• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Statement of intent
 Introduction
 Trip itinerary
 Facts
 Note on bibliography
 Warehouses
 Factories and Mills
 Wharves
 Public Buildings
 Transportation terminals
 Office and retail structures
 Residential structures
 Hotels
 Miscellaneous






Adaptive use in the eastern United States
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00099630/00001
 Material Information
Title: Adaptive use in the eastern United States
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Mills, Jerry W.
Publisher: Jerry W. Mills
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1976
Copyright Date: 1976
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Historic preservation
Adaptive reuse of buildings
 Notes
General Note: UF AFA Historic Preservation document 139
General Note: Professors Carl Feiss, F. Blair Reeves, and Phillip Wisley
General Note: Course number: AE629
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00099630:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Statement of intent
        Page 3
    Introduction
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
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        Page 9
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        Page 11
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        Page 15
    Trip itinerary
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Facts
        Page 24
    Note on bibliography
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Warehouses
        Page 27
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    Factories and Mills
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    Wharves
        Page 115
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    Public Buildings
        Page 144
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    Transportation terminals
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    Office and retail structures
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    Residential structures
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    Hotels
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    Miscellaneous
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Full Text














adaptive use
In the eastern

united states


a student's Investigation

j. w. mills


- i




ADAPTIVE USE

IN THE

EASTERN UNITED STATES


A Student's Investigation



AE 629, Spring, 1976





BY

JERRY W. MILLS





FOR:

Professor Carl Feiss, Committee Chairman

Professor F. Blair Reeves

Phillip Wisley








Statements of Intent

Introduction

Trip Itinerary*

Facts

Note on Bibliography


follows above, these
pages are not numbered.


See Map, pg 26



TEXT

Section I Warehouses


1. Lamont C. Osteen Residence/Retail
2. Ironfronts
3. Canal Square
4. Teknor Apex
5. 21 Merchants Row
6. Henry Shaw Warehouse

Section II Factories and Mills


1. Appomattox Iron Works
2. Duvall Foundry
3. Torpedo Art Center
4. Bancroft Mills
5. Brandywine River Museum
6. University Square
7. Providence Partnership
8. Prince Condominiums
9. Piano Craft Guild
0. Crownshield Estates
1. Cohoes Industrial Terminal
2. Johnson, Johnson and Roy

Section III Wharves

1. Custom House Block


Savannah, GA
Richmond, VA
Washington, D.C.
Pawtucket, R.I.
Boston, MA
St. Louis, MO


Petersburg, VA
Washington, D.C.
Alexandria, VA
Wilmington, DE
Chadds Ford, PA
Bridgeport, CN
Providence, R.I.
Boston, MA
Boston, MA
Peabody, MA
Cohoes, NY
Ann Arbor, MI


Boston, MA

Long Wharf


CONTENTS


PAGE

3


Text







2. Chart House Restaurant
3. Commercial Wharf
4. Mercantile Wharf
5. The Granite Building Apartments
6. Pilot House Restaurant/Offices
7. Lincoln Power Plant/Coal Storage

Section IV Public Buildings

1. Portrait Gallery
2. Center Stage
3. Whig Hall
4. Institute of Contemporary Arts
5. Old City Hall
6. Central Grammar School
7. Dr. Murtagh's Apartments
8. CEMREL

Section V Transportation Terminals


Savannah Visitors' Center
Providence/Worcester Company
The Gandy Dancer Restaurant
REA Restaurant


Section VI Office and Retail Structures

1. 1610 Chestnut Street
2. One Winthrop Square
3. Grain Exchange (Offices for Perry,
Dean, Stahl, Rogers Associates, Inc.)

Section VII Residential Structures


Morris Newspaper Company
Southern Bell
Design Research, Inc.
Guernsey Hall Condominiums
Webster House
Portsmouth Public Library


Long Wharf
Commercial Wharf
New Atlantic Avenue
Lewis Wharf
Lewis Wharf
Lincoln Wharf


Philadelphia, PA
Baltimore, MD
Princeton, NJ
Boston, MA
Boston, MA
Gloucester, MA
Castine, ME
St. Louis, MO


Savannah, GA
Woonsocket, RI
Ann Arbor, MI
Akron, Ohio


Philadelphia, PA
Boston, MA

Boston, MA


Savannah, GA
Savannah, GA
Philadelphia, PA
Princeton, NJ
Boston, MA
Portsmouth, NH


Section VII Hotels


The Cairo'Apartments
Vendome Condominiums
Rockingham Condominiums


Washington,
Boston, MA
Portsmouth,


IX Miscellaneous


Farmer's Market Restaurant
Exeter Street Theater
Faneuil Hall Marketplace
Weyerbacher Terrace Apartments
Powell Symphony Hall


Petersburg, VA
Boston, MA
Boston, MA
Indianapolis, ID
St. Louis, MO


D.C.

NH









STATEMENT OF INTENT


The primary purposes sought and achieved for this project involved
personal investigation of some well known adaptive use projects in the east-
ern United States and meeting their architects and in some cases, owners
of studied buildings.


The purpose of this paper is to formally present ideas, experiences
and conclusions derived from the trip which encompassed approximately
5,400 driving miles, numerous walking miles and many rides on public
transportation systems.


Although the writing of this paper has had a definite influence
on the formulation of concrete ideas concerning the various aspects
of adaptive use, the total knowledge gained and the feelings for the
spaces experienced cannot, by any means, be transmitted to interested
listeners, or readers. Photographs have been included to help
convey specific solutions to problems encountered but they are
only a small frame through which one can view a minute percentage
of the total product.




INTRODUCTION


The conception and implementation of this project was of a

totally selfish nature oriented towards gaining as much knowledge

as possible concerning the reuse of old buildings. This "knowledge"

was not meant and did not restrict itself to the physical structures

alone. Several other (no less important) purposes were entertained

from the outset and are listed below with supporting justification

following.

1) TRAVEL WHILE THE OPPORTUNITY EXISTS.

2) SEE WHAT ARE CONSIDERED "GOOD" EXAMPLES OF REUSE PROJECTS AND
PERSONALLY EXPERIENCE THEIR SPACES.

3) RETAIN A WRITTEN CATALOGUE OF BUILDINGS FOR FUTURE REFERENCE.

4) COMPILE THREE SETS OF PHOTOGRAPHS, EACH SERVING A SEPARATE
PURPOSE.

5) OPPORTUNITY TO MEET ARCHITECTS IN THE FIELD OF ADAPTIVE USE.

6) OPPORTUNITY TO MEET OWNERS OF THESE PROJECTS.

7) DEAL WITH MAJOR PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS ENCOUNTERED.

8) EDUCATION ON ECONOMICS.

9) LOCATE AREAS WITH FUTURE POTENTIAL IN RESTORING OLD BUILDINGS.

10) ENHANCE AND CRYSTALLIZE NY OWN PHILOSOPHIES TOWARDS THIS
SPECIALIZED FIELD OF ARCHITECTURE.

1) Travel while the opportunity exists. Never before did the

opportunity present itself to travel to this extent. Since graduation

is imminent and one can't rely on one's first permanent architectural




5

job to offer travel possibilities, this was really the first and

last chance to see, in three dimensions, the completed projects so

often read about in architectural periodicals. From this experience

of studying reused buildings in the eastern United States I feel

very strongly about the growing success and desire to reuse old

buildings.

In almost every architectural office visited, new projects

centered around the adaptive use of older buildings were either in

the proposal or working drawing stage With increasing anxiousness

to graduate and become a positive function of society I am encouraged

by the rapidly growing trend towards saving the most important physical

feature of past history: old buildings.


2) See what are considered "good" examples of reuse projects and

personally experience their spaces. The listing of over 130 examples

of projects was conducted through research in architectural and

related fields periodicals from April of 1977 backwards to January

of 1973.

The product of this research was not intended as a complete

listing of projects in the eastern United States, but more a prime

sampling. Of the 130 buildings found in periodicals some 50 were

seen. A few others surveyed were either recommended by architects

or developers. Quaker Square in Akron, Ohio and the Public Library

in Portsmouth, NH, were two of these.

Photography provides an immense wealth of data in that, once

the scale of the building and its spaces are experienced first hand,

the photographs can serve to refresh the mind, not only in exactly







what exists but also the 3-dimensional feeling perceived when

moving through these spaces. This impression can be made only through

direct contact making it essential for one to see and feel the style

of architecture he wishes to create in his future career.

No-matter how well done a picture or slide is, that framed

view is like a piece in a puzzle and total perception of the subject

matter is not complete until the puzzle is viewed as a whole.

The decision to see or not to see a building relied on several

factors. If a structure had been written up in several journals

over a period of time, then the project must have some significance

to more than just the owner or the architect; this was a definite

drawing point. Its geographical location was another factor considered.

If the project was somewhere near the route being taken then its

chances of survey were increased. A single building, however, at

four hours driving time and at a right angle (900) to the projected

route would less likely be surveyed than theone directly in line

with that route.

In planning the rough itinerary, which was changed many times

over during the trip, the cities with several listings were used as

guidelines in developing the overall driving scheme.

Personal contacts with friends sharing the same interests in

old buildings provided a vital resource, not only with respect to

exact location of listed buildings, but also in regards to places

to stay and in providing interviews with the persons required to

furnish data for the completion of the survey forms.

Unfortunately, some listed buildings could not be surveyed

since they either were still in the process of being completed or

had never been started. For this paper, finished projects provided






more of a complete picture with respect to the "new" building's

public acceptance, and projects in the works were considered almost

hypothetical since their was no information yet available concerning

its economic success.

Some periodicals printed completion dates which were never met

due to various problems, but some articles led the reader to believe

that the work had already been completed and all systems were

functioning. A case in point is the Stillman White Brass Foundry

article in Progressive Architecture (5/75, p..68.) This article

has been included and can be found in Section .II: The Providence

Partnership.

This small factory building in Providence, RI was to have been

the home of the Research Design Institute (REDE). The article made

references to all the environmentally sound mechanical systems in-

stalled in the building which were part of the Institute's experimental

undertakings promoting.less energy consumption. -I arrived at the

site to find REDE bankrupt and the building in the process of being

transformed into the architectural offices of the Providence Partner-

ship. I was very disturbed to learn that almost all of the mechanical

systems and restoration that was presented in the article had never

been implemented. From the article read, this project was to be one

of the most promising reuses to be studied.

Many listed buildings thought to have been completed had to be

left behind, incomplete, for the purposes of this project.


3) Retain a written catalogue of buildings for future reference.

Here again, in order to create a style sympathetic to and promoting

one's own philosophy towards architecture, a permanent record of

other's works is necessary for reference purposes in dealing with future

projects.








Clients owning unused buildings with potential would be interested

in seeing examples of similar buildings once thought obsolete which

are now producing a profitable income for their owners.

The product of this permanent record can be found in the text

of this paper. Several major points of inquiry were conveyed when

interviewing owners and architects:

a) Original and new functions.

b) Major structural changes.

c) Adapted mechanical systems.

d) Meeting code requirements.

e) Sources of funding.

Samples of the working and finished forms can be found in the front

pocket of this notebook or in the appendices (later copies).

Originally eight building types were listed and each building

was categorized according to its original function. The original

eight types were as follows:

A. Warehouses

B. Wharves and Piers

C. Factories and Mills

D. Transportation Terminals

E. Office and Retail Structures

F. Public Buildings

G. Banks

H. Miscellaneous

The last category, Miscellaneous, contained the largest group of

listings and included hospitals, churches, hotels, large single family




9


residences, markets and theaters. Of these the most commonly reused

building type was the residential structure with new uses varying

from restaurants to office facilities, shops and multi-family-

dwellings in the form of apartments and even condominiums; Surprisingly

enough, even though two listings were found for the new use of old

churches neither proved to be fruitful. The old Blanford Church in

Petersburg, Virginia, listed as a new visitors' center was found

intact as a church with no services while the new visitors' center

was actually a contemporary structure some distance from the church

itself. Another church, this one in Rockport, MA was unknown by

the townspeople and even in the office of the architect with whom

the work was credited. Apparently, when mention of this church

was made in the August, 1974 issue of the AIA Journal (p. 50) the

project was in the pre-planning stage and never went beyond.

