• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Main
 Introduction
 Table of Contents
 Site evaluation
 Program and spaces






Title: New River Historical Museum
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00099619/00001
 Material Information
Title: New River Historical Museum
Physical Description: 101p. : ill., plans.
Language: English
Creator: Manning, Raymond L.
Publisher: Raymond L. Manning
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 1979
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00099619
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
    Introduction
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Site evaluation
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Program and spaces
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
Full Text





MUSJ1EUrLT.

II


RAY MANNING
COLLEGE OF ARCH.
PRESERVATION DEPT.
UNIV. OF FLA.,'1979


4 1.


.I~=1

8~








INTRODUCTION



The thesis project contained within this volume

is to fulfill the final requirements to attain a

Masters of Arts in Architecture from the University

of Florida.

The intent of the project is to design a historical

museum to serve Ft. Lauderdale and the surrounding

Broward County. It is to be located within the fixed

environment of the recently established historic

district in Ft. Lauderdale.

The volume is divided into two primary sections,

one deals with the evaluation of the site and the

other consists of the program and spaces required

for a museum of this type.













INEWP RIVER /
-------- r- nlrr cr~r= T", -








PROGRAM & SPACES


PROJECT CONCEPT


The museum is to provide a link with the present
day visitor, the historic district and the history of
the area and the city. An atmosphere is to be created
that will take the visitor back into the past and
introduce him to New River and the importance it had
on the development of the city.
The museum shall stimulate interest in itself, the
district and the character of the area. the area's
character is developing into an arts and crafts comm-
unity with other interest such as plays and minor
cultural activities. A group of local businessmen
and citizens have established a community within
the district called the Himmarshee Village. It
consolidates the community into a whole with a purpose
to create public awareness and interest in the community.
The museum will become a part of the community and
act as an extension of the history supplied by the
Himmarshee Village information center.
A research center at the museum will provide a
centralized location for records and information
related to the area's history.








N EW RIVER
ow-.------


__










The easier access point will reduce the travel time
time needed to visit many history resources.
An assembly area will extend use of the museum
beyond it's normal closing time while drawing persons
to the area. This will increase the public's aware-
ness of the area and provide a community service.


PROGRAM & SPACES


-NEW RIVER .
-_P C- -r-P-%P% MP rn W r- 0P 0-*












TABLE OF CONTENTS

A. SITE EVALUATION

1. INTRODUCTION TO THE SITE

2. SITE DESCRIPTION AND BOUNDARIES

3. HISTORY OF THE SITE

B. PROGRAM AND SPACES


U'


I-NEW RIVER


_~








INTRODUCTION TO THE SITE


The museum is to be located on a site in the Ft.
Lauderdale Historic District which is within walking
distance of the downtown business district. The
location will promote public awareness and interest
in the historical structures and the history related
to the area. The increased public interaction that
will be generated by the museum will help promote
the success of the historic district.
Another aspect of the location is that persons
interested in the old structures can be directed
to the museum where they can study a detailed history
of the structures and the area. The research facilities
will allow the visitor to further investigate a point
of interest to a much greater degree.
The visitor would soon learn that the site is
directly adjacent to four of the earliest structures
to be built in Ft. Lauderdale. The location of the
site puts it in the area that is known as the birth-
place of the city. This places a direct historical
significance on the site which makes it even more
appropriate to be the location of a museum dealing
with the history of the area.






-NEW RIVER


SITE EVALUATION










The river front location provides a view of the
present day river activity as well as a visual link
with one of the major developing forces behind the
founding of the city. The near proximity to the
visitor oriented beach area provides a means for
persons that live outside the state to examine the
unusual history of the area. The site is centralized
in relation to the city of Ft. Lauderdale and
Broward County. This allows it to be easily accessible
from any point in the city or county.


S


SITE EVALUATION


INTRODUCTION TO THE SITE
p-2






































-N\EW RIVER






J L IIJ II .II II IIW II I.;I I I L II IIJ II II LU I I LW




I
I I





:--F l- i Br
LL] LZIZf DiI __ _















II II I I a I
nnnrsnnnnnix'7
i 1[ i rl 1 r I I


SITE EVALUATION


SITE LOCATION WITHIN THE
CITY OF FT. LAUDERDALE



























LINEW RIVER
I - - I -








SITE EVALUATION


L-NEW FIV


AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH.





C, 3


SITE EVALUATION


SITE BOUNDARIES AND
ELEMENTS IN CLOSE
PROXIMITY










































--NEW RIVER
- %-A v - r-,% T" I r W m I 'Q








SITE DESCRIPTION AND BOUNDARIES SITE EVALUATION



The site is located within town, range and section
T505-R42E-11 and census tract 419. The population
within the census tract has increased very slowly
during recent years, from 3,967 in 1970 to 4,261 in
1977. The area is occupied by mixed retail and res-
idential structures which make up a low income area.
The following 1970 statistics give a general
indication of the area's character;
Medium home value $19,700
rental rate $128 (mth.)
family income $8,854
age 47
persons in home 1.0 to 2.2
Owner occupied homes 673
Rented homes 1,295
The low quality of the area is due in part to the
dispersal of downtown interest and the older character
of the area. The establishment of the historic district
has started an upward trend in the character and value
of a major portion of the district which occupies
the area.







INE W RIVER








SITE EVALUATION


The historic district surrounding the site now
contains a population of a slightly younger age
then that of 1970 with a creative interest ia arts
and crafts. This has resulted in a revitilazation
of a number of the retail structures and the organ-
ization of a group which promotes the area khich is
known as Himmarshee Village.-The arts and crafts
shops along with the children oriented exhibits of
the newely restored New River Inn has produced a
more youthful character within a major portion of
the district.
The site is presently a small branch post office
with a small customer parking lot at the north end
and a larger employee parking lot at the south end.
The river front location is three to four feet above
sea level so hurricane flooding is a definite con-
cern.
A small perimeter road now encircles the site on
three sides with a major road on the north side that
leads directly to the downtown business district of
the city.
To the west of the site are a few small residences
with three of historic significance that are located
on the river front.






I--EW RIVER








SITE EVALUATION
A small auto parts store is located on the highway
frontage to the west of the small customer parking
lot on the site.
To the north of the site is a collection of misc-
cellaneous commercial establishments. A small deli,
an antique store, a used clothing store and a small
automobile museum are the major features. An open
patio is encircled by the buildings with an open
access directly across from the site.
A small open lot and a two story commercial and
apartment buildingare located to the east of the site
on the-fontage of the major road- Directly east of the
site is a number of small frame rental houses and
garages with a two story block apartment building.
None of these structures are of significance.
At the south river front portion of the eastern
boundary are two houses of historic significance
with landscaped yards that enhance the river bank.
Sailboat bend of the New River forms the southern
boundary of the site. The riverfront walk extends
across the southern portion of the site. A large lot
is located across the river with heavy tree coverage
a the southern end.








-N-EWLVV RIVER








HISTORY OF THE SITE
TABLE OF CONTENTS


A. History Related To The Site And The Surrounding Area
B. Historic District Organizational History
C. Survey Team Recommendations
D. Historic District Evaluation
E. Structures Surrounding The Site And Significant
Structures Of The Area


--NEW RIVER _


SITE EVALUATION







HISTORY BELATED TO THE SITE & THE SURROUNDING AREA.

