• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Introduction
 Regional analysis
 History
 Architectural analysis
 Site
 Program
 Design
 Bibliography






St. Augustine Public Library
CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00099627/00001
 Material Information
Title: St. Augustine Public Library
Physical Description: 92p. : axonometric, elevations, ill., photocopies, plans sections.
Language: English
Creator: Leuthold, William
Publisher: William Leuthold
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 1979
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Historic preservation
St. Augustine, Florida
Genre:
Spatial Coverage:
Coordinates: 29.891151 x -81.312175
 Notes
General Note: AFA HP document 308
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
System ID: UF00099627:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
    Acknowledgement
        Page 3
    Introduction
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Regional analysis
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    History
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Architectural analysis
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Site
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Program
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Design
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Bibliography
        Page 87
        Page 88
Full Text













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ST. AUGUSTINE PUBLIC LIBRARY


A terminal project in partial
fulfillment of requirements
leading to the degree of
Master of Arts in Architecture



By Bill Leuthold


Graduate Committee:

F, Blair Reeves, chairman
Phillip P. Wisley
Harold W. Kemp

Department of Architecture

University of Florida
June, 1979




ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


I would like to express my appreciation to the following
people for their assistance in the project,

F. Blair Reeves, F.A.I.A.
U.F. professor of architecture
committee chairman
Phillip P. Wisley
U.F. assistant professor of architecture
committee member
Harold W. Kemp
U.F. associate professor of architecture
committee member
Robert Lipscomb
director, St Augustine Public Library
Matthew P. Smith
photography




INTRODUCTION


Upon hearing that the city of St. Augustine needed a new li-
brary to replace their space in the Kirby-Smith house on Aviles
Street, I decided to take their needed design as my terminal
project, as required for receiving the degree of Master of Arts
in Architecture at the University of Florida.

Through several meetings with Bob Lipscomb, the director of
the St. Augustine Public Library, I began to realize the needs
of'the library and applying that knowledge to research of what
a modern library should be as well as my own preferences, the
functions began-to take shape.

The project offers many challenges, including selecting the
site, writing the program, developing the relationships and
producing the design in graphic form. The most important part
of the design is that of making it compatible with5the surroundings
in St. Augustine. This type of design is usually done in terms
of relating the new structure to the old in terms of scale,
rhythm, spatial relationships and general style. These relat-
ionships can be done at different degrees, from copying exactly
the surrounding styles to abstracting the features of the sur-
roundings into a contemporary statement.

The following is a description of the reasoning behind the dec-
isions made in completing the design.




NEED FOR kA EW .LIBRARY


The St. Augustine Public Library is currently housed in the 150
year old Kirby-Smith House, where it has been located since 1895.
The library currently has 6800 regular borrowers with a yearly
circulation of approximately 25,000. The problems of this loc-
ation include...


Lack of Space:
The entire library
contained in ap-
proximately 2500
sq.ft., severely
limiting the am-
ount of books able
to be displayed and
the amount of reading space.


J flr; nnR E1,


The Kirby-Smith House.


No Access to the Handicapped;
The entire adult section of the library, including circulation
desk, is located on the second floor which is accessible only
by a narrow exterior stair,

Lack of Visibility:
The building does not possess a look of a library on the exterior,
making it difficult to locate.

No Bookmobile Accessibility:
The county needs bookmobile service for the small outlying towns


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but currently has no space for loading and servicing.

No Ability to Function as a Modern Library,
The building was designed as a house in 1832, a design which
has little in common with a modern library. They presently
have few provisions for art and'audio-visual equipment which
are two very important parts of libraries today.

A new library has been needed for many years and now a concerted
effort is being taken by Bob Lipscomb, the director, and organ-
izations within the city to raise money for the construction of
a new facility.

With the library moving out of the Kirby-Smith House where they
have a lifetime lease with the city of one dollar per year, there
is a need for a function to be designated for the space. The
first floor is presently used for the children's library and as
a meeting space for an organization in the city. The rest of
the building could be converted into meeting spaces and as an
exhibition hall for the citizens to enjoy.
























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REGIONAL ANALYSIS


Locations


Climate:


Population:


Economy:


St. Augustine is located in the northeast'section of Florida,
35 miles southeast of Jacksonville and 50 miles north of Daytona
Beach,(see map 1). The historic section of the city lies bet-
ween the Matanzas River and the San Sebastian River on a piece
of land which lies only about 2 miles from the Atlantic Ocean.
(see map 2).

The temperatures of St. Augustine are greatly stabilized by
the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf Stream which lies just 90 miles
off shore. The average annual temperature is 70.1 F, with a
monthly high average of 81.1F in August and a monthly low
average of 57.80F in January.
The average yearly rainfall is 52.38" with the'heaviest months
being between June and October.
Hurricanes, always feared in a coastal city, have a probability
of hitting St. Augustine of only 40 to 1, with past ones hitting
in 1921, 1944, 1964 and 1968.

In the 1970 census the city of St. Augustine had a population
of 12,352. St. Johns County's population was 31,035.


The most important source of income in the area is through
tourism with fishing and shrimping ranking second. To stabilize
this, some people are employed by the National Guard State
headquarters, Flagler college and some manufacturing. There is
also a large retirement population.




MAP 1

St. Augustine
as it relates
to surrounding
cities and
waterways.


EXISTING LAND1 USE
LEGEND
* I~D(*hII u*t3




MAP 2

The city of
St. Augustine.









































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HISTORY OF ST. AUGUSTINE


Taken from the Historic St. Augustine Preservation Board
Guide Book,


The story of the founding of St. Augustine cannot be told without
including the story of colonization of the southeast section of
the United States, Known today as the nation's oldest contin-
uously occupied city, St. Augustine's history is firmly inter-
woven with the fates and fancies of many nations and people.

The discoverer of Florida was Don Juan de Ponce de Leon, a former
governor of Puerto Rico. Ponce de Leon sighted the eastern coast
of Florida, on Easter Sunday, March 27, 1513, while on a trip in
search of gold and silver. Ponce claimed the land for Spain and
named it La Florida, or the Land of Flowers.

In the following half century, the government of Spain launched
no less than six expeditions attempting to settle Florida but
all failed. In 1564 the French succeeded in establishing a fort
and colony near the mouth of the St. Johns river and in doing so,
threatened Spain's treasure fleets which sailed along Florida's
shorelines. As a result of this incursion into Florida, King
Phillip II named Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles, Spain's most ex-
perienced admiral, governor of Florida, and instructed Menendez
to explore and colonize the territory. King Phillip also in-
structed him to drive out any corsairs or settlers of other na-
tions if they should be found in Florida.




On September 8, 1565, with banners flying, trumpets sounding,
artillery booming and 600 voyagers cheering, Menendez set foot
on the shores of St. Augustine. In honor of the Saint whose
feast day it was when Menendez first sighted shore, he named
the town St. Augustine.

Menendez quickly set to work following the instructions of King
Phillip, With brilliant military maneuvers and a tremendous
amount of good fortune, Menendez did away with the French gar-
risons. Following these successes he set to work establishing
a permanent colony, as well as establishing Indian missions for
the church and perimeter fortifications for the town.