It seems that several new functions would work well within

the walls of these structures, however I wonder if there is a

skepticism involved with changing an ecclesiastical structure to a

more human, earthly need. A multi-level restaurant, a players

theater, or even perhaps a night club would work well in a church

properly scaled to its adapted function.

Exeter Street Theater in Boston, MA was the only religious

edifice found adaptively used and the work has not yet been completed.

So, from the eight building types first used to organize the

project, one more was added and others were changed.

The final types follow:

SECTION I WAREHOUSES

SECTION II FACTORIES AND MILLS







SECTION III WHARVES BOSTON, MA

SECTION IV PUBLIC BUILDINGS

SECTION V TRANSPORTATION TERMINALS

SECTION VI OFFICE AND RETAIL STRUCTURES

SECTION VII RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES

SECTION VIII HOTELS

SECTION IX MISCELLANEOUS

A SECTION was created when three or more structures sharing

similar original functions were studied. SECTION IX MISCELLANEOUS

consists of two markets, a church structure, a Catholic hospital

and-an old movie theater.


4) Compile three sets of photographs, each serving a separate

purpose. Three cameras were taken along on the trip and two more

would have been very useful. The first camera, a simple Kodak Instamatic

with 126 color print film, was used to collect front facade studies

of all buildings catalogued. These prints are used to identify all

structures. The second camera was a Regula, a small but efficient

35 mm German camera with no attachments. This camera provided interior

and exterior studies in slide form for the oral lecture and to add to

my slide library for future reference. The slides were never

intended to accompany this paper. The third camera, a Yaschika

Electra, GSN, was used for the black and white prints accompanying

each form to help identify certain interesting or useful points within

each building surveyed.


5) Opportunity to meet architects in the field of adaptive use.

The architects which produced the results found in the buildings







surveyed were the ones responsible for some of the most sensitive

and well-done adaptive use projects in the eastern United States,

Naturally, then, in educating oneself on the type of work most

desirable to him, the personal communication with these people can

do nothing but improve one's awareness and sense of direction towards

the accepted reuse.of old buildings. Most architects interviewed

were pleased to spend some time with me and explain certain aspects

of their work.

Since the itinerary had to be followed rather loosely it was

extremely difficult to set up appointments with architects more than

a few hours ahead of time. The amount of time spent at each site varied

greatly since some were closed during my available hours, or the work

had not been completed, or in some cases the work had not even begun.

With these examples little time was spent at the site. Sometimes

a completed project with a great deal to offer was studied.for over

an-hour or two. With this time span so variable and the time to drive
to and find each building, all of which were in unfamiliar territory,

and the time necessary to drive to and find the architects office, it

was virtually impossible to follow a strict preplanned schedule. With

the knowledge of the probable problems involved with this flexibility,

several good architects,temporarily unavailable, had to be skipped

since time was so valuable and there was so much to see. An appoint-

ment was made for a certain time in Arthur Cotton Moore's office in

Washington, D.C. and after waiting 15 minutes beyond the scheduled

appointment, I found it necessary to excuse myself and continue with

my journey.


6) Opportunity to meet owners of these projects. Some of the owners






or developers of various projects were interviewed, using the outline

of the survey form as a guideline. The most important point to be

made here, however, is not the quality or quantity of answers provided

during these interviews, but the communication produced and the educa-

tion gained by building a rapport with individuals similar in character

to future clients. An anticipated positive ingestion of self-confidence

was successfully achieved through these conversations which is vital

at the outset of any new career.


7) Deal with the major problems and solutions encountered. It was

discovered during the trip, that no two projects are ever exactly

alike and very few are even similar in the problems that are incurred

during a renovation/adaptive use project. Costs vary in different

locations, as do code requirements and so even though two structures

might be physically similar in original materials, form and function,

problems uncovered during the renovation can be and usually are

unique to each individual project. I cannot think of any two of the

55 buildings surveyed that can be confused with one another. And

in most cases, when a certain project reminds me of another, it is

usually because they were in the same geographic location and not

because of similar past or present functions.


8) Education on Economics. Of utmost importance to a future potential

client are his costs. How much is it going to cost him to take a

certain building and make it into an income producing facility?

Of course no projected project is a 100% sure success, but many

guidelines can be followed to increase his chances of showing a profit.

It was dnummed into my head during the trip that the most important

first step is in procurring a structure with a good or potentially







good location.

While reading some printed matter on One-Winthrop Square in

Boston (Record American Building) I came across five points which would

increase chances of, or are advantages for a financially successful

project. They are edited and listed below, but the article in its

entirety can be found in this notebook following the form and photos

for One-Winthrop Square, SECTION VI OFFICE AND RETAIL STRUCTURES.

a) Be sure to Maximize Space Utilization This can be accomplished

by creating new square footage (i.e. mezzanines) or utilizing

previously unused available space (basements, porte-cochere.,

attics)

b) Shorter Construction Time With a basic shell already in

existence there is less time necessary in producing useable

space versus completely new construction.

c) Quicker Ability to Market the Building Existing amenities

such as lavish lobby space or quality ornamental exterior

and/or interior detail can serve as a positive influence in

renting space early in the game.

d) You can attract Competitive Bidding In many cases a projects'

construction can occur year round with little stoppage due to

inclement weather conditions, since "buttoning up" an existing

building is easier than new construction. This means a project

can begin and proceed efficiently in the dead of winter.

e) Easier Local and Political Support One will find an undeniable

advantage when in search of vocal support for the retention

of a socially or culturally valuable historic building versus

the construction of some new unsympathetic structure.







Charles Tseckares of Childs, Bertman, Tseckares Associates, Inc.

was the author of this article, which I believe to be the best, most

pointed essay on the positive considerations of economic feasibility

in rehabbing old buildings.

9) Locate areas with future potential in reusing old buildings.

Though inclusion of this information is not formally presented in

this paper, mental notes are retained regarding geographic areas which

could provide the necessary fabric for new income producing facilities

in older structures. However, it can be stated here that overall,

the northeastern United States abounds in long-since vacated, industrial

buildings, patiently waiting and quietly decaying......


10) Enhance and crystallize my own philosophy towards this specialized

field of architecture. In reading this introduction, studying the

individual forms, and noting the types of buildings surveyed, one can

surely follow'the direction in which my feelings are pointed. I

feel I'm headed towards a desirable form of architecture with which

to create and build a career.




15





I can't expect anyone to enjoy or render useful this paper,

half as much as I enjoyed the educational experiences.gained as a result

of the journey.

I thank my professors for n6t discouraging one of my best

college ideas and I especially thank my aunt, Evelyn Scholz and

grandmother, Dorothy Overman, for their unselfish economic support

in this venture.




TRIP ITINERARY


The following is a brief outline from notes taken during the

trip.


TueSday, April 12

1:30 pm Left by car, alone, heading for Savannah.

5:30 pm Arrived in Savannah. Stayed with friends
(Shirley Stokes and family).

Wednesday, April 13

9:30 am Appointment with Juan Bertotto, architect
for Lamont Osteen Residence.

11:00 am Lamont C. Osteen Residence
Factors Row, Savannah.

11:30 am Savannah Visitors' Center.

2:30 pm Appointment Robert Gunn of Gunn and
Meyerhoff. Southern Bell, Morris Newspaper,
Savannah Visitors Center.

4:30 pm After seeing Southern Bell and Morris
Newspaper, left for Charleston.

Arrived in Charleston, Motel 6.

Thursday, April 14

Morning Photographed, Market Square, Lodge Alley
and spoke to Lloyd Miller in Harold Adler's
office.

11:00 am Left for Petersburg, VA

7:00 pm Arrived, Petersburg, VA, Holiday Inn.

Friday, April 15

9:00 am Dr. Bailey at Old Blanford Church.

Discovered Farmers' Market Restaurant and
Appomattox Iron Works.




12:30 pm






4:30 pm


Saturday, April 16

morning

11:00 am

3:00 pm


Sunday, April 17

8:30-11:00 am

Afternoon

4:00 pm



later

Monday, April 18

8:00 am


11:30 am



Early pm

3:25-3:45 pm


4:15 pm

Tuesday, April 19

8:30 am


-Left for Richmond, VA.
Stearns Block (Ironfronts).
-Talked with James Glave of Glave, Newman,
Anderson.
-Bob Winthrop of GNA toured me around Ironfronts,
Shockoe slip and various Richmond'historic
neighborhoods.

Left for Virginia Beach. Spent the evening
with old friend. Stayed Econo-travel.



Left for Virginia Beach for Alexandria.

Stopped briefly in Williamsburg, VA

Arrived at Dr. Murtagh's in Alexandria, VA
Stayed at Dr. Robert Rettig's.


Mapped out schedule for Washington, D.C.

Walking tour of Alexandria with Dr. Murtagh.

Met with Gene Keith, President of local
historical Society, on adaptive use in
Alexandria.

Began photography in Downtown Alexandria.



Rode into D.C. with Dr. Rettig.
Cairo Hotel.

Arthur Cotton Moore's Office and made
appointment for 3:30 pm,
The Foundry Mall.

Canal Square,

Arthur Cotton Moore's waiting room. Had to
leave without meeting.

Back to Alexandria. Met Roy Graham.


Continued photography Alexandria.




- 18


10:00 am Torpedo Art Center, interview with Mrs.
Meyer, Assistant Director.
Called Baltimore set up afternoon appointment
with James Grieves.

11:00 am Left for Baltimore *

2:00 pm Finished excellent interview and tour of
Center Stage, Baltimore, with Peter England,
Company Director.

2:30 pm Relaxing interview, James Grieves, architect
for Center Stage and Brandywine River Museum.

4:00 pm Appointment with Bowie Arnot, Vice President,
New Project Development-Inner. Harbor
Management, Inc., Baltimore.

7:00 pm Ranch Motel, northeast Maryland.

Wednesday, April 20

10:00 am Arrived at Architectural offices of Whiteside
Moeckel Carbonell at Bancroft Mills, Wilmington,
Delaware. Interviewed Carbonell.

11:45 am Hagley Museum for Bancroft Mills history.

12:30 pm Chadds Ford, PA at Brandywine River Museum.
Talked with Joan Gorman, Assistant Curator
and toured museum.

2:30 pm Office of John Milner, National Heritage, Inc.
Spoke with John Parks, University of Florida
graduate (Westchester, PA),

8:00 pm Historical Society, Westchester, PA
Lecture on Victoriana by Joan Thill Wells,
Executive Director of the Victorian Society
in America.

10:30 pm Wells' Residence, Philadelphia, PA

Thursday, April 21

8:00 am Commuter train to downtown Philadelphia.
Photo-exterior LIT Brothers.

Second Bank of U.S. and interview with John
C. Milley, supervisory curator.

Franklin Court then New Market, but did not
list.




19-;


Afternoon "1610 Chestnut" (1927 Art Deco Building)
and interviewed Dan Cuzini, manager' of Workbench.

3:00 pm Design Research, Inc. (Van Rennselaer)
Spoke to Wm. Knapp, Presbyterian Minister's
Fund on loan to DRI.

5:00 pm Train back to Wells residence.

Friday, April 22

8:30 am Kenneth Parker Associates, Philadelphia.
No appointment and no interview.

11:00 am Princeton, NJ Whig Hall.

Afternoon Guernsey Hall and its architect for reuse,
Wm. Short of Short and Ford.

3:00 pm Left Princeton for Binghamton, NY

7:00 pm Arrived, Binghamton, NY photographed
Iron Building but did not list.
Del Motel.

Saturday, April 23

12:30 pm Walton, NY stayed with friends and toured
town.

Sunday, April 24

Early pm Left for New York City.

Evening Drove into and out of New York City after
three discouraging attempts at crossing the
George Washington Bridge. I had no good
personal contacts, though I did have several
buildings listed. Stayed in Bridgeport, CN,
Motel.

Monday, April 25

Morning University Square, Bridgeport. Photographed
the Railroad Depot, but no work as yet
completed.
Called and made an appointment with Victor
Christ Janer, Architect.

3:30 pm Interview with a very pessimistic and dis-
couraging V. Christ-Janer, New Canaan, CN.

Late pm Photographed at Union Station, New London, CN,
no interview.