1893, Jan. 31, Frank Stranahan replaced Ed Moffatt
as the operator of the stage ferry at New River
near Tarpon Bend and acquired ten acres of land
where he then constructed the Stranahan New River
Camp and Trading Post.


,_-


Stranahan Camp and Trading Post.

1895, The first plat of the future city of Ft. Laud-
erdale was filed with the Dade County Circuit
Court Clerk by the Brickell family. The plat was
to encompass a town one square mile in area which
would include the present day Historic District.


SITE EVALUATION


HISTORY


-\NEW RIVER_ /_


_____


-------~


j\








SITE EVALUATION
1895, The original route of the Florida East Coast
Railway was to run adjacent to the county's major HISTORY
road but this plan had to be changed due to the
refusal of the Brickell family to sell the right-
of-way to the railroad company. A compromise was
reached whereby the tracks would be placed to the
west, which is now their present location.


1895, P. N. Bryan received a sub-contract from Louis
McLain of the Florida East Coast Railway Co. to
cut and grade the right-of-way for a new set of
tracks which were to extend ten miles north from
the New River.


1896, Feb. 22, The first rail passengers reached
Ft. Lauderdale which marked the establishment of
a transportation and shipping link with the
Northern markets. The new rail transportation that
terminated at New River was to allow the city to
develop into the major shipping crossroads of
South Florida in a very short time.


1899, P. N. Bryan built a wooden residence on the
west side of the railway tracks directly across
from the train station which was located on the
north bank of New River.



Ni-- EW RIVER








SITE EVALUATION
-Rooms were added to the building which were rented
to the incoming train passengers and signified this HISTORY
as the area's first hotel.


1899, A one room school house was built by the men
of the community to accommodate Miss Ivy Cromartie
who was sent by Dade County to become the city's
first school teacher. A reconstructed fac-simile
is now located on the original site which is
within the Historic District.

1900, The city of Ft. Lauderdale has a population
of 52, with most of them housed in tar-paper lean-
tos and cypress framed palmetto shacks.


1904,. A plan was devised for the drainage of the
Everglades which was widely endorsed and supported
by the newely elected governor of Florida,
Napolean Bonaparte Broward.


1905, Governor Broward appointed Reed A. Bryan to
supervise the construction of two dredges to clear
a canal to the Everglades. These were constructed
at the King Boat Yards at Sailboat Bend on the
New River, which is just east of the present
Historic District and on the opposite bank.



NMVEW RIVER








SITE EVALUATION

1905, The New River Hotel was constructed for P. N.
Bryan by E. T. King, who was a member of Bryan's HISTORY
crew that cleared the railroad right-of-way. It was
built on the site of the first Bryan residence.
The previous year the original structure on the
site was sawn into several pieces and only one
piece was left remaining on the site.at this
time. The remaining pieces were moved slightly
to the west and were to be annexes to the new
hotel. The hotel was constructed of concrete
blocks that were molded on the site by the con-
tractor. It contained 40 rooms, a spacious
dining room and well kept lawns. In 1944 the name
was changed to the New River Inn which was to
stay in active use until 1953.



















I NEW RIVER .
------------------ EW RIVE
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------" l 1l --lf- 'm- |f- r r~ ^ M i w


---Re







SITE EVALUATION


HISTORY
1907, The two dredges, "The Evergladesu and "The
Okeechobee" were clearing canals to the west
towards the Everglades and eventually Lake
Okeechobee. This was to stimulate land sales
and speculation in the Ft. Lauderdale area.





















Canal dredge.







-INEW RIVER .
-IIc;TORIC VUn 15i=' irv







SITE EVALUATION

1908, -Richard J. Bolles purchased 500,000 acres
of land in the area around Ft Lauderdale and HISTORY
was to later sell it in the "Great Land Lottery
of 1911."


1910, The expectations of the Everglades drainage
and the ensuing development had increased the
population to 143. At this time the intersection
of the railroad and the river transportation
route was the center of the town's activity.

1911, At this time the city of Ft. Lauderdale was
officially incorporated.

1911, The H. G. Wheeler Building was constructed
to provide the city with it's first impressive
commercial structure. It was located on North
New River Drive at Brickell Ave. facing the
river. The general merchandise store was to
become the major competition for the Stranahan
store that was located down the street. At
this time other commercial establishments were
being located on Brickell and Andrews Ave.







INEW RIVER_
MIRT-O rJ C "rI 1cc= In/rM






























H. G. Wheeler building.


1912, April 26, Governor Albert W. Gilchrist pre-
sides at the opening of the North New River canal
that links the city with Lake Okeechobee. The
ceremonies at the foot of Brickell Ave. were to
mark the beginning of an era of rapid increased
development in the city. The great farm regions
of the lake area were to use Ft. Lauderdale as
the shipping point to the northern markets.


-I


SITE EVALUATION


HISTORY


-NEW RIVER_
i-41STOPIC I! 1!= fl Inn










1912, June 1, The entire business area of the down-
town portion of the city burned, fortunately this
did not affect the area included in the present
historic district.


Ft. Lauderdale fire.


1913, Northwest Third Street (present 2nd Street)
was opened as an east-west artery through the
present historic district.


1913, As a result of the opening of the canal to
the lake, vegetable docks and fish processing
houses were located on the river banks between
Andrews Ave. and the railroad to the west.


I_


SITE EVALUATION


HISTORY









































-NEW RIVER/
- I I* I' I"f WI II Kn R I I* I I I R f


~_








SITE EVALUATION

1913, Commercial redevelopInt in the burned out
section of the city was nearly completed to the HISTORY
point that most traces of the fire were gone.


1915, Dixie Highway was opened to interstate traf-
fic. This linking of the city with the rest of the
nation by automobile was te have a great effect
on the future development of the city.


1915, April 30, With a population of approximately
eight thoudand, Broward Comnty was formed with a
little over one thousand square miles of land
within it's boundaries.


1915, Passenger and freight service was provided
between Lake Okeechobee anx Ft. Lauderdale by
the stern wheelers, "Lily", "Napolean" and the
"Suwanee". Winter vegetables, sugar cane, fish
and flowers were shipped ito Ft. Lauderdale by
the canal so they could be transported by rail
to the northern markets.


1917, A bridge linking the Teach with the city by
way of Las Olas Boulevard was completed. This
was to give access to areas outside of the orig-
inal city boundaries.


* A


I

NEW RIVER _
HISTORIC "V1I I== !VI


__ __









In the coming years this drew development away
from the old established commercial district.
The opening of Dixie Highway and this bridge
resulted in very little new construction in the
historic district between 1914 and 1918.


1918, As Ft. Lauderdale foresaw the future tour-
ist market, they developed their fishing fleet
which was based at the docks at the foot of
Brickell Ave. As the tourist industry grew,
these docks were to become nationally famous
and.attract thousands of fishermen, yachtsmen
and tourist annually


1921, Dec. 2, As the canal slowly drained portions
of the Everglades, the silt was to eventually
render the canal too shallow for use, so this
was the last day for the regularly scheduled
trip between the city and Lake Okeechobee.


