Title: Historic Gainesville, Incorporated and their association with the City of Gainesville, Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00099615/00001
 Material Information
Title: Historic Gainesville, Incorporated and their association with the City of Gainesville, Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Mills, Jerry W.
Publisher: Jerry W. Mills
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 1975
 Subjects
Subject: Historic preservation
Gainesville, Florida
 Notes
General Note: Written for AE601/621, Preservation Law Seminar
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00099615
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text











HIJTil-C GAliESVILiLE Ii UORPO1AiTED
AMD
THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH

THE CITY OF GAINESVILLE,. FLORIDA,.















PRESERVATION LAvW SEI3E~AR
AE 601/621


JERRY V. I'iILLS
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ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION


OF


HISTORIC CAINESVILLE, INC.



We, the undersigned subscribers, hereby associate ourselves

together to form and establish a corporation, not for profit,

under the applicable law of the State of Florida.



ARTICLE I

NAME


The name of this corporation shall be HISTORIC GAINESVILLE,

INC., and its principal place of business shall be 406 Northeast

Fifth Avenue, Gainesville, Florida.



ARTICLE II

PURPOSES


The purposes for which this corporation is organized are as

follows:

S 1. To seek preservation, rehabilitation, restoration,

*maintenance and acquisition of important natural, scenic, historic,

and architectural sites and structures.

2. To define areas as historic districts defined as areas

containing important structures, sites, or other incidences -


'"i\\ '














necessitating the preservation of the areas' essential character-

istics, as defined in area surveys, for the benefit of Alachua

County and its citizens.

3. ,o promote and finance studies of architectural, historic,

scenic sites and structures and other significant studies in

Alachua County and to promalgate the findings and results of such

studies.

4. To furnish educational information to citizens of Alachua

County about their heritage.

5. To enter into contracts and to carry out such programs

and activities as will accomplish the foregoing purposes and to

do all legal things in pursuit of these objectives.

6. To accept grants to accomplish the purposes of the

corporation.

7. In order to promote the purposes of this corporation,

it may acquire property by grant, gift, purchase, devise or

bequest and may hold and dispose of such property as the corporation

shall require to carry on its purposes.

8. Said corporation is organized exclusively for charitable,

educational and scientific purposes. No part of the net earnings

of the corporation shall inure to the benefit of or be distributable

to its members, directors, officers, or other private persons,4

except that the corporation may be authorized and empowered to

pay reasonable compensation for services rendered and make payments

and distributions in futherance of the purposes set forth in















Article--II hereof. No substantial part of the activities of the

eerporation-shall be. the-carrying on' f propaganda, or otherwise

attempting to influence legislation, a4d the corporation shill not

participate in, or intervene in any political campaign on behalf

of any candidate for public office., Notwithstanding an-y.--other

provision of these articles, the corporation shall not carry on

any other activities not permitted to be carried on (a) by a

corporation exempt from Federal Income Tax under Section 501 Cc)(3)

of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 (or the corresponding

provision of any future United States Internal Revenue Law) or

(b) by a corporation, contributions to which are deductible under

Section 170 (c)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 (or the

corresponding provision of any future Unites States Internal

Revenue Law).

9. Upon the dissolution of the corporation, the Board of-

Directors shall, after paying or.making provision for the pay-

ment of all liabilities of the corporation, dispose of all of the

assets of the corporation exclusively for the purposes of the

corporation in such manner or to such organization or organizations

organized and operated exclusively for charitable, educational,

religious or scientific purposes as shall at the time qualify

as an exempt organization or organizations under Section 501

(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 (or the corresponding

provision of any future United States Internal Revenue Law), as

the Board of Directors shall determine. Any of such assets not
















so disposed of shall he disposed of.by distribution to the

Federal Government or to a state or local government for a public

purpose.

10. To coordinate with other groups, public or private,

involved'4in preservation of heritage wherever located.



ARTICLE III

POWERS


In order to accomplish the aforesaid purpose of this corporation,

the corporation shall be authorized and is by these articles of

incorporation authorized to acquire, own, lease and hold such real

and personal property and improvements thereon as may be necessary

or convenient for the accomplishment of the corporate purpose as

set forth in these articles of incorporation and to improve, develop,

use and occupy same; to sell, convey, exchange, lease, mortgage,

rent or otherwise dispose of same at will. This corporation is

further authorized to do any and all other lawful acts which a

natural person or a corporation may do which are necessary, con-

venient, expedient or conducive to the proper and successful

accomplishment of the purpose hereinabove set out, and in general

shall possess all rights, privileges, and immunities, and enjoy
I. -
.all the benefits granted to corporations of similar character

under the laws of the State of Florida.
-













5


ARTICLE IV

MEMBERSHIP


The members of this corporation shall be all of the original

subscribers hereto, the original officers, the original directors

and such other persons as are elected to membership by the Board

of Directors.



ARTICLE V

TERM


The term for which the corporation shall exist shall be

perpetual unless sooner dissolved according to law.



