile,
Paint. Great Location, Amenities.
$650/Month. Incl. W/S/G, Cable.
(727)639-9801.
S.W. LARGO: LG. 1BR/1BA,
Quiet. Laundry on Premises.
Petless. $500/mo., $400 security.
Yearly lease. (727)595-2228. Last
Month FREE!




1oy :la 9OC ta CsH
Step to Beach. Pet F upndl .
ww sU ncleMiltsCottag n~co .
(727)595-8013.


BELLEAIR BCH: 3BR/2BA/1CG,
Unfurnished Home. Fenced Back-
yard, Steps To Gulf Pet OK.
$1,200/Month. (727)596-4949.


nr mxl
INDIAN ROCKS BEACH
Short Sale, Won't Lasts '
Remodeled 3BR/2BA Pool Home.
Walk To Beach. Only $267K<.
Dayi 2Sur oast5Realty,


LAR60O POOL HOME



IM

3BR/3BA/2CG
2,350 sq. ft. Home
on golf course near
Taylor Park.
Open Floor Plan.
Fenced Yard, Office.


(7272 6-845


I if5 Time I

SHome buyer :

SProgram* I

O lolnereStRate

SMortigge i
SDown Paymentsitae:
I at 0% Interest :

I Housing Finance Authority :
Sof Pine las County a
~ I

S1-800-806-5154 i
Swww.pinellascounty.org/community/ha 3

SProgram available in Pinellas, Polk I
Sand Pasco unties. I

Sin hlatyears
mmmmemmmemmmmmmmmmmmmmma


How to SELL any BEACH AREA
home FAST & MAKE Thousands
MORE! 24Hr Recorded Info,
1-888-Mr-Beach Ext. 3331.

REAL EST TE AUO ON


17111 Mockingbird Lane, Lutz.
3BR 2BA 1,210sf+/- condo.
6262 142 Ave. N. #1010, Clnrwtr.
2BR 2BA 1,241sf +/- condo.
13156 120TH St. N., Largo
4BR 2BA 1,416sf+/-
102493 Osis Palm3 f+.Tampa

All properties sell: 12:00PM Sun.,
Oct. 24 at 10249 Oasis Palm Dr.,
Tampa O n to he Public


Many pro rties 1 available
for online bidding!
A Buyer's Premium may apply.
Williams & Williams
FL RE LIC#BK3223097
DANIEL NELSON, BROKER,
W&W RE LIC#1032049






All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Falr
ade tse "ay perene sriato o

religion, sex, handicap, familial status, o
national origin, or an intention, to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status includes
children under the age of 18 living with
parents or legal custodians; pregnant
women and people securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this newspaper
are available on an equal opportunity
basis. To complain of discrimination call
HUD Toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The
Toll-free telephone number for the
hearing impaired is i-800-927-9275.






Jlove-In Ready! Million $$$ Views.
Clubhouse. $599,000. Liz, Execu-
tive Inc., (727)461-6000.
BELLEAIR SHORES
BEACHFRONT HOME
Spacious 4BR/3BA, Large FR,
Woodburning Fireplace, Formal
DR, Separate Office Entrance.
Value elnLand ,8 0' x24 0' .
$2,000,000, Owner Financing. Liz,
Executive Inc., (727)461-6000.
CLEARWATER BEACH
440 West Condos, 2BR/2BA Split
wlGarage, Gulf-front! Two Units
A ailalaM 12t 2FIoo $3 Bd0

Dreams Real Estate, Rebecca
Henry, (727)504-9490.
NEAR CLEARWATER PASS, 15
Minutes To Gulf. 4BR/2BA, Pool,
Spea, Ba tLift &FDoavis.D s o
RE Sales & Rentals, Inc.
(727)595-5774.




Call Classifieds
For Your Hot Link
(727) 397-2563


uive mne riorlaao uream!
Just steps from the beacth

Bori 11 berom, 1 bbethh $9100


Fr e: (to e ision Pr (ontrbat 11( Ftrs,
(larpet Clealning, WI/5/

13 mont uese /He/ 13 Mont~h F ee
Lease now to move in
November, December or January
17105 Gulf Blvd., NRB
727-392-0753

UNDulANu OxCKS:I kBR IBc
$700/Month, Annual. Best Beach
Rentals. (727)398-1200.

R Nodeld "slan Llo '.
Pics Available. Private balcony.
Walkto Beach. Reduced!
$915/mo., includes all utilities.
(813)294-3400.
IRB TOWNHOUSE. QUIET
2BR/2BA, WID, storage,
$1,200/Mo. Yearly lease. No Pets.
Call Bob, (727)410-5108.
MADEIRA BEACH: EFFICIENCY
w/l~it hen,dFurnished, Phone, Ca-

Beach. No Pets. $250/week, FL
Resi 4- 51 14711 Gulf Blvd.
(727) 9-05.
MADEIRA BEACH DUPLEX
1BR/1BA, fully furnished. Utilities
included. Walk to beach, John's
Pass. Nonsmokers. $850/mo.
Viewpoint Realty, (727)448-3533.
REDINGTON SHORES: NICE
3BR/2BA/1CG, Unfurn. House.
000ty f P king. Nal~k- 5Beach.

TREASURE ISLAND
EFFICIENCY BR/2BR
WATERFRONT RESORT

Iul Fu nsmed U/lt ite &
Cable. Long/ Short Term Avail.
Pool, BBQ, Laundry, Fishing,
Docks/ Slips. Wkly/$200 & Up,
Mthly/$750 & Up. 11160 1st St. E.
(727)323-6698 Ext. 1163.

TBREABSAURE ISLANDce.LARGE
ute Walk To Beach. Quiet Neigh-
borhood. (727)512-4301.



BEACH CONDOS, FANTASTIC
views! Direct beach front,
Redington Shores. 2BR, 3BR.
1,250-2,000SF, Furn. /Unfurn.
Heated Pool. Pets OK.
$1,375/month. (727)490-2765.
ISLAND ESTATES CONDO,
2BR/2BA, 2 Balcony, Waterfront
wlDock. Modern & Updated. Un-
furnished. $1,400/Month. Call Liz,
Executive Inc., (727)804-4280,
(727)461-6000.

ISBLANBDA.ESSTtEa u1a5THieFwL
Sales & Rentals Island Estates,
Clearwater Beach, Sand Key, Bel-
leair Beach. Pappas Realty &
Mgmt. Co. Vangie (727)447-6852.
JOHN'S PASS: 1BR/1BA
Cottages. Fully Furnished, On-site
Laundry, Blk. To Beach. $250/Wk.
Includes Electric, Water, Cable.
Dock Available. (727)392-5378.

TREASURE ISLAND,
105 110th Ave. 1 BR & 2BR, Dock,
Laundry, From $675/Mo. Walk To
Beach. Credit Check. Pets OK.
(727)367-9474.

TREASURE ISLAND, ISLE OF
Capri, 2BR/2BA/2CG, Dock
w/aBo t Lilft.650M nue ,ToA Jhn's



Tr~esaee Islan~deassle OfCtaipori,
2BR/1BA/1CG Condo, 1,200 SF,
Open Water, wlBoat Slip.
(727)409-8848.


INDIAN ROCKS AREA
1BR/1BA Furnished Mobile.
Quiet, Shady Park. $455/Mo.
+$300 Security. Petless.
(727)595-8232.
LARGO DUPLEX Side-by-Side
3BR/1.5BA/1CG, Newly

C/ReA W/e eokups small
Pet OK. Section-8 welcome.
JUST REDUCED RENT!!!
Bob, (727)686-8973.
CHEAP APARTMENTS! FROM
$500 per month. Thousands of
apartments available at dis-
counted rates (800)524-9780.
CHEAP APARTMENTS! FROM
$500/mo. Millions of rentals na-
tionwide. Low income and luxury
at discounted rates. Call now!
(800)805-6834.



RENT-TO-OWN: GULFPORT
2BR Bungalow. Newer Kitchen,
C/H/A. Newer windows. Close to
Marina. 728725/3mo h5FlHURRY!




FALL AT THE BEACH!
1C2y : e~an Cottka es.
Steps to Beach. Pet Frieundly.
www.U ncleMiltsCottages.com
(727)595-8013.



BELLEAIR 2BR/2BA/1CG, NICE!
Clean & Spacious. Large Sunroom
604 Mehlenbacher Rd. $895/Mo.
(Discounted rent). (727)586-2412.


