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Geologic Map of the Eastern Portion of the U.S.G.S. 1:100,000 scale Gainesville Quadrangle, Northern Florida ( FGS: Open...
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 Material Information
Title: Geologic Map of the Eastern Portion of the U.S.G.S. 1:100,000 scale Gainesville Quadrangle, Northern Florida ( FGS: Open File Map Series 94 )
Physical Description: Map
Language: English
Creator: Green, R.C., Evans, W.L. III, Paul, D.T., and Scott, T.M.
Publisher: Florida Geological Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, FL
Publication Date: 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
System ID: UF00099548:00001

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Open-File Map Series No. 94-01
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GEOLOGIC MAP OF TI

GAINESV





RICHARD C. GREEN, P.G. #1776


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Undifferentiated Quaternary Sediments
Light brown to tan, medium to fine quartz sand with variab
unconsolidated to poorly indurated. This unit may contain
organic.





Trail Ridge Sands
The Trail Ridge sands consist of white to tan, medium to f
to slightly indurated. They contain an average of 3 percent
approximately 45 percent are titanium-rich minerals consis
common heavy minerals include staurolite, zircon, kyanite,


Undifferentiated Tertiary/Quaternary Sediments
White to gray to orange to blue-green, fine to coarse grain
sandy clays and clays with variable admixtures of organic
sediments are siliciclastics that are separated from the Und
on the basis of elevation (Scott, 2001). Pleistocene sea lev
100 feet (30.5 meters) above MSL (Colquhoun, 1969). Th
Pleistocene but include sediments reworked during the Pie
aeolian deposits.




Cypresshead Formation
The Cypresshead Formation is a mottled reddish-brown to
to poorly consolidated, fine to very coarse grained, variably
sands are common within this formation. Discoid quartzite
mollusks are often present.


Hawthorn Group
Coosawhatchie Formation


The Coosawhatchie Formation consists of gray to bluish-g
grains, and limestone to dolostone. Lenses of relatively pu
uncommon. This unit is lithologically variable and units m
and vertically. Outcrops of Coosawhatchie Formation in th
and the lithology consists of reddish-brown to white, claye
leached phosphate grains and limonitic and calcareous peb


Ocala Limestone
White to cream-colored, fine to coarse grained, poorly to v
fossiliferous limestone (wackestone, packstone, and grains
Ocala may be dolomitized. Fossils include the foraminifer
miliolids, bryozoans, mollusks, echinoids, crabs, and algae


This map was created using FDEP databases and data obtained from the Florida Geologi
30, 2005, by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Resource
Geological Survey, Geological Investigations Section. This document was prepared fort
information shown and is not intended to replace site-specific or use-specific investigation
does not guarantee this document to be free from errors or inaccuracies and disclaims an
inappropriate change of scale or interpretations or decisions based thereon. Cooperative]
Survey and the U.S. Geological Survey, National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Progra
number 04-HQ-PA-0003. The views and conclusions in this document are those of the a
as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the U.S. C


For more information please contact:
Richard C. Green or David T. Paul
Florida Geological Survey
903 W. Tennessee Street
Tallahassee, Fl. 32304-7700
850/488-9380 Bas.


Projection: FDEP Albers HARN Norti
emap: Georeferenced TIF ofU.S.G.S. l:100,000-sc


S2 30' il)"