Forty-two years before the English colonized Jamestown and fifty-
five years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock, St. Au-
gustine was founded and she remains to this day the oldest per-
manent European settlement in the Continental United States.

Maintaining St. Augustine as a permanent colony and military
base, however, was a mighty task. Without the courage, per-
severance and tenacity of the early pioneers, it is very doubt-
ful that the community would have survived.

Sir Francis Drake, the English corsair, pillaged and burned the
town in 1586, and then in 1668 another pirate, Captain John
Davis and his English buccaneers, plundered the homes and left
60 persons dead in the streets. Clashes between the Spaniards




and the British became more frequent when the English colonies
were established in Georgia and the Carolinas.

The year 1672 saw work begun on the stone fortress now called
Castillo de San Marcos. The fort was nearly completed in 1696
but not officially dedicated until 1756. Attesting to the strength
of the fort, in 1702 Governor James Moore of Carolina led a two
month seige without success and in 1740 an even stronger attack
by British General James Oglethorpe of Georgia was beaten off.

In 1763, the stroke of a pen accomplished what pitched battles
had failed to do. Spain gave Florida to Great Britain in exchange
for newly conquered Havana and St. Augustine came under British
rule for the first time. England ruled over the city and ter-
ritory for 20 years which included the period of the American
Revolution. The citizens of the city remained loyal to the crown
throughout the span. In 1783, under the terms of a treaty signed
by England, France and Spain, East Florida and St. Augustine re-
turned to the rule of Spain, which lasted for 37 years.

In this period of the world's history, many changes were taking
place in Europe, and as a result, 255 years after Menendez set
foot on the shores of St. Augustine, Spain sold Florida to the
United States 6f America. At a colorful military ceremony on July
10, 1821, troops of the United States took possession of the ter-
ritory and the Spanish soldiers departed, never to return again.




The new regime found the town in a pathetic condition, devoid
of progress and with great apathy among its citizens. Much of
this had been created in the closing years of the second Spanish
period due primarily to the general poverty in the area. Many
of the buildings were run down, some almost in ruins. After the
American occupation speculators arrived in the city to take ad-
vantage of the situation. A yellow fever epidemic in 1821, how-
ever, carried off many of these newcomers. Despite the condition
of the city it was said to have possessed a mellow charm with the
scent of orange blossoms in the air, the narrow streets with lat-
ticed gates that led into cool courtyards, and a lack of industry
or commerce to disturb the serenity of the scene.

Although St. Augustine of the early 1800's was difficult to reach,
many distinguished visitors such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, noted
poet and philosopher, as well as Prince Napoleon Achille Murat,
son of the King of Naples and the nephew of the great Napoleon,
made the arduous journey. The Seminole War of 1836 called a
halt to this new awakening temporarily, as the Indians made a
desperate attempt to regain control of Florida from the Americans.
In 1837, two prominent Seminole leaders, Osceola and Coacoochee,
with a number of warriors were captured just south of St. Augustine
where they had come under a white flag for a parley with the
Americans. All were imprisoned in the Castillo from which Coa-
coochee and 20 of his companions managed to escape. Oceola




however was transferred to Fort Moultrie at Charleston, South
Carolina, where he died. Remnants of the Seminole Indians con-
tinued battling until most of them were either killed or had
surrendered for transfer to reservations in the West.

The end of the Seminole War made Florida safe once again for
visitors, who among other reasons came to take advantage of fine
climate. In 1845, Florida became the 27th state in the Union
with Tallahassee selected as the state capital. This was a com-
promise between St. Augustine and Pensacola, both of which were
difficult to reach from most parts of the state.

St. Augustine continued to prosper until it was interrupted by
another conflict, the Civil War. Slaves in this area had played
a minor role in the economy as compared with the rest of the
state and there was considerable Union sentiment in the city due
to the number of northern-born residents. Florida, however, se-
ceded from the Union and according to letters of the time, "It
was announced here by the firing of cannon and musketry, and
much shooting. A large flag made by the ladies waved on the
square. By order of the Governor of the state, the fort, barracks,
and federal property were taken possession of. Cannon are
mounted on the ramparts of the fortto defend if any attempt
should be made to retake it,"' The temporary joy of the inhab-
itants was soon replaced with sadness. Many of the young men




from the city served in the Confederate armies while the majority
of the northern-born citizens returned horth for the duration of
the war. In march of 1862 a Union blockading squadron appeared
off the inlet and demanded the city's surrender. During the night
the small Confederate garrison withdrew and the'next morning the
city was occupied by Union forces who remained until the end of
the conflict.

At the conclusion of the war, in 1865, St. Augustine was three
centuries old. The effects of the war and the privation it had
caused took some time to wear off, but the winter visitors began
to return almost immediately. Facilities were bad to say the
least, so work was begun on improving the travel arrangements'
and accommodations. In 1883 the Jacksonville, St. Augustine and
Halifax River railway was completed giving the city a link with its
neighbor to the north, Jacksonville.


During the winter of 1883-84 Henry M. Flagler, one of the co-
founders of the Standard Oil Company, visited the city and was
very impressed with the charm and possibilities of the area.
As a result of his interest, the magnificent Ponce de Leon Hotel
was built, as were the Alcazar and Cordova Hotels. With the
opening of these three the wealthy and fashionable flocked to
St. Augustine, soon to become known as the "Southern Newport".
Flagler purchased the surrounding railroads at the same time he




started his hotels, marking the beginning of the Florida East
Coast railroad. Eventually he extended the FEC down the east
coast of Florida, first creating Palm Beach and then Miami in
1896.

The progress engendered by men such as Flagler also took its
toll. The old and storied inevitably gave way to the new and
modern. Many old houses and the remaining sections of the de-
fense lines were uprooted to make way for new buildings. In
those days these changes were hailed as a. great improvement.
Construction wasn't the only enemy of St. Augustine, however,
as fire did its share of damage. In 1887 flames swept the Cath-
edral and much of the block north of the plaza. In 1914 a dis-
astrous fire wiped out many of the buildings in the older section
of the city between the city gates and the plaza.

St. Augustine, weatheringthe storms of World War I and II, has
undergone a rebirth with the quaint Spanish charm being re-in-
stilled through the dedication of the citizens. Major areas of
the city have undergone facelifting to return it to the appearance
of the first Spanish period. As a result of this, St, Augustine
has again become a major point of interest for tourists. Now,
however, instead of just a winter playground, St. Augustine, rich
in heritage of the past, has become an important center for vis-
itors all year long.






















:.....: ..........: ...:.. .. : ........ .........:...* ...* ...........:... ..... .... :*.. .:..... :...... :.. :.........:.:.....: ...:.........:.:....:.......:............ :.. :...:.......: .....: ... .



. . . . ........... .... . .. ..-. .. ......* . ; .. ..-. . ....... .*. *. .. . ...... ..*... ... ... . .. .. . . . . .
.......*.....................* ....*.............................;.......... . *...... ....;........*.. ..... ... .. ..* ... ....
. . .. . . ... . . . . . . ... ... . .****.. . . . . . . ..o . . ..* . .. . . . . . . ..*. .... . .... .
.;.--- .- ..- .-.........................-. ... .. ...... .... ...............:................................ :...:..... ....... ........:.. ...... :...........:.............-............ . . . .



. . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


.. .. .. .. ....................................... ...o........o......,....-................. .... ................... .. . .. . .. .

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ....................'-:-'-' ............-...................-....-.--''-.'-.''...'-. ....................






















:::::::::::: :::::::::: ::::::: i:::::::::: . . . . . . . .:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::.. .. .
: : : : : ... ..........


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. . .. .. . . .. .. . . . .. . . .. .. . ''. .:.. . . .
. . . . . . . . :..". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :.. . . .
. . . . ..:.. : :.. :...:
. ..... .:.:. . . . '..':...
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. . . . . . . . ... .. : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
... .... .. ... ....... . ... .. . .. .. ...... .. ... .. ... . .. ... .. ... .. .. ... .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .... ... .. ... .. ... ... .... .....
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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.... .........
......... ....... .....;
........ .......

.. ... .... ....... .... ... ...
........ ........i~i
... .. .. .. ..

. . . .




ARCHITECTURAL CHARACTER OF ST. AUGUSTINE


St. Augustine is an area of a rich but varied architectural heritage.
The oldest building remaining in the city, the Castillo de San Mar-
cos, begun in 1672 is very much an adaptation of Spanish renaissance
architecture. The residential scale for which St. Augustine is
well noted varies between the Spanish, British and later periods,
and the two major hotels in the city, the Ponce de Leon and the
Alcazar, both built in the late 1880's by Henry Flagler were Carrere
and Hasting's interpretation of Spanish Mediterranean architecture
applied at a grand scale. The only thing these three building types
have in common is the word "Spanish", as each is very different
from the other.


^ ,m.-.- ,, "'a . r(,-.,-r-i- ,..". ,- sy, -~, lfV- 'W.'-_-- "-.---.,, _-, ." i7 f.l t ..I t.. WT- ;i^X










:- i t '"
I ---"-


-0 ^ ,;

"BI'"~B~W~:"~"~iW ; m ;


The Hotel Ponce de Leon, from Drafting Room Practice, by Eugene Clute.



























The Castillo de San Marcos
Construction was begun in
1672 but dedication was
not until 1756.









Map and following illustrations

are from The Houses of St. Aug-

ustine, by Albert Manucy.


3. COLONIAL BUILDINGS
IN ST. AUGUSTINE
Although most of these bu:ldins have
undergone changes required by suc-
cessive occupants. each retains sig-
nificant structural elements daring
from colonial times.

1. Castillo de San Marcos
2. City (;ate
Vi St. Geurge
-i. 46 Sr. George
5. it) St. George
6 52 St. George
7. -43 St. George
8. 5-1 St. George
9. -i2 Spanish
10. 65 S (George
II. 62 Spanish
12. 105 St. (eorge
I1. 12 Aenida Mnenendez itnunda-
tions onlyv
14. 57 Treasury
I. I i.I St. George
16. 101 Charlotte
17. .6 Avenid Menindcz ua 19th L.
reconstrut.ilon)
18. Cathedral of S( Augustine
19. Governor s House
20. Marker-1824
21. Trinity Episrtpal Church-1825
22. 211 St (;erce
21. 221 St. (;eorge
21. 12 Avil&
25. 16 Mabrine-re-erected
26. 20 Avuls
27 20 Charlotte
28. i2 Avil&i
29 ;6 Avilds
;0. .6 Bridge
1. 250 St. George
Q2. ,ii Marine
13. 45 Marine
;4. 56 Marine
,5. 279 St. George
,6. 31 Sr Francis
37. 22 St. Francis
38. 14 St. Francis Oldest HouseP
19. St. Francis Barracks
40. King's Bakery




To determine the St. Augustine style, concentrating on the smaller
buildings, various design principles and details must be discussed.

St. Augustine is a city noted for its small scale, created by nar-


Scale:


row streets, walled gar-
dens, balconies and use
of landscaping. This
scale, especially in the
San Agustin Antiguo area
is oriented to the ped-
estrian, which es very
important in attracting
visitors to the city.
Most parts of the city
possess this pedestrian
scale but also allow
automobiles which causes
a dichotomy in the use.
It is unfortunate that
this evil is necessary
in this pedestrian city.


1! -Ii i -'7, iTT
--. ... _- - -- ~- _













-A4






1. THE ST. AUGUSTINE LOOK
j ^il^ ;- ^ u c P 'y' '^ l1'-- ^




Rhythms


Street .
Relationships


The buildings along the historic streets in St. Augustine are or-
ganized on a definite rhythm of building to walled courtyard an a
one to one ratio. This was a development brought over by the
Spanish in their early colonization and continued in later times,
The walled gardens served as the private exterior space, sometimes
used as an extension of the house, which could also serve as a
small farmyard. The main entrance to the house was usually open
to this space,


.Almost every building dating back to the early occupation periods
was constructed on the street line. This was traditional of Euro-
pean construction at the time and was simply carried over to this
continent by the early settlers. The building facades are often
continued beyond the house to form the courtyard wall. This acts
as a continuation of the building, creating a walled street effect
which greatly contributes to the pedestrian scale of the street.





Facades:


The facades were generally simple, balanced and devoid of decoration.
For analysis, the facades will be broken down into each element.




S ...-.... ......a .,



-----. --:- i -- -
'F 7- -------------
v* *' -C rS ri.
ada.









I I 'P M M.Ji:
___ |'"! 8' .. i Ii


The Lindsley House
N,W. of site.,


S- iliiT

7 7. =
.RE MNS

UIRI T,-___ I T T






Facades:


BEFORE
ITEM 1700 1703-1763 BRITISH 1783-1821


A list of

characteristics.
from The Houses
of St. Augustine,
by Albert Manucy


Height
I -story .........................
1 '2 -story ...................
2-story ............................
Openings
Main entrance via
side yard .....................
Street door ................
No north openings ...
Openings all sides .....
Doors large,
many 2-leaf ...............
6-panel door .................
Transoms. ....................
Windows large
on street, small
on west .. ....................
Wooden gratings on
all windows, rejas
on street windows ...
Inside shutters ..............
Outside shutters ........
Half-lattice on
windows .......................
Glazed casements ......
Glazed double-
hung sash ..........
Cornice
. Parapet, sometimes
castellated, on
flat roof .....................
Iox cornice ...................
Narrow eave ...........
Features
Posts, columns or
arches (at porches,
logias, or arcades)...
Side porch or loggia ..
Street balcony .........
Outside stair -
Chimney ............


_________________________ I _____________________ _____________________________


t ____ ____


7


S




Fenestrations


With bearing wall construction, the doors and windows of the
buildings of St. Augustine werelimited in size and spacing.
Openings were usually based on a 3"module and located symmet-
rically or assymmetrically, (see:facade examples)

For windows, the Spanish had no glass so they protected their
openings with bannisters and lattices or a covering called "rejas".
The English introduced glass in double hung window units in six
pane over six and nine over six styles.


The Spanish doors were of simple const-
ruction with vertical boards mounted on
a simple frame. The
English introduced the
six panel door. (...