~~Wt~u2e~L~F





PACKER/ UNPACKER
Packer/ Unpacker needed for a "white glove" move
management and organizing service. We are not movers.
This is a flex-time (parttime) position. Applicants must be able
to work a physical 6-8 hour day, pass an extensive criminal
background & drug test. Applications will be accepted in
person only Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Apply at:

Welcome Home Relocation, Inc.
1115 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suite A-5, Belleair, FL 33756
No phone calls
Visit our website at:
www.welcomehomerelocation.com


PERSONAL CARE ASSISTANT
We are looking for experienced, dependable CNAs/HHAs
to help our clients in Pinellas and Pasco Counties
We offer: Our Services Include:

SCmetiitive Pay ompianionshiepsoaae
* Flexible Sc edules Light Housekeeping
* Mileage Reimbursement M~eal preparation
* Employer Paid Life Insurance Shopping, Dinners and more
* Company Banking Benefits

Phone (727) 448-0900
Fax (727) 443-5258
EASYLIVINGNL HHA29992282 5


THE STREETS OF
REDINGTON BEACH
lietween 155tl Ave. & 164tl Ave.


CLEARWATER BCHISAND KEY
2BR/2BA, Furnished Condos
Available: 1-12 Months. Florida
Dreams RE Sales & Rentals, Inc.
(727)595-5774.


AILL AGES BEST PRICES.
Near North Beaches. Starting
$105/week, 28-wk. lease includes
W/S/G. Move special: $295
w/FREE firts week,a b aprovallf

Breeze, (727)559-8644.

BLUE SKIES M.H.P., LARGO.
Mobile Homes For Rent. Move-In
Special, $199. One Bedroom. Call
Lee, (727)657-2104.
1, 2 & 3BR HOMES FOR RENT
or sale in a quiet community.
Furnished or unfurnished.
Any age. Rentals starting
at $600/month,
Background check required.
First month & secuirty deposit.
Call Indian Rocks Estates
(727)593-7796 '


CLEARWATER: Efficiencies
c eri g at $ 8 / k r o se uits

(727)445-7134.


PRIVATE ENTRANCE & BATH,
Microwave, Refrigerator. $400/Mo.
Incl. Utilities, Cable. Nonsmoking,
55+, Male Only. (727)398-6024.
ROOMS AVAILABLE IN Private
Homes Frcomon4s00- 50 /Month.

Background Checks Required.
Contact: Home Share Pinellas.
www.homeshareprog ram .org
(727)945-1528
SAFE, CLEAN, QUIET.
Fully Furnished. Utilities, Cable In-
cluded. Deposit, References, ID
Required. From $130/Week.
(727)547-1199.
SEMINOLE POOL HOME
Quiet Neighborhood, Adults Only.
Furnished, House Privileges. Non-
smoking. $120/Wk. Utilities In-
cluded. (727)331-3935.



FOOeD AR sFOeR RENeTI ESsALbE
lished operating Mini-mart, great
location (Ulmerton Rd.). EBT, fully
equipped, plenty of signage avall.
As~kingd M ,0mo. After 6pm call

IDEAL FOR SMALL

Leas~e R~e~na 02RU TOSRA2 000
SF with 20' Garage Door. Ware-
house with Office & Restroom. Off
Bryan Dairy Road. (727)667-1647
LARGO SEMINOLE OFFICE
$325, 390 Square Feet, Executive
Office Suite, Includes Electric.
Cornerstone Realty Services,
(727)369-0788
LARGO: 220 13TH ST. SW.
Near Diagnostic Clinic.
Office/ Wo~rkhop 8Storage.

OFFICE & RETAIL SPACE
From $385 $630 Per Month.
Ample Parking. Madeira Beach.
(727)641-6465.


EVERY BABY DESERVES A
healthy start. Join more than a mil-
lion people walking and raising
money to support the March of
Dimes. The walk starts at:
www.marchforbabies.org


ABORTION NOT AN OPTION?
Consider Adoption. It's a wonder-
ful choice for an unplanned preg-
nancy. Living and Medical ex-
penses paid. Loving, financially
secure families await. Call Attor-
II Ele Kaplan, (877)341-1309.

ADOPT: ADORING COUPLE,

aocor wyer, pr se y u

(800)552-0045. FL Bar #0247014.
ADOPTION (866)633-0397: Un-
planned Pregnancy? Provide your
baby with a loving, financially se-
cure family. Living/ Medical/ Coun-
seling expenses paid. Social
worker on staff. Call compassion-
ate attorney Lauren Feingold, (FL
Bar #0958107) 24/7.
ADOPTION: 888-812-3678. AII


child. Caring & confidential. (24/7)
Attorney Amy Hickman. Lic.

AOTON: Give Your Baby The
Best in Life! Living expenses paid.
Many loving, financially secure
coeleasnwaiting. Calc oi OR r
who truly cares about you. Call
(800)852-0041. #133050.
PREGNANT? CONSIDERING

tio epr Yu hhoasea fm fm-
lies nal onwid~ereLivrn t ene

tions. (866)413-6298. Call 24/7.
PREGNANT? CONSIDERING
Adoption? A childless, successful
woman seeks to adopt and needs
your help! Financially secure. Ex-
penses paid. Call Margie (ask for
Michelle/Adam). (800)790-5260.
FL Bar #0150789.


BANKRUPTCY
17 Years. Exp. In Bankruptcy,
Over 15,000 Cases As A Chapter
7 Bankruptcy Trustee. Night &
Weekend Appointments Available.
I Will Come To You. Attorney Traci
ts ensn (727) 97-4838.m

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY Start-
ing at $65. 1-Signature Divorce,
Missing Spouse Divorce. "We
nome to You." (888)705-7221.

LOCALLY SERVING 40 STATES.
Divorce $50-$300*. Money-back
guarantee! Covers children, etc.
*excludes Government fees.
(800)522-6000 x700. Baylor &
Associates, est.1973.

lli





BASIC OBEDIENCE, BEHAVIOR
Modification, Group Classes,
In-home Training. (727)434-3647.
www.doggonepositive.com.
Certified Pet Dog Trainer.



A CAREER TO LOVE
Learn Dog Grooming.
Financial A sistahnoce Available

Vocational Rehabilitatio .
Veteran Training Approved.
(866)517-9546
DRAW AND PAINT WITH
Master Artist Jessica Rockwell.
Anyone can learn Il ages.

infol 01 @rockwellportraits.com
www.rockwellportraits.com
AIRLINES ARE HIRING: Train
for high-paying Aviation Mainte-
nance career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualify ied.
Housing available. Call Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
(866)314-3769.
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA FAST!
Accredited! At Home! Online! Call
(305)270-9830 or visit website:
www.worldhopeacademy.org.
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast,
Aff rdablre & Ar rhieu aPACE

w w.)c50 n t4a6a mt.l or visit

NEED YOUR HIGH SCHOOL DI-
ploma? Finish from home fast for
$399! Nationally accredited, EZ
p~a0047 re723 brochure. Call



AVIATION MAINTENANCE and
Avionics. Graduate in 14 months
FAA Approved. Financial aid if
qualified. Job placement assis-
tance. Call National Aviation Acad-
emy today! (800)659-2080 or visit
www.NAA.edu.


HIP REPLACEMENT Problem?
Pain, mobility loss from hip sur-
gerpyuwithSZimmerRD mom Cp
mum $50K compensation or no
fee. Free Consultation. Call
(888)-GARRETT.



I'M AVAILABLE FOR
Meal Preperation, Light House-
keeping, Running Errands, Etc.
Lois, (310)433-7058.









NOW HIRING: CNAs, HHAs,
24 Hour Shifts, Flexible Hours
HarmonhaHome Iep Apply At:

HOUSEKEEPER
C eaningckStea Ioo nC o ee

ences. $7.50/Hr. (727)446-3553.
E-mail:Iizseither@gmail.com
PARALEGAL FOR PLAINTIFF
Attorney. Experience preparing
demand packages mandatory.
Full-time. Send reply to:
Box 205, TBN, 9911 Seminole
Blvd., Seminole, FL 33772.

RESdEoRRAnTNSfiCeLERKnFaR
Shores. Will Train. Send Resume
To: LtheBelle@yahoo.com
EXPERIENCED MAIDS FOR

B7 s 7eEOtab iheda so Ex eln

13 DRIVERS NEEDED! TOP 5%
Pay! Excellent Benefits, Latest
Technology. Need CD)LTA & thr e

ww 7)5 r k8or visit website:

AIRLINE MECHANIC: TRAIN for
hgho dying Aviati.n icaane i a
qualified. Job placement assis-
I ice eCal lA ai)n 4r titute of

EARN UP TO $150 PER DAY.
Undercover Shoppers needed to
judge retail and dining establish-
ments. Experience not required.
(888)601-4861.