1922, This was a era of prosperity and the big
land boom developments.


I~ .1


SITE EVALUATION


HISTORY


NEW RIVER j
HISTORIC MV1USEUMV










1924-28, This era saw the full development of the
commercial district on Brickell Ave. and in the
historic district. This was to becoming the time
of the "Roaring Twenties", prohibition, bootleg-
ging, gambling and the free spending of an ample
supply of money was to give a time of free living
to the residences of the city. The land boom came
into full swing with many major subdivisions
being developed. Growth in the area was spreading
in many directions, particular the newely dis-
covered beach. This expanding growth eventually
left behind the older original section of town
and the historic district was to become the first
victim.


,rickell Ave. retail district.


_I


,NEW RIVER
* I W-P ,- %- 1 a 0"U l' r In l" 9__i q 1 lf IM


__










1926, The first great hurricane to hit the city
brought the residents back into reality from
their free spending spirit. It was severe blow
to the area and it's effects as the forerunner
to the great depression were to ruin many once
prosperous people of the area. The area's devel-
opment died out as the rest of the United States
continued to grow and prosper until the nation-
wide depression.


South Andrews hurricane damage on the river front.


I-I.


SITE EVALUATION


HISTORY






































-NEW RIVER









1927, Tom Bryan constructed a new post office at
the corner of S.W. 4th. Ave. and S.W. 2nd. St.


1928, The streets of the city acquired their pre-
sent numbering system. At this time a marked
amount of new construction evolved on both sides
of the commercial street in the historic district.


1928, Another major hurricane went through the city
but this time caused much less damage then the
hurricane of 1926.


1928, From this time to the present, very little
change occurred in and around the major portion
of the historic district. This was primarily due
to the continue growth toward the beach and the
development of automobile transportation.


1933, The area was popular with the tourist for
a short time when the charter fishing boats were
docked at the foot of Brickell Ave. Fish racks
placed on both sides of the Andrews Ave. bridge
to attract tourist to the day's catch. For a
time this was one of the most colorful features
of life in the city, but development of the beach
properties and specifically Bahia Mar was to
draw this attraction away from the ailing down-
town area.


U-II


SITE EVALUATION


HISTORY






























I





L-NEW RIVER _
HISTTO:IC "!I' IrF:F I!V









FT. LAUDERDALE HISTORIC DISTRICT, ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY

The Ft. Lauderdale Historic District was estab-
lished in 1975 by city ordinance, no. C-75-29,
section 47-23.13 with an "H-1" zoning. It is loca-
ted in the downtown section of the city with it's
south boundary at the New River,and the tracks of
the Florida East Coast Railroad forming it's east-
ern boundary. The district is bounded on the west
by S.W. 5th. Ave. and extends approximately 200
feet north of S.W. 2nd. St.
The Housing and Community Act of 1974 provided
funds for the initial development and survey of
the district.
The city was advised by the Division of Archives
of the State of Florida to follow these suggestions
for the establishment and preservation of the dis-
trict;
1. Place an immediate moratorium on new const-
ruction, alterations or modifactions and
demolition within the district.

2. Obtain professional services to conduct a
survey of the existing structures within
the district.


SITE EVALUATION


FT. LAUDERDALE
HISTORIC DISTRICT,
ORGANIZATIONAL
HISTORY.































LNEW RIVER










3. A historical documentation of the events
retaining to the district should be
complied by a professional source.


4. The results of the survey and the historic
documentation should be produced in a
printed report.


A survey of the district was conducted between
Dec. 13 and 17 in 1976 by the architectural firm
of Fisher and Sheppard, Architects and Planners
Inc. with the assistance of the. architectural
preservation instructures from the University of
Florida, Mrs. Elizabeth Bolge of the Broward
County Historical Commission was retained to
compile the historical documentation for the
final report.


I I.


FT. LAUDERDALE
HISTORIC DISTRICT,
ORGANIZATIONAL
HISTORY.


-NEW RIVER
-i-nrlTO oil r In C I<;= inr


SITE EVALUATION









HISTORIC DISTRICT, SURVEY TEAM RECOMMENDATIONS.


The survey team strongly suggest that the city
establish a city wide preservation commission.
This would expand the authority of the present
board which at this time only presides over the
historic district.
Establish a city or county landmark commission
with the following responsibilities;
1. The completion of a survey of the entire
area that would fall under it's control.
2. Prepare a historical preservation and cul-
tural preservation plan that would work in
accord with the area.
3. Review any and all demolition proposals.
4. Advise the planning boards with respect
to preservation and conservation matters.
5. Publish reports related to preservation in
the area.
6. Establish the designation of individual
sites and areas of importance as landmark
or historic districts.
7. Establish committees to supervise the desig-
nated areas.


SITE EVALUATION


HISTORIC DISTRICT,
SURVEY TEAM
RECOMMENDATIONS.


































LNEW RIVER
-HISTO IrC M!0 ,cr7- ;C r,


II









Recommendations were put forth to establish a
master plan for the city's historic preservation
program. It should contain loth a long range and
a short range plan which womld consider including
the surrounding areas in the program.
The long range plan would] set goals to control
the use and character of the historic district or
conservation areas. Two long range plans were sug-
gested by the survey team.
The first long range plam would use strict con-
trols to insure proper use of restoration and pre-
servation principles. The following is to be the
essence of this plan that retains to the district;
1. Restoration of the residential area to it's
1904 to 1918 character and the commercial
area to it's 1918 tb 1928 character.
2. The open spaces in the district should be
returned to a state appropriate to the
suggested periods.
3. New construction that is permitted in the
district will be allowed only in spaces
where previous structures were located and
are to be of the sam volumn and scale as
those they are replacing.


I~I.


SITE EVALUATION


HISTORIC DISTRICT,
SURVEY TEAM
RECOMMENDATIONS.


































--NEW RIVER
-HISTOF10IC MvI 1 s It"r









The second long range plan would not take such
a strict stance on the controls that are to be used
in the district. The plan wold assume the district
would be geared for adaptive use and is far more
compromising then the first plan. The open spaces
and the surrounding landscape would be returned to
the original character and scale of the proper
period but will be flexible to meet the needs of
adaptive use. New construction would be allowed in
the district under control of the city's contem-
porary planning principles.
A short range plan would be developed to act as
a reference point for the decisions that are to be
made in respect to the historic district with the
following to be the criteria used;
1. Specific guidelines should be established
to deal with the buildings in the inventory.
2. Specify the open spaces that are to remain
open.
3. Establish parameters to control new con-
struction that is to be permitted in the
area.
4. Develop a list of the permissible alter-
ations allowed in the district.


m I.


SITE EVALUATION


HISTORIC DISTRICT
SURVEY TEAM
RECOMMENDATIONS.


































-NEW RIVER
- HIST- 1C V l '=, IV









HISTORIC DISTRICT EVALUATION.