41. A "'ANNI.STIERIN)
AN LA) IA I.IE"
WXINI)DOW


42. Cn()II)N O(.RAIN
CAlI.Il) A "Ri)JA"


00


-~ I IJI~


The English six
panel door,


'
P )I:
'
ii-Maii3.i r:r'r j'' EL;ijlIv :; Pi(l:c

r~r~T 1


rui loi




Balconies


A very distinctive feature of St. Augustine is its second story
balconies which protrude over the street. They were originated
by the Spanish but continued during the English period as they
found them a good asset to the houses in the climate of the area.
From the street they become very strong scale elements, limiting
the perceived space of -
the street to a height
of approximately eight
to ten feet.


12. BALCONIES ON ST. GEORGE-- A "PRINCIPAL" STREET







Loggias:


The loggia is an element
that distinguishes St.
Augustine architecture.
The loggias usually
were built on the south
and east elevations of
the buildings and could
be built of simple post
and beam, wood construc-
tion in the common hous-
es or as fine as arched
masonry construction in
the more expensive houses.


D
48. TYPICAL LOGGIA ELEVATIONS


T-I -'
b II
5 C






Walls:


The structure and heights


of the building walls

varied according to date

and building types.










L6 L o


3% 4
r-%7k" i*-o"


b, c.4 7 7%
Wl1-0" i7-o t" 'I .


36. MASONRY WALL HEIGHTS


Masonry Wall Heights (in Varas)'


WALL MATERIALS
Types of Wall Materials and their Periods of Use
(Numbers refer to list below)


WALL MATERIALS


HOUSE 3
WING
PATIO 3
PARTITIONS 3
KITCHEN 3
FENCE 2 3
XVara 33 inches


4 5 51/z 61/ 7
4 5 6V/2
31/2 4 5
4
4
4


Common Names of Wall Materials


WOOD
1. Savino: cypress post
2. Madera. tabla: woox. board. (tim-
ber frame
3. Timber frame, clapboard, weath-
erboard
4. Tablas y paja: board & straw
thatch
5. Tablas y palma: board & palm
thatch
6. Tablas y rajones: board &
shingle
CONCRETE


STONE CCOQUINA)
Piedra: stone, meaning rubble
masonry
Alamposteria: rubble masonry
Stone. stone-and-lime: rubble
masonry
COMBINATIONS
Ripio y tabla: tabby & frame
Ostidn y tabla: tabby & frame
Piedra y tabla: stone & frame
Mamposteria y madera: stone &
frame
Stone & frame
Piedra v rimio: stone & tabbv


1. Cal: lime 20. Malnpostcria y ostion: stone &
8. Ripio: tabby (probably ostidn) tabby
9. Ostidn: oyster-shell tabby BRICK
10. MAamposteria: masonry, meaning 21. Ladrillo: brick, brickmasonry
ostion (rare). See 12. 22. Brickmasonry
(As the divisions in our list show, several synonyms for the same
material are to be found. For example wood is called variously ma-
dera, tabla or rajdn; tabby is cal, ripio or ostidn; and stone is piedra
or inamposteria.)


*LLY W
fLrX rb


PERIODS WHEN USED
(DATING IS CONSERVATIVE




Finishes:






Colors


The first floor of most buildings were finished with a smooth or
ashlar simulating lime cement. Second floors could either be a
continuation of the first floor plaster finish or shiplapped
wood siding.


Plaster was generally
white but pigments were
sometimes added to color
the walls either red or
yellow. They were some-
times whitewashed.
Wood could be left un-
finished, whitewashed
or painted.
Colors were; --
wh i te
ochre
red
green _
olive green
brown


33. ASHLAR-MARKED PLASTER








































... .. ... .. ... .. ... .. ... .. .. .......... .. .. ............ ..... ... .. ... .. ... .. ... .. ..
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r~~::i~r:::~:i..................... :i... :~ i~~::i:::....,

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.. .. . . .. .. .... .



. . . . . . . . . . . .

. .. .. . . .. . . .. . . .. .. .



. . . . . . . . .
...... ...... ...... ..... ...... ...... ......
... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
... .. ...



.. .. .. ..





SITE ANALYSIS


The purpose of this section is to discuss the factors of the
site which affect the design.

Why was this site chosen?
This site was selected over others in and around the city because
of its location and size. It is located on St. George St., St.
jugustine's most famous street, one block south of the plaza.
'his location is on the fringe of the downtown area with many
businesses and government offices to the immediate north and
residential areas to the south.

Ownerships
The site is owned by the Trinity Episcopal Church and is used
as the site of a small thrift shop, for overflow parking and as
a playground for children.

Size: -





Topography:
The site is basically flat and will be considered so for the
design of the project.




Zoning:
The site is on the southern edge of Historic Preservation Zone 2
(HP 2), with the separation from the residential HP 1 being 65'
north of Palm Row to St. George St., then south to Cadiz St.,
then east to Aviles St., then south. The intent of this district,
quoting from the Historic Preservation Zoning Board Suggestions
of 1966, "The zone is designed to preserve the historic character
of the original St. Augustine settlement. While preserving the
scale and atmosphere of the ancient city, the intent of the reg-
ulations for this zone is to permit and encourage the kind of
commercial, governmental, religious, and cultural activities
stimulating to the heart of the city and complement the other
historic areas around it." Also, heights in this zone are lin-
ited to 21 stories, not to exceed 30'.

Immediate Context:
The buildings around the site (see maps and photographs) were
mostly constructed in the early twentieth century and are not
of the Spanish style mentioned elsewhere'in this program. There
are four buildings which date back to Colonial times, these being
the McMillan House, the Lindsley House, the Kirby-Smith House
(a little late in 1832) and the Ximenes-Fatio House. Of thcne,
the McMillan House is the oldest, being the only structure ap-
pearing on the Rocque Map of 1788 and is of the English period
with outside shutters, 9 over 6 windows and wood sidingon the 2nd
floor.




Street Relationship:
The four Colonial structures, along with the Oldest Store Museum
and some shops are the only buildings thich were built on the
street line, typical of the city. All other buildings are set
back from the street.

Wallst
All the surrounding buildings have a wall or fence on the street
or sidewalk line, similar to those in the historic areas except
in height as some are considerably lower. The walls serve two
purposes; they make the yards more private and they relate to
the historical architecture of the city.

Rhythm:
All the buildings have a side yard which sets up a rhythm of
solid to void throughout the area,

Scale:
The scale of the areas surrounding the site vary, with the build-
ings to the north being larger and more concentrated than the
residential buildings to the south. The exception to this is
the St. Joseph's Academy dormitory across Cadiz Street from the
site.




Vehicular Circulation:
The site is surrounded by one way streets with both St. George
St. and Aviles St. going south and Artillery Lane and Cadiz St.
going east. Traffic volume is low on St. George St. amd almost
nonexistent on the others. Parking is available on the streets
and in the municipal parking lot on the west side of St. George
St. at Artillery Lane. There are other lots available one block
west of the site behind the Alcazar Hotel (now city offices and
the Lightner Museum).
The St. Augustine tram system's route travels south on St. George
St. with a stop at Artillery for visitors to see the Oldest Store
Museum. The horse drawn carriages turn onto Artillery and make
their stop in front of the museum,

Pedestrian Circulation:
A sidewalk continues south on St. George St. from the Government
House, passing directly in front of the site. There is presently
little in the area to attract the visitor to the site, but a new
library will be a strong element which can act as an attractor,
St. George St. is the most active street in the city with the
San Agustin Antiguo district anchoring the north end. Currently
the pedestrians on the street walk south only as far as the plaza,
but with the introduction of a new library many will be encouraged
to extend their walk into the area. Palm Row is a very nice ped-
estrian street connecting the site with the Alcazar Hotel, parking
areas and residential neighborhoods to the west.