Leader, October 14, 2010


ATTN: COMPUTER WORK.
Work from anywhere, 24/7. Up to
$1,500 Part-time to $7,500/mo.
Full-time. Training provided. Call
(888)304-2847 or visit website:
www.KTPGlobal.com.
DRIVERS FOOD ToAto adrv -

able now! CDL-A wlTanker re-
quired. Outstanding pay & bene-
fits! Teams welcome! Call a re-
crs~e w kly! 87 )48 3042 or

EARN EXTRA INCOME Working
from Home. $5.00 for every enve-
lope processed w/our sales bro-
chures. Guaranteed! Free Infor-
mtin Call (800)210-2686 o
vsit:iow w.funsimplework.comor
FREE TO TRAVEL? 18 OR
older? Travel Sales Jobs! No ex-
perience necessary! Commission
weekly. Daily Cash Bonuses! Call
Mr. Johnson (877)547-6927 x1.
www.aniwehire.com..
MOVIE EXTRAS TO STAND IN
the background for a Major Film
Production. Experience not re-
quired. Earn up to $200/day. All
Looks Needed. (888)664-5279.
THR & ASSOCIATES, The

rhwi seing Bues, r isa
I managers. E perienc wtehi s

metals and sales are highly de-
sired. Must be willing to travel and

t35eKnt I K. r o tply Eo t
www.thrassociates.com/careers.



ApLyBEleAi SBluff tl aH r

(727)585-1101.


BE YOUR OWN BOSS!!
High Commissions Paid For
Experienced Only!
Timeshare Resale Phone Closers.
1(888)366-5670.
COLONIAL LIFE seeks entrepre-
neurial professional with sales ex-
perience to become a District
Manager. Life/Health license is re-
quired. Substantial earnings po-
tenetial Please contact me eda h


WANTED: LIFEaAGEN-S. EARN

C aysson Paid Daily Lib ra
Unme wrt n. Leads, Leaedrs
Leads. Life Insurance, License
Required. Call (888)713-6020.



CAeREeVdEeR cWrTHsA SMILIIG
facility i Lare Full-t me
(727)586- 969 ag. m.
CNAs, HHAs NEEDED FOR
Pinellas County Area.
Choose Your Hours. $10-$13.50
Per Hour. (727) 822-3034



CNA POSITION WANTED
Exdperirenncehd,sRefe ecesallEnglish
(727)587-0709, (727)248-9151.



AVON, EARN 40%
Why Not You? Why Not Today?
Join Now!! $10 Start-Up Fee.
(727)215-6339
THINK CHRISTMAS, START
Now! Own a Red-hot! Dollar, Dol-
lar Plus, Mailbox or Discount Party
Store from $51,900 worldwide!
100% Turnkey. Call
(800)518-3064. www.DRSS4.com.
CALL EARLY
TO PLACE YOUR
CLASSIFIED AD


ACCESS LAWSUIT Cash Now!
As seen on TV. Injury lawsuit
dragging? Need $500-$500,000
within 48 hours? Low rates. Apply
now by phone, (800)568-8321.
www.Iawcapital.com.

BIEaWARhEcOFitLOhANeFtRrABUD!
ness Bureau or Consumer Protec-
tion Agency before sending any
money to any loan company.
BURIED IN CREDIT CARD Debt
over $10,000? We can save you
thousands of dollars. Call Credit
Card Relief for your Free Consul-
tation. (866)640-3315.
IT'S YOUR MONEY! Lump Sums
paid for structured settlement or
fixed annuity payments. Rapid,
high payouts. Call J.G. Wentworth,
(866)294-8772. A+ rating by the
Better Business Bureau
TOO MANY BILLS? TOO MANY
credit cards, payday loans, medi-
cal bills? In financial distress? Call
A.D.S. for immediate help! Mem-
ber of BBB. Call (888)790-4660
x10, or visit www.mydebtfree.com.



NrObCeREDIT BADNCREMDa, N

tn ed uHnodme 500a Gte tComme
Mon-Sat! Call (888)841-6091.









HURRICANE SHUTTERS: New
3/8" Plywood, Painted, Several
Sizes, Clips/ Screws, You Cut To
Fit. $375/OBO. (727)393-0733.
LAWNMOWERS FOR SALE, (6).
4 Self-propelled, 2 Push. My
Hobby. Reconditioned. $55-$125.
Sav Hun~dredis. Also Other Equip-

met (2)9163.
)11 1~

MAC LAPTOP I BOOK, LIKE
New, 1.42 ghz memory. Call for

FREE GS! BF E1 4R3 E !
FREE MP3!P Nith pu ch t rt naw

only $29.99/wk. No credit check!
Call GCF today! (877)212-9978.



nEbNTRAL3 CBaRnNsDa ECWISt l
information. (941)704-9413.
REFRIGERATOR, LG. WHITE
Whirlpool side-by-side, perfect
condition. Won't fit in my home'
$450, (727)776-2749.
STAINLESS STEEL, Hardl y
Used. Kenmore, Double Oven Set,
Dishwasher. White Glass-Top 4
BurnerR KitchenAid. Must BeO Ire

(727)446-3553, (727)804-4280.

STOV MdAGblCcCHsEeF Slro th--
digital controls & timers. Excellent
condition, $340. (727)729-1304 -
WHIRLPOOL GAS DRYER,
Rarely used. White Model
LRG4634PQ0. 4-Yrs' Old, Excel-
lent Condition. $175. Robert
(727)409-3126.
WHIRLPOOL REFRIGERATOR,
Side-By-Side, White, Good Condi-
tion With Icemaker, Missing Tray.
$250. Call For Appt.
(727)446-3553.



WANTED: ARTS & CRAFTS &
New Merchandise Vendors For
Church Christmas Bazaar, Nov.
13th. (727)526-7915.


WHAT TO WEAR FASHIONS!
Women's Consignment!
Juniors, Misses, Plus Maternity!
$5 Off $25 With This Ad!
11171 Seminole Blvd.
(727)498-8043.



2 PVC PATIO SETS
With 4 Chairs, Plus Lounge Chairs.
Mak e Offer Belleair ,
(727)446-3553.
BABY CRIB, DARK BROWN
With Mattress, Complete Set.
Good Condition. $100.
(727)365-5425.
BROWN QUEEN SOFA BED,
Excellent Condition. $100.
(727)393-8417.
KING POSTER BED, BLACK
Wrought Iron/ Light Wood. Mat-
tress, Box Spring, Chest Of Draw-
ers, 2 Nightstands wlGlass.
$1,000 O.B.O. (727)446-3553
MARTHA STEWART Patio Table
w/lazy Susan, 5 chairs, 11' um-
brella. Paid $550, asking $250
OBO, (813)431-8226.
MATTRESS SET, FULL, NEW,

21 0 6N e Quen n t, Pilo H o S

QUEEN BED, HEAD BOARD,
Mattress & Box Spring, Excellent
Condition. $100. (727)393-8417.
ROUND DINING ROOM TABLE,
Glasstop, 4 Arm Chairs, Dark
wood, $250. Belleair,
(727)446-3553.
Shaker Style Queen Bedroom
0ute w/eth romfor oM rsess
$200. Entertainment Center, $300.
Excellent Cond. (727)517-0878.



WE BUY HOT TUBS!
Up To $1,000 Cash Paid!
Running Or Not! (727)394-8036
CASH PAID FOR DIABETIC Test
Strips! New, sealed & unexpired.
Most brands, shipping pre-paid.
We pay the most & fast! Call Linda
(888)973-3729 or visit website:
www.cash4dlabeticsupplies.com.



FOlUND: BcLA8ChK & WeHiTE F -
118th St. N. and Park Blvd. in
Seminole. Call to identify tattoo.
(727)397-8862.
FREE TO A GOOD HOME: Male

deIaway, 5vabe AsA%, yu r ol

mea edeod 6S5 Ibs, p Cfe on I
trained. Needs yard and exercise.
(727)642-9917.
FREE TO GOOD HOME: 6-week
old male kitten; all white
w/blue-gray eyes. Very Loving!
(727)452-1665.
FREE: STELLA NEEDS A Home!

P mferl ho dho w/ kis. al i
interested. (727)585-4273.
MALTI-POO SM. SIZE,hFEMATL
5 ots. Flfy Wie, Ti
docked, non-shed. Shots com-
pleted. $355. (727)544-0229.

ru i as so '
MEDICAL MOTOR SCOOTER
Pride Victory. Runs, needs axle
bearing on one wheel. $300,
Cash. (727)595-4067.