The district is located in what is known as the
birth place of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. The opening
of the Florida East Coast Railroad to the north
bank of New River from West Palm Beach was to
produce the major developing foree in the city's
early history. This development marked the location
of the city's beginning and the present location of
the historic district.
The river was the major means of transportation
in the area during the late 1800's. It's link with
the railroad and the northern cities was to produce
the major transportation system in mainland South
Florida for many years.
The buildings in the district that resulted
from the early influences of the railroad are the
most significant, architecturally and historically.
The historic value of the structures is included
not only on a local level but also state and in the
early history of the Florida East Coast Railroad.
The structures built in response to the railroad
are mostly residential in character and are located
on the north river bank where the tracks meet the
New River.


SITE EVALUATION


HISTORIC DISTRICT
EVALUATION.



































-NEW RIVER -_
"-l-4:t:ZrMCr" INcM 1Ct=T= I?










This was to be the first major development in the
city and in the historic district and occurred
between 1904 and 1918.
The railroad crossing for vehicular traffic
which was constructed in 1913, allowed convenient
movement to and from the area which is now the
historic district. This development opened the
district to commercial establishments and event-
ually lead to the period of the second majar dev-
elopment in the area between 1918 and 1928. The
structures that resulted from this period af dev-
elopment were of little or no architectural or
historical value. The character representeI by
the buildings and their locations, lend a sup-
portive role to the scale and character of the
predominately residential portion of the district
that is located to the south.
The Bryan structures which exists in the area
today were influenced by the development of the
railroad and were later to be preserved by its
presence. The development of the city after 1915
was to move toward the east and away from the
district. The barrier imposed by the railroad
along with the opening of the bridge to the beach
and the opening of Dixie Highway to the cities
to the north caused this shifting of the city's
development.


SITE EVALUATION


HISTORIC DISTRICT
EVALUATION.


































-NEWV RIVER










Very little change has occurred in the district
since 1928, this has allowed it to retain much of
it's early character.
The shift of the city's development away from
it's place of origin and the river may reverse it-
self in time. The present economic trends and the
move for revitalization ot the city's downtown
area may cause rediscovery of the once popular
river front land.
The preservation of the historic district and
the surrounding areas of significant value will
depend on a city preservation plan and the future
development that is allowed in the area that will
allow it to retain it's character.


SITE EVALUATION


HISTORIC DISTRICT
EVALUATION.


































-MNEW RIVER









SITE EVALUATION


STRUCTURES SURROUNDING
THE SITE AND SIGNIFICANT
STRUCTURES OF THE AREA


Photographs of the
structures are located on
the following and can be
identified by the numbers
on the map.




























-NEWA RIVER


I-



















































I iI


SITE EVALUATION


STRUCTURES SURROUNDING
THE SITE AND SIGNIFICANT
STRUCTURES OF THE AREA
1. REED A. BRYAN RES.
2. TOM M. BRYAN RES.
































SNEW RIVER
HISTORIC IVIUSEUIV








SITE EVALUATION


STRUCTURES SURROUNDING
THE SITE AND SIGNIFICANT
STRUCTURES OF THE AREA
3. NORMAN RESIDENCE
4. APOLLO AUTO PARTS




























LNEW RIVER
-HISTORIC rM I E U





LNEW RIVER J
SL I Ir' l''" I 'D3 CP P- Ip


_~_ ~~


SITE EVALUATION


STRUCTURES SURROUNDING
THE SITE AND SIGNIFICANT
STRUCTURES OF THE AREA
5. GEORGE MURGATROYD RES.
6. MISCELLANEOUS RES.


I






























S-lr p i


m T-
; Ii


I


SITE EVALUATION


STRUCTURES SURROUNDING
THE SITE AND SIGNIFICANT
STRUCTURES OF THE AREA
7. BIVEN'S MOTOR CO.
OFFICES
8. BIVEN'S MOTOR GARAGE

























-NEW RIVER C
-i-nC-n nr PC!= or%,"


r


I-;


17J pt
li Al


__


77-
~ e~an- Avii


- - _~_ ___~


s
























-Mi z


THRIFT STORE


I'I.


SITE EVALUA


i!


STRUCTURES SURROUNDING
THE SITE AND SIGNIFICANT
STRUCTURES OF THE AREA
9. BIVEN'S AUXILIARY
GARAGE
10. C. E. PARKS CASH STORE


-NEW RIVER
--nF;T-nC* v~Juptrurvt


TION







SITE EVALUATION


I- THE SITE AND SIGNIFICANT
STRUCTURES OF THE AREA
11. T. M. BRYAN BUILDING
12. HIIM4ARSHEE BUILDING


























lNEVV RIVER


I !


i __


--







































I[51 ; ....
- 1


|fl ,


__


1CI


SITE EVALUATION


STRUCTURES SURROUNDING
THE SITE AND SIGNIFICANT
STRUCTURES OF THE AREA
13. P. N. BRYAN RES.
14. KING-CROMARTIE RES.

































-LNEW RIVER
- p as 9** o- o" 0 e 01- P. - p- I





S ...... . .
* .'*-


Ia


fl~


--


m


--- --


I r


SITE EVALUATION


STRUCTURES SURROUNDING
THE SITE AND SIGNIFICANT
STRUCTURES OF THE AREA

15. NEW RIVER INN








































-NEW1 RIVER-
- v-c=T-r r now tirl Inn








SITE ANALYSIS
TABLE OF CONTENTS


A. Location As To City
B. Accessibility To Site (Macro And Micro)
C. Local Traffic Patterns (Auto And Pedestrain)
D. Zoning
E. Present Land Use (Macro And Micro)
F. Commercial Aspects Of The Area
G. Riverwalk And Significant Structures
H. Roof Contours And Utility Poles
I. Major Building Of The Surrounding City
J. Vegetation
K. Parking
L. Climate


0


SITE EVALUATION


L NEW RIVER ,
-HISTORIC VIUSEUMVI





r I .


SITE EVALUATION


LOCATION WITH RESPECT TO
MAJOR SURROUNDING AREAS.






































--NEW RIVER








SITE EVALUATION


ACCESS FROM METROPOLITAN
FT. LAUDERDALE.



KEY
----- Major Artery

--- Secondary Artery

SDirect Access



























-NIEW RIVER













E l L1 ~ I~ 1


SITE EVALUATION


ACCESS FROM THE
SURROUNDING NEIGHBORHOOD.


KEY
Vehicle Traffic

Pedestrian Traffic


NEW R


-----





I -


SITE EVALUATION


VEHICULAR TRAFFIC VOLUMt ,
DAILY.



KEY
Z Major Traffic Flow

12,000 Traffic Count






























-NEW RIVER








SITE EVALUATION


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC
VOLUME, DAILY.



KEY


-zzzz~



7-ZL2
7//Z;


Major Traffic Flow

Under 50

50 to 100

100 to 200

200 to 400


-NEW RIVER '


I- -
















I I


I I


SITE EVALUATION

EXISTING ZONING.