20


Evening Watertown, MA. Townhouse Motor Inn.

Wednesday, April 27

Prepared forms for buildings in the Boston.
area I had 25 listed.
Automobile scheduled maintenance check.

Phone conversation with Paul McGinley of
Anderson Notter Associates Invited to "end
of quarter" party for Boston University
students participating in Tim Anderson and
P. McGinley's recycling class.

Phone conversation with James Michael, host
for the next five nights, and friend at
University of Florida.

7:30 pm Met George Notter, Paul McGinley,

Thursday, April 28

7:30 pm 51 Hereford Street, James Michael residence,
Back Bay, Boston. Wayne Dewhirst, roommate,
works for Perry, Dean Stahl Rogers Associates.

Lunch Wayne Dewhirst and Frank C. Adams, project
designer for Vendome and Portsmouth Public
Library. Met Roger Dean and Tad Stahl.

Afternoon Vendome toured with Mrs. Aberjam, Manager.
Exeter- Street Theater, exetrior of Webster
House.

Friday and Saturday, April 29 and 30

Attended the Massachusetts Historical Com-
mission's "The Economics of Historic Preservation."
see Program in the appendix.

Saturday Bus tour of the Boston Water front.

At this point the notes in my day book drop off and don't pick up again
until Wednesday, May 4. Because of this, I will simply list the
buildings seen during this period and persons interviewed. A Tuesday
morning appointment at Anderson Notter Associates was cancelled
by P. McGinley, but the information was promised.

Monday, May 2
The Waterfront

Custom House Block
Gardner Building
Mercantile Wharf
Commercial Wharf
Lewis Wharf (Granite Building and Pilot House)




Prince Condominiums
Lincoln Wharf

Old City Hall and Roger Webb


Tuesday, May 3


21 Merchants Row
Faneuil Hall Markets
One Winthrop Square
Webster House Neil St. John Raymond, of the Raymond
Cattle Company; Alan A. Schoenezze and David
W. Stirling of Childs, Bertmon, Tseckares.

Piano Craft Guildsecretary for John Sharratt,
reuse architect.


Evening


Frank C. Adams (Stahl Associates)


Wednesday, May 4


9:00 am


10:00 am
(approximate)

Late morning



Early afternoon











Night


Institute of Contemporary Arts, but closed.

Crownshield Apartments. (The Tannery) in
Peabody, MA, but no entry or interview.

Gloucester, MA Central Grammar Apartments
for the Elderly. Tried to see Kirk Noyes,
developer but didn't..

Rockport, MA two listed projects fell through
never completed.
East Row in Newburyport, MA was listed, seen
and photoed but not a completed project -
no listing in this paper.
Portsmouth, NH Rockingham Condominiums -
saw the "Library Bar and Restaurant" a sample
apartment and a roof view.
Portsmouth Public Library and interview with
Sherman Pridham, Library Director.
Left Portsmouth and arrived in Albany, New
York at 9:00 pm.

Stayed with friend, Pegg Nadler.


Thursday, May 5


Albany, New York D & H building was listed
but not studied due to apparent lack of difference
in change of use.
Cohoes, New York Harmony Mills.
Left Cohoes and Albany for Cleveland, Ohio.








Early evening Arrived, Cleveland, Ohio but decided to
stop for the night in Akron, Ohio.

10:00 pm Stayed at L/K Motel, Akron, Ohio.

Friday, May 6

11:00 am REA Restaurant and discovered adjacent facility,
Quaker Square. Interviewed Jay Nusbaum,
President, Quaker Square Associates.

2:00 pm Left Akron for Ann Arbor, Michigan.

5:00 pm Arrived Ann Arbor Motor Lodge.

Saturday, May 7

Morning Miller Main Building, Gandy Dancer
Restaurant, Ann Arbor. Interviewed Dave
Dreese, Assistant Manager, Gandy Dancer.

Early afternoon Arrived at friend's farm in Williamstown,
Michigan, just outside Lansing, Michigan.

Sunday, May 8
R and R plus guided driving tour of Lansing.

Monday, May 9

Michigan State University

Tuesday, May 10

11:00 am Ann Arbor, Michigan interviewed in Johnson,
Johnson and Roy Landscape Architects for
Miller Main Building.

4:00 pm Arrived in Dayton, Ohio and phoned archi-
tectural offices of Lorenz, Williams, Lively,
Likens and Partners. Spoke with Notley Alford
of LWLL and learned that neither building
listed had been completed.

4:05 pm Left for Indianapolis, Indiana.

Stayed with Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Bauer,
Bill was a '76 University of Florida Preserva-
tion Graduate.








Wednesday, May 11

9:00 am






1:30 pm

5:30 pm

Thursday, May 12

9:00 am















6:45 pm

Friday May 13

9:30 am

Monday, May 16

11:30 am

11:00 pm


Indianapolis Preservation Commission Office -
Bill Bauer and Jim Keesling (another Preservation
Graduate).
Weyerbacher Terrace Apartments and guided
tour. Interviewed Lynn Molzzan at Evans
Woolen, Associates, architects for that
project.

Heading for St. Louis.

Arrived St. Louis, stayed at another Motel 6.



Hastings and Chivetta, Architects, Planners -
on status of Wainwright.

Anselevicious/RupeiAssociates and interviewed
Bill Rupe on CEMREL.

Toured CEMREL

Toured Powell Symphony Hall. Interviewed
Angelo Corrubia of Wedemeyer, Cernik, Corrubia,
Inc., architects for Powell Symphony Hall.

Laclede's Landing. Visited Raeder Building
and Riverfront Design Center.

Interviewed Dwight Reum, owner of RFDC.

Left St. Louis for New Orleans.



Drove all night, arrived New Orleans.



Left New Orleans for Gainesville.

Gainesville end of trip.











FACTS


TOTAL MILES DRIVEN

GAS (TOTAL COST)

STATES DRIVENTHROUGH

STATES IN WHICH BUILDINGS WERE STUDIED

BUILDINGS ORIGINALLY LISTED

BUILDINGS STUDIED

TRIP DATES: APRIL 12 MAY 13

TOTAL.DAYS:



TOTAL EXPENSES INCLUDING FILM AND
PROCESSING


5,493

$176.00

24

14

130

54

4 1/2 Weeks

32


$1,000.00










NOTE ON BIBLIOGRAPHY


Research for this project was restricted to periodical

survey, only no books were investigated. A reading list of

books on preservation and adaptive use can be found in the

appendix.

All periodicals used and other supporting reference material

can be found listed on the last page of each survey form.































































































































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pariaHly complete nmArk ltsae shown only where erected.
on maior completed sections. Refer to mole detailed *. t PL-
heroin lor alianmrn.l ol proposed complete network. ... *.
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CONSTRUCTION DATE
ARCHITECT
STYLE


1816


ORIGINAL NALE/ USE
William Taylor Warehouse
for Cotton


NEW NAIE 'AND ADDRESS
William Taylor Warehouse
206 W. Bay Street
Factor's Row
Savannah, Georgia


OWNERS AND ADDRESS 232-8530
Dr. & Mrs. Lamont C. Osteen
206 W. Bay Street
Factor's Row
Savannah, Georgia


ARCHITECTS FOR REUSE 232-2722
Juan Bertotto
124 W. Huntington Street
Savannah, Georgia


AFFILIATIONS


AWARDS


NiW FUNCTIONS:: RETAIL 50 OFFICE __ RESIDENTIAL ,
UTF ER _o .



CONSTRUCTION. TIEiE 6-8 months COMPLETION DATE 1972
% OCCUPANCY 80




PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE Size of building STRUCTURAL SYSTEIA.:
LOAD BEAR.IG MASONRY X
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE WOOD FRAiE X
PER FLOOR OTHER 1
FLOORS 5 The masonry used was balast stone
and savannah gray brick.

L;,,W CONSTRUCTION: O_0DERATE X ; EXTENSIVE
2 foot bridges were added from structure to Factor's Walk siral stairway at
north elevation for entry to second floor shop; all finished floors replaced:
opened existing elevator shaft for stairs.





REIVOVALS:NONE X ; MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE





USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION.:
None





ADAPTED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

SYSTEM ORIGINAL .NEW COMBINATION

HEATING X
VENTILATING -
AIR CONDITIONING X
ELECTRICAL X
PLUMBING X
Compressors located within stair structure at north elevation. New plumbing
system is shared with adjoining building.



CODE COMiPLIANiCE
ZONING: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE Yes. Changed from Light
OTHER Industry in 1972, but only allowed one living unit p r hiilding.
FIRE: Four or five levels have access to the exterior.


_OTHER:



ECONO!v.ICS
TYPE OF FUNDING: COST OF PROPERTY 31,000
PUBLIC RENOVATION COST 69,000
PRIVATE X TOTAL COSTS 100,000
COST PER SQ. FT. -
REFLACE;iiENT COST

LENDING INSTITUTIONS) C & S OPERATION AND
Bank of Savannah MAINTENANCE COSTS -
TYE OF LOAN


INTEREST RATE __











1.LOFT w .
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e ,,-,. BAL
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SI OAUGsTEr bedroom .

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Loft space,.




























CONSTRUCTION
ARCHITECTiron
STYLE Italian


DATE 1866 -
by Hayward & Bartlett
of Baltimore


ORIGINAL NAME/ USE
Stearns Block
Warehouse and office space


NEW NAMiE AND ADDRESS
Ironfronts
1011 E. Main Street
Richmond, VA 23219



OWNERS AND ADDRESS
Ironfront Association
l011 L. Main Street
.Richmond, VA 23219



ARCHITECTS FOR REUSE
Glave, Newman, Anderson
1011 E. Main Street
Richmond, VA

AFFILIATIONS Listed in the National
Register
AWARDS AIA State Honor Award of Merit;
Friends of Cast Iron Award.


NEW FUNCTIONS:; RETAIL .50 OFFICE 50 RESIDENTIAL %
OTHER Law firms, investment company, architect's office, bank an
various retail shops.


CONSTRUCTION. TIME 11 months* COMPLETION DATE 6/76
% OCCUPANCY -
Some portions are not yet complete.



PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE Size of building STRUCTURAL SYSTE1i:
14,uuU LOAD BEARING t',ASONRY X
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE 64,000 WOOD FRAIE X
PER FLOOR14,000 1st, 4,000 5th & 6th OTHER
FLOORS Six including basement and sub-
basement.

NEW CONSTRUCTION: MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE X
New steel joists added at roof to support hvac system.
Additional floor support with steel joists added every three or four wood joists.
All non-bearing interior walls removed. Part of first floor cast iron recast
in aluminum.






REMOVALS:NONE __ ; MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE 1.




USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION.:





ADAPTED MECHANICALL SYSTEMS

SYSTEt ORIGINAL .NEW COMBINATION

HEATING
VENTILATING __
AIR CONDITIONING
ELECTRICAL _
PLUMBING
Electric heat pump on roof. Ducting above dropped ceilings. In architects
office the ducting is tubular and exposed.



CODE CO P.FLIALI CE
ZONING.: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE No
OTHER
FIRE: Two new firestairs constructed. Building sprinkled throughout. All
wood frame construction is encased with gypsum board.

.OTHER: According to present codes, a building similar to this one could not
be constructed.


ECONOkICS
TYPE OF FUNDING: COST OF PROPERTY 560.000
PUBLIC RENOVATION COST. 740,000
PRIVATE All TOTAL COSTS 300.000
COST PER SQ. FT. $20.00
REPLACEl'iEN COST $40-50/S.ft.

T ENDING INSTITUTIONS) First OPERATION AND
Mierchanis Bank MAINTENANCE COSTS
TY1E OF LOAI Construction

TERi -
INTEREST RA'E -
Purchase funding was not available until the renovation was completed. Then a
20 year mortgage was obtained through Aetna Life Insurance Company whose office
building is located next door.




~~>:<.,'


FRONT ENTIGGNCe,


)


ACCESS TO LOWER
CUlil.iEIiCIAL LEVELt


IM

.4,


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P




























CONSTRUCTION DATE
ARCHITECT -
STYLE Typical 19th
construction.