NEW NORWOOD SAWMILLS
LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34"
in diameter, mills boards 28" wide.
Automated quick-cycle sawing in-
creases efficiency up to 40%!
(800)661-7746, x300N or visit
www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N



METAL ROOFING & Steel Build-
ings. Save $$, buy direct from

witim ac cs h proflees in2

shop ports. Completely turnkey
jobs. All Steel Buildings, Gibson-
ton, FL. Call (800)331-8341.
www.allsteel-buildi ngs.com


CHEAP!!
Quality Used Vehicles. Many 1
owner. LOW mileage new car
trades. LOW cash prices!
www.j dgossa utohouse.com
(727)571-1753.

FO9RSDan9d dESROsRT WIAG Nd
Condition. $1,500 OBO. Seminole
Area. (727)385-1246.



CHRYSLER 2006 TOWN AND
Country Wheelchair Van. 10" Low-
ered Floor With Ramp. Call Ben,
(727)644-6101.



THINKING ABOUT
SELLING OR TRADING?
I Will Pay More Than
Trade-In On Good, Clean,
Low-Mileage Vehicles
Harold Corey, Auto Broker
(727)595-9393.
CASH FOR CARS
We come to YOU!
1998 and newer- MOST $$
run/not run. **(727)49-502*
Hillsborough & Pinellas
Getthernostcashformvear.com


TopCD Hlar Paid ForaC ean Qality
(727)798-2921





CASHICARS

Ho et, Fe~e5UT ng.

(727)564-0831
UP TO $500 FOR JUNK CARS,
Trucks, Vans. Free Pick Up.
No Lies. (727)458-7710,
(727)458-3721.
WE BUY CARS
AnyaC40ondtnN hpt iolrPaid
www.CashNowFo rCars.com
(813)410-9067 or (727)565-9320

D10NOATGEroVEHICI.E,o Receh'e
Arc. Support N -KilluSphelters; Re-
seaa mhet sA~d wiceete inary
d ctible Nlon-GRu~nners Accepted.

DONATE YOUR CAR, Truck or
Boat to Heritage for the Blind.
Free 3-day vacation, tax deducti-
te rfrceee fow IIg (l 6pa~p5 rk

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE: Receive


Mammograms and Breast Cancer
info. Free towing, tax deductible,
non-runners accepted. Call
(888)468-5964.


L&M DOCKSIDE
Complete Boat Repairs.
Mercruiser, Crusader,
Volvo-Penta, etc. Electrical
and Engine Repair or
Replacement! Mercury and

Imdo 7s eoctea id.com.

BOAT TRAILER SERVICE ON
Brakes, Axles, Bearings, Tires &
Muc 5More 4C Dell Trailers, Largo,


rBjlh1c


SALE
INFANT CHILDREN'S ITEMS
Pre-sale: Thursday Only,
8:30pm-10pm, $5 Admission.
Fri., 3:30pm-10:00pm. Sat.,

1 e -4m r Cn. nalr f ff Sa e!

CHAPEL TREASURES!
An Unusual Thrift Shop Full Of
Fine Things. Friday & Saturday,
SAM-12PM,7n)63091- 9.rBlvde
Accept Donations And Drop Offs
As Well. coth@coth.org
INDIAN ROCKS BEACH, 215

SrFt s 11 tue. rdy Sady.

Dryer, Clothing.
MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE.
Tools, Furniture, Etc. 3090 Dryer
Avenue SW, Largo. Saturday,
Sunday 8-5.



INEIGHBnlOROD SLE


PINEBROOK ESTATES
Saturday, Oct. 16, 8-5. Rain Date:
BeSuenednaB, Oct. 17.60ffht e1t.


New &UsedO Iems SALt., Oct. 16,
9am-3pm. Ruth Eckerd Hall,
1111 McMullen Booth Rd., Clrwtr.


COMMUNITY SALE


FRJMMA3GE & BAKE SkALE! OCT.
16h, 9-, Crysa Laes Manor,
4100 62nd Ave. Pinellas Park.


NEGBORHOOD SALE



NeSATURDbAd, NDASYo 85O
East Bay Drive, Between Belcher
&~ US 19).





ROMANCATHOUICCHURCH
The Newly Expanded,
Famous

Thrift Shoppe






Clothing
Housewares
Tools
Furniture

Col et odes

Jewelry

*1*Holida Ie re

397-3312
10851 Ridge Rd., S >nle








INDOORS Saturday & Sunday
8 2. Some furniture, lots of blue
& white. 17084 Dolphin Dr., NRB.


2003 Glastron SX170 Runabout
(Bow Rider), 115HP Evinrude Out-
board (model E115FPLSN), EZ
Loader Trailer. Seats 8. Engine
starts easily, very dependable,
runs great! Engine fully serviced
in June, 2009 at Suncoast Marine
Center: Water pump service, new
bilge pump, new battery, new
spark plugs, everything checked
out. Has ski tow bar, new
AM/FM/CD player wl4 speakers.
Asking $7,900. (727)612-0745.
23 FT. PROLINE WICABIN,
250HP Johnson. On private boat
lift. Indian Shores. $10,000.
(727)596-6713.
BOATS: 1000s FOR SALE!
Reaching six million homes



(800)388-9307



60' BOAT SLIP On Intracoastal,
Easy Gulf Access. Well Main-

t sell 11 rules R tne~argt R
alty (77638-0535.
SAND KEY CONDO OWNER
Wants To Lease Boat Slip on
Sand Key. Sea Ray, 33'x10.5',
12,500 Dry Weight. Call Todd,
(321)231-4690.
2 WET SLIPS FOR RENT
From 25'-55'. Sail Or Power. From
$7.55 A Foot (727)641-6465


JAYCO, 2005 TRAILER.



(727)543-0960.

TRA EL TRAH..EeRarnERIlEesON
Electrical Work. O'Dell Trailers,
Largo, (727)531-8944.


1995 MERCURY VILLAGER GS,
Power doors/ windows, Cold A/C.
Looks and runs great. $3,000.
OBO. (727)290-9344.


KIMMIES APPLIANCE SVC.
A pleasant experience. In-home
repair services. 5-Star customer

w/ServiceMagic.com.
Same-day service. Credit cards
accepted. (727)502-7320
LORICCO'S APPLIANCE SVC.
Repairs On All Major Appliances,
Gas Appliances. $20 Off wlAd.
(727)393-2774.
Hungry For Results?
Try Our Classifieds!
397-5563


AIR-FLO/ ERWOOD
Htg. & A/C. CAC1816535

R 7arsSe2vce Sa es.

Save Up To 25%
On Your Electric Bill Without
Changing Your System!





Cooling & Heating
Sales Service Installation
*Free Second Opinion*
(727)365-2694. Lic#CAC1816540
Committed to Excellence.


Anclifs Air, InC.
DEAL DIRECTLY WITH THE
Owner And Save! Honest,
Affordable. #CAC1814825.
Andy's Air, Inc. (727)447-1903.
Visa/MC/DisclAmEx.


BAVER'S HEAT & A/C
Professional, Honest Service At
Affordable Rates. Free 2nd
Opinions! #CMC056915.
Call (727)544-5861.


It s Hard To StopA Trane
HALE'S A/C SERVICE INC.
Reliable, Same-Day Service
On All Brands. Free Est. On
Replacement. (727)398-5515.
#CACO55503 www.halesac.com


$19 SERVICE CALL
All Makes. Authorized Trane
Dealer. Why Pay More? Rick's Air
Conditioning,Inc. CAC1814441
(727)258-0015


6 B Classifieds


REDINGTON BEACH'S
FALL 2010
TOWN- WIDE GARAGE SALE

Friday, October 22nd
& Saturday, October 23rd
8 g yn, to ???
THROUGHOUT


r


To Place An Ad Call 397-5563 Fax 399-2042

24 Hour Classifieds www.tbnweekly.com



Deadlines: Display, Friday-5 p.m.


Line Ads, Monday-Noon


HOP ON

THE SAVINGS


Cm~ornake*'

Best Prices in Pinellas County
Carr Air Conditioning
& Heating, Inc.
Repair & Service All Brands.
Call the Co. You Can Trust!
(727)447-7212 CACO45888
Senior & Veterans' Discounts


CRYSTAL A/C
Since 1953. 24/7 Service. All
Makes & Models. Free Estimates.
CAC-027361.
(727)449-1010, (727)326-2854.


1IRANE


Place an ad today!