KEY
A-1 Agriculture
R-1 Single Family Res.
R-2 Two-Family Res.
R-3-A Multi-Family 25 u/a.
R-3-B Multi-Family 15 u/a.
R-3 Multi-Family 25 u/a.
R-4 Multi-Family 60 u/a.
R-0 Residential/Office
B-1 Business (General)
B-2 Business (Intensive)
B-3 Business (Heavy)
M-1 Industrial District
S-1 Recreational Dis.
H-1 Historic District




-NEWV RIVER_








SITE EVALUATION


PRESENT LAND USE,
MACRO-SCALE.


KEY

WF///////A


Residential


I Retail/Commercial

mmm Offices

k\\\\ Parking

I 1 Vacant

I Open Recreational

Goverment/Semi-
Public Institution

















-NEW RIVER











Ul
.4 N.W. 3rd. St.

i-
ui


I7


mU


0
z


0 100 200

i I


SITE EVALUATION


PRESENT LAND USE,
MICRO-SCALE.


kiq


Single Family Res.
Multi-Family Res.
Retail/Commercial
Heavy Industry
Community Service
Govermental/Public


I KNEWRIVER_____


Se w


E~ ~a


-NEW RIVER


in


I


KEY
m
vr^^
V//// A


FOClZ 7







IZ]





I"

DEP;


I


A e w


(oodw II

Antiques
Theatre
Restaurant
Misc. Shops


FtLaud. um




C3 n
DD r:
=Ezclz


/rr7
0 10 200


SITE EVALUATION


TYPE OF COMMERCIAL.


EW RIVER








SITE EVALUATION


PUBLIC RIVERWALK AND
ASSOCIATED SIGNIFICANT
STRUCTURES.


KEY


Existing Path


O Proposed Path




























L-NEW RIVER








SITE EVALUATION


ROOF CONTOURS AND UTILITY
POLES.



KEY

Utility Pole
--- High Tension Pole

e-e Cable Crossing Sign


























-NEW RIVER _








SITE EVALUATION


MAJOR BUILDINGS IN THE
DOWNTOWN AREA.


NEW RIVER -_








SITE EVALUATION


VEGETATION.







































-NIEW RIVER











El

N.W. 3rd. 3rd. St.

O L



a n Ln Wk





DI--


SITE EVALUATION


PARKING.


KEY
M Present
M7 Potential


U~~~~- NE IV R_____


fNEW RIVER








SITE EVALUATION


CLIMATE.



KEY

Wind

Sunshine

DATA

Climate, Sub-tropical
Marine
Latitude, 26 d. North
Yearly Sunshine, 3000 hrs.
Wind, Yearly Ave., .8 mph.
Rain Fall, Yr. Ave. 56.4"
Heaviest, June to Oct.
With 64%
Mean Winter Temp. 66.5
Mean Summer Temp. 84.5
Mean Yearly Temp. 75.5
Wind Direction,
Summer, From the S.E.
March to October
Winter, From the N.W.-E.
December to February



-LNEW RIVER








PROGRAM & SPACES PROGRAM & SPACES
TABLE OF CONTENTS


A. Administration
1. Director's Office
2. Reception/Secretary
3. Conference
B. Public
1. Exhibit
2. Research Library
3. Assembly
4. Lobby
5. Sales Area
6. Restrooms
C. Curator Spaces
1. Curator Office
2. Workshop
3. Live Storage
4. Dead Storage
5. Preperation & Restoration
6. Photography











LN-EW RIVER
-.--'w'--"- i r- 9 0-% 1% or 0. r- Fp. 0 P, p











The primary access to the site and the structure

is to be located on the North boundary which is

adjacent to 3rd. St. The location will become part

of the communities circulation network that is

centered around 3rd. St. The access point should be

conspicious and convenient to both vehicular and

pedestrain traffic.

An auxiliary access point is to be located at

the riverfront side of the structure. This will

be locked most of the time, since it is to be used

only for special occasions that are to take place

on the riverfront portion of the site and requires

access to the structure.


PROGRAIVI SPACES


ACCESS TO THE STRUCTURE






































-NlEW RIVER _
-HISTORIC MUSEUM


U i


I I I








PROGRAM & SPACES


Description,
The space will be used as a office by the museum
director in which he will conduct affairs pertaining
to the business and operation of the museum. The
director office will have direct access to the lobby,
the research library and the museum work spaces to
supervision.
The space will be located near the main front
entry of the building where it can best command the
various parts and functions within the museum. The
circulation path between the main entry and this
space will pass through the lobby, so it will pro-
vide a short and direct route that is easily located
and followed. This convenient route will allow a
visitor to locate the office logically without assis-
tance.
The conference space that is to be located ad-
jacent to the director office will occasionally be
used by the director as an extension of his office
space. Provisions will be made to allow an open
and closed condition between the two spaces.
A closet and private toilet will be provided
within this for exclusive use by the director.
The space will have a private and quiet atmos-
phere that is conducive to concentration and
private conversation.


Sq. Ft. 150
Small toilet
Coat closet
Natural light
































-INEW RIVER _


A-1. DIRECTOR OFFICE









SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


r#
H
,-1



U2CQ
P.1 U)


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STORE.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
1CECH. EQUIP.


1 1 2 2 3 2 4 5 3 3 3 4 3 4 5 3 4 5


o
0
E-0
01 r-a


-NEW RIVER ..-
-HISTORIC niVr FF IuVI


PROGRAM & SPACES









A-2. RECEPTION/SECRETARY


Description,
The space is to serve as a coordination center
for interaction between museum visitors, business
communications and the museum administration. The
space will also act as a control point for commu-
nication between the museum director and his staff.
The secretary within the space will monitor the
activity in the lobby and the research library as
well as direct researchers to the live storage
area. The location of the space will allow the
secretary to control all public entry to the live
storage so as not to allow too many persons to
enter it at a single time.
The atmosphere of the space is to be open to
promote visitor interaction as well as create a
pleasant work area. As a point of high visitor
interaction, this area should invoke the intended
character of the building.


PROGRAM & SPACES


Sq. Ft. 100



































-INEWV RIVER









SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


* E-4
- .-1
o


0 4
wW


o 0
0 0
M <
r CQ o


pi
v-1



M ,-


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STORE.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
MECH. EQUIP.


I o
o E-


0
04^


p
U) C1

11 Pz


01
PEF4 W H
O-0 0
E- E-< M
P4 0 mQ m
> U
0 En MM


1 1 2 2 3 2 3 5 3 4 2 4 4 4 5 3 5 5


-NEW RIVER
-HISTORIC V MI IrF-rLl


_ ____ __


PROGRAM G SPACES









A-3. CONFERENCE


Description,
The space will be used for conferences and
meetings related to museum affairs such as
director meetings, financial acquisition and
report meetings. It will also be used by the
director as an extension of his usable office
space.
The secretary will control access to this space
as well as provide information concerning meetings
in progress and those to be held in the future.
The atmosphere is to be quiet and private to
accommodate meetings and provide a pleasant area
in which to hold meetings that may last for sev-
eral hours.


PROGRAIV & SPACES



Sq. Ft. 200
Counter space




































-NEWl RIVER'


- -









SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


H


m0


IMruO~ 1


o
0 P
?1:1
K~r 0
0 W.