Circulation and Parking:


LE $ENs4ID
-..... PSo6-rm IAn ClaVcLA.O

-.- TR2Ati
-...- WOrar v DAWM CAra.Bl.As




Site in 1979.

1. Private residence, 2-story,
2, Private residence, 2 story. V
3. McMillan House, 2 story,
colonial.
4, Parking attendant station
1 story. -
5, Lindsley House 21 story
colonial,
6. Trinity Epiccopal
Church offices 7.
1 & 2 story. "--
7. Retail stores, 1 stor .-
8. Oldest Store Museum
22 story. "- T
9. Private residence
2 story.
10. Private residence ..O
1 story.
11. Ximenes-Fatio ---___ W 1
House I.
2 story .
colonial. _
12. Kirby-Smith House
location of current library,2 story, colonial.
13. St. Josephs Academy Dormitory, 3 story,















a t
II









The site in 1788, with the McMillan House (no.3)
being the only remaining building.
From San Agustin de la Florida, 25 de April de 1788.
by Marianno de la Rocque.


r: i 1 13 C




















.....
77 .


East facade of private residence no. 1.


Residence no. 2, located


on Palm Row.


The 'ilian House, a colonial structure
seen on the ?ccque "an of 1?88.


The parking attendant's station at the corner
of St. George St. and Artillz-- Lane.

































The colonial Lindsley House.


Looking north on St. George St., Towards the
Government House and the plaza.


~~1--. *~so~-r >-rrTr l


The Trinity Episcopal Church offices with their Looking from site north across Artillary Lane
new wall and parking lot.


~r
3.
-J-r
~': U1
































View of northwest corner of the site.
























Service area at north-
east corner of site.


The Oldest Store Museum, located in an early
twentieth century warehouse.


-L-
I' ur i'






2:


Al
a ~ 1: f r


West elevation of residence no. 9.
This elevation faces the site.


St. Josephr~s Academy dormitory,
built in 1902.


South elevation of
residence no. 9, facing
Cadiz St.



































.:.... ....................... .............. ......... .............
. . . . . :: .:- .:. -:. .:- .: -:- -:. .:- -, ,.* ".* ,,. ,," * **"'" " *"' *

--..............
......................................................................


......... ..... ..... ..... ..... .. . . . .
.. ......... ...;.................. ................... ..................
....... ............ .... ....... ........................ ........
;.;C;............... ........ ........ ........
......................... ....... ..........................




.......... ........ ..........................~

......... ........;;;
................ .. .. .. ... ....... ..........

......... ........ ..........!. ~~ :;$ ,


.. .......
li:: i~'':' r.h:::~ ~i


ICC..
c~w~8:8i~
~ 1.


.v~ii~~~X~:~;i...~.~n;
~ w:h~s:s~i~Si~I

v~


.' ..-.- -'- '- -.' ..............I* -




EXHIBITION AREA


Function:







Contents:




Design Datas









Relationships:


(From The Design of a Small Public Library, by Rolf Myller)
The space is intended for exhibits whose displays are used to
merchandise ideas and books, to stimulate interests in new
fields, to promote good will and in general to allow the lib-
rarian to communicate with the public.


A variety of exhibition methods should be used.., shelves,
suspended planes, bulletin boards, display cases and movable'
partitions. Wall space should also be used.


Most of the above items are available in many styles from
manufacturers. They should be of a style compatible with
the building.
With an always changing display, there is a. need for flexibility
in the lighting. A series 6f track lights in addition to
permanent fixtures will be a good solution.


The ideal location for the exhibit area is between the entrance
and the desk. This places an active function within an active
space and can be used to control circulation, baffle noise and
make the entrance inviting, colorful and cheerful.


Areas 800 sq.ft.




CARD CATALOG


Function:


Contents:


Design Data:









Relationships:


This area serves as the readily accessible guide to the books
in the library.


A 60 tray card catalog with a standing height reference table
directly opposite. The table should have pockets for scrap
paper.


The catalog should be easily accessible from all the book col-
lections in the library.
Lighting levels should be 50 to 100 footcandles and provided
by fluorescent fixtures and indirect sunlight.
The ceiling should be acoustically treated to absorb sound.
The floor should be resilient.


The catalog must be located near the circulation desk and just
off the major circulation path.


100 sq.ft.


Area:




ADULT COLLECTION


Function:


Contents:


Design Data:


This space is to contain the adult collection in the library.
This includes both fiction and non-fiction books and is the
most popular section in the library.


The space must contain sufficient shelving to hold the 25,000
volumes in the collection. The collection is equally divided
fiction and non-fiction books and consists mostly of octavos
size books. According to the Wheeler/Goldhor formula, eight
books fit on one lineal foot of shelving. Using this formula...
25,000 + 8 = 3125 lineal feet of shelving.
Then allowing 33% for expansion within the shelves...
3125 x 1.33 = 4200 lineal feet of shelving required.

Stacks must be available to everyone.
Stacks will be serviced by a book truck.
At least one surface should be acoustically treated to ab-
sorb sound.
Floors should be resilient for sound control and to minimize
damage to dropped books.
Direct sunlight should be avoided as it contributes to the
rapid deterioration of books, but indirect sunlight can
be beneficial for additional lighting.
Lighting levels should be 30 to 70 footcandles and provided
by fluorescent fixtures for energy conservation.




Relationships


Areas


The area should be near the...
card catalog,
young adult section,
reading area and the
circulation desk.


Using the rule of thumb formula from Wheeler/Goldhor...
1 sq.ft. per 10 volumes...
25,000 -4 10 = 2500 sq.ft.




YOUNG ADULT


Function:




Contents:











Design Datas


The space is to be designed to contain a collection of books
for the use of early teens and adults who prefer the easier
reading in these books.


The space must contain sufficient shelving for the 3000 books
in the collection. -Using the Wheeler/Goldhor formula for
shelf requirements; when shelves contain mostly'octavos sized
books they will contain 8 books per lineal foot of shelving.
Applying the formula...
3000 -- 8 = 375 lineal feet of shelving required.
Then allowing 33% expansion within the shelves...
375 x 1.33 = 500 lineal feet of shelving required.

Stacks must be accessible to everyone.
Stacks will be serviced by a book truck.
At least one surface should be acoustically treated to ab-
sorb sound.
Floors should be resilient for sound control and to minimize
damage to dropped books.
Lighting levels should be 30 to 70 footcandles and provided
by fluorescent fixtures.for energy conservation.
Direct sunlight should be avoided as it contributes to the
rapid deterioration of books and bindings.




Relationships,


Area:


With the various users of the young adult collection, teens
and less advanced adults, it is important that they do not
feel subconcious about looking for books in this easier read-
ing section. Therefore it is most important that the young
adult section seem like part of the adult collection. The
section should also relate to the circulation desk, reading
areas, the card catalog and the reference section.


Using the rule of thumb calculation from Wheeler/Goldhor...
lsq.ft, per 10 volumes...
3000 + 10 = 300 sq.ft.




REFERENCE


Function


Contents:


Design Data:


The reference section serves as the information center for
the community, with books, maps and various other information
sources,


The collection contains 3000 books of sizes varying from
octavos to quartos and some folios. With folios carried in
larger shelves, the combination octavos and quartos will re-
quire one lineal foot of shelving to contain 7 volumes.
Applying this formula...
3000 + 7 = 425 lineal feet of shelving required.
Allowing for 33% expansion within the shelves..,
425 x 1.33 = 550 lineal feet of shelving required.
The area must also contain a map cabinet, an atlas stand,
a dictionary stand and a display case.


The area must be accessible by everyone.
Stacks will be serviced by a book truck,
At least one surface should be acoustically treated to ab-
sorb sound.
Floors should be resilient to absorb sound and to minimize
damage to dropped books.
Lighting levels should be 30 to 70 footcandles and provided
by fluorescent fixtures for energy conservation.
Indirect sunlight would be very beneficial, but direct sunlight








Relationships,


Area


should be avoided as it contributes to the rapid det-
erioration of the books.


The area must contain within itself a reading area which
will be used for study and contemplation. It should also
be near the adult and young adult collections.

Using the rule of thumb formula...
1 sq.ft. per 10 volumes...
3000 + 10 = 300 sq.ft.
Adding to this the areas for study (150 sq.ft.) and the other
storage areas (100 sq.ft.)...
300 + 150 + 100 = 550 sq.ft.




NEW BOOKS


Function:



Contents









Design Data:









Relationships:


To give easy access of the library users to the recent ac-
quisitions of the library.


A rotating collection of about 500 octavo sized books with
an additional 400 paperbacks.
Applying the octavos formula for shelf requirements...
500 + 8 = 62 lineal feet of shelving.with no need
for expansion.
The paperbacks can all be held in one revolving shelf unit.


Stack units should be low to attract quick browsing.
Area will be serviced by a book truck.
The area should almost be a part of the major circulation path.
Lighting should be brighter than other stack areas.and sunlight
is desirable as it helps activate the space.
Colors should also be brighter.


The important relationships are those with the major cir-
culation path and informal reading areas.


Areas 80 sq.ft.




ART COLLECTION SPACE


Function:


Contents:


Design Datas









Relationships:


This space is to allow prospective borrowers to look through
a collection of framed art reproductions.


The collection contains 120 reproductions of various sizes which
are displayed on hinged partitions. These parttition* can hold
approximately 12 paintings per lineal foot, so the space required
will be...
120 + 12 = 10 lineal feet of wall space for the partitions.


Art is to be viewed from a standing position.
Partitions should be 5'-0" x 4'-0" and covered with a material
which will support hanging hooks while being a good back-
ground for viewing art.
Lighting should be from above and toward the front for optimum
illumination. Levels should be 30 to 70 footcandles.


Can be part of a large area containing newspapers, magazines,
music and an informal reading area,


120 sq.ft.


Areas




NEWSPAPERS


Functions


Contents


Design Data:




Relationships:


This space is to display newspapers, both current issues and
issues dating back about two weeks, for people to read within
the library. Microfilm issues will also be available for the
library users.


The library has subscriptions to approximately 20 newspapers.
Current issues should be displayed in a newspaper rack. This
rack is 3'-0" wide and can hold 6 issues per foot. Using this
formula to determine the depth of the rack...
20 + 6 = 3'-4"
Back issues can be stacked in backward chronological order in
shelf units which measure as a 3'-0" cube, each containing room
for 12 stacks of newspapers.
20 + 12 = 2 units.
Microfilm will require one large cabinet for storage and two
reader units.


Lighting levels should be toward the upper end of the 30 to 70
footcandle levels.
The floor should be resilient and the ceiling acoustically treated.


The area must have an informal reading area. included in the space.
The area should be directly accessible from the major circulation
path.


SCollection, 120 sq.ft. Reading, 500 sq.ft.


Areas




MAGAZINES


Function:


Contents:


Design Datas










Relationships,


Area


This area. is used to display current magazines for people to
read within the library.


The library will display 250 magazines in a shelf unit which
holds the most recent issue vertically with a shelf to hold
the older'one or two issues directly underneath. This type of
shelving contains approximately 4 magazines per lineal foot.
Applying this to a formula...
250 + 4 = 63 lineal feet of shelving required.
The shelf unit is 5 rows high...
63 + 5 = 13 lineal feet of shelf unit.


The magazine area should be incorporated with the newspaper
area and they should share the same reading area.
Lighting levels should be in the upper levels of the 30 to 70
footcandle levels with indirect sunlight providing much
of the light during the day.
The floor should be resilient and the ceiling acoustically
treated to absorb sound.


The reading area should be shared with the newspaper reading
area. The space should be directly accessible from the major
circulation path. There should be a view to the exterior.

Collection, 100 sq.ft. Reading, 500 sq.ft. (shared)




MUSIC


Function:


Contents:


Design Data:











Relationships:


Area:


This will be a space to music for the use of the people in
the community. Library users will be able to listen to rec-
ords and check them out in this area.


The library currently possesses 400 long playing albums, but this
should expand with the new library, as music is becoming an im-
portant asset to the modern library. Planning is for 1000 albums,
which can be displayed in 2 double sided cabinets, each 3'-0"
long. For private listening, 3 booths, each equipped with a turn-
table and 2 sets of headphones will be required. For informal
reading and general music listening, an informal reading room
should be included in this area. The room should contain com-
fortable chairs with low tables and stools.


The booths must be of sound deadening construction inside, with
three walls, the floor and ceiling treated acoustically for sound
absorption. The front wall, facing the reading room, should
have a heavy door and double glazing.
The reading/listening room should be separated from surrounding
areas by sound reflecting walls.
Lighting should be in the 30 to 70 footcandle range with some
indirect sunlight desirable.


The area should be visibly part of the informal reading -art,
newspaper, and magazine areas.

Booths, 35 sq.ft. each; Reading/listening, 200 sq.ft.




READING AREAS


Function:


Contents


To provide library users with areas for reading and studying.


Since no two people arealike and with the variety of activities
dictating a variety of reading areas, there is a need for many
small spaces, each providing a different type of reading experience.
A guideline for the total number of seats is found in Time Saver
Standards for Building Types...
With a population of 15,000...
For a served population of 10,000 to 24,999 a library needs
40 seats for 10,000 plus 4 seats for each 1000 over...
40 + (4x5) = 60 seats


Each area in the library requires a. reading area...

Adult and Young Adult:
Informal reading with comfortable chairs and couches. Some
people prefer a smaller scale space, so a quieter area should
also be provided. There will also be some studying, so an
area. with tables and chairs and individual carrels should be
provided.
Area: 1500 sq.ft.

References
Should have table and chair study units and be near an in-
formal reading area.
Area. 200 sqft.




Newspapers and Magazines,
This area needs a very informal reading area with couches,
cushioned chairs and footstools.
Areas 500 sq.ft.

Music Listening Spaces
Very informal with a couch, cushioned chairs footstools and
constant background music.
Area: 200 sq.ft.
General Library Requirements:
To take advantage of the climate of the area there should
an exterior reading area which is contained within the
library.
Areas 1000 sq.ft.


Total areas 2400 sq.ft. (excluding exterior area)


Area




MEETING ROOM


Function




Contents




Design Data:














Relationships:


A space for community meetings, both during and after library
hours. It will also be used for exhibitions, films, slide
shows, parties and classes.


The space will require movable seating for 50, a slide and film
projector with screen and stand, temporary partitions, a writing
surface, and a generous amount of storage.


The room must be accessible from the interior and the exterior.
With after hours meeting., a security problem will become ap-
parent as the library will be open with no one to watch over
the events. Therefore the interior door should be lockable
from the interior of the library.
The room must be designed acoustically to reflect a speakers
voice while absorbing other noises. This will require a
a reflective ceiling with absorptive walls and floor.
Lighting should be very flexible to handle the differing uses
of the space.


The room should be near the children area, the exhibit space,
the toilets, the circulation desk and have an exterior entrance.


900 sq. ft.


Areas




CHILDREN


Function:






Contents













Design Data;


A collection of children's books to be displayed in a way to
promote maximum use by the children of the community. The area
should also have a reading and storytelling area incorporated
into the space.


10,000 books of octavos size and smaller will fit on the shelves
at approximately 10 books per lineal foot. Using this formula...
10,000 10 = 1000 lineal feet.
Allowing for 33% expansion within the shelves.,,
1000 x 1.33 = 1330 lineal feet of shelving required,
Also included in the space is an area of approximately 300 sqft.
to be used for the children's reading area and story telling.
The area should be controllable from the main desk, but it will
be advantageous to include a desk in the area.


With the minimal reach of children, the highest shelf can be
only 45 inches off the ground. This allows only 4 shelves
per lineal foot of stack.
The reading/story telling area should contain sturdy furniture
or be molded into the floor with surfaces of carpet or
other soft finishes which promote their use.
The reading/story telling area should open to an exterior
courtyard for additional reading space.
Colors should be bright and graphics entertaining.
Lighting levels should be toward the upper end of the 30 to 70











Relationships:


Area


footcandle levels, with flexibility to allow the reading/
story telling area to be lighter or darker for effect,
The entrance to the area should be defined with an element
which changes the scale,of the space.


There should be access to the meeting room which can be used
for films and other activities. It is also important that the
toilets be accessible to the children without them having to
enter the adult sections of the library.


2000 sq.ft.




CIRCULATION DESK


Function:


(All from The Design of a Small Public Library, by Rolf Myller)
The desk must control the entrance,
The desk must be close to the card catalog.
The desk clerk must help with the book:return and checking out.
The desk clerk must answer inquiries and direct traffic.
The desk clerk must answer inquiries from adult readers and
the reference section.
The desk clerk must watch over the activity in the young adult
section.
The desk clerk must handle the children's area when no one
else is around.
The desk clerk must have control over the toilet entrance.
In short, the desk is the nerve center of the library, with all
activities revolving around it.


Desk space.
A typewriterand a telephone.
A card tray.
A closed storage area.
Cash and supply drawer.
Open shelves.
Space for a book truck.


Design Data:


Circulation desks are commercially produced in modular com-
ponents that can fit behind a permanent facade element.


Contents:















Relationships:


Area:


The space must be organized for easy flow in taking book returns
and checking out books.
As many surfaces as possible should be treated for sound ab-
sorption.
Lighting levels should be 40 to 80 footcandles and provided
by fluorescent fixtures and natural sunlight.
Desk height should be 33".


The desk must relate visually with almost every area within the
library.
It must control the entrance, the card catalog, the toilets and
the children's area.
It must have room around it for activity and should be the most
important part of the major circulation path.


600 sq.ft.




WORK ROOM


Function:























Contents:


(All from The Design of a Small Public Library, by Rolf Myller)
Receiving and preparing books and magazines to go to public shelves.
Mending, which may require plenty of bookshelves and a work table.
Typing and other business chores not done at the desk and which
require space or quiet concentration.
Storage for a variety of material: paper and card supplies, extra
pencils, staples, etc., holiday book collections, special
display materials, poster paper and minor "art supplies" for
making posters, books, and small equipment items such as
special book display racks for tables, signs, etc.
Working space to spread out work. Work here would be such things
as sorting cards for filing, simple book mending, checking
in and sorting magazines for use, and routine things easily
picked up after interruption.
Mailing of books, which may require a delivery table with a paper
dispenser and storage space for boxes, labels, etc.


A supply closet,
A bulletin board.
A paper'basket.
A'kitchen sink.
A stepping stool.
As much adjustable shelf space as possible.
A shelf list.
A catalog case.
A telephone.




Transaction card files.
A supply cupboard.
A coat closet.
A paper roller.
A smooth finished delivery table,
Some vertical files.


Design Data:










Relationships:


The space should be organized to handle the flow of books from
delivery to the shelf.
Lighting should be 50 to 100 footcandles.
Flooring should be resilient tile or roll to ease cleaning.
The ceiling should be acoustically treated.
Doors should be at least 41-0" wide with push plates for easy
operation.


The space must be located between the delivery area and the
circulation desk.
It should also be near the librarian's office, the staff room
and the staff toilet.


800 sq.ft.


Areas




STAFF ROOM


Function:




Contents:














Design Data;


This is a room where the staff can get away from the troubles
of the library. It also serves as a space where the library
staff can eat and keep their personal belongings during the day.


(From The Design of a. Small Public Library, by Rolf Myller)
A wall cabinet and base.
A small kitchen unit with a sink, a small refrigerator and an
electric burner.
A couch with blanket and pillows.
At least one easy chair.
A small dining table,with 6 chairs and a waste basket.
A wardrobe unit or closet for coats and miscellaneous personal
things.
An electric wall clock.


The space should be separated from the problems of the library,
like an island.
Colors should be light but subdued.
Lighting should be 25 to 45 footcandles and provided by fluor-
escent fixtures and natural sunlight.
Furnishings should be soft and comfortable.
The floor should be carpeted and the ceiling acoustically
treated.




Relationships:









Areas


The room should be relatively isolated from all internal li-
brary functions.
It should have direct access to an exterior space for reading
and relaxing.
The room should be near the staff toilet and the librarian's
office.


400 sq.ft.




LIBRARIAN'S OFFICE


Functions


Contents:













Design Data:









Relationships,


To allow the librarian a space for privace to think and work.


(From The Design of a Small Public Library, by Rolf Myller)
A large desk and chair.
2or 3 side chairs for visitors or staff,
A 4-drawer vertical file.
A wastebasket.
An electric clock.
A telephone.
A desk lamp.
And as many shelves as possible.


The room should be designed to keep out the noises of the
library while allowing the librarian to see what is hap-
pening within the library.
The floor should be carpet and the ceiling acoustically treated.
lighting levels should be 25 to 45 footcandles and provided by
fluorescent fixtures and natural sunlight.


The room should be close to the work room, the circulation desk
the staff toilet and the staff room. It should also have an
exterior view.


200 sq.ft.


Are as




BOOKMOBILE AREA


Function:


Contents:


Design Data











Relationships:


The space serves as the home base for the bookmobile which
serves the entire county. Also must be used for storage of
the rotating collection of books used in the bookmobile.


Enclosed space for the bookmobile to park, load and unload.
Stack area for the collection to hold approximately 2000 books.
The amount of space needed will be...
2000 + 8 = 250 lineal feet of shelving required.
With 7 shelves in a stack the amount of stack length is...
250 + 7 = 36 lineal feet of stacks.


The bookmobile is approx 30' x 9' and will require several feet
in each direction around it for service.
The ceiling can be left exposed for additional height since
this will be important and this is a utilitarian space.
Lighting levels should be 50 to 100 footcandles and provided
by fluorescent fixtures.
The floor under the bookmobile should be a material that is
easily cleaned and can stand up to the extreme weight.


Since this is a noisy space, it should be isolated from the
quiet areas of the library.
The space should be near the workroom.


1000 sq.ft.


Area:




JANITOR'S SPACE


Functions



Contents:














Design Data:










Relationships


This will serve as a space for the janitor to work and store
his equipment.


(From The Design of a Small Public Library, by Rolf Myller)
A slop sink.
Floor to ceiling shelving, 12" deep and no less than 12" bet-
ween shelves for cleaning supplies.
Shelving 24" deep and no less than 12" between shelves for light
bulbs, fluorescent tubes, paper towels, soap, and other
building supplies.
A mop, broom and brush rack,
A space for a vacuum cleaner, buffing machine, janitor's cart,
And mop bucket on casters,


The floor should be quarry tile to ease cleaning..
There should also be quarry tile around the sink.
The janitor's cart is 1'-9" x 2'-2".
Lighting should be 50 to 100 footcandles and provided by
fluorescent fixtures,
The ceiling should be exposed structure for maximum height.
The walls, where exposed, should be peg board.


With the exterior, mechanical space and the work room.


Area: 150 sq.ft.




TOILETS


Function:


Contents


Design Data:


Obvious.


Men...
2 flush valve water closets; 1 for handicapped.
2 urinals
3 lavatories, each with soap dispenser and mirror.
1 paper towel dispenser.
1 waste disposal unit.
A shelf for books, packages, etc.
Women... Same except urinals replaced by 2 additional water-
closets and add sanitary napkin dispenser and disposal.
Staff Toilet...
1 flush valve water closet,
1 lavatory with soap dispenser and mirror.
1 paper towel dispenser.
1 wadte disposal unit.


Floors and walls should be of ceramoc tile.
Toilet partitions should be ceiling hung for ease of cleaning.
Toilet partitions should be finished with laminated plastic to
prevent rust.
Lavatories should be placed in a laminated plastic covered
counter.
Lighting levels should be 25 to 55 footcandles and provided
by fluorescent fixtures.




Relationships:


Area:


Toilets are a real nuisance in a public library,
They create supervision problems.
They invite nonreaders into the library.
They require maintenance and upkeep.
But since they are necessary they should be located near the
circulation desk where someone will always be able to
control the situation,
They should also be located near the children's area and the
meeting room.


200 sq.ft, for each main toilet.
40 sq.ft. for the staff toilet.




MECHANICAL OPERATIONS SPACE


Function:


These spaces serve only to support the building and its
functions.


These spaces include all non-assignable spaces such as halls,
corridors, stairs,,closets,'and mechanical equipment areas.


Contents:


Area:


3500 sq.ft.




SUMMARY: AREA REQUIREMENTS


Public Areass























Work Areass


Exhibition area.......................... 800
Card Catalog. ....... ,....,,..,,....,,..100
Adult Collection .. .......... .. ....... .. 2500
Young Adult Collection.................. 300
Reference Collection........,,........... 300
New Books..... ...... .. .......... ......80
Art Collection.. ,.,.. ,,. t...... ...... 120
Newspapers. ......... ... .. ., ..... .. .. 120
Magazines.. ......... .. ,., .... .. ,100
Music ... .. ......... .. .. .. . ... 105
Reading Areas ... .... .. ... ..... ...... 2400
Meeting Room....... g.... ... .......900
Children's Area................... ... 2000

Total...... .. ... .... ...... ....... ..... 9825


Circulation Desk.......,................600
Work Room....................... .......800
Staff Room............................400
Librarian's Office...,. ....,...... .... 200
Bookmobile Area .......................... 1000
Janitor's Space...,,,.......... ........... 150
Toilets ... . . . ...... ........... 440
Mechanical Operations Space............. 3500

Total Work Areas....... ........ ......... 7090

Total for Building.....................16,915


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DESIGN


Introductory
Statement


















Approach:


In any compatible design there are three basic options the
designer can take.
1. Design an exact replica of the surrounding buildings.
2, Copy the surrounding buildings on the facade while plac-
ing a modern structure inside.
3. Search out the design ideas which give an area its char-
acter and abstract these into a contemporary design
which reacts to modern needs while fitting into the
surroundings.
Of the three options listed above, I feel that the third is the
only option a sensitive designer can take, as it requires him to
study the area, searching for design principles, not details to
copy, and leads to a fresh architectural statement which will add
to an area instead of mocking it.

This project is one that requires a meshing of two different and
distinct needs. First, it must fit in a site which is surrounded
by mostly residential scale buildings within a colonial city.
Second, it must fulfill the needs on a. modern, active library
run by a small staff, requiring a'large open space.
This can not be simply separated into interior, exterior problems
as many aspects of a modern library relate to the exterior and
many features of St. Augustine must be carried into the interior,




The elements of St. Augustine which should be considered in the
design are...
Scale
Rhythm of building to yard.
Rhythm of voids to solid within the facade.
Relationship of buildings to the streets.
Courtyards and their use as an extension of the interior
space and for the entrance.
Use of the wall,
Use of the balcony.
Use of the loggia.
Use of texture.
Use of color.
Relationship of heights.

Elements of a modern library which must be considered are...
Making the space controllable from the desk.
Creating a lively space which will draw people in from the city.
Making a variety of reading spaces,
Making the building able to be serviced,
Allowing space for a bookmobile.


















matanzas rver


LOCATION MAP
rLB M0m


ST. AUGUSTINE PUBLIC LIBRARY

WILLIAM A. LEUTHOLD
JUNE 1979
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


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BIBLIOGRAPHY


American Library Association. Problems in Planning Library
Facilities; Consultants, Architects, Plans, Critiques.
Chicago: American Library Association, 1964.

De Chiara, Joseph and Callender, John H, Ed. Time Saver Standards
for Building Types. New York; McGraw-Hill, 1973.

Galvin, Hoyt B. and Van Buren, Martin, The Small Public Library
Building. Paris: UNESCO, 1959.

Historic St. Augustine Planning Board. Guidebook, Florida:
Department of State, 1971.

Manucy, Albert. The Houses of St. Augustine (Notes on Archit-
ecturc from 1565 to 1821. Jacksonville, Florida: Convention
Press, 1962.

Myller, Rolf. The Design of a Small Public Library, New York
and Londons R.R. Bowker Co, 1966.

Wheeler, Joseph L, and Goldhor, Herbert. Practical Administration
of Public Libraries. New York: Harper and Row, 1962.




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