Call 397-5563


~u~an;nnl:~


~u~an;nnl:~


B


~): ~II





HENDRICK ROOFING, INC.
Lea Spciaist All Types of Roofs All Work Guaranteed
Family Owned & Operated No Subcontractors
Over 40 Years Experience in Pinellas
For Your Free Estimate Call


L'",~Ice ure,'d Tile Mtal hin~gl t Roofs 12706

SCOtt COOff ROOf Hg, iHc.
Owens Corning Preferred Contractor, Certified Installer


tdPwOUDWORKING
CUSTOM CADFIETS &i THIM
SPECIAL Crown Mlolding on Sale $6.00 per foot*
727-692-1156
Also Specializing in Kitchen Cabinets and Built-In Furniture
*Up to5 5" Crown Molding Lic #C9627


C


EIX TRA! EIX TRA!
Read About It In The Classifieds!

Call 397-5563 today! NE SPAPERS


ALL WOOD Cabinets, Counter-
tops. Reface/ Replace. Free
Estimates, Computer Design.
30-yrs. #C9055. (727)391-0959.

www k stm icon n.com.

Complete Custom Cabinets:
Kitchens, Baths. Low Rates, Free
Estimates, All Work Guaranteed.
#C-8910. Call (727)367-1450.

Eccpom~y AIl oo~d Cat nets

Free Estimates. Showroom.
C-9362. (727)536-0859.
www.cometcabinetsi nc.com



Don Bolam Enterprises, Inc.
Carpentry, Refacing, Repairs,
Doors, Moldings, etc.
42 yrs. in Pinellas. (727)443-3811.
#CRCO57276
DONE RIGHT CARPENTRY
Rotte wodw dr pac doors

2Trim/ Fi ish Sp sit.
Lic#C-5826. Insured.
(727)443-5822.



S{ARPET, TII.E, UPHO tTERdYr
treatment. ROTOVAC Profes-
sional. Pressure cleaning avail-
able. (727)331-0855. Lic/Ins.


M ~
CARPET REPAIRS BY TOM
Over 30 Years' Exp. in Pinellas.
Installation Available. Free Est.
(727)588-1591.


"QUALITY CARPET"
Repairs, Re-stretches. Wood
Laminate, Carpet, Tile. Sales/
Service. Credit-cards accepted
20-Years' Experience.
(727)527-1359.
CARPET CLEANING
DIVISION, (727)527-10s88.


POPCORN CEILING?
Removal & Re-Texturing.
Give Your Home A Fresh,
Contemporary Look!
(727)596-9006 #CBC1255512
ClassicFinishDrywall.com
B.B.B. Accredited Business.

QUALITY CEILING
REINSHNG | | (
*Popcorn Removal
*Cracked Ceilings
*Plaster/Drywall Repair
*Water Damage Repair
*Outdoor Ceilings
Job com lated in
one day wit 'o mess.
100% Financing
Lic. #CRC-1326471 Bonded,

(727)446-3550
Established 1979


SYDOW CEILINGS '

ReW ersr m5 ges dmte nd
Professinl 4 frences.




Bowes Expert Ceramic Tile
Company. Bathroom Remodeling
tSh ec alii slas! arinstl never3
years. Insured. Lic#C-6341. Kevin
or Mike: (727)946-8281.

BOB COTRONE TILE, INC.
Bathroom Rernodel S eialist.

C-7922. Call Bob, (727)423-3754
DEAN'S CUSTOM TILE, Inc.
Specializing in Remodeling,
Bath-to-Shower Conversions,
Floors, Kitchens, Backsplashes,
Repairs. C-5823. (727)546-6670.
HUSBAND & WIFE TEAM
Low, Low Prices!! Repairs/ New
Installations. #C5760. VISA/MC
WHY WAIT? Ceramic Life-style
Inc. (727)399-0770.


FREE ESTIMATES.
If CLEAN Is What You Want
CLEAN Is What You Get '
When You Call Georgette.
(727)391-7866.
ABSOLUTELY SPOTLESS!
Meticulous, Diligent. 15 Years,
Exp. Dependable, Trustworthy. If
you want the job done right, call
Wendy. (727)430-2147.
ANGEL CLEANING
"We Clean Above The Rest"
SRe idential eomivercF es.

LcL nsd (7 S 4-707

Low Cost Professional House
Cleaning. Hourly/ Flat Rates Avail-
able. Bonded, Insured. Emily
(727)251-5181 '

SaOaME CLEArnINGe!
Reasonable rates
Excelln te erdnces Re iable,



Husband & Wife Cleaning Team
Homes & Offices. Top-To-Bottom
Cleaning. Move-Outs, Foreclo-
sures. Bonded, References.
(727)403-8051.





Cleaning Couple, Mature & Ex-
perienced. Small and Large
Homes, Offices. Free Estimates.
References. Available 7 Days.
(727)548-4342, (727)251-4342.


n~r~m~


rrLi.| 0, ~\T/3S~~?T
We take care of our classified customers.





sAPERs sor-sses ww.t ~ky.com


POLISH LADY WILL CLEAN
Your Home. Excellent References,
Good Prices! Free Estimates. Call
Aneta, (727)398-5702.

HEREeS IS T UCHIPtrofe soa
Rates. Honest & Reliable. Good
References. (727)-475-9444.




$D25 inearohme Ser ce.
PaINELAScer PC REPAIR
30-Years' Experience. Vrs


COPUTELA R SOLUTION
In-Hoeas Sxervices: Intrnet
Seurty Tainn, Data Recovery,


Repair. (727)343-2838.

DISCOUNT COMPUTER

Fre Es iateA! Pcku &
DeliveR Available! Vrus/Spyware

Wirelemsos BUY aSELeL TR DE
Sr., Military, Teacher Discounts.
Just Call 'W2EOF9X61T ALL!"

Serving Pinellas County



CONCRETE 'N BLOCK
State Certified Contractor.
#CGCO36131. Quality Work,
Reasonable Rates.
40-Years' Experience.
(727)393-7697, (727)459-8177.




CONCRETE
Complete Concrete, Block &
Paver Work. Driveways,
Sidewalks, Patios. Residential/
Commercial. David Will,
(727)459-9710. #C10222.
MIKE QUARANTO Concrete Inc.
20+ Yrs. Exp. Quality Service.
Dvw0 CallPatios, Si~dewalks.

VENABLE CONCRETE
Driveways, Pool Decks, Patios,
Sidewalks, Color Sealers, Acrylics,
Pressure Cleaning. Clay Venable.
C-4847. (727)545-5288.



CLnOrCALr CBECNS2ED2B no s g
Windows, Repairs.
A Full Service listing@
Bob~cole8LLC~com



Patio Door Repair Specialist
"I Get Them Sliding Again"
No Installations. Angie's List
2007-2008 Super Service Award
(727)733-4353.


CUSTOM DRAPERIES &
Valances, Bedding, Cushions
Shades. Your Fabric Or Ours'
Since 1981. (727)397-5708.
Sewfinecustomsewing.com



B. BLEVINS DRYWALL
No Job Too Small! Water Dam-

Cre Esitates #-8P7a iry
(727)638-4342
NO JOB TOO BIG,
From Hanging To Custom Finish
Details. All Types Of Wall And
Ciig T xturesM Full s enesn
Lic#CB-C1255807 (727)259-9894
QUINTERO DRYWALL, INC.
Remodels, Additions, Repairs,
Large/ Small. Free Estimates.
27-Yrs.' Experience. #C-5447.
(727)898-5112, (727)560-0468.


Affordable Quality Work
24-Hour Service. Free Est.
Senior Discount. #ER0009230
STEVEN HOBBS ELECTRIC, INC.
(727)441-2788
B&B ELECTRICAL SOLUTIONS.
We Have The Solution! All Electri-
cal Repairs/Installs. "Fuses to
Breakers!" Senior Discounts!
#ER13012577. (727)546-7047.
ALL WORK DONE BY OWNER.
Repairs, Service Calls, Remodel.
Barnes Electric. Since 1980.
(727)409-4364. EC13002693.
ES ELECTRIC
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LFree Es rates. All ElE ti~c 9
(727)584-8961.
GABRIEL ELECTRIC
R wirrs ccepis Uprds 2/

#ER0010733. (727)442-0845.
**$28 OFF REPAIR**
Same Day Service
We Specialize In Electrical
Repairs, Troubleshooting, New
EIn~s I l. NolJobrToo Si C !
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Military Seiotr Dscounts.