S0
0 ;


* *0



W P4
H 0 Oi


0 : .
1E-
0 4

W MM
(x~Ci M >
<< u cq
E^ M M


DIRECTOR OFF. 1 1 3 5 5 3 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP

LIVE STOR.
DEAD STORE.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
MECH. EQUIP.


* E-i
. p
rM4 W4

hW
M UZ
0 W


W4 0


--NEW RIVER
"-I5lT- fl-fl m cr/71yvy


PROGRAM G SPACES j







B-1. EXHIBIT AREA

Description,
The space will house exhibits that relate to
the history of Fort Lauderdale and the surrounding
areas. Popular displays may include large objects,
period displays, habitat groups and working demon-
strations. The displays will change periodically
over a one year period with the-length of each
exhibit varying at the discretion of the museum
staff and director.
The exhibit space is to be set up as a flexible
plan that will permit the use of removable interior
partitions and panels as well as display cases.
This allows full flexibility as to the manner in
which a exhibit is set up and allows a completely
different type of exhibit to easily replace the
previous one.
No builtin exhibits, display cases, architectural
ornamentation or any irregular space intrusions
shall be in the space. Pipes, ductwork and any
other mechanical equipment or it's accessories
will not be placed within the space in such a
manner that will obstruct the use of the space.


PROGRAM & SPACES


Sq. Ft. 3000
20' high ceiling





























-IMNE\EW IVER'


-------------------------`--I-----


11











Natural light is not to be used in this space
where it may hamper the ability of the staff to
completely control light conditions of the displays.
Complete climate control is to be maintained within
the space at all times.
The exhibit space is to be located adjacent to
the lobby and near the main entry of the building.
A separation is to exist between the two in order
to provide a socializing point near the entry of
the exhibit area that will not disturb visitors
viewing the exhibits.
The workshop and preparation spaces are to di-
rectly adjoin the space to allow ease of movement
between them. An 18 feet high by twelve feet wide
door is to connect the spaces to allow tall objects
or displays to be moved in while in the up right
position.
The atmosphere of the space is to be open and
quiet with the building's fabric drawing as little
attention as possible. Atmospheres are created and
altered by the museum personnel to suit each specific
exhibit.


PROGRAM & SPACES


NEW I RIVER -


-









SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES. PROGRAM & SPACEmS




E-i
*(M H O -
OO * 0 E-

0- W F1 E 0 E --i W MM
F- 4 O E OO E--i rM M
P 4; 0 M ft 'a -1 U) OD u ? 4 U) P; U)

DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT 2 3 4 5 5 1 2 5 2 3 4 5 1 3 5 3 5 0
RESEARCH LIB.


ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STORE.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
MECH. EQUIP.


-NEW RIVER_
-HISTORfC vriL r '-rn- -


_ r








PROGRAM & SPACES


B-2. RESEARCH LIBRARY


Description,
This space will house written material related to
the history of Fort Lauderdale, the surrounding area
and other related matters. The material will be used
by researchers as well as casual readers.
Indirect natural light is to be provided within
the space to accommodate reading and writing.
The space shall be located near the fromt of the
building in a location that can easily be found as
one enters the lobby. Its entry point should be under
the control of the lobby and in close proximity to
the reception space so the access can be monitored
and controlled to keep out disturbances and undue
noise.
The curator and the live storage space is to be
easily accessible from the library to allcw research-
ers to further explore a topic within the stored
artifacts and materials. Access between the two is to
be controlled by the reception/secretary space for
security and to minimize unnecessary use of the
stored materials.


Sq. Ft. 1200
Newspaper storage
Photograph storage
Map storage






























-IEWA RIVER
HISTORIC IVUSEUVI


I --












The space is to have a quiet, private and pleasant
atmosphere that is conducive to concentration and
leisurely type reading. A open sense is to be exper-
ienced within the space with an abundance of natural
light creating a light and airy atmosphere-


ai


-NEW RIVER
HISTORIC IVUSEUIVI


PROGRAM & SPACES








SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


ri4c
& 0 0
w

'El-
u-4
HWU
1-1 M


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STOP.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
MECH. EQUIP.


04 0 R
m >i R4 o o 0
Si1 O KO PE-4 r4

W P t E-i i p op
U) U) m .1 tL m r> r4 0
w Q- 0 <4 w 0 C = I
t R~ ~ OH o p
o .


0 P

EH i-
>u
M M
W >
UZ pj U~


2255 51 4335 24 5 5 5 4 4 5


-NEW RIVER'
-HISTORIC IVIUSEUFVI


I I II_ _I
-I


PROGRAM & SPACES
PRGA..I..~.








B-3. ASSEMBLY AREA


Description,
The space is to be used primarily for educa-
tional and recreational functions which require
a group assembly seating arrangement of up to
150 persons. The functions will include lectures,
motion picture presentations, public meetings
and large scale museum business conferences.
The space will also be used for public work-
shops and various public oriented programs pre-
sented by the museum. The multi-use possibility
of the space requires the use of nonfixed seating
and a flat floor without any provisions for a
elevated stage area.
The space will be periodically rented to pri-
vate organizations or persons outside of the
museum interest to provide increased income for
museum funds. The use of the space may occur
after the museum exhibit area has been closed
for the day. This will require a security sep-
eration to exist between the two spaces. The lobby
and restrooms are to remain open to the assembly
occupants while the remainder of the museum is
closed.


I II


PROGRAM & SPACES



Sq. Ft. 1400
Non-fixed seating

































-NEW RIVER-
-HISTORIC IVUSEUMV







PROGRAM SPACES

Due to-the small scale of the assembly area no
box office, projection room or stage area will be
required.
The assembly area is to be in close proximity to
the main entry for convenience and ease of access.
It will connect directly to a main portion of the
lobby area, this will provide a socializing area
at the entry point of the assembly sjace.
The assembly area is not to be located directly
ahead as one enters because this slace is not to
compete with the importance of the museum exhibit
area.
The space is to exhibit an atmosphere that is
quiet and compatible with the functios that will
occur within this space.

















_-INEW RIVER _
HISTORIC MUSEUM









SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


. p
F-4 MA
00M
W 0
^ ^
(- Ei
U (l< M P
M H ^ M
K U
M M0
Q C U


(4 0z4 4 W QQ
S* 00 E-i E- H

) U) m tQ o w t < 0
fr 1 ,- O W4 --- f- CIt p; > Im U
M 13 0 5 Wa 0 '


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY 3 2 5 5 5 2 5 2 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 0
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STORE.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
MECH. EQUIP.


-NEW RIVER R
-H-ITrOJ I V1. Fl'lrFLLIV


PROGRAM & SPACES





B-4. LOBBY


Description,
The lobby is to act as the introduction
point to the building and as the transition
space between the open outdoors and the confines
of the structure. The major public circulation
path of the building is to be contained within
this space which will form the circulation link
that leads from the main entry to the research
library, the assembly space and the exhibit space.
Public access to the administration offices
and museum staff work areas is to be controlled
by the reception/secretary space. The admin-
istration spaces are to be in close proximity
to this space to allow visitors and business
contacts to easily locate it.
The space will be of sufficient size to accom-
madate the occupants of a full assembly meeting
olus the average exhibit and research library
population.
When the assembly area is to be used after
the exhibit area has been closed for the day,
the building is to allow the lobby to remain
open with full use of the entry point and the
public restroom facilities.