19th Century

century warehouse


ORIGINAL NALE/ USE
Warehouse facilities on the
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal


NEW NAZiE AND ADDRESS
Canal Square
M and 31st Street
Georgetown
Washington, D.C.


OWNERS AND ADDRESS
Charles Coyers





ARCHITECTS FOR REUSE
Arthur Cotton Moore
1214 28th Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20007

AFFILIATIONS -

A,.ARiDS


NEW FUNCTIONS:: RETAIL X. OFFICE X RESIDENTIAL _,
OT'HER X y Checks in cca e occupancy type, however % was unavailaTTe.
"Other~is for the restaurant.


CONSTRUCTION, TI,-E COMPLETIONON DATE .
% OCCUPANCY _




PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM:
LOAD BEARIE~G IASONRY X
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE WOOD FRA-iiE X _
PER FLOOR O THEIR
FLOORS Four


NEW CONSTRUCTION: MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE X
The old warehouse structure forms thesouth wall of the Square with new
construction enclosing the west; north and east sides of the plaza. A fourth
floor was added to the warehouse building.


--





REMOVALS:NONE ; MiODERATE ; EXTENSIVE





USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION:





ADAPTED 1rECHANICAL SYSTEMS

SYSTEM ORIGINAL NEW COMBINATION

HEATING
VENTILATING
AIR CONDITIONING
ELECTRICAL
PLUMBING





CODE COiyPLIAi CE
ZONING: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE
OTHER
FIRE:


OTHERE R:



ECONOMrICS
TYPE OF FUNDING: COST OF PROPERTY
PUBLIC RENOVATION COST
PRIVATE TOTAL COSTS
COST PER SQ. FT-
REPLACEIiENT. COST

"LENDING INSTITUTIONS) OPERATION AND
L__AINTENANCE COSTS
TYIE OF LOAN


INTEREST RAI'E





QUiTiO1'S :

1. WAS THERE A NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED?
2. WAS THE BUILDING. LOCATION AN ASSET?
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL APPEARANCE 3EEUN AN ILhEORTART FACTOR?

4. WAS THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING: CAMiPAIGN?
5. DOES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDIiG IE-LY SOLELY
ON THE SUPPORT OF THE LOCAL POPULATION?
6. WAS THERE A 1.ARKET ANALYSIS IADE?
7. 'AS AN APPRAISAL LADE?
8. IS THERE ANY TAX RELIEF UN THE STRuCTUiREY

9. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY ECONOMIC FAILURES?



SUPPLEL.ENTAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTING POINTS:


























NOTE: People to interview-were unavailable, but information will be added
when received.

REFERENCES

Progressive Architecture 4/71.


DATE OF INTERVIEW Site
BY: JERRY W.I. ;ILLS
Studied 4/18/77


PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:


---- --





















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NEW EXIT


ADDED FLOOR


II,, *I


INSIDE THE SQUARE


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CONSTRUCTION DATE
ARCHITECT -
STYLE Industrial


19th century


~~_


NEW FUNCTIONS:; RETAIL J OFFICE 100j ,, RESIDENTIAL ,
OTHER o General office space in the od buildings, executive offices
in the new addition.


CONSTRUCTION, TIME _. COOiPLETION DATE-.
%c OCCUPANCY -




PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM:
LOAD BEARING 2iASONRY X
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE WOOD FRA1iE "
PER FLOOR OTHER
FLOORS


NEW CONSTRUCTION: MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE X
Two extant buildings were reused one of brick; the other of cinderblock was vpne
, in brick of the same company which produced the old brick. Small one story
addition was built. The arched windows in the cinderblock structure were
punched through and given an arch to match the older brick structure. An
open space area between the new addition and another property was effectively
landscaped,


ORIGINAL NAAi.E/ USE
Manufactory and storage.



NEW NAMiE 'AND ADDRESS
Teknor Apex
Central Avenue
"Pawtucket, Rhode Island


OWNERS AND ADDRESS
Teknor Apex
Central Avenue
Pawtucket, Rhode Island



ARCHITECTS FOR REUSE
Warren Platner Associates
18 Mitchell Drive
New Haven, Conn.
Jesse Lyons, project architect.
AFFILIATIONS -

AWARDS -






REMOVALS:NONE ; MODERATE X__; EXTENSIVE
Previously a retail space the buildings were stripped inside to their wood
columns and concrete floor.



USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION.:






ADAPTED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

SYSTEM ORIGINAL NEW COMBINATION

HEATING X
VENTILATING X
AIR CONDITIONING __
ELECTRICAL .X
PLUMBING X





CODE COiMPLIANCE
ZONING: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE -
OTHER
FIRE: New sprinkling system installed.


OTHER:



ECONO,,I CS
TYPE OF FUNDING: COST OF PROPERTY -
PUBLIC RENOVATION COST. -
PRIVATE XA TOTAL COSTS $32.13/.
COST. PER SQ. FT.
-HELACEi1ENT COST

LENDING INSTITUTIONS) OPERATION AND
MAINTENANCE COSTS


TYI-E UP LOAN -

TLLaLL


INTEREST RAMlE


Cost for all floor covering, furniture
refinishing and new furniture 5.33
square foot. (This included in the above
cost per square foot)





QUESTIONS:

1. WAS THERE A NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED? Yes
2. WAS THE BUILDING. LOCATION AN ASSET? No
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL APPEARANCE BEEN AN IMPORTANT. FACTOR?

4. WAS THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING: CAMPAIGN? No
5. DOES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDIiG thELY SOLELY
ON THE SUPPORT OF THE LOCAL POPULATION? No
6. WAS THERE A RLARKE-T ANALYSIS MADE?. -
7. 'AS AN APPRAISAL LADE? -
8. IS THERE AiNY TAX RELIEF ON THE STRUCTURE? No

9. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY ECONOMIC FAILURES? No


SUPPLEMENTAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTING POINTS:


One junior executive toured me around very
answer questions. The architects, located
interviewed.


briefly but was not available to
in another town, were not


This building was not included in the oral presentation.



















REFERENCES

Architectural Record 1/75, p. 111.






DATE OF INTERVIEW 4/26/77 PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:
BY- JERRY W. MrILLS




KEMUULLINU BY WARREN PLAINER


V


INTERIOR VIEWS


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CONSTRUCTION DATE early 19th century
ARCHITECT -
STYLE
Consists of three old warehouse/


commercial buildings.


ORIGINAL NAL,.E/ USE
Storage and Commercial building.



NEW NAMiE AND ADDRESS
21 Merchants' Row

Boston, Massachusetts



OWNERS AND ADDRESS
Raymond Cattle Company
306 Dartmouth Street
Boston, Massachusetts



ARCHITECTS FOR REUSE
Childs Bertman Tseckares Associates, Inc.
306 Dartmouth
Boston, Massachusetts

AFFILIATIONS -

AWARDS-


NEW FUNCTIONS:; RETAIL __ OFFICE 80 % RESIDENTIAL ,
OTHER 20 % There is a restaurant, which occupies the other 20%.



CONSTRUCTION. TIME One year. COMPLETION DATE 7/72
% OCCUPANCY -




PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE Size of building STRUCTURAL SYSTEiM:
LOAD BEARING TiASONRY X
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE 25,000 WOOD FRAvE X
PER FLOOR OTHER
FLOORS Five
Restaurant storage and offices in basement.

AiEW CONSTRUCTION: MODERATE X ; EXTENSIVE
All window sash and glazing replaced with aluminum frames. A steel frame and
concrete block fire stair was constructed at the northeast corner. Centrally
located in the front facade is the new main entry where fire stairs, restroom
and an elevator have been constructed.


;" ^ 1






REMlOVALS:NONE ; MODERATE X ; EXTENSIVE
No main structures have been removed, only interior gutting.



USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION::





ADAPTED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

SYSTEM ORIGINAL NEW COMBINATION

HEATING X
VENTILATING X
AIR CONDITIONING
ELECTRICAL --
PLUMBIING, X
All new systems, including a forced air central HVAC system have been
incorporated in these buildings. Duct work in the offices with exposed
ceiling.construction has been painted to match the sandblasted wood.


CODE COMPLIANCE
ZONING: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE
OTHER -
FIRE: New sprinkling system and fire detection devices.


OTHER: -



ECONOMICS
TYPE OF FUNDING: COST OF PROPERTY +$1,000,000
PUBLIC RENOVATION COST 725,000
PRIVATE X TOTAL COSTS + 1,725,000
COST PER SQ. FT. +$ 69.00
REFLACEIiEI~ COST. (incl.purchase)

LENDING INSTITUTIONS) major portion cfPERATION AND
money necessary came from an insurance lIAINTENANCE COSTS
TYiE OF LOAN company and savings and loan.


INTEREST RAiE -
See "note" "inder "Economics" from the form on Exeter Street Theater.





QUESTIONS:

1. WAS THERE A NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED? Yes
2. WAS THE BUILDING LOCATION AN ASSET? Yes
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL APPEARANCE BEEN AN IIiPORTART FACTOR?
Not really.
4.. WAS THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING. CAMPAIGN? No
5. DOES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDING i-ELY SOLELY
ON THE SUPPORT OF THE LOCAL POPULATION? No
6. WAS THERE A ;-ARKET. ANALYSIS, TADE?. *
7. #AS AN APPRAISAL MADE?
8. IS THERE AINY TAX RELIEF ON THE STRUCTURE?No

9. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY ECONOMIC FAILURES? -


SUPPLELENTAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTING- POINTS:
*The original stimulus for the purchase and renovation of the buildings was
the belief that the FaneUil Hall Markets area would be completed prior to
the implementation of the 21 Merchants Row project, however, this was
not the case.


I ~~L7


REFERENCES

"Report, Special Issue, Adaptive Use: A Survey of Construction Costs" by
the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, p. 15.


DATE OF INTERVIEW 5/1377
BY: JERRY W. LILLS
J E!~|


PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:


PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:
Neil St. John Raymond ,
J i i i i i i iI



























CONSTRUCTION
ARCHITECT
STYLE -


DATE 1870


ORIGINAL NAME/ USE
Henry Shaw Warehouse



NEW NAME AND ADDRESS
The River Front Design Center
612 North 2nd Street
St. Louis, Missouri

Washington University (lessor)
OWNERS AND ADDRESS
.Dwight Reum (lessee)
612 North 2nd Street
.St. Louis. Missouri


ARCHITECTS FOR REUSE
Dwiight Reum has done his own work.


AFFILIATIONS Laclede's Landing
Historic District
AWARDS -


NEW FUNCTIONS:: RETAIL X- % OFFICE X RESIDEiNTIAL ,
OTHER X Multi-use office, showrooms an restaurant (Kennedy's Restaurant
occupies hal of the first floor, Belson and Belson's interior showroom occupies
all ot the second floor.

CONSTRUCTION. TIME Began in October, 1973 COMPLETION DATE
% OCCUPAI .C 60 jra and 5th floors have not been completed.



PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE 8,00 sq. ft. the size STRUCTURAL SYSTEM:
of the building. LOAD BEARING MASONRY X
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE 48,000 WOOD FRAIviE
PER FLOOR 8.000T OTHER .___
FLOORS 5 plus full basement


N2W CONSTRUCTION: MODERATE X ; EXTENSIVE
This is a two-bay wide structure and the- owner is preparing space for leasehold
work.- Brick is exposed on the interior and has been lightly sandblasted without
the destruction of the thin exterior surface of the brick. The wood frame is all
exposed and has been sandblasted. The medium of sandblasting are commercially
known as the "black beauties." A concrete and steel frame fire stair with enclosure
and tire doors was incorporated on the interior of the rear of the structure.
Some interior non-bearing partitions have been removed.





REM5IOVALS:NONE ; MODERATE X ; EXTENSIVE
Interior partitions.



USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION.:





ADAPTED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

SYSTEM ORIGINAL .NEW COMBINATION

HEATING X individual gas units.
VENTILATING
AIR CONDITIONING
ELECTRICAL some older conduit was rewired. X
PLUT1BING X two new vertical master lines.





CODE COIPI;,ANCE
ZONING: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE
OTHER
FIRE: Older sprinkler system repaired and reused. Steel fire escape was
added to the front facade.

-OTHER:


ECONOiv-:ICS


TYPE OF FUNDING:
PUBLIC
-RIVATE X


COST OF PROPERTY
RENOVATION COST*
TOTAL COSTS *
COST PER SQ. FT.
REPLACEMENT COST


LENDING INSTITUTIONS) OPERATION AND
~___AINTENANCE COSTS
TYITE OF LOAN Construction loan for *$75,000 borrowed and $20,000 more in
$75,000 preparatory renovation by lessees.
ITERf -- Another $105,000 ,(est.) has been spent
INTEREST RA'IE by the other renting businesses.
This building has been leased to Dwight Reun for 20 years (with any alterations)
by Washington University.


n n


S200000 est.
$ 200,000 est.





QUESTIONS:

1. WAS TH13RE A NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED? Yes
2. WAS THE BUILDING LOCATION AN ASSET? Yes
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL APPEARANEC'E lEEN AN IA IkO1-TANT FACTuR?
Yes No, but the whole area
4. WAS THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING: CAMPAIGN? received frpe P.R
5. DOES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDIiG it7LY SOLELY
ON TiHE SUPI-ORT OF THE LOCAL POPULATION? Mostly, yes.
6. WAS THERE A r1ARKET ANALYSIS TihADE? No
7. WAS AN APPRAISAL uADE? No
8. IS THERE ANY TAX RELIEF UN THE STRUCTURE Since the building is
owned by a non-profit organization, it is not on the tax rolls.
9. IAVE THERE BEEN A!;Y ECUO.OfilC FAILIjUESY -


SUPPLEL.ENTAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTING F6INTS:


REFERENCES

Interiors 8/75, p. 38.


DATE OF INTERVIEW 5/12/77 PERSON(S) INTERVIEWED:
Dwiqht Reum
BY:: JiFRRY 'W. kILLS
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Appomattox Iron Works
.o U Ta. u c Tio oj
1790, 1805, 1890
ARC C14 T E. T

ST Y L E


D0 TE.


Purchased 4/75.
Purchasing Price $35,000


O W Etea c O T CT 6
Mr. and Mrs. Frank.L. Peckinpaugh
20 W. Old Street
Petersburg, VA

M E W N A. A E Appomattox Iron Works
f u C. TO 1 -' Shops, 1st floor, vacant 2nd and 3rd (see below)
16 IT L-l r D ? DN.WA P. V
National Register

Functions continued

Three craft shops, a needlepoint shop, an antique store by the owners
and a museum.

The owners are receiving a grant from the National Endowment for the
Arts this year. This is a $5,000 matching fund grant.


T-1


E U I L D I t & 4.P V 0 r-
20-28 W.Old Street
Petersburg, VA


Ornamenta I rM L F U dr
Ornamental Iron Foundry
0 CICz I Vj A. N A M E.


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CONSTRUCTION DATE
ARCHITECT
STYLE -


1856


NEW' FUNCTIONS:; RETAIL __ OFFICE __ % RESIDENTIAL ,
OTHER I0~fo Restaurant and lounge.



CONSTRUCTION. TIME Two years 'IC LETION DATE June 1976,
% OCCUPANCY 100
This structure is incorporated with the construction of the Foundry Mall.



PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE Seven acres STRUCTURAL SYSTEM:
LOAD BEARING MASONRY X
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE WOOD FRALE X
PER FLOOR OTHER
FLOORS 2 plus basement Wood frame construction is all new.


NEW CONSTRUCTION: MODERATE E ; EXTENSIVE X
The Foundry building was moved 100 feet until the construction of the basement
for that building and the five story office/retail structure adjacent was completed
The Foundry building was then moved back to its original location. The roof
was completely replaced and all interior partitions removed along with original
sash and glazing. All mortar joints were repainted with a "tuck"point.
Hand made brick, brought from South Carolina was sliced into fourths, lenthwise
and was applied as a veneer on all interior stud, and gypsum partitions. Heavy


ORIGINAL NAA.E/ USE
Duvall Foundry



NEW NAME 'AND ADDRESS
The Foundry
1055 Thomas Jefferson Street
Georgetown,
Washington, D.C.
Located on the Chesapeake and Ohio
Canal
OWNERS AND ADDRESS
.In3and Steel Corporation





ARCHITECTS FOR REUSE
Arthur Cottom Moore
1214 28th Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20UU/
Interiors by John Stulurow of California
AFFILIATIONS -

AWARDS






REMOVALS:NONE ; MODERATE ;. EXTENSIVE X
(continued from previous page) timbeT'%'dms and joists arPe T d for aesthetics
only.


USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION.:





ADAPTED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

SYSTEM ORIGINAL NEW COMBINATION

HEATING X.
VENTILATING X
AIR CONDITIONING
ELECTRICAL -
PLUMBING. X
The new basement houses all mechanical equipment, carrier equipment and
a forced air system was installed.



CODE CO1.PLIAICE
ZONING: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE No
OTHER No
FIRE: All construction had to meet contemporary codes.


-OTHER: In order to construct the mall building the owners had to promise
to "restore" the Foundry building.


ECONOMICS This building is
TYPE OF FUNDING: COST OF PROPERTY leased to the res
PUBLIC RENOVATION, COST. $900,000*
PRIVATE X TOTAL COSTS (see last page)
COST PER SQ.. FT-
REPLACEL ENT. COST $bUO,UU(U
COST OF MOVE $135,00
LENDING INSTITUTIONS) Redwood OPERATION AND
Bank of California MAINTENANCE COSTS
TYHiE OF LOAN $225,000 for *Excessive renovation costs were
"furnishings" due in part to the necessary move.
TERi '
INTEREST RA~iIE 7 3/4% which flutuates from month to month; this was a point
and one half over the prime lending rate. The restaurant operation is part
of a chain from California. This is why a California bank was used.

i i i i






QUESTIONS:

1. WAS THERE A NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED? No
2. WAS THE BUILDING LOCATION AN ASSET? Yes
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL AFPEARA1CE BEEN AN IIPORTAINT FACTOR?
Yes
4.. WAS THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING: CAMPAIGN?$20,000 spent in 1976
5. DOES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDING RELY SOLELY
ON THE SUP-ORT OF THE LOCAL POPULATION? Local and tourist.
6. WAS THERE A LARKET ANALYSIS- MADE?. No
7. 'AS AN APPRAISAL IADE? No
8. IS THERE ANJY TAX RELIEF ON THE STRUCTURE? No

9. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY ECONOMIC FAILURES?No, the owners claim to be
showing a profit.


SUPPLEMENTAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTING POINTS:

-In 1970 Inland Steel purchased seven acres at a cost of $12,573,000.

-The owners of the restaurant borrowed capital for leasing necessary
kitchen equipment. They submitted plans to Inland Steel (ISDC) in a
"build to suit" agreement. Cost of construction is included in the
lease payments.





















REFERENCES

Preservation News 4/76, p. 7.
Architectural Record 2/77, p. 95.


DATE OF INTERVIEW 4/18/77
BY: JERRY W. ,:ILLS


PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:
Dave Middleton, Owner
Duncan Horn, Owner
Jerry Sigal, Contractor









:! '~i1~


2ND LEVEL


TRUSS CONSTRUCTION


I rrTT
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NON-BEARING.
PARTITION WALL


Woo
| lhtj #IYQMIN
ll^^- ^xmf~l~ B~
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2ND LEVEL
CONSTRUCTION


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CONSTRUCTION. DATE 1917
ARCHITECT Government architect
STYLE Art Noveau



NEW FUNCTIONS:; RETAIL O_ OF:
OTHER 10 Consists of artists stui
allowed to sell what is made of the center

CONSTRUCTION. TIME Five months
% OCCUPANCY -
38,000 square feet rented to artists witl
circulation. Art Center occupies only or
building complex.

PHYSICAL

PROPERTY SIZE

BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE -V ,
PER FLOOR
FLOORS i,


NfEW CONSTRUCTION: MODERATEE X
Individual shop partitions extend eight ft
spaces for artists.






HEV OVALS:NONE X ; MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE




USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION:





ADAPTED r;,ECHANICAL SYSTEMS

SYSTEIi ORIGINAL NEW COMBINATION

HEATING X
VENTILATING
AIR CONDITIONING
ELECTRICAL X with some additions
PLUDBING X with repairs





CODE CO-iPLIAIICE
ZONING: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE No
OTHER -
FIRE: Some doors had to be replaced. Extinguishers visible throughout


-OTHER:


ECONOkICS
TYPE OF FUNDING:
PUBLIC X by the City
PRIVATE X by the individual
Artists in "fixing-up" their own
studios.

LENDING INSTITUTIONS)
See back page.


TYE OF LOAN


COST OF PROPERTY
RENOVATION COST. $ 140,000*
TOTAL COSTS
COST PER SQ. FT.
REPLACENiIEN2 COST
*pls an estimated $158 000 by the indi-
idual artists over a 2 year period.
OPERATION AND
MAINTENANCE COSTS $ 79,000 in 19;
for salaries and utilities


INTEREST iRA -
Annual income to the City in 1976 was $114,000. 1977 income is expected to be
near 200,000. $6,000 annually is gained by the City through artists' licensing.





QUI3STIoNJ:

1. WAS THERE A NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED? Yes
2. 'AS THE BUILDING LOCATION AN ASSET? Yes, helped improve the CBD.
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL APPEARANCE bEEN AN IfOURTANT FACTOR?
No
4.. WAS THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN? No
5. DOES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDI'iG :IELY SULELY
ON THE SUFEORT OF THE LOCAL PuPULATION? No
6. WAS THERE A MARKET ANALYSIS huLDE?
7. /,AS AN APPRAISAL LADE? No
8. IS THERE ANY TAX RELIEF ON THE STRUCTURE? City owned.

9. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY ECONOMIC FAILURES? One third of the artists
show a small profit, one-third break even and one-third do not make enough
to pay for rent.

SUPPLEL:EIJTAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTING POINTS:

-The City loaned $140,000 for construction costs to the Art Center Association
as a Bicentennial Project. This money was raised through a bond issue.

-As of this interview there were 203 artists with in the complex.

-For more information, please see the following articles.


REFERENCES:

E. Pandula report for AE 581 at University of Florida, Fall, 1976.

America's Forgotten Architecture, by the National Trust, 1976

Southern Living 1/76.



., -- l l


DATE OF INTERVIEW 4/19/77
BY: JERRY W. L ILILS


PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:
Margaret Mayer, Assistant Director






USING 01D


AMERICA'S FORGOTTEN ARCHITECTURE
by The National Trust for Historic Preservation in
the United States Copyright 1976


-Space for manufacturing on a small scale and for sell-
ing wares-especially arts and crafts-has been found in
Number of unusual places. In Alexandria, Va., an aban-
med torpedo factory (c. 1917) is now the Torpedo
factory Art Center. There, artists and craftsmen rent
space in which to work and to sell their art. Visitors can
5atch the artists at work, learning techniques of silk-
acreening, pottery, enameling, harpsichord making, and
woodworking, and then can purchase the finished prod-
uct if they wish. There are obvious advantages here for
oth customers and artists: monetary' profits for the art-
ests and cultural profits for their customers. Such an art
ore than 150 artists and artisans are at work in the studios and retail spaces of
e Torpedo Factory Art Center, Alexandria, Va., the left portion of the waterfront
munitions plant. Uses for the later portion are under study.


center would, of course, have been possible in a new
building. But the vast space, the light, and the building's
unusual nature make it one of a kind, a quality highly
valued by the tenants. For those who worked on the ren-
ovation themselves, the old factory is more than a place
to show art-it is itself a work of art.
EDUCATION AND EDIFICATION
Many older structures have been converted to education-
al uses as museums, libraries, schools, art galleries,
training schools, think tanks, and research facilities.
One of the most common means of preservation is to
convert an old building into a house museum, especially
if it is architecturally or historically significant. Most
places in the country have at least one old house that
has become such a museum; altogether there are so
many that the nation is "in danger of strangling in velvet
ropes," Helen Duprey Bullock of the National Trust re-
marked years ago. Rather than bring out more ropes, in
many regions that already .have their surfeit of house





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CONSTRUCTION DATE 1850's
ARCHITECT -
STYLE Mid 19th Century Industrial


ORIGINAL NAkE/ USE
Bancroft Textile Mills



NEW NAYIE AND ADDRESS
Bancroft Mills Complex
Wi mington, Delaware

.n the Brandywine River


OWNERS AND ADDRESS
Industrial Park Trust
Wilmington, Delaware




ARCHITECTS FOR REUSE
Whiteside, Moeckel and Carbonell (WMC)
29 Hill Road
Wilmington, Delaware

AFFILIATIONS -

AWARDS


NEW FUNCTIONS:: RETAIL .o OFFICE 50 ,, RESIDENTIAL 70 ,.
OTHER 50 % Offices of the above architects are located on the top Two' oors
(7000 square feet) of one building. The other two floors are vacant.


CONSTRUCTION. TIME About 6 months for WMC COTiPLETION DATE Spring 74.
% OCCUPANCY Less than 1% of total complex.




PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE STRUCTURAL SYSTE-i:
LOAD BEARIIl- ;ASONRY X*
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE 1.5 million WOOD FRAIE X
PER FLOOR OTHER
FLOORS
-- *Offices of WMX are located in the only
granite stone structure. All other are
brick.
NEW CONSTRUCTION: MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE
The locally quarried granite was sandblasted, as was the woocdframe construction.
Portions of the fourth floor were removed to provide two story space and additional
natural lighting to the third floor. Also an interior wood stairway was added for
vertical circulation between the two floors. A footbridge was built to provide
direct access from the hillside to the main entrance, which is at the fourth floor.
Thp conference room was expanded by extending a "bay" which projects as a cantilever


from the fourth floor. All wood frame widows were replaced
..~~~~... ~~ nonopeabl metal~v~Al~od rm inos-


I


d emarf M a r i na,


---- ---- ---------


....LI. Ulli2a [11 dZ1 DCI. ,





RE,.OVALS:NONE ; MODERATE X ; EXTENSIVE





USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION.:





ADAPTED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

SYSTEM ORIGINAL NEW COMBINATION

HEATING X
VENTILATING
AIR CONDITIONING _
ELECTRICAL X
PLUMBING X
Sprinkler system was reused. Forced air system was used with exposed tube ducting.
Additional A.C. units (2) were placed in the conference room.



CODE COiPLIANCE
ZONING: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE Zoning was upgraded from M-1 (industrial)
OTHER to C-6 (special commercial use).
FIRE:


OTHER: -



ECONOMICS
TYPE OF FUNDING: COST OF PROPERTY Unavailable
PUBLIC ** RENOVATION COST. $131 ,bU'
PRIVATE XX TOTAL COSTS -
COST PER SQ. FT. $ 18.75 *
REPLACEMENT. COST. -

LENDING INSTITUTIONS) Unavailable OPERATION AN)
MAINTENANCEE COSTS Unavailable
TYIE OF LOAN *This is for the 7000 square feet of
____ office space for WMC.
TEhi, _______________________
INTEREST RA'E
**Owners are in the process of applying for grants to develop Phase I, some
250,000 square feet. D.A. Crane and partners of Philadelphia are designing the
master plan.





QUESTIONS:

1. WAS THERE A NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED? Yes
2. WAS TIiE BUILDING LOCATION AN ASSET? Yes
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL AFPEARMACE B.EEN AN IPORTART FACTOR?
Not Yet
4.. WA THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN? In the works.
5. DOES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDING iCELY SOLELY
ON THE SUP-ORT OF THE LOCAL POPULATION? N.A.
6. WAS THERE A LLARKET ANALYSIS .iADE? Unavailable
7. W'AS AN APPRAISAL LADE? Unavailable
8. IS THERE ANY TAX RELIEF UN THE STRUCTURE? No

9. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY ECONOMIC FAILURES? --


SUPPLE:, EIITAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTING PiINTS:
Some of the machinery from the Bancroft Mills, which were the largest textile mills
in the world until the 1940's was removed by the Smithsonian Institute.

The southeast portion of the mills is occupied by the Wilmington Finishing Company.

The architect, Carbonell, expressed hope in attracting new commercial, retail,
residential business into the available 1 1/2 million square feet. Thoughts of
a possible convention facility were also mentioned.



















REFERENCES

AIA Journal 6/76, p. 37.


DATE OF INTERVIEW 4/20/77
BY: JERRY W, [.ILLS


PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:
Carbonell of WMC.





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CONFERENCE ADDITION


RECEPTION


TWO-STORY SPACE




























CONSTRUCTION. DATE 1851
ARCHITECT -
STYLE Typical Mid-19th Century Light
Industrial


ORIGINAL NALE/ USE
Hoffman's Grist Mill



NEW NAYiE AND ADDRESS
Brandywine River Museum
Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania


OWNERS AND ADDRESS
Brandywine River Conservancy


James Uuff, Director


Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania



ARCHITECTS F R REUSE
James Grieves Associates
1009 N. Chase Avenue
Baltimore, Maryland


AFFILIATIONS


AWARDS -


NEW FUNCTIONS:: RETAIL OFFICE _% RESIDENTIAL j ,.
OTHER 100 Mill structure is used for exhibit space;later addition an con-
temporary structure.


CONSTRUCTION, TINE Eightteen months COMPLETION DATE 1970
% OCCUPANCY N.A.
Property was purchased in 1967.



PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE Unavailable STRUCTURAL SYSTEM:
LOAD BEARING( MASONRY X
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE UnavailablE WOOD FRAMEiE
PER FLOOR OTHER X
FLOORS _Four See "Removals," next page.


NEW CONSTRUCTION: T;ODERATE ; EXTENSIVE X
An early 20th Century shed addition was moved some feet away from the old mill
building and a contemporary concrete and glass addition was constructed in between
and connecting both. The shed addition serves as a small cafeteria at grade and
offices, work space and storage below. The contemporary addition provides office
space, verticle circulation services and restroom facilities.


- I II






REMOVALS:NONE ; MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE X
Heavy timber frame interior construction was disassembled; a new steel truss system
replaced the old wood roof system and the upper three floors, now of 3-4" rnnrrptp
on 2-way metal decking, are suspended from that truss system with cables, The old
hand-hewn columns were then cut in half, cored, and put back in place around the as-
buslu wrapped cables. T--e reTilted joint s barely visible. Conditioned air moves
USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION.:
through the spaces in the/metal decking.





ADAPTED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

SYSTEMi ORIGINAL .NEW COMBINATION

HEATING
VENTILATING
AIR CONDITIONING X
ELECTRICAL X
PLUMBING X
See "Removals" above for conditioned air moving.




CODE COQPI-LIAIiCE
ZONING: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE -
OTHER -
FIRE: New and reused construction meets fire codes. Verticle circulation occurs
in the contemporary addition and not in the mill building.

-OTHER:



ECONOi .ICS


TYPE OF FUNDING:
PUBLIC
PRIVATE XX Inf(
sent, but as ot b/l
4-A%- .


)rmation was to be
/// nothing had been


LENDING INSTITUTIONS) Unavailable

TYt-E UP LOAN

TEliTn
INTEREST RA'IE


COST OF PROPERTY
RENOVATION COST
TOTAL COSTS
COST PER SQ. FT.
REFLACEMENT COST

OPERATION AND
MAINTENANCE COSTS


-
-
$1.3 million




Unavailable





QUB,3TIONS:

1. WAS THERE A NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED? Yes
2. 'WAS THIE BUILDING. LOCATION AN ASSET? Yes*
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL APPEARANCE BEEN AN I1,O-URTAiT FACTOR?
Yes
4.. WAS THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN? Not really**
5. DOES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDING iELY SoLELY
ON THE SUPPORT OF THE LOCAL POPULATION? +
6. WAS THERE A I.ARKET ANALYSIS MADE? Not formally.
7. VAS AN. APPRAISAL LADE? No
8. IS THERE ANY TAX RELIEF ON THE STRUCTURE? No


9. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY ECONOMIC FAILURES?


SUPPLELI!TAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTING POINTS:
*The building location is in the heart of Andrew Wyeth Country

**3,000.people were present for the "opening."

+Tourist population is a large percentage of the annual visitors' count, however
a larger portion of monetary support is received from locals.






















REFERENCES

Historic Preservation Jan.-Mar., 1972.


DATE OF INTERVIEW
BY:. JERRY W. KILLS


PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:
James Grieves, Architect.
Ms. Joan Gorman. Assistant Curatnr









































.d r
44


INOPERABLE SHUTTER


JONTELPORARY
ADDITION


I


AN1


Jd


I V,* I































CONSTRUCTION: DATE 19 century
ARCHITECT -
STYLE Industrial


ORIGINAL NAkE/ USE
The Corset Factory


NEW NAME AND ADDRESS
University Square
Mb Myrtle
Bridgeport, Connecticut



OWNERS AND ADDRESS
Bridgeport People's Savings Bank
Victor Christ-Janer, Architect
-WARNACO of Bridgeport
This group is called the South End
Development Company.

ARCHITECTS FOR REUSE
Victor Christ-Janer
140 Elm Street
New Canaan, Conn.

AFFILIATIONS -

AWARDS -


NEW FUNCTIONS:: RETAIL X OFFICE XIj r RESIDENTIAL ,
OTHER X % College orited functions: Barnes and Noble's University
of Bridgeport Book Store, Barnaby's Restaurant and others. Also Warnaco
Employee Cafeteria.

CONSTRUCTION TIME _. COMPLETION DATE_
% OCCUPANCY _




PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE Size of building and STRUCTURAL SYSTEf_:
111ii 11ni1l aptrkiiy. LOAD BEARIIG iiASONRY X
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE WOOD FRANBE X
PER FLOOR OTHER
FLOORS .3 plus basement


NEW CONSTRUCTION: MODERATEE X ; EXTENSIVE
VArious "questionable" exterior changes with some balcony' a7 stairway


daaditlons. "Questonable" refers to quality ot design of these additions,
as studied by personal investigation.

Q.,,


---






REMOVALS:NONE ; MODERATE ;. EXTENSIVE





USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION,:





ADAPTED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

SYSTEII. ORIGINAL .NEW COMBINATION

HEATING
VENTILATING
AIR CONDITIONING
ELECTRICAL
PLUMBING
This information was unavailable, see "supplemental datd" following page.




CODE CO 7"PLIANCE
ZONING: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE
OTHER
FIRE: Rrnnht up tn rnrI. Npw hoses, exit signs. exterior concrptp and
steel stairwells.

.OTHER:



ECONOMvICS
TYPE OF FUNDING: COST OF PROPERTY $1.00*
PUBLIC _RENOVATION. COST $ 600,000
PRIVATE A TOTAL COSTS -
COST. PER SQ. FT. -
HEPLACEI.ENT COST The building is
now valued at $1.5 million.
LENDING INSTITUTIONS) People's OPERATION AND
Savings Bank of Bridgeport iAINTENANCE COSTS
TYPE OF LOAN Mortgage WARNACO, the owners, sold the spa..
a portion of their factory complex
T**- i_ S.E. Development Company for one do, .:
INTEREST RAIE plus one third interest in the develop-
ment company.





OUlSTiONS:

1. WAS THERE A NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED? Probably
2. WAS THE BUILDING LOCATION AN ASSET? Yes. Near University of Bridgeport
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL AFPEARAICE bEEI, AN IIFORTAiT FACTOR?
Not necessarily.
4.. VWA THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING. CAMPAIGh? -
5. DOES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDING iadLY SOLELY
ON THE SUPPORT OF THE LOCAL POPULATION?University population.
6. WAS THEIE A IrARKET ANALYSIS TiuiDE? -
7. iiAS AN. APPRAISAL LADE?
8. IS THERE ANY TAX RELIEF UN THE STRUCTURE? -

9. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY ECONOMIC FAILURES? -



SUPPLEL.EL'NTAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTING POINTS:
The interview for this building was not completed. The appointment with the
architect was very disappointing, as his attitude was extremely pessimistic
and non-revealing.


DATE OF INTERVIEW 4/25/77
BY:* JERRY W. FILLS


PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:
Victor Christ-Janer. Architert





























main bldg.-l~4U's
CONSTRUCTION DATE 2 addt's before
ARCHITECT 1869
STYLE Industrial


ORIGINAL NAME/ USE
Stillman White Brass Foundry


NEW NAMiE AND ADDRESS
Was to be Research and Design Institute
of Providence, but will now be the
Architectural offices of the Providence
Partnership.


OWNERS AND ADDRESS
Providence Partnership





ARCHITECTS FQ)R REUSE
Providence Partnership



AFFILIATIONS National Register

AWARDS


NEW FUNCTIONS:: RETAIL OFFICE 00 % RESIDENTIAL __ ,
OTHER .



CONSTRUCTION. TIME COiPLETION DATEnot complete
% OCCUPANCY .___
Research and Design 'Institute has gone bankrupt and Providence Partnership
is engaged in their own restoration/adaptive, use.


PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE 5,600 square feet STRUCTURAL S3YSTENv:
LOAD BEARIINI IASONRY X
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE 5,400 WOOD FRAiE X
PER FLOOR OTHER
FLOORS .2 plus basement


NEW CONSTRUCTION: MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE
Please read the included article froim Progressive Architecture of 5/75 p. 68-75.
Of the systems and work that was to go into the building only the following
work was accomplished: the entire masonry portion was repainted, some brick
walls were entirely rebuilt and a new roof and roof structure were built. The
double glazed swivelling sashes were installed but the architects are now
refitting due to poor rraftma~nhip







REr/iOVALS:NONE ; MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE X
New oak flooring has~been laid and a new concrete and steel firestair has been


added, both of these by the architects.


lhe steam heating system was


installed by REDE but no solar collectors, hydroelectric generators or photovolta4
cells were ever installed.

USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION,:
The product of the energy conservation station of the design and quality discussed
in P.A.'s article would have been an unprecedented advancement for the
United States.


ADAPTED MECHANICALL SYSTEMS


SYSTEM


ORIGINAL


HEATING
VENTILATING
AIR CONDITIONING
ELECTRICAL
PLUMBING


x

X
x

x-
x-


COMBINATION


CODE COiMPLIAN CE
ZONING: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE
OTHER
FIRE: -


OTHER: A frontal easement exists and various city easements in the parking area.


ECONOMvICS
TYPE OF FUNDING:
PUBLIC X
PRIVATE X
+ a $5;000 Grant was received by the


Providence Partnership from the National
ParK bSrvice.
LENDING INSTITUTIONS) -

TYIE OF LOAN -


INTEriEST iA'iE -


COST OF PROPERTY
RENOVATION GOST.
TOTAL COSTS
COST. PER SQ.. FT..
REFLACELEINT COST.


$ 13,500*
60,000
73,500
(approx.) $14.00j


OPERATION AND
MAINTENANCE COSTS
*The figures given here were from a
conversation with a member of the
Providence Partnership, in transferring
interview notes to this form, I feel
some figures are missing.






QUESTIONS:

1. WAS THERE A NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED?For REDE, yes, the
2. WAS THE BUILDING LOCATION AN ASSET?Yes, cornerstone for nriiyhburhuud.
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL APPEARANCE ~LEEi -4A IilPURfTAIT FACTOR?
No upgrading.
4.. WAS THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING: CAMPAIGN? No
5. DOES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDING iELY SOLELY
ON THE SUPPORT OF THE LOCAL POPULATION? No
6. WAS THERE A MARKET ANALYSIS i-ADE? No
7. WAS AN APPRAISAL LADE? _40
8. IS THERE AINY TAX RELIEF UN THE STRUCTURE? -

9. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY ECONOMIC FAILURES? REDE went bankrupt.


SUPPLELEiTTAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTING POINTS:


REFERENCES

Progressive Architecture 5/75, p. 68.


DATE OF INTERVIEW 4/26/77
BY:. JERRY ,V. ,;ILLS


PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:
Richard.Kuehl, Providence Partnership




energy conservation station, providence



By all means


In their renovation, restoration, and retrofitting of a
derelict foundry building, the Research and Design
Institute evolves solutions to energy-related concerns.


It's almost as if the scenario were written for a play. Only
the critics Wouldn't buy it. It's too Pollyanna. If the program
for an ideal project were written-and the conditions sur-
rounding it were carefully contrived to produce the most in-
teresting situations-how would it read? Research and De-
sign Institute (REDE) of Providence has a pet project that
would qualify.
First on nearly everybody's list, in 1975, would be an
energy-conscious parti. Next current concern: reuse, resto-
ration, and resource conservation, say with a historic old
mill. Proper respect for, and advancement of, urban con-
text would also be a natural component. Then, to get ideal-
istic, wouldn't it be great to share the problem with students
and manufacturers, and learn from/with them? And to get
an interchange going between student (aspirations), pro-
ducer pragmaticss) and architect (a balance)? Also, be-
cause there is probably a little romanticist in most of us, we
are apt to be warmed-literally and figuratively-by the no-
tion that nature is supplying comforts for which we've been
used to paying dearly.
Well, that's it. That is what is happening in Providence.
As in all good plays, a touch of pathos (funding, political
and technical setbacks) has been included along the way.
REDE, however, has persevered. A nonprofit institute work-
ing largely on contracts from various sources, REDE, under
Executive Director Ron Beckman and Associate Director
Howard Yarme, has become a model of the interdis-
ciplinary work mode. The restoration and retrofitting of the
Stillman White Brass Foundry is just the latest phase of the
group's long involvement in ecological/environmental/
sociological/design pursuits. This project is, however, the
embodiment of these, and more, as the scenario suggests.
The Rhode Island Energy Conservation Station, as the
Foundry will be known, is made up of the original building
(1840s) and two subsequent additions (prior to 1869).
Along the small Moshassuck River to the north were other
industrial buildings of the period. e south of the EDE
project, a cleared area-destined to become Roger Wil-"


x~: l rrI1'l,,i' ..


Drawing by Steve Oles of the retrofitted foundry. In april, the New England
Regional Commission-a federal ended intertae planning agency d-
Tiectedb aix $8govee50~ri$5 the
retrofitting.

liams National Memorial Park-stretches~ th~edof
downtown _Pro e. The future of the park proposal was
uncertain when REDE began considering the Stillman
White Foundry. "We were just naive enough," notes Beck-
man, "to believe it would happen, and we have now been
assured that work will begin this summer."
Seen from the park and downtown, the Foundry will be
the local point of the Moshassuck Square eve pment,
which is adjiacen.agnd.eybn-dTMosbnassfK quare is a
residential Qmmgegia Lfr~ec ittug
William Warper.dogga ,rsistence, intermixes new
housing and renov4~~ ctr gs.) AIough de-
geacomber's residential units-designed tb
arner-are finished, they are noyt o helming fi-
nancial success. Neither are the commercial spaces in the
renovated buildings. But the area is only now reversing it,.
downhill slide and, with Moshassuck Square, the Stillma9
White Foundry, and the national park, Providence will ha;,
erased a barrier of existing no-man's-land.
The Foundry and nearby remnants of industrial history
had stood empty for years. Macomber and Warner's plant:
revive the area was unpopular with somebody (protago-
nists of an in-town industrial park?), and an intriguing num.




ti ,"iit y ,;UliiC a VIdva u l bd[iilo n

I




Si



L-O1i-
.;

.j/fIi


MOSHASSUCK SQUARE
25 5' N -"N
ation included such maneuvers as dismantling, strengthening, and
ling the existing chimney (opposite), and walls and roof (right).
























Energy conservation station And then came the manufacturers, drawn by REDE's alert
that their products have a place in the big picture.

ber of fires had effectively crippled several of the old struc- The work ethic
tures. What the flames had left, bulldozers were waiting, With the support of the U,.S Doartment of the terior and
with bated breather caps, to level. REDE had joined Warner he National Trust for Hist reservationn the recon-
in the search for new owners, but their efforts were struction process began. Further help came fromTnLe Na-
thwarted by the demolition of the venerable Eagle Mill in tional Endowment for the s a tate of Rhode Is-
1973 because it lacked tenants. One end wall of the Still- laTfrou Lgh1overnor Phipgls efforts.
man White Foundry had already been reduced-"mistaken- Structural assessments were first made by William Theon
ly"-to rubble before REDE's comptroller Eric Godfrey of LeMessurier Associates, and the findings indicated that
could organize a corporation to buy the building and halt the building was onthe vergecollapse and would have
its destruction. REDE decided that it would retrofit the facil- td l Ft rn sn'"~ l na towards. he ma-
ity, occupy it, and conduct energy conservation research, sonry work also needed help. Partially because of age, but
mainly to deposit necessary polyurethane insulation foam
The involvement principle in the wall cavities, large sections of wall were rebuilt. New
There is no prima donna in this production. In order to pull wood roof beams were slipped into position, and remaijng
it off on REDE's admittedly limited resources, the cast grew woT' siffaces were sandblated clean.
to include numerous factions. BeqinninQwith the Stillman Even the existing lc chimney stack was dismantled,
White Associ-the. .c g.o n that saved th uild- s en. d
ing-the roster expanded to include other preseationts reassembled ,to serve as a base for a wirw-_.ed..r~Doyer
government bakL an.-e.gom.a aun- u- nerator. Like a microcosm of the mill project generally,
merous manufacturers. Another important facet of the pro- even the parts of the wind device will combine historic and
gram has been its unique educational opportunities, a fact relatively new technologies. At the heart of the a sembly
not overlooked by REDE, the Rhode Island School of De- will-be a Savonius rotor, a form of wind-harnessing har--
sign (RISD), or Brown University. Since the fall of 1973, ware used biyersi Easi ily ac-
RISD and Brown students have played an active role in the tivated by light winds, the rotor will, at a certain speed, start
project, gaining valuable experience, and school credit, a Darrieus wind rotor turning. The Darrieus is a vertical axis
through their contributions. The interaction of students, mechanism developed in this century (but little used until
manufacturers, and REDE personnel has been encouraged recently) for harnessing higher sustained winds. Thus old
through seminars organized by REDE; these experiences, meets new, again.
Beckman notes, have been very rewarding and instructive Also in the works isa. small .hydrroelectric.geatiaor
to all of the participants. Bu more i ortantltheene f which will draw power from the Moshassuck River outside
ain ELLraperrga.ea tt.h~ednF. ry rect is a sure of REDE's windows. Although the riverss actuallyar-
sigr.t h.aytte.proces. Wris. row canal 'h"ie'idd should produce at least a modest
Banking and industrial participation began early. As is charge. Several other devices will also tap natural phenc.r,-
often the case-fortunately-tL .nks sa the reject as a ena, extracting power or heat. SQtallgjs pthe id
good thing for the downtown, a catalyst for the surround .ya.ri.ty,will trapheat and store it a highly insulatedtank ir
Randall Square area. They, like thepreservationists and the the Foundr yloweqLldyl. Banksof j crs m.ade. up of
stale, were in favor of anything that would stabilize the his It nt Ils will eventually be mounted on the roof,
toric district's land values, and add strength to Providenc. c Knvertingolr en e dirtlyinto ricitY.Amulle-
The electricc company hopes thaLtteaaaaclditty.wi.dlMpn- datteyS t.age facility.als.Qn the lower level, will collect
state the use of power generated during off-peak hours. e rgy from, all electric generation points.
s u qy~~~~~,3,jro l e sigeeain ons


Inflatable meeting enclosure in Foundfy


Beckman describes rotor at Brown.































Mill Street and Mohassuck Square facades after reglazing and rebuilding. First floor interior, ready for fir

~~'"'
























River fagade (west) will be shaded by deciduous trees.

Energy conservation station


Once this energy is collected, care in its use will be es-
sential. The theme for REDE'S operations at all levels has
Seen scrutityffeta1. That meant no effort would be
spared to make each building element as efficient as pos-
sible in terms of energy conservation. Besides the urethane
in the walls, the new windows were selected very carefully.
To prevent temperature transfer through them.the.duble
glazing is mounig frames.Jtha.tt a&discont.iuo from
sidcto outside. Sealed betwee0th.e.tLwpaLs.&s-a-vene-
tian blind, and the windows pivot, awning:style, to allow
Natural circulation and gleaning
Since there was no choice about building orientation,
REDE will plant deciduous trees along the Foundry's long
sides, so that leaves will provide shade in hot weather, but
not in winter. of insulatiqnad-aan.entryvestibule will
also cut down on the amountof heat gainorloss. Wherever
possible, manual equipment will replace electric within the
offices, and lights will be individually controlled. (REDE re-
placed gang switches in their present quarters with pull
chain sockets in July. Since that time, for an expenditure of
$21.39, they.have.reduGed4their.Lengconsumption aver-
age by a startling 51 pernt.
Still arlother-conspTcuous consumer, the standard bath-
room, is being updated with a new solution in the REDE
quarters. A recyc!igAit.Qje..compleLeiyelf-contained,
,promises an 80,000 galon per year water savings over a
conventional toilet, It is said to require only that its
bioenzymatic system be drained and refilled each two
years with 120 gallons of fresh water. Beckman loves to
picture the prospect: "We're going to draw power from the
polluted river to run a toilet that produces pure water without
adding pollution!"

Elemental enjoyment
While recognizing that the conservation station/restored
foundry/office will undergo continuous changes, due to its
laboratory nature, REDE is emotionally involved with the
project. As it changes, it will be doing exactly what its oc-




Further data to be included pending receipt
of information promised by Paul McGinley
of Anderson Notter Associates.


CONSTRUCTION DATE
ARCHITECT
STYLE


1918


ORIGINAL NAIv:E/ USE
Prince Macaroni Factory



NEW NAIviE AND ADDRESS
Prince Condominiums
63 Atlantic Blvd.
Boston, Waterfront
Boston, Massachusetts

OWNERS AND ADDRESS
Prince Condominium Trust
63 Atlantic Avenue
Boston, Massachusetts


ARCHITECTS FOR REUSE
Anderson Notter Associates
77 N. Washington
Boston, Massachusetts


AFFILIATIONS


AWARDS


I
NE'W FUNCTIONS:; RETAIL o OFFICE __ RESIDENTIAL j ,
OTHER -_7o Parking; 33 apartments.



CONSTRUCTION TIME _COMPLETION DATE .
% OCCUPANCY ___




PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE STRUCTURAL SYSTEiM:
LOAD BEARING _iASONRY
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE WOOD FRAIEiE
PER FLOOR OTHER
FLOORS _8 original 3 new


'EW CONSTRUCTION: MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE






RETvMOVALS:NONE ; MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE





USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION.:
Floors in all rooms except living room have been raised to accommodate
mecnanical systems.




ADAPTED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

SYSTEMi ORIGINAL .NEW COMBINATION

HEATING
VENTILATING
AIR CONDITIONING
ELECTRICAL
PLUMBING





CODE CO.-PLIAICE
ZONING: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE
OTHER
FIRE:


.OTHER:



ECONOI.,ICS
TYPE OF FUNDING: COST OF PROPERTY
PUBLIC RENOVATION. COST
PRIVATE TOTAL COSTS
COST PER SQ. FT- $12.00
hRELACELuENZT COST


LENDING INSTITUTIONS)

TYiE UPF LOA

TE-Rmn
INTEREST kRAE


OPERATION AND
MAINTENANCE COSTS


- -~--^--~





QUIElSTIOi;L :

1. WAS THERE A NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED?
2. WAS THE BUILDING LOCATION AN ASSET?
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL APPEARANCE BEEN AN ILPORTART FACTOR?

4. WAS THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING CAMiPAIGIN?
5. DUES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDIi4G i'.LY SULELY
ON THE SUPPORT OF THE LOCAL POPULATION?
6. WAS THERE A MARKET ANALYSIS ,ADE?
7. ,AS AN APPRAISAL LADE?
8. IS THERE ANY TAX RELIEF ON THE STRUCTURE?

9. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY ECONOMIC FAILURES?



SUPPLEiE JTAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTING POINTS:


REFERENCES

AIA Journal 4/77, p. 64 & 67
Student Report by Gary V. Magarian University of Florida, Fall, 1976


DATE OF INTERVIEW 5/2/77*
BY: JERRY W. IILLS
*personal exterior observation


PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:


~-~-~1111








'jI


3 NEW LEVELS


NEW INTERIOR
PARKING


a


7-;j


* --flfi-Y,1'."'






























CONSTRUCTION DATE 1853
ARCHITECT -
STYLE -


ORIGINAL NAAE/ USE
Chickering Piano Factory



NEW NAMiE AND ADDRESS
Piano Craft Guild
791 Tremont
Southend
Boston, Massachusetts


OWNERS AND ADDRESS
Gelardin/Bruner/Cott, Inc.
543a Green
Cambridge, Massachusetts



ARCHITECTS FOR REUSE
Gelardin/Bruner/Cott, Inc.
543a Green
Cambridge, Massachusetts

AFFILIATIONS -

AWARDS -


NEWY FUNCTIONS:: RETAIL __ OFFICE __ RESIDENTIAL 100 ,
UTHER 174 apartment/studios for artists, in state subsidized housing.


CONSTRUCTION, TIE COMPLETION DATE 1974
% OCCUPANCY 96




PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE STRUCTURAL SYSTEM:
LOAD BEARING MASONRY X
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE 250,000 WOOD FRALRE X
PER FLOOR 4 ,6 OTHER
FLOORS 5 plus basement


NEW CONSTRUCTION: MODERATE X ; EXTENSIVE
Lobby floor was cut through to expose the basement level for commercial purposes
(gallery for the artists). Dormers were added to the roof which was rebuilt to
provide space for 36 duplex apartments. Brick walls and wood columns were left
exposed. Wood floors were patched as necessary.


I







REOVALS:NONE ; MODERATE X; EXTENSIVE
Fire escapes were removed. Six stories of public bathrooms used by factory
employees located at both inside corners oT the aougnnut-snaped plan.



USE OF INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND/OR CONSTRUCTION.:
No apartment plan is repeated.





ADAPTED I'ECHANICAL SYSTFIS

SYSTEM ORIGINAL NEW COMBINATION

HEATING X
VENTILATING
AIR CONDITIONING condt
conduit work -
ELECTRICAL __ was left exposed.
PLUMBING X
Twenty new "efficiency" boilers were installed providing hot water heating in
perimeter baseboard reflectors.



CODE COMPLIANCE
ZONINGC: CHANGE OF USE VARIANCE Yes, to incorporate living and working.
OTHER
FIRE: Sprinkler-heads were replaced, existing fire stairs were used, heat sensi-
tive closing devices were installed on metal Tire doors in corridors.

OTHER:



ECONOU,.ICS
TYPE OF FUNDING: COST OF PROPERTY $625,000
PUBLIC XX RENOVATION COST. $2,775,000
PRIVATE__________ TOTAL COSTS 3.4 million
COST PER SQ. FT. $13.00*
REPLACEMENT COST -

SLENDING INSTITUTIONS) OPERATION A.ND
Massachusetts Housing Finance Agency lAINTENANCE COSTS -


TYI-E OF LOAN $3,382,916,

TEiili
INTEREST RAE _
There are 44 low income apartments (from
198) apartments and 44, which are rented
square footage ranges from 500-1740.


*Both purchase and renovation.


$91-140), 86 moderate income (from $150-
at market rates($205-$401). Apartment


- I





QUESTIONS:

1. WAS THERE A NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED? Yes
2. WAS TIIE BUILDING LOCATION AN ASSET? Yes
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL APPEARANCE BEEN AN ILPORTA.,T FACTOR?
Yes
4. WAS THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING: CAMPAIGN? Media publicity only
5. DOES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDIiG LELY SOLELY
ON THE SUFPPRT OF THE LOCAL POPULATION? No
6. WAS THEIE A _AARKET ANALYSIS MADE?. Yes, by the architects.
7. 'AS AN. APPRAISAL L-ADE? -
8. IS THERE ANY TAX RELIEF ON THE STRUCTURE? -

9. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY ECONOMIC FAILURES? -


SUPPLELENTAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTINGr POINTS:

'Many unique spaces were created in the construction of apartment units. Some
retain original fire places, still functional. Mezzanine levels available in
certain apartments, open with a balcony to the living room space below, are
accessible by way of a steel ships ladder.

Same local artists were consulted on desirable details which include oversize
hallways, 8 feet entry doors at apartments,.with outlets at the ceiling for spot-
lights and other amenities for artists and photographers.


















REFERENCES

AIA Journal 11/74, p. 38.

Preservation News 4/75, 8/75, p. 11.

Architectural Record 12/75.
i i. ii - "a


DATE OF INTERVIEW
BY: JERRY W. R.ILLS


PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:





R.R. TOWER
IiElv1OVED


2 STORY LOBBY


COURTYiAjU


-I


--



- A


I


5~C~


iNar HIEI L


j






SHIILAD).DER TO
LOVi'T


FIRE DOOR


LAz 1h T'lEN T


I,


4





'If:


rrc~-- rr.~*trbY~C~`'~
t C'L~L~ r~U-YO .* *I


1
b~


,

s
'I 'e
"I~ ~ n'b


i


r


Ij-


















































CHICKERING & SONS' PIANO-FORTE MANUFACTORY, TREMONT STRI





Further data to be included pending receipt
of information promised by Paul McGinley
of Anderson Notter Associates.
f aw, .. .. 1,.


CONSTRUCTION, DATE 1904
ARCHITECT
STYLE


ORIGINAL NAM:E/ USE
The Tannery?



NEW NAviE 'AND ADDRESS
Crownshield Estates
18 Crownshidld
Peabody. Massachusetts


OWNERS AND ADDRESS
The Crownshield Corporation
18 Crownshield
Peabody, Massachusetts



ARCHITECTS FOR REUSE
Anderson Notter Associates
77 N. Washington
Boston, Massachusetts

AFFILIATIONS

AWA'RDS First honor award for "Extended
Use", N.E. AIA


NEW FUNCTIONS:: RETAIL OFFICE % RESIDENTIAL ,.
OTHER ___ 284 apartments, 75% of which are subsidized.


(reuse)
CONSTRUCTION, TINE One year. COMPLETION DATEFeb./75
% OCCUPANCY. 95




Four buildings? PHYSICAL DATA

PROPERTY SIZE STRUCTURAL SYSTEIT:
LOAD BEARING iiASONRY X
BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE WOOD FRAJilE
PER FLOOR OTHER
FLOORS


7NW CONSTRUCTION: MODERATE ; EXTENSIVE

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QUESTIONS:

1. WAS THERE A. NEED FELT FOR THE FUNCTIONS PROVIDED?
2. WAS THE BUILDING LOCATION AN ASSET?
3. HAS THE BUILDING'S PHYSICAL APPEARANCE BEEN AN. IfiPORTAT\T FACTOR?

4.. WAS THERE AN EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING: CAMPAIGN?
5. DOES THE SUCCESS OF THE OPERATIONS IN THIS BUILDIi ON THE SUPPORT OF THE LOCAL POPULATION?
6. WAS THERE A MARKET ANALYSIS MADEE.
7. WAS AN APPRAISAL LADE?
8. IS THERE ANY TAX RELIEF UN THE STRUCTURiE?

9. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY ECONOMIC FAILURES?


SUPPLEMENTAL DATA AND/OR INTERESTING POINTS:


REFERENCES

AIA Journal 4/77, p. 66,67.
Preservation News 9/75, p. 11.
Architectural Record 11/75, p. 37.


DATE OF INTERVIEW 5/4/77*
BY:: JERRY W. .:ILLS
*personal observation.


PERSONS) INTERVIEWED:




































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The Tannery in Peabody, Mass., once a
"big, blocky, smelling, empty leather tan-
nery," in the words of one architectural
critic, now houses 284 rental units, mostly
for the elderly; 75 percent are subsidized.
Widely criticized at first, the development
now has a waiting list. To make room for
parking and open space, the architects
cleared several old buildings, reusing the
materials for landscaping and plazas. Old
wooden vats and tanning wheels now func-
tion as planters; tivo former steam-oper-
ated pumps have been transformed into
sculpture for plazas. Conversion required
gutting, new utility systems, roofing, glass
windows, stairs and equipment for elderly
and handicapped. Original timber beams
and ceilings were retained and sand-
>blasted to give a "natural" feeling.


AIA JOURNAL
4/77, P.67


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