AII Calls Answered.
RILEY ELECTRIC
For All Your Wiring Or Service
Needs. Generators, Panel
Upgrades, Circuits Added,
Remodeling, Marina & Dock
Wiring. #EC13001284. For FAST




BRUCE'S FURNITURE
Repair, Refinishing, Stripping.
Specializing In Caning.
Don't Buy New, "Renew"!
Free Estimates. (727)439-7324.


n~r~m~


FREE ESTIMATES!
Installations/ Repairs. I Fix It Or
It's Free!! C-8821/Ins. Advanced
Garage Doors, (727)585-3525.


BarnettAluminum.com
Gutters, Soffit, Fascia, Siding,
Screening, Patios, Cages,
Awnings, Windows. Satisfaction




ABLE HANDYMAN MIKE
Many Skills, From St. Pete

Ap oinrtmn (72 )2Ca 09

HANDY ANDY HOME SERVICE
All Types Minor Home Repair
Experienced, Professional, Eco-
nomically Priced. (727)459-0010

HANDYMAN HUSBANDS
Sildr len Lo kingaForLWbork.

Rea )n~a~bl 7pr ed.

"LET GEORGE DO IT!"
Retired contractor is ready to do
Im + pars for yo. m e
(727)596-6431.

MACK'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
35+ Years' Exp. Reliable, Honest.
Insured. All Minor Repairs. Free
Estimates. (727)420-9703.
MIKE'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
Minor Home Repairs, Lawn
Clean-up, Trimming, Hauling
Pressure Washing. 25-Yrs.' Exp
(727)526-0408
RETIRED HOME BUILDER.
A Kind OfTMinovreRe ars

Can-Do Attitude! Leon,
(727)481-4115.

TORNADO CONSTRUCTION
Water Damage Repairs, Painting
Carpentry, Tile. European Crafts
man. Excellent References. Fall
Specials! CRC-1328045
(727)239-3254


AJ'S AFFORDABLE HAULING.
Brush, Trash, Clean-Ups, Drop-Off
Service. We Haul It All! Free Esti-
mates. (727)504-2808.

BILLY'S HAULING
Small Jobs OK. Yard/ Garage
Clevari Its,7Small Re ais.
(727)393-7567 (727)644-6037
MIDWEST HAULING
Clean Up, Clear Out, Any Size
Job. Fast, Reliable, Fair. Free Est.
(727)475-8103.


BETZ BUILDING Contractors,
Inc. All Phases Of Work. 35-Yrs.'
Local Experience. CGCO36272
(727)384-0347 (727)644-8847







Aff r&Kble, Mualt tRmo~d s &
Rehabs. Call Today For Free
Estimate. CBC1253003.
(727)798-8775 (727)798-8772



















MOISTURE BARRIERS, FIX
Cracked Walls. Foundation repair.
Specializing in settling problems.
Jim Purdue, CRC058402
(727)784-6996.
PATRIOT CONSTRUCTION
& RENOVATION INC.
Minor To Major Home Repairs.
Remodels, Additions. Insured.
CRC1330042 (727)432-2361
R.J. PATE CONTRACTING
Repair, Remodel, Update
Kitchens, baths, windows, doors
Free Estimates. CRC-1326585.
(727)320-0182 (727)424-2834.

* '

KITCHENS BATHS, CROWN

302 6er 3p 1Lie #C2594 09- 7







KITCHEN & BATH REMODELING

Ful Dpe g & I sesall

Floor/Wall Coverings, Countertops,
Custom Vanities, Tile,
Tu b To Shower Conve rsions
Call for your FREE Estimate ~
727-258-9101
#C-8623


OLDJA ENTERPRISES
New kitchen under $3,995, in-
cludes 12 all-wood cabinets, gran-
ite tops, SS sink and installa-

@ 426 2u4 9NSt e or a
(7756-20 CG15 1


ALL BACKHOE/ BOBCAT Work.
Plart & sopdre~moval lan sap


(727)595-0429.
ANGEL'S LANDSCAPING
& LAWN SERVICE

Sroe Etiem temmFl Lie s d,
Insured. se habla Espanol.
Angelandscaping@gmall.com
angelandscaping.com
(727)686-7268
AV PROPERTY MAINTENANCE
Landscaping, Tree & Sod Services
Prompt,VAfforpdeale Fre Esti-m

AVP ropery Mainteaince.com

LANDSCAPING YOU CAN
Afford. Stone Patios, Palms,


Stump-grinding, Xeriscaping.
(727)319-8195.
STEVE'S FULL SERVICE
Landscaping, Lawn Care, Tree
Trimming, Clean-ups. Enhancing
Curb A peal! Fee Estimates.

(7 )6 -67

A LAWN SERVICE YOU CAN
AFFORD! From $55/Mo. Hedge,
Tree, Palm Trimming, Leaf Rak-
ing, Clean-Ulps. (727)319-8195.
A+ PROFESSIONAL LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Offering Dependable, Year-Round
Lawn Care. Landscape And Sod
Installation/ Removal.
(727)565-9989.


A-TROPICAL

GREENE .

WEEKLY LAWN



SOD

LANDSCAPE

WWW.atfopicalgreen.com

531-2886

EBEL LAWN CARE
Reliable, Well-Established
Company. Competitive Rates.
Call (727)586-5617 Or Visit
www.ebellawncare.com
EVERGREEN LAWNS
Pr fe sional, R sdnia m wnw

Clean-Ups. Reasonable Rates,
Free Est. Ed, (727)639-3596.
HENRY'S LAWN SERVICE
Mow, Edge, Trim & Clean-Ups.
Free Est. Lic. /Ins. (727)688-4141.

KING'S KUT
Lawn Maintenance, Landscape &
Design. Complete Property Clean-
Ups. Free Estimates. Reliable,
Dependable. (727)392-8692
TIRED OF PAYING High Prices?
Quality Work At Reasonable
Rates! Diego's Lam Care,



$10 A FOOT BUFF & WAX
2C-r. rEcoenrielc di Fiberglass
Gelcoat Repair. Call Steve,
(727)365-3210.


BarnettAluminum.com
Soffit, Fascia, Siding, Gutters,
Screening, Patios, Cages,
Awnings, Windows. Satisfaction
Guaranteed. #C9302. Charles
Barnett, Inc. (727)528-2449.



A-2-Z MOVING, INC.
24' Box Truck. Est. Pinellas, 1986.
Local/ Statewide. FL#1M660. Free
Estimates. (727)584-2302.

HoDAINOf R IECLDdMOV rGe r
Small. Furniture, Appliance
Deliveries. (727)392-5856
Local Mover. IM-1034.
DOUG'S HOURLY MUSCLE! 10
FRFE m arb BxslewlM e.
Hustle #1M410. (727)545-9332.



LcU K4E4P INhNGa tO.
Price Both Matter!
Int. /Ext. Painting &
Deck/ Paver Sealing.
We Want To Work For You!
(727)397-2284 Available 24/7.






A. BOYD FARMER. FAMILY
Business, 30+ Yrs. Residential &
Commercial. NO JOB TOO
SMALL! 2 Coats Paint, Power
Wash & Prep Work. Quality
Guaranteed. Senior Discounts.
#C-8626. (727)458-3650.


A FULL SERVICE PAINTING
Company. Quality Workmanship,
Competitive Rates, 30-Years' Exp.
#C10218. Insured. Brian Keegan

A FOsDABI.E
PAINTING
By Tim Barrett Painting, Inc.
20-Years' Experience. Honest &
Dependable. Insured. #C-9762.
O w n e r E o e ra e H. o t7) s al 9


time Exterior Paint. Call to see if

(87)29 -me20. # R163C7a711
#CVC056656



PATIO DOOR REPAIRS
Get sliding doors rolling again.
Special Offer $95.95 per panel.
Ca0l Ro at Ron's Wir dows.




RRcOB' PEtSTFCeONTR ing
Pinellas since 1979. Call Now!
(727)392-2847 Cell (727)687-1730


DOG GROOMING, Only $20!
Any Small Breed. New Clients
Only. (727)596-CLIP (2547).
academyofanimalarts.com


TURNER WALL & CEILING, INC.
Wall & Ceiling Repairs. Water
Damage, A/C Holes, Plastering,
Drywall Repairs And Texturing.
#C-5129 (727)391-3569.

ANDY'S STUCCO & Plastering
Small Plaster/ Stucco Jobs. Patch
Work. Lic#C-6903. Insured. Free
Estimates. (727)524-8140.

* ~
FAUCETS TO WATER HEATERS
No Job Too Small. Sewer/ Drain
Cleaning. Serving Pinellas 25

Rick's P rs.ng #nRFO( 7-7809,
""'" 59-"1.
James McDaniel Plumbing
Full Service Master Plumber. No
Overtime Or Hidden Cost! Water
Heater Repair/ Replace. Sewer &
Drain Line Cleaning, Faucet
Repairs. Lic/Ins. CFC1427191
(727)584-3046.

GLENo MYrRS PI.UMBING

AII W k on '7B54 len"
($20.00 OFF WITH THIS AD)
Call (727) 443-6318 or
www.glenmyersplumbing.com.
METCALFE PLUMBING
Full Service. 30-Years' Exper.
Free Estimates. Senior Discounts.
License #C-10193. RF11067406.
(727)641-2876.
PETE'S CERT. PLUMBING

Owner opr td. o Rt s. Free
estimates. 10% OFF W/AD!
CFCO21491. Insured. Visa/MC.
(727)487-3645.
Small Job Specialist.
Senior Discount
CFC1427888. Don-Charles,
(727)522-2508
VALCO PLUMBING, INC.
*Discount on drain cleaning.
*Up-front pricing. *Faucets to
water h~eatersI No jo oo small.








EXPERIENCE
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
New Pools/ Remodeling, Pavers,
Driveways, Pool Repairs & More!
Call For Special Promotion
(727)474-2142 CPCO57338
TropicalPoolsAndPavers.com


STEVE'S RIVER ROCK
Pressure Cleaning, Reseals,
Acrylics, Pavers, Garage
Floor Coatings & More.
Decks DoneR ightTam paBay.co m
Since 1986, #C-8452, Insured.
Free Estimates (727)581-7902

* ea .
BLUE BAYOU POOL SERVICE
Services as low as $60/mo.
Third month FREE!
Free Estimates. (727)812-6885.
HARTLEY'S POOL SERVICE
D pend Ile Relit le.

Weekly service starting
@ $ 2.50c/ronth.f o0eas'


JE Sic (IMMIN GP OLS.
Pool service. Serving Largo,
Seminole, Belleair. No contracts.
Quality guaranteed! Jeff,
(727)492-7416, (813)765-1047.
LIVING WATER

Weekly Oe~ry eE r ChCEical
Check Only, Includes Chemicals.




A XTREME Pressure Cleaning
Lic/Ins. We Clean Anything!!! Big/
Small Jobs, LOW PRICES! Free
Estimates. (727)585-2886.

SAFE

R o o. t h 9 o c e n o m .

(727)584-6622
HOUSE, DRIVEWAYS, DECKS,
Etc. Great Clean Work, Great
Price! Free Estimates. Call
(727)422-5416.


Olkd Timeh
Wrmans ip
Old Time Integrity
Licensed & Insured
#CCCO56850

A Ch isti n2 O ne C





A.C.E'S ROOFING
All Phases Of Roofing & Repairs.
Mobile Home Specialist. Free Est.
CCC1329416. (727)510-4988.

ARK ROOFING
Re-Roofs, New Roofs,
Re airs. All Roof Types.

(727)793-4915
FL. Lic#CCC1326623





DEAN WLSON ROOFING
There Is Nothing More Important
Than Quality For Our Customers!!
CCC1327771. (727)320-7940.
HOWE ROOFING. NEW ROOFS,
Re-roofing, Flat Roofs, Repairs.
Serving Pinellas Cty. 30+ Years!
#RC0031425. (727)584-6387.
MAGYAR ROOFING
All Types Of Roofs & Repairs.
Contractor On Site. Free
Estimates 6CCC1328213.




WS~l"T C8 lT
ROOFING& CONTRACTINGING

WEST COAST ROOFING &

CallU ONTr AACI Gr Roing
Needs! ()a67-o640net

#RC-29027093
METAL ROOFING: 40 YR. WAR-
ranty. Buy direct from Manufac-
turer. 30 colors in stock with all ac-
cessories. Quick turn around. De-
livery available. Gulf Coast Supply
& Manufacturing, Inc. Call
w88 391f03c3s u vIcsitmwebsite:

ROOF REPAIRS, CALL 24/7.
Flat roof and mobile home special-
is.Fre ertfe insp~ectos i 0
All Florida Weatherproof ing &
Construction. (877)572-1019.



DISH: BEST OFFER EVER!
$24.99/mo. (1 year.) 120+ chan-

C8 ls 3e HD an V R u ga~d




J&J RESCREENING LLC
Rescreen Your Pool/ Lanai Today!
SNCE 1993C FREE Estimates

(727)522-1033.

Po~o EA lom r Screese Ros
Windows. Installation. Free Esti-
mates! Lic.#C9596. Dependable.
(727)688-1364.





















WILL SOFFIT FOR FOOD!!
Over 31 YBear fol Ep tSoffit'
Fascla, Bae iyl Eerlor
Ce t rs.Small Jobs Welcome.
Call Bruc (27)422-0012.



SWIM SPA LOADED! THREE
Pumps, LED Lighting, OZ Cover.
Ne er sud d5H8,929250 Hot Tub

$2,695. Can deliver. Call
(727)851-3217.




ALL SPRINKLERS, Shallow
Wells, Pumps. Free Estimates.
Residential/ Commercial. #C-5918.
Kellis Williams. (727)381-7132


***SPRINKLERS***
Installation & repairs. .
15 years experience. Lic#C10564
Greater Image Landscape

R. FOLEY Ir 8aolt 1Landscape,
Installation, Reclaimed Hook-Ups,
Sprinkler Check-up, $29.95.
Check For Leaks, Adjust Heads,
Program Timer. C-9784.

RIH7A7RlSRON II RIGAT ON

Water Hook-up. Quality Work.
#C-948 2F ee Estio tes.



JUST STUMPS
Stump, Shrub & Palm Tree
Removal, Root Pruning. Lic./Ins.
Starting At $40. (727)459-3338



ar un~d th ew Ild! EltheA USS
ad.960r Co.C00triel for rn

98u7 2 079.Why pay more?



Eddie's Prof essional Tree
Services.Complete Service &
Stumpr.Removatl. Firewod cl3L c.
/Is r iscount (727)58-38





WILLETT PRO TREE CARE

Hauling,CL nS apig, Fie d.
We Are Awesome! (727)545-5885.

Joe's
Tree
Ti Service
ALL PHASES TREE WORK!
Honest Prices! Quality Work.
Satisfaction Guaranteed. Lic/Ins.
Veteran's Discount.
(727)392-9495 (727)656-8386
GREEN PL NET TREEFCARE

Esti& nes. rF I clean-p OL ensed

ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST
Freeze Damage, Tree & Shrub
Evaluations. Soil Testing For pH &
Moisture. Trimming & Removals.
Phil Turner, FL-5990A
www.Phil )rn rAr~borist.com


KING'S KUT
Lawn Maintenance, Landscape &
Design. Complete Property Clean-
Ups. Free Estimates. Reliable,
Dependable. (727)392-8692
LESS THAN HALF-PRICE!
Since 1978! Tree/ Stump removal,
trimming. Certified Arborist. Free
mulch, estimate. Lic/Ins.
(727)525-7433.


CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY SHOP
Don't Replace Your Furniture,
Have It Reupholstered!
20 Yrs. Exp. Fast Turnaround,
Pick-Up & Delivery.
Brett Kennedy (727)322-3445



SprinALeL SWst m MIalow Well
Experts! Quality Work.
Free Estimates. #C-5918.
Kellis Williams, (727)381-7132.


WINDOWS & DOORS AT
Discount Prices!! Any Brand.
Installation Special, Only $80
Pe W ndow!! C MR63.Karoly
windowsandinstallation.com



SHANE'S WINDOW CLEANING
Serving Pinellas County 15 years.
Weekly, Bi-weekly, Monthly.
Construction Clean-up Specialist.
Residential, Commercial. Insured.
(727)542-8610.
Goodview@tampabay.rr.com



CALL AL NELSON WINDOW
TINTING, (727)403-2323
Commercial, Residential,
Automotive. 23-years' experience.
Free Estimates. www.gulftint.com


OLD CRANK WINDOWS
GIVING YOU A PROBLEM?
Replace Cranks, Rescreen.
Free Estimates. Reasonable
Rates. (727)422-5416.


Leader, October 14, 2010


Attention
central Pinells. H-omeowners g g ao
FREE MINOR ROOFING REPAIRS* ......
For the month of October! Roofing &
Does your roof enve at mno~r problem Carpentr y
GET IT FIXED FREE!! NO GIMMICKS, NO CA TCHES! 77 6 -O F(63
Just call our office and schedule to have one of our guys State lic'd./Bonded/1ns.
come out and check your problem. CCC-1 327709 CBC-1 254607
First come, first served! Limited appointments available! *Call for details. a


Share the passing of your
loved one with the
community by placing an

Tampa Ba newspapers:
Beacon Leader
Bee Citizen
(727) 397-5563


PPOfessional Services 7B


PARADISE s r.
AIN~IN C GuarantSO 90

Contractors of Western Florida, LLC
Family Owned & Operated Over 30 Years
Interior/Exterior
*Painting Waterproofing Eco Friendly


3) 727( 84-4942 & (727) 5 2 Lic. #C-10378










8B Entertainment

OPENING,fCrom pageB 11 I


**If promo and debt cancellation are not paid in full within 5 years, interest at 29.99% will be assessed from purchase date. If account goes 60 days past
due, promo may be terminated early and accrued interest will be billed. As of July 1, 2010, Purchase APR 29.99%; Penalty APR 29.99%. Minimum Interest
$2. Subject to credit approval. ttNominal additional charges for upholstery, steps or furniture that requires disasembly and items like pool tables, pianos,


Leader, October 14, 2010


11111~(:
~lmu~~m~urnl


1IIC--tilI~-~ll1I~-X~I1I~III


I~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ Iv lly rlls l~ ulr


Soggy Doggie 2010, Saturday, Oct. 16, 11
a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Highland Family Aquatic Cen-
ter, 400 Highland Ave. NE.
Description: "Pet owners are permitted to bring
their dogs to enjoy a swim at the Highland Family
Aquatic Center. Owners can enjoy concessions,
sponsor displays and goody bags. Owners will
need to provide proof of vaccination for the dog
upon admission. Slides will not be open; plenty of
activities and contests. For more information visit
LargoPools. com."
Call 518-3128.
Pint Size Pumpkin Patch, Monday, Oct. 18, 6
to 7:30 p.m., Southwest Recreation Complex,
13120 Vonn Road.
Description: "Come in costume and join the
trick or treat parade at this year's Pint Size Pump-
kin Patch Event. Children ages 6 and younger will
enjoy fun Fall activities, crafts, food and a special
visit from a storytelling scarecrow. Cost is $5 per
child, children under 2 years old are free. Regis-
tration is recommended by Oct. 15."
Call 518-3125.
Enchanting Evening of MAGIC, presented by
the Tampa Bay Magic Club Friday, Oct. 22, 7:30
p.m., Largo Community Center, 65 Fourth St.
NW.
Description: "Enjoy an evening of astonishing and
mesmerizing magic as two of the world's best magi-
cians amaze you. Direct from Hollywood's Magic
Castle, Losander and Ezell will perform for one show
only. General admission is $15 pre-sale and $20 at
the door. Call to reserve your tickets today."


Call 518-3131.
Halloween Spooktacular 2010, Saturday, Oct.
23, 4 to 10 p.m., Largo Central Park, 101 Central
Park Drive.
Description: "Dress up in your favorite costume
and join the fun of the 16th Annual Halloween
Spooktacular in Largo Central Park. This enor-
mous and exhilarating event takes up all the
green space. The trick-or-treat path wraps around
the entirety of central field. Inflatables, slides,
games, activities and concessions fill the center
and outer areas. The old library field promises fun
for the littlest ones. Circus arts performers also
will delight and entertain you. There's so much
going on that the whole family is sure to have a
fantastic night. Wristbands are required for all ac-
tivities. Purchase yours at any staffed Recreation
Facility. For more information visit
LargoEvents.com."
Call 587-6740, ext. 5014.
Owl-o-ween, Thursday, Oct. 28, 6:30 to 8 p.m.,
McGough Nature Park, 11901 146th St. N.
Description: "Celebrate Halloween among our
nocturnal friends as we trick or treat along the
nature trail. Learn about creepy critters, roast s'-
mores around a campfire and much more. Space
is limited, so register early by calling 518-3047."
Halloween Glow in the Dark Golf Tournament,
Friday, Oct. 29, Largo Golf Course, 12500 Vonn
Road.
Description: "Entry Fee is $35 per person. To
enter the Halloween Tournament, call the Pro
Shop at 518-3024."


Cast: Hilary Swank, Minnie
Driver, Sam Rockwell, Melissa
Leo and Loren Dean
Director: Tony Goldwyn
Rated: R
"Conviction" is the inspira-
tional true story of a sister's un-
wavering devotion to her brother.
When Betty Anne Waters' (Hi-
lary Swank) older brother Kenny
(Sam Rockwell) is arrested for
murder and sentenced to life in
1983, Betty Anne, a Mas-
sachusetts wife and mother of
two, dedicates her life to over-
turning the murder conviction.
Convinced that her brother is
innocent, Betty Anne puts herself
through high school, college and.
finally, law school in an 18-year
quest to free Kenny. With the
help of best friend Abra Rice
(Minnie Driver), Betty Anne pores
through suspicious evidence
mounted by small town cop
Nancy Taylor (Melissa Leo).
meticulously retracing the steps
that led to Kenny's arrest. Belief
in her brother and her quest for
the truth pushes Betty Anne
and her team to uncover the facts
and utilize DNA evidence with the
hope of exonerating Kenny.


~3~3


Photo by RON BATZDORFF
Minnie Driver, left, and Hilary Swank star in "Conviction."


:~. .. .' We~A _


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finncng We beat the big box so. c.~

see~~~~ for yoref ECDC.
Parc aloe4
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"Deco~ratntrce e


nwa ra-o nternu.


9012 Seminole Blvd., Seminole, FL 33772
(One mile north of Park Blvd.)

727.397.5509
www.FlooringAmericaofSeminole.com
Store Hours: Monday-Friday 10am-6pm; Saturday 10am-4pm; Closed Sunday
Lic. #C9390 & Lic. #C9673


*Discount applies to materials only; cushion, labor and installation charges are additional. toffer applies to basic installation on new orders of 200
sq. ft. or more placed for special order materials only. Does not apply to in-stock or commercial items. Prior orders exempt. See store for details
on all offers and warranties. Offer expires 10/31/10. Participating stores only. Unless otherwise stated, all prices are for materials only. Not all
merchandise in all stores. Photos are representational only. Actual merchandise may not exactly match photos shown. Although we make every
effort to insure that our advertising is accurate, we cannot be held liable for typographical errors or misprints. FALME-24153. 9/2010


Around Largo


GOING


SonIV


FlooningAmenica.

of S eminole
::,an111 a. I I h ool Color Center


Carpet
Hearth and Home Hallowell
For outstanding value, look no f further.
Reg. $2.19 .. Sale 880 Sq. Ft. 24 colors

Resista First Shoot Super Heavy Twist
28 Beautiful Colors. Reg. $2.93 .. Sale $2.08 Sq. FI.
Resista Stand up Reg. $2.48 .. Sale $1.74 Sq. Fi.
(10 year food and beverage warranty)


Laminate

Traditional Oak, Honey Oak Color
Reg. $2.49 .. Sale 990 Sq. Ft.
Winslow Oak 8.3m
Natural Wood Look, Easy Care
Reg. $3.49 .. Sale $1.37 Sq. Ft.
Bruce
With Easy Clean Finish, Natural Looks
Great Styling. Reg. $4.23 .. Sale $1.73 Sq. Ft.

Hardwood

Green Mountain White Oak
Long-wearing natural beauty in 5 1/2"Width
Reg. $4.69 .. Sale $1.99 Sq. Ft.

Anderson Nayatoh. Exotic flooring in a hardwood
5" widths. Reg $5.79 .. Sale $2.99 Sq. Ft.
Mohawk Hamilton Oak
Classic Oak in a Beautiful Honey Color
Reg. $5.79 .. Sale $2.99 Sq. Ft.


Ceramic and Vinyl

Dal Tile El Salvador 18" x 18" Porcelain
Beautiful Tile, limited stock.
Reg. $3.72 .. Sale 990 Sq. Ft.

Belago Light Ivory
20"x20" Porcelain Beautiful Stone Look
Reg. $3.37 .. Sale $1.96 Sq. Ft.

Nafco Lattitudes Luxury Vinyl
Re-crteate he ook of Real WS $.9 q F.

6" x 36" Brazilian Maple Reg. $2.99 .. Sale $1.93 Sq. Ft.
Professional Installation Available.


Flooring America. of Seminole
formerly Floor Color Center


102ndAve. ~I
Freedom Blvd.


86th Ave. v


-3 WAYS TO SHOP



In-Store Online Al-Horne




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