Sq. Ft..1000

































-NEW RIVER' _
HISTORIC IVIUSEUIV


II


PROGRAM SPACES











The space is to be open and airy to provide
a strong relationship with the outdoors. This
will attract the public into this space and as
a result introduce them to the museum itself.
Natural light and openess is to play a strong
role in the humanization of this space as well
as reflect the character of South Florida.


-I


-NEW RIVER
HISTORIC IVUSEUMV


PROGRAM & SPACES









SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


P4O 0


0 H
=- 1


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STORE.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
MECII. EQUIP.


PH

uroP


2 .1 2 1 1 1 1 1 4 5 5 55 5 5 5 5 5


I I


NEW RIVER
HIS-._TORIC lVI


I -


PROGRAM G SPACES








PROGRAM & SPACES


B-5. SALES AREA


Description,
The sales area will provide books, small artifacts,
souvenirs and miscellaneous material related to the
history of the area that can be purchased by the museum
visitors. This is not to be a financially supportive
element of the museum but more a service and means
to stimulate public awareness of the area's history.
The space will be monitored at all times by a
museum employee.
The space will be a part of the lobby or in direct
proximity to it. It should be easy to locate as one
leaves the exhibit area and convenient to the main
circulation in'the lobby and near the main entry.
The atmosphere is to be conducive to the display
of sales items and open to promote browsing.


Sq. Ft. 100



































NEW RIVER









SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


*E-

4W
0u


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STORE.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
M ECH. EQUIP.


H .
Q0 E4
P 4 0 0 Q U
0 00
0 yO 0 0 O p 01


M d 1:0. o4 WLP4 P44


E-i Ep

*M W
0 H

1O M4
fx > U
E H M --M
PI -!3


4252231 34555555555


--NEW RIVER
-H'Wl- TC-7I( nVI Pqrc- irvia


PROGRAM G SPACES








PROGRAM & SPACES


B-6. RESTROOMS


Description,
The structure is to contain two sets of restroom
facilities. One is to be located in the public por-
tion of the building and the other is to be located
in the workshop areas to serve the museum personnel.
The handicapped will be accommodated in the public
restrooms as stipulated in applicable codes.
The visitors are to be provided an easy access
route to the spaces which should logically be placed
near the lobby space. Discretion is to be used in
providing a location that is not overly obvious to
the point that it creates a conspicuous use.
The staff restrooms are to be positioned in a cen-
tralized location within the work spaces to provide
easy access.
Access to the public restrooms is to be maintained
when the assemble area is to be used after the museum
exhibit area has been closed for the day.
The spaces are to be more humanized than the
standard public restroom. A light and airy char-
acter is to provide a pleasant space that is a
pleasure to use.


Sq. Ft. 400
Handicapped


































LINEW RIVER _








SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


r' W

0EU M
wE-4
oU O

MMO
KU SU


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STOP.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
-ECH. EQUIP.


1~


0 0
0 r 0 E E 4 W
0 0 1 tU) Lo m
>i tQ 4 p VI 0
w 0 W M ; MK
i0l fy U = P 04 P0


I


W O-
E-tf E(f


44352213 5555555555


PROGRAM & SPACES


-NEW RIVER .
--HIS-TnRnIr' rVt c;RF-_-VI


-ii









C-1. CURATOR OFFICE


Description,
The space is to contain three work stations
that are to be used by the museum curators. The
function of the curators is to coordinate the
design and installation of displays, the catalog-
ing and recording of new items and assisting
persons from the research library that are using
the live storage space as a further source of
research.
The work area is to contain a desk with temp-
orary storage for records and small exhibit items.
The workshop, live storage, preparation space
and the directors office are to be in close pro-
ximity to allow ease of communication.
The space is to have natural light and a
source of outdoor involvement to humanize it's
atmosphere. This will contribute to a pleasant
working space.


- '1


'V


PROGRAM & SPACES



Sq. Ft. 350



































-NIEW RIVER
HISTORIC IVIUSEUIVM









SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


*E-


NNP HI
rX4 M r
0 W t-4


Up4 Mpq
W PF
wM0MM
HWuaW
MM0^M~


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STOP.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
MECH. EQUIP.


0 4 0 0 am!
0 0 t0 1.l
SE- Pr4 E-
0 << > 5 0 M M 1W
rn t p
Od zi


w *
0 pq

opc-

M 1)1
I Iv
Putf2 u


2 3 5 2 3 5 3 5 5 1 1 3 1 1 3 1 3 5


I 4


~7N


PROGRAM & SPACES


NEW RIVER-
"IcTI-rr-1pr3 rv (r\I c t r_ n


II


~_





1II


C-2.. WORKSHOP


Description,
The function of this space is to be the work area
where the display cabinets and miscellaneous items
used in the museum exhibits are constructed. Minor
building maintanence and major restoration of large
objects is to also be carried out in this space.
The space is to be used by experienced carpenters
to provide services such as;
cabinet and millwork
painting and finishing
light machine and sheet metal work.
Lumber is to be stored in a portion of the space
which must accommodate lumber up to twenty feet in
length.
A major concern is the control of noise generated
within the space and the required connection with the
exhibit space.
A close connection is to exist between this space
and the receiving area to allow easy transfer of
construction materials.
An eighteen feet high by ten feet wide door is
to connect this space with the preparation area and
the exhibit area to allow transfer of tall objects.


EL


PROGRAM & SPACES


Sq. Ft. 1200
Considerations,
Dryness
Dust
Vermin
Theives
18' High access door
Lumber storage
Machinery

























-NEW RIVER
-- L PPe_""%P nP1 0 ":- % pp












The space is to be quiet and closed to the surround-
ing to contain it's own noise, fire and diat. Good
natural light is to also be in the climate controlled
space.


PROGRAM & SPACES


--NEW RIVER 7
- 1 c PP 1 U D- *


El









SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


.^ p
-4
fc< W
0U
pq
w U
WH
I\ M E
E E-U 1 0
PU P MP
M |i
wu a a


S0< p P
-- Er o E-I E0 H
cn o K; C

E-0O<4 W q q E- Wf1

<- rO O < M O
f

DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP 3 4 53 55 5 5 5 1 1 2 1 3 2 1 4 5
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STORE.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STOP.
MECH. EQUIP.