R Is E


The near surface geology of the eastern portion of the U.S.G.S. 1:100,000 scale Gainesville
a complex sequence of carbonate and siliciclastic sediments ranging from Eocene to Holocene i
factors, including fluvio-deltaic deposition, marine deposition, dissolution of underlying carbon,
a result ofeustatic changes in sea level, and structural features, have influenced the geology oft
Numerous karst features are present in the area. Just west of the study area, the Suwannee I
basins and their tributaries contain at least 55 documented springs, including 9 first magnitude s
a minimum average flow of 100 cubic feet per second, or 64.6 million gallons per day). Many o
significant increases in pollutants, particularly nitrate, in the last few decades (Jones et al., 1998
Scott et al., 2004; Means and Scott, 2003). The recharge areas for many of these springs are bel
Of particular concern are the locations of numerous swallets in the area. A swallet is defined as
disappears underground in a limestone region (Copeland, 2003). These karst features are of imp
water they receive flows directly into the Floridan Aquifer System without being filtered by ove
and agricultural areas, where surface waters often contain pollutants, they recharge our aquifer s
discharge from springs.
The majority of the swallets occur in areas near the Cody Escarpment where clayey sediment
been removed by erosion (Means and Scott, 2005). In the map area, the southern portion of the
along the western boundary of the Alachua Karst Hills extending southward to the eastern, soutt
of the Hawthorne Lakes Region (Scott, in preparation) or the southeastern and southern bound
(Puri and Vernon, 1964; White, 1970). The Florida Geological Survey, funded through the Flori
currently conducting a survey of swallets in and around the region. STATEMAP personnel are
the study area. To date 19 swallets have been located and catalogued in the map area. Detailed
lithostratigraphic units in this area provides critical data needed to help in future assessments of
systems to contamination in areas of swallet influence as well as determining where limestone is
Several structural, sedimentological and geomorphic variables have affected the geology oft
Arch, a structurally high area which affected deposition from the early Cenozoic through the 01
1977; Miller, 1986; Randazzo and Jones, 1997) is the dominant subsurface feature in the Florid
The axis of the Peninsular Arch extends from southeastern Georgia to the vicinity of Lake Okee
following a general northwest to southeast trend. The crest of the arch passes beneath Alachua
area and is highest just north of Alachua County in Union and Baker Counties. The arch was a
most of the Cretaceous Period and had Upper Cretaceous sediments deposited over it (Applin, 1
stable base for Paleogene carbonate deposition except during times of periodic land emergence
(Williams et al., 1977). The arch did not affect Neogene to Holocene sediment deposition (Will
The Ocala Platform is the most prominent structure affecting the near surface depositional an
environments within the area. The map area is on the northeastern flank of the Ocala Platform (
where the Ocala Limestone is at or near land surface. Hopkins (1920) originally named this fea
Vernon (1951) described the Ocala Uplift as a gentle flexure developed in Tertiary sediments w
trending crest. Because there is continuing uncertainty about the origin of this feature, Scott (19
Platform, rather than Ocala Uplift, since it does not have a structural connotation.
The Ocala Platform exerted its influence on Neogene sediment deposition, and Miocene sedi
are thought to have been deposited across the platform (Scott, 1988). Post-Miocene erosion, ho
of the Hawthorn Group from much of the crest of the Ocala Platform, exposing Eocene and Olil
Pirkle, 1956b; Espenshade and Spencer, 1963; Brooks, 1966; Scott, 1988). Undifferentiated sec
deposited on the exposed Eocene carbonates. These consist of residual clays, sands, and eolian
Pliocene to Holocene (Randazzo and Jones, 1997).
Vernon (1951) utilizing aerial photographs, first mapped fracture patterns throughout northern
Regionally, these fractures generally trend parallel to the axis of the Ocala Platform in a north'
A secondary system of fractures intersects these primary fractures at about 90 degree angles in g
southwest trend (Vernon, 1951). Orientation of stream meanders along the Suwannee and Santa
these fracture patterns may be a controlling factor in stream location. Lakes, sinkholes and othe
to be forming more commonly along these fracture trends (Williams et al., 1977).
Several relict Neogene and Quartemrnary coastal terraces, which developed as a result of fluct
documented in the study area. Healy (1975) recognized four marine terraces within the study ar
at elevations of 70 to 100 feet (21.3 to 30.5 meters) above mean sea level (MSL), the Sunderlan
terrace (MacNeil, 1950) at elevations between 100 and 170 feet (30.5 and 51.8 meters) above NM
elevations between 170 and 215 feet (51.8 and 65.5 meters) above MSL, and the Hazlehurst tenr
the Brandywine terrace (Cooke, 1939); the Coastwise delta plain (Vernon, 1942); and the Plioce
with elevations between 215 and 320 feet (51.8 to 97.5 meters) above MSL. Detailed discussion
marine terraces and relict shorelines have been attempted by many authors, including Matson ar
1939), Flint (1940, 1971), MacNeil (1950), Alt and Brooks (1965), Pirkle et al. (1970), and Hea
According to Scott (in preparation), the study area falls within four geomorphic districts: the
Okeefenokee Basin District, the Central Lakes District and the Barrier Island Sequence District.
subdivided topographically into five regional physiographic units (Scott, in preparation): the W
Karst Hills of the Ocala Karst District, the Southern Okeefenokee Basin in the Okeefenokee Ba
Lakes Region in the Central Lakes District and Trail Ridge in the Barrier Island Sequence (SeeI
discussion of these five units).
The Ocala Karst District is dominated by dissolution sinkholes producing a rolling topograpl
a thin permeable siliciclastic cover where downward percolating groundwater slowly dissolves t
to cover-collapse sinkholes and cover-subsidence features. Cover-collapse sinkholes form rather
failure of a cavern roof An excellent example of this is Devil's Millhopper, located in Alachua
Cover subsidence features generally occur in areas where the overlying siliciclastics are thick
the carbonates dissolve underneath. Typically, areas such as these have only a few shallow sink
movement of the siliciclastic overburden filling voids created by the slow dissolution of the und
sinking and resurgent streams, and caverns commonly occur within the Ocala Karst District.
The Okeefenokee Basin District is an area of low relief. Elevations, which decrease from thi
--^~ f,--_ '?/An C-14 01 _A~_ ') 7C- 1 ~t T; n 4 f 0 _4---\ h1--. TUPT T1. ^- -1,;,bl 1-^ x-


I


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----I


----l


07 0


0 0









Open-File Map Series No. 94-02
p


L IZ:;:>:<:Q?: :


Figure 1. Generalized Geomorphology with Scale 1:300,000
1:24,000 Scale Quadrangles.


FiLgure 2. Location of Cross-sections on OFNIS 94-(.)1 Geologic
N lap with 1:24.000 Scale Quadrangles.


Sea le = I:3000(1


LEGEND FOR GEOMORPHOLOGY


Ocala Karst District


The Alachua Karst Hills extend from Columbia County to Central Alachua County, with elevations ranging from
approximately 100 feet (30.5 meters) to over 200 feet (61 meters) above mean sea level (MSL) (Scott, in preparation).
The karst hills are well drained and formed in response to karstification of uplands covered by Hawthorn Group and
undifferentiated sediments.

Williston Karst Plain

The Williston Karst Plain, located on the eastern flank of the Brooksville Ridge (see Evans et al., 2004), extends eastward
to the Alachua Karst Hills and is underlain by the Ocala Limestone (Scott, in preparation). It merges to the northwest with
the Branford Karst Plain and Chiefland Karst Plain. Elevations of the Williston Karst Plain range from 50 feet (15.3 meters)
to 100 feet (30.5 meters) above MSL. A few outlier hills, composed of weathered Hawthorn Group sediments, are present
within this area and locally may exceed 150 feet (45.8 meters) above MSL. Much of the plain is well drained and a number
of springs occur within this area, mainly along the Santa Fe River.


Okeefenokee Basin District


The Southern Okeefenokee Basin lies to the south of the Lake City Ridge (which is north of the study area) and east of
the Alachua Karst Hills. Relief is variable in the southern basin with well-drained, low hills and intervening swampy
lowlands present due to the low permeability of the Hawthorn Group sediments. Elevations in the basin within the study
area range from 65 feet (19.8 meters) to 175 feet (53.3 meters) above MSL. In the map area, the basin is underlain by the
Coosawhatchie Formation of the Hawthorn Group and undifferentiated Tertiary/Quaternary siliciclastic sediments.


Central Lakes District
Hawthorne Lakes Region

The Hawthorne Lakes Region is bounded to the north in Bradford County by the Southern Okeefenokee Basin and the western
flank of Trail Ridge, and to the west in Alachua County by the Alachua Karst Hills and the Williston Karst Plain. The lakes
in the Hawthorne Lakes Region formed through karst processes and were modified by subsequent surficial erosion. The
surficial erosion has caused some of the formerly closed basins to develop outflow streams. Elevations in the northern portion
of the region range from approximately 100 feet (30.5 meters) above MSL for the water levels in the lakes to over 200 feet
(61 meters) above MSL on the hills. Relief generally decreases to the south. In the southern part of the Hawthorne Lakes
Region, elevations range from less than 60 feet (18.3 meters) to approximately 100 feet (30.5 meters) above MSL.


Barrier Island Sequence District
Trail Ridge

Trail Ridge is a 130 mile (209 kilometer) long sand ridge that extends southward from the Altamaha River in southern
Georgia to the southern parts of Clay and Bradford Counties in the northeast comer of the study area. The crest elevations
range from approximately 140 feet (42.7 meters) to 170 feet (51.8 meters) above mean sea level in Georgia to 250 feet
(76.2 meters) above MSL in the study area. The Trail Ridge sands consists ofunconsolidated to slightly indurated white to
tan, medium to fine quartz beach ridge sands containing an average of 3 percent heavy minerals in some areas, of which
approximately 45 percent are titanium-rich minerals, consisting of ilmenite, luecoxene, and futile. The average TiO2
content of these minerals is approximately 69 percent. Other common heavy minerals include staurolite, zircon, kyanite,
sillimanite, corundum, topaz, and tourmaline.

5 0 5 10 15 20 Miles
M


5 0 5 10 15 20 25 Kilometers


LEGEND FUR GEOLOGIC'NIAP



Undifferentiated Quaternar) Sedimients

Livhi hruu ito tinr. nied~un-itfine' quartz -'nd %% Ah anabIL a~iniirure; o cl.Nand L'rganic,. unc'n..olidated I,) poorly\
H'CdLtraiid liii' unit ia\~conta in *;i~nificauni .jinuunt, of c\arid -'rL.jnlc,.



Trail Ridge Sands

The Trail Ridi.eC;,and; co'ns'iL1of %% IiiL to Ian. nie1ditan t-, finec qiiarlz beach i rld'C;.nd;.ncon~ohdied it) d loiglitI\ indu~rated.
The-N~ conta Iin. i .eray2e ofI3 percent he. %\ Iiiirie akIn i i oline ai e. ; ~I:'[' Muchappi oi..Imnitel-I percentt are I I.n Iiun-.rich mineIirakI
Of ~ ~I Ilt:11*iilieriIe. ItI?~i~eIowe. and rLrnle Ot)her Commninol Iea'%\ iuiiiiaI~ include 'aLorolite. lirconI. k~anitie. Ain,1arilie.
cI 'rtiiduru. Iiipa?. and (L'Lol-ilai e


Uindifferentiated Teriiar% /QuaternarN Sediments

"~hite I,-% LTrJ\ it-% Lr.IIIL'10L bLICL'Treel. fIineIit., ciars'e gained. ce11Iclan to Lil foi 'I I fertIiLI' ~IJld'. 'and\ %cIJ\' iad claw.'
u ith \.inabie .idnojrure-; ofor-anilc-; Un~differentiat~ed lerilar, (,uaenixN edini1ent,'are that I'IC~ ia re sepairjted
f1-011 the LUndifferentiated (himrra~iar\ scdiniunt; sokI on thehC bI' i;-ofclc~ation I Scrti. 2'ol II Plc~,ci-icene ;ea IC'wI reached
.1 1113 \11111iii .111 1'ppr~\IA111 l % [i ll fI I eel 1 11, i IllllsiCC l ao \ e N I SL I ( I-Iq uhotiin. 19(191 These w' ned wl s I~ale C iredor'n~ina'iI
older ta PljlPeiqoiceie ie Ilel inlude .cdiiiin~niC"ie%%rLCLIdu~r1ing the CPlei~roene Thisuit Lia\l~.\ include flu\i~ al iand .ieoiiandeII


. presshead Formiation

The N.\pie~~iad FormfatIion I' anirorlied 'edd;Im-hr1ok Iit-,i' IddI~isi-oaflge I,, Ihae tIFICcon'oicdaied it) pooirI\ eon~,idaied.
fineC tol \er.\ cour- Lqainled. 3nahlC~\e. to cleani quiflt7 'aid Croi-beddeil anJd'are coninionL\%iti n11111 iil' 1rmidiL'I
Di.;coid quartz~ie pebble,;. mijca. and i.I1io ill ofnear~horerniollu-;k' Jre often pre,'eni


Coosa%%hatchie Formation orfthe Ha%% thorn Group

The (o;.% h''aw'hjieh Fomlvation ceon'i;.I;of er a\ t muhi~mh-gra\ aid,\ cla\ or clawe\ ;andd%\mmh pho~phate arain;. and lirne;,tone

and n. imnmm fl\ pinch outandi rfid -er NOmhlameralk and enil.~IIl\ ( )Lumerop;I-w' iio iiiIavk hh~imehmFonnammon in[i te .rtmd\ area
are r~pieaII\ -e!-\ \eamhered and the uimm1'Iu0 0 mmm'' llreddmihhbi,1 "% iito \%hmme. Claw\calcareotI '. qLI3II/ 'and'lI to ail~cl\a1
I% mit leached phorphipmae L-rammm' amd idtnioitrmc amtd edicareoum' pebhle'-


Ocala Linmestone

While Itocreamn-colomed. tine It, Coarse gritried. poor-,it, i%%~ellimndiiramed. pooi k. to '\%ell soied. fo..im~mier-OLm.I; 'nle.mon
I %kacke.toie. packsmome.aild Lyrammm1mP'w m. m1. Ila. jOinLmlolide cden mtdtileu. Lo\%er O calaIlmia.\ be doilomnmmmed Fuo'mik mclomde
the f1 .'amnum i feia I/& C['001_ I I / 1'I I'pamid H r ., i e al wo n ip~~m i iold.. hr q,070atr. 101U. t e I~ ch inImomdu. c raj'. anmd la


(I :~ ii IS 1' Nlie,


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OPEN-FILE MAP SERIES
(O.F.M.S.) PRODUCED UNDER THE STATEMAP PROGRAM


O.F.M.S. 83/01-07

SO.F.M.S. 83/08-12

m O.F.M.S. 86

m O.F.M.S. 87

m O.F.M.S. 88

I-I O.F.M.S. 89

SO.F.M.S. 90

SO.F.M.S. 91

SO.F.M.S. 92

m O.F.M.S. 93

(COU EN.F.M.S. 94
(CURRENT STUDY AREA)


N
DECLINATION DIAGRAM


o045S
13 MIL


1:100,000 Scale Quadrangle Index


LEGEND FOR FIGURE 2 AND CROSS-SECTIONS


LIZ



LIZ

LIII


Quaternary Undiff.

Trail Ridge Sands

Tertiary/Quaternary Undiff.

Cypresshead Fm.

Hawthorn Group Undiff.

Hawthorn Group,
Coosawhatchie Fm.


'y Interstate
S/ @ Primary / Secondary road

E Core

0 Cuttings

& Variable Interval

@ 10 Foot Interval

TD Total Depth
B.L.S. Below Land Surface


Ocala Limestone


/iV/


County Boundary

River or Stream

Lake or Pond


ii Wetland

l Sinkhole


1:24,000 Scale
Quadrangles


Projection: FDEP Albers HARN North American Datum 1983 (NAD83)
Basemap: Georeferenced TIF ofU.S.G.S. 1:100,000-scale metric topographic map of Gainesville, Florida


This map was created using FDEP databases and data obtained from the Florida Geological Survey. It was completed October
30, 2005, by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Resource Assessment & Management, Florida
Geological Survey, Geological Investigations Section. This document was prepared for the presentation of the geologic
information shown and is not intended to replace site-specific or use-specific investigations. The Florida Geological Survey
does not guarantee this document to be free from errors or inaccuracies and disclaims any responsibility or liablility for
inappropriate change of scale or interpretations or decisions based thereon. Cooperatively funded by the Florida Geological
Survey and the U.S. Geological Survey, National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program, under U.S.G.S. assistance award
number 04-HQ-PA-0003. The views and conclusions in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted
as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the U.S. Government.


**NOTE:

For more information please contact:
Richard C. Green or David T. Paul
Florida Geological Survey
903 W. Tennessee Street
Tallahassee, Fl. 32304-7700
850/488-9380


Geologic map and geologic cross-sections may appear to disagree slightly
when depicting the upper unit due to the convention of not portraying Qu /
TQu on geologic map unless it is thicker than twenty feet (6.1 meters).
Additionally, cross-section contacts are based on straight-line projection
between wells, which can lead to apparent thicknesses between wells on the
cross-section that are not supported by field evidence or other wells. Some
examples of this include: 1) the presence of TQu on the southern end of
D-D', but not on geologic map and 2) the depiction of TQu in the vicinity of
W-17498 on cross-section B-B', but not on the geologic map.


Alachua Karst Hills


GEOLOGIC CROSS-SECTIONS


**See Note Above


B
WEST


R18E R19E


1 W-17396
FEET METERS

200
7 60 ALACHUA


150 50
125 PROBABLE
125 40 SINKHOLE


TD=38'
B.L.S.


R19E R20E


1 W-5624 0 W-14556
UNIV. OF FL.
AG. FARM


W-16206


R20E R21E

W-4046 E W-16207


121 BUCK HATCHET HATCHET
BAY CREEK 225 (24 CREEK AUSTIN CARY
-MEMORIAL
FOREST


STD=230' TD=191'
B.L.S. B.L.S.
0 0.5 1 2 3 4 5 MILES
TD=-490'
B.L.S. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 KILOMETERS
SCALE
VERTICAL EXAGGERATION- 200 TIMES HORIZONTAL SCALE


-150 -50


R21E R22E

W-17498 W-1971


ORANGE
HEIGHTS
C3013 F' ,


B'
EAST
ALACHUA CO. PUTNAM CO.
R22E R23E

E W-14594


SANTA FE
LAKE


FEET METERS

200 -


150- 50

125 40

100
30
75
20
50

25 10

0 0

-25 -10

-50


TD=231'
B.L.S.


TD=175'
B.L.S.


-1501 -50


WEST


1 W-126
FEET METERS
175 60
175


150

125

100

75

50

25

0

-25

-50

-75

-100

-125


-150 -50


r\.


-20 1
TD=131
-30 B.L.S.

-40


D
NORTH
UNION CO. ALACHUA CO.
T06S T07S
V W-13733 v W-2701


FEET METERS
60
175

150 50

125 40


DS
SOUTH


T07S T08S
1 W-2966


W-17396


18) (236) (235 441


I III


T08S T09S
W-3640
SAN FELASCO HAMMOCK


v I IA I 'I


T09S TIOS


T10S Til S


W-13429 W-13095
775 26


W-12614

FEET METERS
1 60


KANAPAHA
PRAIRIE
I


\j IV ~ J


150 50

125 40


NORTH


SOUTH


BRADFORD CO.I ALACHUA CO.


T06S IT07S
W-1466 a W-16054 a W-15897


FEET METERS

175 60

150 50

125 40


T07S T08S


W-18622


SANTA FE RIVER
(285, 18 231 1 (225


p -


T08S T09S
( W-4046
HATCHET LITTLE
CREEK HATCHET24
CREEK


T09S T10S


GAINESVILI


I Ill ~ ~


T10S T11S
@ W-2447 E W-16204 W-15691 W-2504
LLE
34 (346) FEET METERS
PP 175 60
PAYNES PRAIRIE STATE PRESERVE


150 50

125 40


FEET METE


NORTH


T06S T07S
W-10488
CAMP BLANI
RS WILDLIFE MGMT
TRAIL RIDGE
MINTES


70
2007
60
175


Southern Okeefenokee Basin


----I


A A'
WEST EAST
ALACHUA CO. BRADFORD CO. BRADFORD CO. CLAY CO.
R18E R19E R19E R20E R20E R21E R21E R22E R22E IR23E
FEET METERS 5 W-2701 5 W-2600 E W-15897 E W-14280 E W-16145 W-10488 FEET METERS
250 W-14255 W-17325 TRAIL RIDGE MINES 250
80 80

225 225 8
S70 70
200 SANTA FE BROKER BROOKS SAMPSON LAKE 200
60 RIVER SINK RIVER ROWELL 60
175- I 235 LAKE -;.. 175

10 50 150 50

25 1.125 40
125 40 \ ^ ~ ~ ~ -_______ \ SS X^ -40
-30 30
75 TD60' 75
75. B .L .S .
20 B-_20
50 50

25 10 25 10

0 0 -. 0 0

-25 -o TD=165' TD127' -25 i
B.L.S. B.LS10

B.B..S.
-50 TS>1~~ -50
-20 B.L.S. -- -20
-75 TD=208' -75
B.L.S.
-30 -30
-100 0 0.5 1 2 3 4 5 MILES TD=200' TD=332' -100-
B.L.S. B.L.S.
-125-40 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 KILOMETERS -125 -40
SSCALE TD=361'
-150 -50 VERTICAL EXAGGERATION- 200 TIMES HORIZONTAL SCALE B.L.S. -150 -50


...............


____j


I


I


74


MLNt,


-^


I


I


I


GEOMORPHOLOGY I

OF THE U.S.G.S. 1:100






RICHARD C. GREEN, P.G





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