ARTICLE VI

SUBSCRIBERS


The names and addresses of the subscribers to this character

are as follows:


NAME


ADDRESS


Sam V. Mace


Mary Barrow


John B. Pickard


620 Boulevard
Gainesville, Florida

224 N.E. 10th Avenue
Gainesville, Florida

406 N.E. 7th Avenue
Gainesville, Florida

















NAME


Wilse Bernard Webb


A@brey L. Williams


Samuel C. Gowan


ADDRESS


405 N.E. 4th Avenue
Gainesville, Florida

608 N.E. 5th Avenue
Gainesville, Florida

406 N.E. 5th 'Avenue
Gainesville, Florida


ARTICLE VII

OFFICERS


.The officers of this corporation shall consist of a President,

Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer and such other officers

as may be found necessary and authorized by the by-laws.

The officers of the corporation shall be nominated and elected

by the Board of Directors provided in the by-laws, and shall hold

office for one year or until their successors are elected and

qualified.

The officers who are to serve until their successors are

elected and qualified are:


Office


Name


Address


President


Vice-President


Samuel C. Gowan


John B. Pickard


406 N.E. 5th Avenue
Gainesville, Florida

406 N.E. 7th Avenue
Gainesville, Florida















Office Name Address


Secretary Mary Barrow 224 N.E. 10 Avenue
Gainesville, Florida

Treasurer Sam V. Mace 620 Boulevard
SGainesville, Florida



ARTICLE VIII

BOARD OF DIRECTORS


The government and management of the corporation shall be

vested in a Board of Directors consisting of not less than five

(5) nor more than fifteen (15) members who shall be appointed,

elected and selected as follows:

A. The President, the Vice-President, the Secretary, and the

Treasurer shall be members of the Board of Directors during their

respective terms of office.

B. The directors shall be elected annually by the membership.

The nomination and election of these directors shall be in the same

manner as that of the officers of the corporation. At the first

annual meeting of the corporation members of the Board of Directors

shall be elected from the membership; one group shall be elected

to serve one (1) year and one group will serve two (2) years.

At annual meetings thereafter replacement members of the Board

of Directors shall be elected to serve a term of two (2) years.

Should a vacancy occur among the directors, the remaining

directors may elect a director to serve for the unexpired term.

















A majority of the Board of Directors shall constitute a

quorum at any meeting and a majority of those present and acting

at any meeting may take any action the directors are authorized

to take.

All nominations and elections shall be conducted as provided

in the by-laws of this corporation. The officers and directors

of said corporation shall serve without salary or financial

remuneration of any kind.

The annual meeting of the corporation shall be held during

the month of October of each year.

The directors, in addition to the above named officers, who

are to manage the affairs of the corporation until their successors

are elected are:


Name Address


Sara Drylie 6603 N.W. 18th Avenue
Gainesville, Florida

John Sanderson 4420 N.W. 14th Place
Gainesville, Florida

John B: Opdyke 1760 N.U. 14th Avenue
Gainesville, Florida

Richard A. Kendzior 718 N.E. 5th Terrace
Gainesville, Florida

Jane Myers 1024 N.E. 4th Street
Gainesville, Florida
N > .. .I .-.'' i. ^ < P ^ 1< ; ***''* `';* li*: *lLC i .






















ARTICLE IX

BY-LAWS N .- 'r. V

The original by-laws of the corporation sha be those framed

for the corporation prior to its incorporation, andaapproved prior

to the incorporation by all present members. The by-laws may be

altered, amended or rescinded upon a two-thirds vote of the Board

of Directors of the corporation present, ratified by a majority

of all members present and voting at any regular or duly called

special meeting.



ARTICLE X

AMENDMENT OF CHARTER


These articles of incorporation may be amended in the manner

provided by law. Every amendment shall be approved by the 2/3

Board of Directors, proposed by them to the membership, and approved

by a two-thirds vote of all members present and voting at any

regular or called meeting, provided all members have been notified

of the proposed amendment thirty (30) days in advance of the meeting.















BY-LAWS OF HISTORIC GAINESVILLE, INC.


ARTICLE I NAME


This corporation shall be known as HISTORIC GAINESVILLE,

INC., a non-profit Florida corporation.



ARTICLE II OBJECTS


The purposes for which this corporation is organized are as

follows:

1. To seek- preservation, rehabilitation, restoration,

maintenance and acquisition of important natural, scenic, historic,

and architectural sites and structures.

2. To define areas as historic districts defined as areas

containing important structures, sites, or other incidences -

necessitating the preservation of the areas' essential character-

istics, as defined in area surveys, for the benefit of Alachua

County and its citizens.

3. To promote and finance studies of architectural, historic,

scenic sites and structures and other significant studies in

Alachua County and to promalgate the findings and results of such

studies.

4. To furnish educational information to citizens of Alachua

County about their heritage.














5. To enter into contracts and to carry out such programs

and.activities as will accomplish the foregoing purposes and to

do all legal things in pursuit of these objectives.

6. To accept grants to accomplish the purposes of the

corporation.

7. In order to promote the purposes of this corporation,

it may acquire property by grant, gift, purchase, devise or

bequest and may hold and dispose of such property as the corporation

shall require to carry on its purposes.

8. Said corporation is organized exclusively for charitable,

educational and scientific purposes. No part of the net earnings

of the corporation shall inure to the benefit of or be distributable

to its members, directors, officers, or other private persons,

except that the corporation may be authorized and empowered to

pay reasonable compensation for services rendered and make payments

and distributions in futherance of the purposes set forth in

Article II hereof. No substantial part of the activities of the

corporation shall be the carrying on of propaganda, or otherwise

attempting to influence legislation, and the corporation shall not

participate in, or intervene in any political campaign on behalf

of any candidate for public office. Notwithstanding any other

provision of these articles, the corporation shall not carry on

any other activities not permitted to be carried on (a) by a

corporation exempt from Federal Income Tax under Section 501 (c)(3)

of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 (or the corresponding

provision of any future United States Internal Revenue Law) or





















(b) by a corporation, contributions to which are deductible

under Section 170 (c)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954

(or the corresponding provision of any future United States

Internal Revenue Law).
9. Upon the dissolution of the corporation, the Board of

Directors shall, after paying or making provision for the pay-

ment of all liabilities of the corporation, dispose of all of the

assets of the corporation exclusively for the purposes of the

corporation in such manner or to such organization or organizations

organized and operated exclusively for charitable, educational,

religious or scientific purposes as shall at the time qualify

as an exempt organization or organizations under Section 501

(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 (or the corresponding

provision of any future United States Internal Revenue Law), as

the Board of Directors shall determine. Any of such assets not

so disposed of shall be disposed of by distribution to the

Federal Government or to a state or local government for a public

purpose.

10. To coordinate with other groups, public or private,

involved in preservation of heritage wherever located.
















ARTICLE III MEMBERSHIP


Classes of Membershin. There shall be eight classifications

of membership in this corporation; namely, Student, Renter,

Individual, Family, Institutions, Business, Donors, Patrons and

Life.

A. Students. Student membership in the corporation shall

be comprised of those individuals who are enrolled as a full-time

student in any institution of learning. Student members shall

pay annual membership dues of $2.50 payable on the calendar year

and shall be entitled to all the privileges of the corporation.

B. Renter. Renter members shall be those individuals who

reside in Alachua County, Florida, and who do not own real

property in Alachua County, Florida. Renter members shall pay

annual membership dues of $2.50 payable on the calendar year and

shall be entitled to all the privileges of the corporation.

C. Individual. The individual members shall be those

individuals who reside and own property in Alachua County, Florida.

Individual members shall pay annual membership dues of $5.00

payable on the calendar year and shall be entitled to all the

privileges of the corporation.

D. Family. Family memberships shall be available to

individuals living together and comprising a family as the same

is traditionally recognized. Up to four (4) members of the same

family may become members of the corporation upon payment of
















$10.00 annual membership dues payable on the calendar year and

shall be entitled to all the privileges of the corporation.

E. Institutions. Institutional members of the corporation

shall be comprised of non-profit organizations. Institutional

members shall pay annual membership dues of $20.00 payable on the

calendar year and shall be entitled to all of the privileges of

the corporation.

F. Business. The business membership shall be made up of

those business enterprises in the community who pay annual

membership dues of $20.00 payable on the calendar year and shall

be entitled to all the privileges of the corporation.

G. Donor. Donor members shall be those persons, associations,

organizations or enterprises who contribute at least $100.00 per

calendar year to the corporation. Donor members shall be entitled

to all the privileges of the corporation.

H. Patron. Patron members shall be those persons,

institutions, organizations or enterprises who contribute at

least $500.00 per calendar year to the corporation. Patron members

shall be entitled to all the privileges of the corporation.

I. Life. Life members are those persons, associations,

organizations or enterprises who contribute at least $1,000.00

and request life membership or donors of $1,000.00 or more of

property shall be eligible for election to a life membership by

the Board of Directors.











6



ARTICLE IV MEETINGS OF MEMBERS -



Section 1 Annual Meeting. The annual meeting of the

membershPf of the corporation shall be held during the month of

October. The members shall be notified by the Board of Directors

as to the exact date, time and location. Purposes ofthis meeting

shall be as follows:

1. The election of the Board of Directors for the ensuing

year, all of whom shall take office immediately following

election;

2. The distribution of any certificates or'awards of merit

for outstanding service;

3. Such other matters as may be stated in the notice of

the meeting, or as approved for discussion by 2/3 of

the members present.


Section 2 Regular Meetings. The annual meeting shall be

the only regular meeting of the membership.


Section 3 Special Meetings. Special meetings may be held

at the call of the President or by written request of the Executive

Committee members of the Board of Directors.

Section 4 Notice. At least five days notice in writing of

each meeting, whether annual, regular or special, shall be mailed

to each member of the corporation at his usual place of business

or residence.















'Section 5 Quorum. Ten (10) percent of the regular member-

ship shall constitute a quorum. Proxies may be counted in

determining a quorum and any member of the Board of Directors

may cast proxy votes.



ARTICLE V BOARD OF DIRECTORS



Section 1 Number and Term of Directors. The business,

property, and affairs of this corporation shall be managed by

a Board of Directors. The number of Directors may vary from

time to time, but shall never be more than fifteen (15) nor less

than five (5). Each Director shall hold office for the term

for which he or she is elected.

Section 2 Classification of Initial Directors. At the

first annual meeting following approval of these by-laws, the

members of the Board of Directors shall be divided into two

classes. The members of the first class shall hold office for

a term of two years. The members of the second class shall hold

office for a term of one year and thereafter all Directors shall

be elected for a term of two years; provided that nothing herein

shall be construed to prevent the election of a Director to

succeed himself. Provided further, however, that no Director

may serve for a period of more than ten years consecutively.

A Director may be re-elected after a one year hiatus after

serving for a period of ten years.















Section 3 Duties of the Board. The Board of Directors

shall transact all business of Historic Gainesville, Inc.

It shall determine the policies, fiscal matters, and.in general

assume responsibilities for the guidance of the affairs of the

corporation.

Section 4 Time of Meetings. Annual meetings of the Board

of Directors shall be held at least five days, but not more than

two weeks after the annual meeting of the membership each year

* and shall he called by the President of the corporation. Regular

meetings of the Board of Directors shall be held on the Fourth

Thursday of January, March, liay, July, September, November, and

at such times and places as the Board of Directors may fix. Other

or substitute meetings of the Board of Directors may be held upon

the call of the President pr by written request of at least three

members of the Board of Directors. Notice of each meeting of the

Board of Directors shall be given by the Secretary to each Director

not less than five days prior to the meeting unless each Director

shall waive notice thereof in writing before, at or after the

meeting.

Section 5 Vacancies. Vacancies on the Board of Directors

shall be filled by election by the remaining Directors. Each

person so elected shall remain a Director until a successor has

been elected by a vote of the membership present, who may hold

such election at their next annual meeting, or at any special

meeting duly called for that purpose.















Section 6 Power to Elect Officers. The Board of Directors

at their annual meeting shall elect a President, Vice-President,

Secretary and Treasurer. The Board of Directors shall have the

power to appoint such other officers from the membership of the

Board as the Board may deem necessary for the transaction of the

business of the corporation. The Board shall have the power to

fill any vacancy in any office occurring for any reason whatsoever.

Section 7 Removal of Directors, Officers and/or Employees.

Any Director, officer and/or employee may be removed by the Board

of Directors whenever, in the judgment of the Board, the best

interest of the corporation will be served thereby, by a majority

vote of the Board of Directors. Failure to attend three consecutive

meetings shall constitute automatic termination of membership on

the Board of Directors for any Director.

Section 8 Delegation of Powers. For any reason deemed

sufficient by the Board of Directors, the Board may delegate any

power or duty of any officer or Director to any other officer or

Director, but no officer or Director shall execute, acknowledge or

verify any instrument in more than one capacity.

Section 9 Power to Appoint Committees. The Board of

Directors shall have the power to appoint Committees, (the chair-

man of.which shall be member of the corporation). Only the

Board of Directors shall have the power to appoint committees.

Section 10 Annual Reports. The President and Treasurer

shall present their respective reports of the operation of the















corporation for the preceding year at the annual meeting of the

Board of Directors or the membership.



ARTICLE VI OFFICERS


Section 1 Officers. The officers of this corporation shall

be-elected from the membership of the Board of Directors of. the

corporations They shall consist of a President, Vice-President,'

Secretary and Treasurer. Each officer shall be elected to hold

office for a period of one year.

Section 2 President. No person shall be elected to the

office of President who has served less than one.year as a member

of the Board of Directors. This provision shall not apply to

the person who is first elected President of the corporation.



ARTICLE VII VOTING


All members of the corporation in good standing shall be

entitled to one vote for each $5.30 increment of dues paid up to

a maximum of four votes. Students and Renters shall have one

vote. Voting may be in person or by proxy and proxy shall count

toward constituting a quorum.







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THE STUDY: DEFINITION AND GOALS


Recognizing the significance of the.Hotel Thomas to the City of Gainesville and recognizing that the
building was in very real danger of demolition, the Alachua County ACTION 76 Steering Committee and
Historic Gainesville, Inc. undertook to determine if there were alternatives to demolition. Although
once a successful and popular hotel and community meeting place, the Thomas had in recent years ex-
perienced a decline and, in 1968, ceased operations. The building was then leased to Santa Fe Commun-
ity College for use as a classroom facility. The owners of the property indicated that the Hotel and
its six acre site would be offered for sale in -June of 1974, at the expiration of the lease with the
College. In view of the fact that practical reuses for the building were not evident on the surface,
its removal and replacement with a new and more marketable structure appeared to be inevitable.


Convinced that the demolition of the Hotel Thomas would represent the loss of a major historical and
architectural element of Gainesville, and convinced that a serious effort must be made to explore the
possibilities for preserving the building by adapting it to serve a viable new function in the com-
munity, Historic Gainesville, Inc. secured a purchase option-on the property and commissioned the
preparation of a Preliminary Feasibility Study for Renovation of the Hotel Thomas by Richard D. Tarbox
Inc., Planning and Design Consultants of Gainesville. The Tarbox study balanced the construction re-
quirements and attendant costs against the anticipated revenue to be derived from the lease of space,
and concluded that, contingent upon the meeting of certain criteria, "it appears that the project can
be made self-sustaining and that further study and planning are warranted". Based on these findings
and recommendations, the Alachua County ACTION 76 Steering Committee commissioned National Heritage
Corporation to prepare this Programming and Feasibility Study for the Preservation of the Hotel Thoma'


It has been the intent of this Study to examine the physical and economic components of a project to
rehabilitate and reuse the hotel. The study has been divided into four distinct categories as follows











The hotel property was studied and evaluated in terms of physical characteristics, accessibility,
zoning and building code regulations and potential for adaptation to meet the requirements of a
new program.


Building Considerations


The hotel building was surveyed, studied and evaluated in terms of general condition, structural
condition, character and extent of available space, building code regulations, restoration and
rehabilitation requirements and potential for adaptation to meet the requirements of a new pro-
gram.


Economic Considerations


Specialized analysis was undertaken to identify potential uses for the property, consistent with
the physical characteristics of the building. Financial analysis was undertaken to translate
elements such as revenues, cost of operations, financial capital cost and other considerations
into an equation demonstrating feasibility or lack thereof.


Conclusions


In consideration of all the factors covered in the foregoing categories, conclusions were reached
and set forth.


To carry out the economic analysis portion of the Study, National Heritage Corporation retained the
services of Gladstone Associates, Economic Consultants, of Miami, Florida.








The Hotel Thomas is situated in a Residential-Professional district (R-P) which extends westward. To
the north and east, the site is bounded by a single family-high density district (R-1C), and to the
south by a multiple family-high density district (R-3).


The zoning in and around the Hotel Thomas area has been studied with specific regard to those adaptive
uses which have shown the most evidence of feasibility. The following excerpts from Chapter 29 of the
Gainesville Code of Ordinances have been selected and entered for their particular bearing on the dir-
ection of this project:


Sec. 29-37. Residential-professional districts, RP


Paragraph 1C Business and professional services, excluding the retail sales of goods and
commodities and excluding personal services.


Paragraph 1D Churches, schools, clubs, lodges, studios including dance, music and art, and
customary accessory buildings incidental thereto.


Paragraph 1E Hotels. motels, or motor courts of not less than one hundred (100) guest
rooms as contemplates by Chapter 561.20 (2), Florida Statutes, 1961, and which are in ex-
istence as of the date of the passage of this section (June 5, 1967,, may secure any of the
licenses referred to in Chapter 4 of the Gainesville Code of Ordinances, Series A, B, C, D,
E, F, and G, and be entitled to operate a business dispensing alcoholic beverages permitted
under such license, including a nightclub, provided no outside entrance normally open to the
public (this does not prohibit emergency or service entrances or exits) to the room or rooms
dispensing alcoholic beverages shall be permitted, and no sign shall be located on the licen-
sed premises visible to the outside indicating that alcoholic beverages are sold or consum-
ed at such hotel, motel, or motor court.


Off-street parking and loading facilities.


Sec. 29-17.








gest work shift.


Paragraph 8c All accessory and public parking lots shall be hard surfaced with asphaltic
concrete or concrete and shall be maintained in a usable dust-proof condition and graded
and drained to dispose of all surface water. The developer of such parking lots is encour-
aged to landscape turn-around islands and other spaces not utilized for parking.


Paragraph 8d All accessory and public parking lots shall be lighted after dark through-
out the hours when they are in use by the public. Such lighting shall not exceed an inten-
sity of five feet (5 ft.) candles nor shall it be less than one and one-half feet (1 ft.)
candles at pavement level. The installation of such lighting shall be so hooded or shield-
ed as to reflect the light away from abutting or neighboring property.


Paragraph 8e All accessory and public parking lots shall be separated, from the side and
rear lot lines of adjacent land zoned RE, R-la, R-lb or R-lc by a continuous masonry wall
in accord with provisions of section 29-39.


Sec. 29-22 Temporary sales for fund-raising by non-profit agencies where such sale is conducted with
or as a special event and for a specified time period.


The intent of this section shall be to permit the sale of goods and may include the use of
a building or parcel of land for such sales, by nonprofit institutions such as churches,
schools, and fraternal societies, where such sales are clearly incidental to the primary
function of such institution and the use of the premises where such sale is conducted witr
or as a special event and for a specified time period.

Sec. 29-75 Required landscape installation.


Sec. 29-76 Applicability new and existing developed areas.











All applicable sections of Chapter 29 of the Gainesville Code of Ordinances have been considered even
if not specifically noted herein. All proposals set forth for the preservation of the Hotel Thomas and
the site it occupies are in compliance with zoning regulations with the exception of the restaurant and
adjacent cocktail lounge (see Sec. 29-37). Because the building no longer houses a hotel, a restaurant
dispensing alcoholic beverages is not technically permissable. However, because there is precedent as
recently as 1968 for this type of operation within the same confines, and because preliminary inquiry
t:. evidenced favorable response to the possibility of re-establishing a restaurant at the Hotel Thomas
it is likely that a variance can be obtained. The Board of Adjustment would require necessary appli-
cation procedures. Confirmation of approval should be obtained prior T- any further undertakings con-
cerning this aspect of the project.


Landscaping requirements described in sections 29-75 and 29-77 are extensive, and have been thoroughly
studied in relation to existing features and proposed site work. All landscaping proposals indicated
on the drawings or referred to in the text of this study are in compliance with zoning regulations, and
often exceed minimum requirements. Particular attention has been giver, to the design of the parking
area with respect to zoning.


Due to the nature of the Hotel Thomas project thus far, and because much of the effort and interest in
its preservation has been motivated by the concept that zoning is a protective device rather than an
impediment, most of the applicable zoning requirements are effectively working in the community. The
particular zoning circumstances involved, along with well planned adaptive usage of the building, could
produce far-reaching benefits for the city of Gainesville.


AVAILABILITY OF WATER AND SEWER












which represent recent additions should be removed. These are:


1. Sun rooms above the south Loggia and matching portecochere on Building 'A'.
2. Sun room above the western connecting passage between Building 'A' and Building 'B'.
3. Enclosure on the west porch on Building 'A'.
4. Additions to the north porch (ground floor) of Building 'A'.


BUILDING CODE COMPLIANCE


Preliminary floor plans with revisions of the Hote7 Thomas were submitted to Mr. Tom Henley, Chief of In-
spection for the City of Gainesville. Certain requirements, as documented in the Southern Standard Build-
ing Code, must be complied with and approved prior to the alteration of usage or the physical appearance
of the Hotel Thomas. Although the building could not technically meet all Code requirements, Mr. Henley
expressed his belief that it could receive approval if the proposed modifications are executed properly.
However, modifications indicated on the proposal drawings have not been officially approved, and cannot
be without complete specifications and working drawings. Fire ratings and related specifications have
been considered in the design of the various modifications but are not detailed in this study. Because
the Hotel Thomas is an existing building, it can be assumed that a certain degree of non-conformance to the
Southern Standard Building Code will be allowed. Because the roofs of the two connecting passageways are
not extensions of the main building roofs, and because they butt directly into masonry, the possibility
of fire-spread between Buildings 'A' and 'B' is greatly reduced. This fact should have significant bear-
ing on any official decisions made by the Board of Inspections in the future.


The following tables indicate pertinent Code requirement status of the Hotel Thomas:









Building 'A'
SSBC Classification E-2-VI
Usage: Small Assembly
Construction: Wood Frame with Stucco Veneer


SSBC
Requirements


5,000 sq. ft.
None Allowed
None Allowed


Exits Required


Exit Units Required @
75 occupants/unit of exit


Hour Fire Rating


Max. Distance of Egress


Exit Width Min.


2 remote



5 units


2 hour


150'


36" min.


7,845 sq. ft.
5,793 sq. ft.
318 sq. ft. (1)


3 remote (2)



7 units


To be enclosed (3)


50' max.


36" min.


3rd floor not to be used.
1 exit to be added as 2 hr.
exit ways to be sealed with fire rated partitions and self closing fire doors.


Stories Allowed
Area Allowed
1st


Hotel
Thomas








BuP nQ '-' 0
SSB Classification B-i-V
Usage: Office
Construction: Solid Masonry Exterior Walls, Wood Frame Interior Partitions


Stories Allowed
Area Allowed
1st
2nd
3rd


Exits Required


Exit Units Required @
60 per/unit @ 22"


Hour Fire Rating


Max. Distance of Egress


Exit Width Min.


SSBC
Requirements


5


17,000 sq. ft.
12,000 sq. ft.
6,000 sq. ft.


2 remote



6 units


1 hour


150'


36" min.


Hotel
Thomas


3


12,000 sq. ft.
10,000 sq. ft.
7,000 sq. ft.


4 remote



7 units


To be enclosed (1)


50' max.


36" min.


(1) exit ways to be sealed with fire rated partitions and self closing fire doors.








*-: regents to be met to satisfy SSBC:


1. Exit enclosures for existing exits.


2. Additional exits
A. From Kitchen
B. 2nd Floor Building 'A'


3. Non-use of 3rd floor Building 'A'.


4. Use of fire rated materials where required.


5. Exit signs throughout, lighted in Building 'A'.


6. Exit illumination, Building 'A'.


7. Manual fire alarm system in Buildina 'B'.


8. All doors to require exits made fire rated and self-closing.


Not required but advisable would be:


1. Fire, smoke and heat detectors throughout.


2. Fire alarm (manual) added in Building 'A'.


3. Emergency lighting in corridors and exits in both buildings.


4. Fire extinguishers placed throughout both buildings.






ST ESTIMATES


The following cost estimates were prepared in cooperation with Mr. John C. Ritch, General Contractor
of Gainesville. The estimates are based on the scope of required construction work set forth in the
preceding section, and represent the most realistic picture of anticipated costs which can be estab-
lished at this time, based on known conditions.


BUILDING A


General Construction including structural repair, exterior restoration,
interior rehabilitation, new heating, ventillating, air conditioning,
mechanical and electrical systems -------------------------------------------$437,320.00


Restaurant Kitchen installed -----------------------------------------------------$ 40,000.00


Carpet or other floor cover throughout ------------------------------------------$ 18,411.00
*TOTAL $495,731.00

* This figure represents a unit cost of $20.65 per square foot.


BUILDING B


General Construction including structural repair, exterior restoration,
interior rehabilitation, new heating, ventillating, air conditioning,
mechanical and electrical systems ------------------------------------------------ $525,980.00


Passenger Elevator (three floors) -----------------------------------------------$ 35,000.00


Carpet or other floor cover throughout --------------------------------------------- -$ 33,313.00

*TOTAL $594,294.00


* This figure represents a unit cost of $17.26 per square foot.






FINAL CONCLUSIONS O



Given Historic Gainesville's. limited financial resources, the equity requirements, as determined by
analysis, may make the project unfeasible for them, as an organization, unless substantial additional
funds can be secured through public contributions, foundation support and grants-in-aid from the
National Trust for Historic Preservation and from federal, state and local governmental agencies.

Several avenues do exist for achieving a reduction in total equity requirements of the project. One,
as previously mentioned, is the sale, to the city of Gainesville or to Alachua County, of the land-
scaped area on the west side of the building. This area would make a significant addition to the
city or county park system, and could provide additional revenue in the amount of $50,000.00 to
$100,000.00.

The concept of assigning a significant amount of space within Building "A" for non-profit organiza-
tions and civic activities is economically sound if such assignation stimulates sufficient contributions
to offset the loss of revenue resulting from lack of income producing leases. If contributions of this
magnitude are not forthcoming, serious consideration should be given to leasing an area, such as the
second floor, to one single tenant or a group of compatible tenants. There is a potential for 5600
square feet of new rentable office space available on the second floor, assuming that the unusually
wide corridors around the gallery can be incorporated in the usable floor area. If the open gallery
arcade were to be enclosed with glass, the resulting office suite would be the most elegant in the
building and should be able to demand a square foot lease of $6.00 or more per year. If this were the
case, the space would yield a net operating income of $18,760.00 per year which would support an ad-
ditional debt of $153,770.00 under the "probable" case analysis and $173,700.00 under the "best"
case analysis. Either of these figures would represent a significant reduction in the total equity
requirement and reduce the amount of funds to be secured through contributions and grants-in-aid.

In fact, if the average square foot rate for the lease of office space were escalated to $6.50 per
year under the "probable" case analysis or $5.75 per year under the "best" case analysis, the equity
requirement for acquisition and renovation could be reduced to zero. These escalated rental figures
are above the average for Gainesville but could conceivably be obtained due to the prestige location.














It would then be necessary to secure only the equity requirement, in the amount of approximately
$200,000.00, needed to cover shortfall in net operating income during the renovation and initial ab-
sorbtion period. This $200,000.00 could be further reduced by the sale of the landscaped park area
to the city or county, and leave a balance of funds to be raised at approximately $100,000.00 to
$150,000.00, a goal which could very well be attainable.


The key to the feasibility of the project for Historic Gainesville, Inc. is their success in reducing
the equity requirement by the aforementioned methods and by securing more favorable financing terms,
as outlined in Financial Analysis section of this study.


In the event that Historic Gainesville, Inc. is not in a position to achieve the equity requirement,
other means for preserving the Hotel Thomas will need to be explored. Among these might be the ac-
quisition and renovation of the building by the city of Gainesville and/or Alachua County to serve
as a public office building incorporating certain community facilities. Alternatively, attempts
could be made to identify private investors seeking tax shelter. The preservation of the Hotel Thomas
is a project which should have a high priority for the citizens of Gainesville and Alachua County.
The loss of such an important historical and cultural asset would be a major impediment to the pres-
ervation and revitalization of the historic northeast district, of which the Hotel Thomas is a
vital component, and would deprive the city and county of an important facet of their collective
identity.








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CRITERIA FOR DEVELOPMENT
WITHIN HISTORIC AREAS


Around each square and along virtually every street in this
historic area runs a thread of continuity. Structures of
every kind are related to one another. Some of the factors
accounting for this relatedness are obvious. For example, all
the buildings may be of the same height and groups of them
may have similar roof shapes and openings.


In other cases the relatedness may be more subtle, perhaps
a result of the relationship of construction materials such as
the brick and stone work.







































In still other cases it may be the result of architectural
details, as in the iron works on these related structures:
From an examination of the structures and spaces within
the Central Area General Neighborhood Renewal Area, it
appears that the elements of relatedness can be reduced to
sixteen items. Coupled with historic structures and
significant points of interest, they form the building blocks
for meaningful redevelopment of the historic area. The
sixteen design criteria are discussed in detail in a following
section.

PILOT NA TURE OF CRITERIA

It should be recognized that the attempt to isolate specific
design criteria by which proposed developments can be
judged is a subjective process at best. The sixteen criteria
described herein have been identified through an analysis of
the types of structures and spaces found within the outdoor
laboratory known as the Central Savannah Area. It may be
that experience gained through specific attempts to apply
the sixteen criteria will result in substantial alteration of
them. However, it is only through such a process that
meaningful standards can be derived.



















, APPLICATION OF CRITERIA


Within the historic area there is a predominance of similar
design characteristics in particular blocks and/or squares.
For example, a majority of buildings may have Savannah
grey brick, have similar windows and porches, and be three
stories in height. Even though there may be a variety of
characteristics, each localized area tends to have a
preponderance of special characteristics as well.

In order to preserve the integrity of the Old Savannah Area
and the more localized characteristics found in various parts
of the area, a number of design criteria have been developed
by which individual structures may be compared and
evaluated. The intent in developing these 16 criteria has
been to identify specific design elements which, if repeated
or echoed a sufficient number of times, will assure the
maintenance and preservation of the architectural and his-
toric character of the area. While providing guidelines for
the restoration of existing structures, use of these criteria
will also assure that new construction will blend reasonably
well with the present character of the area.
The design criteria identify 16 characteristics of relatedness;
each characteristic has been assigned a one-point value. In
order for a proposed structure or a remodeling of an
existing structure to be acceptable, it would have to achieve
an evaluation rating of at least six points, indicating that at
least six characteristics would be similar to those of a
majority of the structures in the immediate surrounding
area.

With the identification of these criteria, hopefully they will
become working tools for the developer, architect and
client. Ideally, they should be studied and evaluated before
design work begins so that the desired relationships can be
established as design objectives, properly relating the
individual building to the total environment.

In order for this process to function smoothly, clearly it
will be necessary for the City of Savannah to establish a
civic design commission or a historic area review board.
















CRITERIA


1. Height This is a mandatory criteria that new buildings be constructed to a height
within ten percent of the average height of existing adjacent buildings.


I HBI6HT


_1


1 1/2 WIDTH
F----------


KATIO rPKOrTION


1- 1 /2


2. Proportion of buildings' front facades The relationship between the width to height
of the front elevation of the building.






























WINDOSW PfrOPOKTIOl 2Z-1


3. Proportion of openings within the facade
windows and doors.


The relationship of width to height of


tHYTTHM I1/ I- 1 -1 I

4. Rhythm of solids to voids in frontfacade -- Rhythm being an ordered recurrent
alternation of strong and weak elements. Moving by an individual building, one experiences
a rhythm of masses to openings.






















'nn BQ "n "




IH''THM 4-1-4-1 -4


5. Rhythm of spacing of buildings on streets Moving past a sequence of buildings, one
experiences a rhythm of recurrent building masses to spaces between them.


RHYTHM I 1 S I


6. Rhythm of entrance and/or porch projections The relationships of entrances to
sidewalks. Moving past a sequence of structures, one experiences a rhythm of entrances or
porch projections at an intimate scale.































HATE.RIAL-
TEFATUL '
COL6oKr


/ E ItK
/ KAKEV JOINT
/ ED &K.,cRAY TrIM


. 7. Relationship of materials Within an area, the predominant material may be brick,
stone, stucco, wood siding or other material.

8. Relationship of textures The predominant texture may be smooth stuccoo) or rough
(brick with tooled joints) or horizontal wood siding, or other textures.

9. Relationship of color The predominant color may be that of a natural nma rial or a
painted one, or a patina colored by iine. Accent or blending colors of Irim is also a actor.


10. IRelatioslhipq o archilclural details Details may include cornices, lintel, arches,
cluoins, halslilt ades, wrought iron work, chimneys, etc.
































11. Relationship of roof shapes The majority of buildings may have gable, mansard, hip,
flat roofs or others.


WALLS LANlSCAPlIN coNTINU.OUS


12. Walls of continuity Physical ingredients such as brick walls, wrought iron fences,
evergreen landscape masses, building facades,or combinations of these,form continuous,
cohesive walls of enclosure along the street.

13. Relationship of landscaping There may be a predominance of a particular quality
and quantity of landscaping. The concern here is more with mass and continuity.

















(:rqCLNJNrP C-VCFRI-N


14. Ground cover There may be a predominance in the use of brick pavers, cobble
stones, granite blocks, tabby or other materials.








II MI nocT


UNIT'S Ofr SALt


15. Scale Scale is created by the size of units of construction and architectural detail
which relate to the size of man. Scale is also determined by building mass and how it
relates to open space. The predominant element of scale may be brick or stone units,
windows or door openings, porches and balconies, etc.


c00

VEkTICAL-


HUI 7OZNTAL


S6. Directional expression of front elevation Structural shape, placement of openings,
and architectural details may give a predominately vertical, horizontal or a non-dircctional
character to the building's front facade.




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