--NEW RIVER
HISTORIC VIURSEUMV"


_____~~~__


__ __


PROGRAM SPACES









C-3. LIVE STORAGE


Description,
This multi-use space is where collections are
available for study in conjunction with the re-
search library and the present exhibits. It is
where newly received items are cataloged, recorded
and temporarily stored until they are moaed into
dead storage or to the work spaces to be used in
an up coming display. The space also contains
collections and artifacts related to the existing
displays. This allows interested visitors to be-
come more involved with the subject matter of the
existing displays.by closely inspecting related
subject matter that was not included in the main
exhibit.
Storage will consists of racks containing items
related to the exhibit as well as material storage
boxes. The system will consists of two feet wide
metal shelves and miscellaneous file and storage
cabinets.
The research library and the preparation/research
space as well as the workshop are all to have easy
access to this space. Access from this space to the
research library is to be monitored by the receptio-
ists.


m -u


PROGRAIV & SPACES


Sq. Ft. 1000
Storage units



































-NEW RIVER
L_ II C_ Il P1V 1% 1 & n OTr P C-r r-- !P %A


~III












The space is to have a business like atmosphere
that doesn't encourage extended visitor interaction.
This will minimize theft and accidental damage to
the articles. The temperature and humidity within
the space are to be controlled by the museum staff.


PROGRAIV & SPACES


NEW RIVER /
r. r~ t -


______________________________~









SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


rn
H
'-4
HO-1
H
P u
M F
cq *^
M M


* E-i
(. p


w 0~
W W
0W 0
0\ M


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STORE.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
MECH. EQUIP.


o fr o o C
0 0 [ cU' 0' (
> tI K -i o 0

0 U) Q. O o o,


0

E H

w u)
tJ)~U)
pw ^ f
K M W
U)> 0l


3 4 5 2 2 5 2 5 5 1 1 2 1 2 3 1 3 5


----- -i- ~~----- -------if


Ia a


PROGRAM & SPACES


NEW RIVER__
HI53TORIC M VIUEUMI








PROGRAM & SPACES


C-4. DEAD STORAGE


Description,
Exhibit material not related to the present dis-
play is stored within this space as well as business
records that are older then one year that concern the
museum.
All types of exhibit items are to be stored in
this space from large objects the size of Indian
canoes to very small objects.
Portions of the area are to contain built in
metal shelving and storage cabinets.
The space is to be in close proximity to the
workshop, the preparation/restoration area and the
live storage area. Newly cataloged items are period-
ically transferred to this area and may be later re-
located to the workshop or preparation/restoration
are to be used in a future exhibit.
The location of the space is to be isolated from
the public areas of the building due to security
and the infrequent use of the space.
The space is to be completely controlled by the
staff in reguards to light, temperature and humidity.


Sq. Ft. 1200
Min. 40% exhibit sp.



































NEW I RIVER
r ~ -~ *- r- r









SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


* E-i
U ,
W w

w 0Q
9 VI '


m 0 MW
W b -* E-0




wn 0 <4 w
0- Q O Cr O ?' PAtW
I< 0 0/3 EOJ O IE ;


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STOR. 4 5 5 3 4 5 5 5 5 3 2 2 1 3 5 3 5
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
MECH. EQUIP.


c-)

'-I

u)


NEW RIVER _
-MIF;TORIC IVRc F-lrVT


PROGRAM & SPACE


S








C-5. PREPARATION/RESTORATION


Description,
The preparation of displays is to be the pri-
mary function of this space. They are then relocated
to the exhibit area at the time exhibits are to be
rotated.
The restoration of display items that have been
damaged and require refinishing is to also be
carried out in this space.
The space is to be adjacent to the exhibit
area to allow easy transfer of displays into this
area. The workshop, live storage, dead storage and
the curator space are to be in close proximity to
allow easy transfer of items required for new dis-
plays. The curator will supervise display construc-
tion and organization during the periods of display
rotations.
The space is to be open to allow the staff and
curator full freedom to design the plan to best
suit their changing needs.


*1


Sq. Ft. 400
Storage shelves
3 to 4 staff































-NEW RIVER
-HISTORIC IVIUSEUMVI


PROGRAM & SPACES





II i f


SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


*E-4
Frx
O"

0 U

H W
1-1 M


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STORE.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
ICECH. EQUIP.


O6-~


0 S 0
0 0 s
fH &


3 4 5 1 4 5 5 5 5 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 3 5


PROGRAM SPACES


-NIEW RIVER -
-HIRTORIC: I IPFrUVI


V .1


N

:4 1-4 tQ








PROGRAM & SPACES


C-6. PHOTOGRAPHIC SHOP


Description,
This space is used only by the museum staff to
produce photographic work that is to be used in the
displays. The preparation/restoration area is to be
in close proximity so photographic work relating to
a upcoming exhibit can be easily coordinated and
transferred.
It is to also provide a photographic record of
all existing and newly acquired museum items.
The space is to be organized to provide efficient
use and at the same time provide a wall that can be
used to produce poster size enlargements.
The space will include sinks and counter space as
required for proper photo work in addition to .places
where various equipment can be stored and a shelving
system for storage.
A small closet is to be include within the space
to house the main stock of photo supplies.
The space is to be closed to any natural light
and outside disturbances. A locking system will be
provided at the access point to control security.


SI.


Sq. Ft. 200






































-NEW RIVER
- 11 PP R 0- n I0 r- r-P F F -


ii





El


SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS &9 PRIORITIES.


. E-4
f-4 W I
EA Mo r
OU tQS

E-i E^ =; M K

M WM W W M
w 0 w5 fc U: p) 0J<
M 0 fW Fe -: #-4 M^


0 E-


0 H
= M


-o
O0

Ef W
8 .P;
r1 4P
<( (L
M KI


E-I M
r5 o



>W U
M1 ,


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS

CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STORE.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO 4 4 5 3 4 55 5512 1 2 2 3 3 5
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
-MECH. EQUIP.


PROGRAM G SPACES


INEEW RIVER
"-P.:IT~ RIC rVI FRF = FVI





D-1. RECEIVING


Description,
The receiving area is to be the distribution
point for deliveries and pickups of the entire
building. It is to accommodate both cars and trucks
as well as delivery persons on foot.
Easy access to the workshop area is required
to accommodate lumber which may be up to twenty
feet in length.
A dock is to be located in front of the load-
ing door that will be accessible to trucks, cars
and walking persons. The dock is to be a minimum
of ten feet wide and ten feet tall and contain
a flight of stairs.
A portion of the dock is to have a permanent
weather protection canopy while the remaining
area is to have facilities to accommodate a
temporary canvas truck canopy.
The space is to be located at the back or
side of the building to avoid public interaction
and observation.
The space shall have access to the workrooms,
the research library and all other spaces requir-
ing service. Most frequent deliveries will be
directed to the workshop and the live storage
area.


S~ II


Sq. Ft. 200
Ramp
10' Access door
Flight of stairs
Exterior loading sp.





























-NEW RIVER
HISTORIC IVUSEUM


PROGRAM & SPACES









SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS & PRIORITIES.


EH
Po


fW 0
g. (X4


DIRECTOR OFF.
RECEPT/SECRET
CONFERENCE
EXHIBIT
RESEARCH LIB.
ASSEMBLY
LOBBY
SALES
RESTROOMS
CURATOR OFF.
WORKSHOP
LIVE STORE.
DEAD STOR.
PREP/RESTORE
PHOTO
STAFF REST.
RECEIVING
SERVICE STORE.
MECH. EQUIP.


H

g~t47-

too:


2 4 3 4 2 1 1 42 1


-NEW RIVER
-HI STOR:IC rVIUEUIV1


_ __


__


PROGRAM & SPACES




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs