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Open File Report 93
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00099547/00002
 Material Information
Title: Open File Report 93
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Green, Richard, Scott, Tom, Campbell, Ken, Arthur, Jon, and Means, G.H.
Publisher: Florida Geological Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, FL
Publication Date: 2009
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
System ID: UF00099547:00002

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page i
    List of Figures
        Page ii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    References
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Acknowledgement
        Page 22
    Appendix A: Wells utilized for study
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
Full Text




STATE OF FLORIDA


DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
Michael W. Sole, Secretary

LAND AND RECREATION
Robert G. Ballard, Deputy Secretary

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Jonathan D. Arthur, State Geologist and Director




SFLOROA* \
.ja, s a ,C',


OPEN-FILE REPORT 93

Text to accompany geologic map of the eastern portion of the
USGS Ocala 30 x 60 minute quadrangle, north-central Florida

By

Richard C. Green, P.G., Christopher P. Williams, David T. Paul, P.G.,
Clinton Kromhout, P.G., and Thomas M. Scott, P.G.

2009
ISSN (1058-1391)

This geologic map was funded in part by the USGS National Cooperative Geologic
Mapping Program under assistance award number 08HQPA0003












TABLE OF CONTENTS

A b str a c t ...................................................................................................................................... 1
In tro d u ctio n ................................................................................................................................ 1
M eth o d s .................................................................................................................. ......... 3
Previous W ork .................................................................................................................. 3
Geologic Summary .............................................................................................................. 4
Stru ctu re ............................................................................................................... ....... 4
G eo m o rp h o lo g y .............................................................................................................. 7
Central Lakes District ............................................................................................... 9
Fort M cCoy Plain ................................................................................................. 9
Hawthorne Lakes Region.................................................................................. 9
Oklawaha River Valley.................................................................................. 10
Ocala Karst District ........................................................................................................ 10
Brooksville Ridge ...................................................................................................... 10
Chiefland Karst Plain ............................................................................................. 11
Crystal River Karst Plain ................................................................................ 12
Fairfield Karst Hills ................................................................................................... 12
O cala K arst H ills ....................................................................................................... 12
W illiston Karst Plain.................................................................................................. 13
L ith o stratig raph ic U nits............................................................................................................ .. 13
Tertiary System ................................................................................................................. 13
E o c en e S erie s ................................................................................................................. 13
Avon Park Formation .............................................................................. ............. 13
O cala L im esto n e ......................................................................................................... 14
M io c e n e S e rie s ........................................................................................................... ... 14
Hawthorn Group ........................................................................................................ 14
Coosawhatchie Formation... ................................................................................ 15
Undifferentiated Hawthorn Group................................... .................................... 15
Tertiary/Quaternary Systems ................................................ ............................................. 16
P lio c e n e S e rie s ............................................................................................................ .. 1 6
Cypresshead Formation ......................................................................................... 16
Undifferentiated Tertiary/Quaternary Sediments.................................................... 16
Pleistocene Series ...................................... .......................... .......... .............. 16
Undifferentiated Quaternary Sediments ................................................................. 16
H o lo c en e S erie s .............. ....... ................................................................................ .. 17
Undifferentiated Holocene Sediments.................................................................... 17
Hydrogeology ....................................................................................................................... 17
D eriv ativ e P ro du cts................................................................................................................... 18
R eferen ces ............................................................................................................... ......... 18
Acknowledgements ................................................................................................................... 22
Appendix A: W ells Utilized for Study.. ...............................................................................23











LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1. Nearby areas mapped under the FGS STATEMAP Program. .................................2...
Figure 2. Location of selected river basins, springs, swallets, and other water bodies................ 5
Figure 3. Principal subsurface structures of north Florida........................................ .............. 6
F figure 4 T erraces in F lorida .............................................................................................. 8






OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


Text to accompany geologic map of the eastern portion of the
USGS Ocala 30 x 60 minute quadrangle, north-central Florida

Richard C. Green (P.G. #1776), Christopher P. Williams, David T. Paul, P.G.,
Clinton Kromhout, P.G., and Thomas M. Scott, P.G.1
Currently with SDII-Global Corporation, Tampa, Florida


ABSTRACT

The accompanying 1:100,000 scale geologic map (Open-File Map Series 100, Plate 1)
depicts the areal distribution of bedrock and surficial geologic units for the eastern half of the
USGS Ocala 30 x 60 minute quadrangle. The map was constructed using a combination of field
mapping (at 1:24,000 scale), compilation of data from existing maps (various scales), core and
cuttings analyses and descriptions, and analyses of various Geographic Information System
(GIS) data sources. The resulting data was compiled in ESRI ArcGIS ArcMapTM 9.2 software
for publication as part of the Florida Geological Survey Open-File Map Series. Mapped units
range in age from the Upper Eocene Ocala Limestone to undifferentiated Holocene sediments.
Important resources in the mapped area include groundwater, springs, sand, clay and limestone.
Numerous springs, swallets (sinking streams), and other karst features are present in the study
area. Understanding of geologic units, karst, springs and their interactions within the area aids
land planners, environmental professionals, and citizens in making land-use decisions such as
designing new construction projects, siting new water supply wells, locating sources of mineable
resources for aggregate supply, and protection of springs and water quality.

Keywords: Florida, geologic map, Cypresshead Formation, Coosawhatchie Formation,
Hawthorn Group, Ocala Limestone, Avon Park Formation, environmental geology,
geomorphology, hydrogeology, springs, swallets, sinkholes, Floridan aquifer system, Marion
County, Levy County, Alachua County, Citrus County, Putnam County, Brooksville Ridge.


INTRODUCTION

This report accompanies Open-File Map Series (OFMS) 100, which is comprised of three
plates. Plate 1 depicts the near-surface geology of the eastern half of the USGS Ocala 30 x 60
minute quadrangle on a digital elevation model (DEM). Plate 2 depicts six geologic cross
sections, a stratigraphic correlation chart, and representative photos for several of the lithologic
units in the study area. Plate 3 shows a geomorphology map on a digital elevation model (DEM),
locations of known springs, sinkholes, and swallets, along with photographs of selected
exposures within the study area.
The study area lies south of Gainesville, Florida and surrounds the city of Ocala, Florida.
It includes portions of Marion, Alachua, Citrus, Putnam, and Levy Counties (Figure 1). It lies
due south of the eastern portion of the USGS Gainesville 30 x 60 minute quadrangle, which was
previously mapped under the STATEMAP program (Green et al., 2005). Three regionally
important rivers, the Withlacoochee River, the Rainbow River, and the Silver River, occur in the







FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


map area. Much of the area serves as recharge to the Floridan aquifer system, the primary source
of drinking water in the region.
One objective for this report is to provide basic geologic information for the
accompanying geologic map, cross sections, and geomorphology plate. Information provided by
this report and the plates in OFMS 100 is intended for a diverse audience comprising
professionals in geology, hydrology, engineering, environmental and urban planning, and
laypersons, all of whom have varying levels of geologic knowledge. The map can help users
identify and interpret geologic features which impact activities related to groundwater quality
and quantity, location of mineral resources, land-use planning and designing construction
projects. Applied uses of the maps and data in this report include: 1) identifying potential new
mineral resources, 2) characterizing zones of potential aquifer recharge and confinement, 3)
aiding in water-management decisions on groundwater flow and usage, 4) providing information
on aquifer vulnerability to potential pollution, 5) ecosystem, wetlands, and environmental
characterization and 6) recreational uses.
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Figure 1. Nearby areas mapped under the FGS STATEMAP Program.






OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


Methods

Mapping efforts consisted of: 1) reviewing and compiling existing geologic literature and
data, 2) mapping geologic units in the field at 1:24,000 scale using standard techniques, 3) core
and cuttings analyses of existing samples, 4) new core drilling, 5) collecting and describing
outcrop samples and 6) preparing a geologic map, geological cross-sections and geomorphic map
of the area. Field work, performed during the fall of 2008 through the spring and summer of
2009, consisted of sampling and describing numerous outcrops, river and pit exposures. One
hundred twenty-seven new samples of geologic material were added to the FGS surface-sample
archives (M-Series) and four new cores were drilled. An additional 86 archived M-Series
samples and over 200 outcrops and exposures were also examined during this project. All data,
including data from over 400 wells, were compiled and analyzed by the authors. The map and
accompanying plates were developed in ESRI ArcGIS ArcMapTM 9.2 software for publication
as part of the Florida Geological Survey Open-File Map Series.
Much of the study area is blanketed by a veneer of undifferentiated Tertiary and
Quaternary sediments and soils. For this reason, and in keeping with geologic mapping practices
developed by Scott et al. (2001), the authors have adopted the policy of mapping the first named
geologic unit within 20 feet (6.1 meters) of the surface. If undifferentiated Tertiary/Quaternary
(TQu), undifferentiated Quaternary (Qu) or undifferentiated Holocene (Qh) sediments attain a
thickness greater than 20 feet (6.1 meters), then they appear as the mapped unit. If these
undifferentiated sediments are less than 20 feet (6.1 meters) thick, then the underlying
stratigraphic unit appears on the map.
The region is generally vegetated, and public access in parts of the mapped area is
hindered by the presence of numerous farms, ranches and privately owned land. Much of the
northeastern portion of the study area is owned by Plum Creek Timber Company, Inc., and
permission to access the area for drilling operations was denied by the company; therefore the
authors had to rely on existing data for mapping in parts of that area. Fieldwork access was
typically limited to public roads, State-owned lands, and St. Johns River Water Management
District and Southwest Florida Water Management District-owned lands.

Previous Work

The current study builds on many previous geologic investigations in and around the
present map area which were useful in preparing this report. Preliminary county geologic maps
for Marion (Scott, 1992a), Levy (Campbell, 1992), Alachua (Scott and Campbell, 1992), Citrus
(Campbell and Scott, 1992) and Putnam (Scott, 1992b) Counties at scales of 1:126,720 were
previously published by the Florida Geological Survey (FGS). However each of these Open-File
Map Series geologic maps were constructed in an average time-frame of two weeks utilizing
selected in-house geologic data with little to no extra field work. Although these maps provided
an excellent starting point for the detailed geologic mapping undertaken for this project,
significant refinement of the geologic maps was possible as a result of this project. A statewide
geologic map (Scott et al., 2001) was published by the FGS in digital format and provided much
of the base map material. A structure-contour map of the top of the Floridan aquifer system
(Allison et al., 1995), and an isopach map of the Hawthorn Group in the region (Groszos and
Rupert, 1992) also proved useful.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


This study benefited greatly from the work performed for geologic mapping in the
eastern portion of the USGS Gainesville 30 x 60 minute quadrangle (Green et al., 2005) and the
western portion of the USGS Gainesville 30 x 60 minute quadrangle (Evans et al., 2004). Many
of the field relationships and stratigraphic problems were worked out during those projects and
data gathered during those projects proved invaluable to the completion of this project.


GEOLOGIC SUMMARY

The near surface geology of the eastern portion of the USGS 30 x 60 minute Ocala
quadrangle is composed of a complex mixture of Eocene to Holocene carbonate and siliciclastic
sediments. A combination of factors, including fluvio-deltaic deposition, marine deposition,
dissolution of underlying carbonates, erosion of sediments as a result of eustatic changes in sea
level and structural features, have influenced the geology of the study area.
Much of the eastern portion of the Ocala quadrangle is located within the Withlacoochee
River and Oklawaha River basins (Figure 2). These rivers and their tributaries contain numerous
documented springs, including one first magnitude spring (Silver Springs) and 33 lesser
magnitude springs (Scott et al., 2004). A first magnitude spring is defined as having a minimum
average flow of 100 cubic feet per second, or 64.6 million gallons per day (Copeland, 2003).
Many of these springs have shown significant increases in pollutants in the last few decades,
particularly nitrate (Phelps, 1994; Phelps, 2004; Jones et al., 1996; Scott et al., 2002; Upchurch
et al., 2004). Detailed geologic mapping of lithostratigraphic units in this area provides critical
data needed for future assessments of the vulnerability of the aquifer systems and these springs
to contamination. The recharge areas for many of these springs are believed to be located in and
around the current study area. Understanding the surficial geology of the map area is a key
factor in developing management and protection plans, not only for the springs, but for the
unconfined portions of the Floridan aquifer system (FAS).


Structure

Several structural variables have affected the geology of the region (Figure 3). The
Peninsular Arch, a structurally high area which affected deposition from the Cretaceous to the
early Cenozoic, is the dominant subsurface feature in the Florida peninsula (Applin and Applin,
1944; Applin, 1951; Puri and Vernon, 1964; Williams et al., 1977; Schmidt, 1984; Miller, 1986;
Scott, 1997). The axis of the Peninsular Arch, which lies primarily to the east of the study area,
extends from southeastern Georgia to the vicinity of Lake Okeechobee in southern Florida in a
general northwest to southeast trend. The crest of the arch passes beneath Alachua County north
of the study area and is highest in Union and Baker Counties north of the study area. The arch
was a topographic high during most of the Cretaceous Period and had Upper Cretaceous
sediments deposited over it (Applin, 1951). It formed a relatively stable base for Eocene
carbonate deposition except during times of periodic land emergence due to lowered sea levels
(Williams et al., 1977). The arch did not affect mid Tertiary to Holocene sediment deposition
(Williams et al., 1977; Scott, 1997).






OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


LEGEND .
CEDAR I
City
Swallet
Ist Magnitude Spring
Non 1st Magnitudc Spring
County Boundary
River or Stream
Lake or Pond
l:1011.1)1)I) Quadiarilec
Oklawaha River Basin
Santa Fe River Basin
Lower St. Johns River Basin
Lower Su\vannee River Basin
Waccasaassa River Basin
Withilacoochcc River South Basin
OFM.S. 100, 2""1l
Current STATEMAP Studv Area


0 10 20 30 40 50 Miles


0 10 20 30 40 50


60 70 80 Kilometers


N

W S E

S


Figure 2. Location of selected river basins, springs, swallets, and other water bodies.


ED






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


tra -'m -


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/ SOUTHEAST GEORGIA
I %. EMBAYMENT


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C


4:A


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0 OFMS 100 Map Area Boundary

0 60 120 180 Miles
0 25 50 100 150 200 250 300 Kilometers


S
0t
it, -
C.


Figure 3. Principal subsurface structures of north Florida (modified from
Puri and Vernon, 1964 and Schmidt, 1984).

The Ocala Platform is the most prominent structure affecting the near surface
depositional and post-depositional environments within the map area. Hopkins (1920) originally
named this feature the Ocala Uplift. Vernon (1951) described the Ocala Uplift as a gentle flexure
developed in Tertiary sediments with a northwest-southeast trending crest. Because there is
continuing uncertainty about the origin of this feature, Scott (1988) used the term Ocala
Platform, rather than Ocala Uplift or Ocala Arch, since it does not have a structural connotation.
The Ocala Platform, which lies primarily to the west of the current study area, exerted its
influence on late Tertiary sediment deposition. Miocene sediments of the Hawthorn Group are






OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


thought to have been deposited across the platform (Scott, 1981a; Scott, 1988; Scott, 1991b).
Post-Miocene erosion has removed sediments of the Hawthorn Group from much of the crest of
the Ocala Platform, exposing Eocene and Oligocene carbonates (Cooke, 1945; Espenshade and
Spencer, 1963; Scott, 1981b). This is evident throughout much of the map area (see OFMS 100,
Plate 1). Undifferentiated sediments have subsequently been deposited on the exposed Eocene
carbonates within the map area. These consist of residual clays, sands, and aeolian sands
deposited during the Pliocene to Holocene (Scott, 1997).
Vernon (1951), utilizing aerial photographs, mapped fracture patterns throughout
northern peninsular Florida. Regionally, these fractures generally trend parallel to the axis of the
Ocala Platform in a northwest-southeast orientation. A secondary system of fractures intersects
these primary fractures at high angles in a northeast-southwest trend (Vernon, 1951). Orientation
of stream meanders along portions of the Rainbow, Silver, and Withlacoochee Rivers suggests
that these fracture patterns may be a controlling factor in stream location.
Vernon (1951) also discussed the occurrence of faults in part of the Florida peninsula. He
attributed the origin of the faults to his postulated uplift of the Ocala Platform (his Ocala Uplift).
Although he described the occurrence and surface-strike orientation of the faults, there was no
discussion of the dip of the faults. Vernon did mention that his postulated faults were very
steeply inclined. Vernon (1951) also mentioned seeing slickensides and grabens in quarries west
of the study area. Similar features have been observed by several of the authors of this
publication while doing fieldwork in the region. It is believed that these are related to karst
collapse and localized block movement within the karst feature, not to faulting as Vernon (1951)
suggested. When a cover collapse sinkhole forms, large blocks may move downward along
fractures created by the collapse and create localized slickensides which are not related to
structural faulting. Additionally, numerous wells which Vernon (1951) used for cross sections
which depicted faults in his report were investigated for this current study and several were
deemed to be drilled in karst features. For example, W-1198 (see Vernon, 1951; Figure 14),
appears to be karst infill. Karst features in the study area are very common (OFMS 100; Plate 3,
Photo 2), and may reach over 100 feet deep in some areas such as Blue Grotto near Williston,
Florida.


Geomorphology

Several relict Neogene coastal terraces, which developed as a result of fluctuating sea
levels, have been documented in the study area. Healy (1975) recognized five marine terraces
within the study area (Figure 4) based upon elevation: the Talbot terrace at elevations between
25 and 42 feet (7.6 and 12.8 meters) above mean sea-level (MSL), the Penholoway terrace at
elevations between 42 and 70 feet (12.8 and 21.3 meters) above MSL, the Wicomico terrace at
elevations of 70 to 100 feet (21.3 to 30.5 meters) above MSL, the Sunderland/Okefenokee
terrace at elevations between 100 and 170 feet (30.5 and 51.8 meters) above MSL and the
Coharie terrace at elevations between 170 and 215 feet (51.8 and 70.5 meters). Detailed
discussions and correlations of these marine terraces and relict shorelines have been attempted
by many authors, including Matson and Sanford (1913), Cooke (1931, 1939), Flint (1940, 1971),
MacNeil (1950), Alt and Brooks (1965), Pirkle et al. (1970) and Healy (1975).






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Legend(
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Figure 4. Terraces in Florida (after Healy, 1975).

According to Scott and Paul (in preparation), the study area contains portions of two
geomorphic districts the Central Lakes District and the Ocala Karst District (OFMS 100; Plate
3, Figure 2). Within the map area, these districts have been further subdivided topographically
into nine regional physiographic units. Three units, the Fort McCoy Plain, the Hawthorne Lakes
Region and the Oklawaha River Valley are in the Central Lakes District. The remaining six of
these, the Brooksville Ridge, the Chiefland Karst Plain, the Crystal River Karst Plain, the
Fairfield Karst Hills, the Ocala Karst Hills and the Williston Karst Plain are in the Ocala Karst
District.


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OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


Central Lakes District

The Central Lakes District occupies most of the Central Highlands of Cooke (1939) in
peninsular Florida. The district extends from eastern Alachua County, southeastern Bradford
County and southern Clay County to southernmost Highlands County. The Central Lakes District
lies east and south of the Ocala Karst District, west of the Barrier Island District, and south of the
Okefenokee Basin District (OFMS 100; Plate 3, Figure 2). A thick layer of siliciclastic and
carbonate sediments of the Hawthorn Group and siliciclastic sediments of the Cypresshead
Formation and undifferentiated Quaternary sediments overlie the Ocala Limestone in the district.
These sediments may reach up to 200 feet (61 meters) thick.
Dissolution of the limestone and subsequent subsidence or collapse has created the
characteristic sinkhole lakes and dry sinks that dominate the landscape. The district is bounded on
the east by erosional scarps with toe elevations ranging from approximately 30 feet (9.1 meters) to
90 feet (27.4 meters) above MSL. Portions of the western boundary are marked by scarps with
elevations ranging from 40 feet (12.2 meters) to 130 feet (39.6 meters) above MSL. Scott and Paul
(in preparation) have divided the Central Lakes District into three geomorphic provinces within the
study area: the Fort McCoy Plain, the Hawthorne Lakes Region, and the Oklawaha River Valley
(OFMS 100; Plate 3, Figure 3).


Fort McCoy Plain

The Fort McCoy Plain is a relatively flat, poorly to moderately drained area just east of
the Ocala Karst Hills and southeast of the Hawthorne Lakes Region (OFMS 100; Plate 3, Figure
3). Scattered sinkholes are present within the province and elevations range from approximately
40 feet (12.2 meters) to approximately 90 feet (27.4 meters) above MSL within the study area.
The Fort McCoy Plain is underlain by sediments of the Hawthorn Group, which are mantled with
variable thicknesses of undifferentiated Quaternary sediments. East of the mapped area, the Fort
McCoy Plain is underlain with Cypresshead Formation sediments (Scott et al., 2001).


Hawthorne Lakes Region

The Hawthorne Lakes Region is bounded to the north in Bradford County by the
Southern Okefenokee Basin and the western flank of Trail Ridge, and to the west in Alachua
County by the Alachua Karst Hills and the Williston Karst Plain (OFMS 100; Plate 3, Figure 3).
The lakes in the Hawthorne Lakes Region formed through karst processes and were modified by
subsequent surficial erosion. The surficial erosion has caused some of the formerly closed basins
to develop outflow streams. Elevations in the northern portion of the region range from
approximately 100 feet (30.5 meters) above MSL for the water levels in the lakes to over 200
feet (61 meters) above MSL on the hills. Relief generally decreases to the south. In the northern
part of the mapped area, elevations range from 50 feet (15.2 meters) to just over 130 feet (39.6
meters) above MSL.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Oklawaha River Valley

The Oklawaha River Valley is a narrow valley extending from near the Lake-Marion
County line northward to the Marion-Putnam County line. To the south, the valley abuts the
Tavares Lakes Region. To the north, it merges with the St. Johns Offset Valley. The headwaters
of the Oklawaha River occur in Lake Griffin, in the Tavares Lakes Region, a broader and more
karstic portion of the Central Lakes Region. As it enters the Oklawaha River Valley, the river
becomes confined to a narrow valley bounded by the Ocala Karst Hills and the Fort McCoy Plain
on the west and the Mt. Dora Ridge on the east (OFMS 100; Plate 3, Figure 3). The province is
underlain by Hawthorn Group sediments and undifferentiated Quaternary sediments. Elevations
of the valley within the study area range from 40 feet (12.2 meters) to 70 feet (21.3 meters)
above MSL.

Ocala Karst District

The Ocala Karst District encompasses a broad area from central Wakulla County in the
panhandle of Florida, south to Hillsborough and Pinellas Counties in the west-central peninsula
and inland to nearly the center of the peninsula (OFMS 100; Plate 3, Figure 3). Elevations within
the district range from sea level along the coast to a maximum of 300 feet (91.4 meters) above mean
sea level (MSL) on the Brooksville Ridge. Within the study area, elevations range from sea level to
210 feet (64.0 meters) above MSL in the north-central portion of the map area.
Carbonate sediments, ranging from the Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation to the
Upper Eocene Ocala Limestone, lie at or near the land surface in this district within the study
area. The Ocala Karst District is dominated by dissolution sinkholes and shallow bowl-shaped
depressions, producing a rolling topography. Generally, a variably permeable siliciclastic cover
allows downward percolating groundwater to slowly dissolve the underlying limestone, leading
to cover-collapse sinkholes and cover-subsidence features (Sinclair and Stewart, 1985). Cover-
collapse sinkholes form rather abruptly from the structural failure of an underlying cavern roof.
An excellent example of this is at Devil's Millhopper Geological State Park, located in Alachua
County northwest of the present study area (Evans et al., 2004).
Cover subsidence features generally occur in areas where sediments sag as carbonates
dissolve underneath. Typically, areas such as these have shallow sinks formed by the downward
movement of the siliciclastic overburden filling voids created by slow dissolution of underlying
carbonates or by slow dissolution of the carbonate surface. Springs, sinking (swallets) and
resurgent streams, and caverns commonly occur within the Ocala Karst District.


Brooksville Ridge

The Brooksville Ridge, described by White (1970) as "the most massive of the ridges which
rise above the general level of the Central Upland", stands out in stark contrast to the surrounding
karst plains. The Brooksville Ridge lies mostly west of the study area, but crosses the southwestern
corner of the mapped area. It is separated into two sections (northern and southern) by the
Withlacoochee River, which forms the boundary between Marion and Citrus Counties.
The northern portion of the Brooksville Ridge begins in Gilchrist and Alachua Counties and
terminates in Levy and Marion Counties. The southern portion extends from Citrus County






OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


southward into Pasco County. The two sections of the ridge differ in elevation, length to width ratio
and underlying geology.
Elevations in the northern, narrower portion of the Brooksville Ridge range from
approximately 50 feet (15.2 meters) to greater than 150 feet (45.7 meters) above MSL. Elevations
in some sinkholes are less than 50 feet (15.2 meters) above MSL. The southern, broader part of the
ridge ranges in elevation from approximately 50 feet (15.2 meters) to more than 300 feet (91
meters) above MSL. In a few sinkholes, elevations of approximately 10 feet (3 meters) above MSL
occur.
The topography of the Brooksville Ridge displays significant variability. The northern
section has low, rolling karst hills interspersed with moderately shallow sinkholes. The southern
portion of the ridge becomes progressively hillier and terrain relief increases from north to south.
White (1970) describes the southern ridge area as having "the most irregular surface to be found in
any area of comparable size in peninsular Florida." From the vicinity of Brooksville southward, the
hills are higher and more closely spaced. North of Brooksville, the hills are more widely spaced and
generally have lower elevations, an indication of more mature karst. The Brooksville Ridge is well
drained with wet conditions existing only in the low lying karst features. There are no springs found
on the ridge.
The Upper Eocene Ocala Limestone underlies the northern portion of the Brooksville Ridge.
Weathered Miocene Hawthorn Group sediments lie on the Ocala Limestone with undifferentiated
Quaternary and/or Tertiary (Qu and TQu) siliciclastics mantling the ridge.
The southern portion of the Brooksville Ridge (which lies predominantly south and west of
the mapped area) is more complex geologically than the northern section. This section of the
Brooksville Ridge, which is only present in a small portion of the southwest corner of the mapped
area (OFMS 100; Plate 3, Figure 1), is underlain by carbonates of the Middle Eocene Avon Park
Formation and the Upper Eocene Ocala Limestone which are overlain by variable thicknesses of
weathered Miocene undifferentiated Hawthorn Group (Th) sediments and undifferentiated Tertiary-
Quaternary siliciclastics (TQu).


Chiefland Karst Plain

The Chiefland Karst Plain lies to the east of the southern portion of the Perry Karst-San
Pedro Bay geomorphic feature, south of the Branford Karst Plain and west of the northern extension
of the Brooksville Ridge (OFMS 100; Plate 3, Figure 3). It occurs from northern Gilchrist County
to southern Levy County and is present in a small part of the southwestern corner of the mapped
area between the northern portion of the Brooksville Ridge and the Crystal River Karst Plain
(OFMS 100; Plate 3, Figure 1). Elevations in of the Chiefland Karst Plain in this area range from 30
feet (9.1 meters) to 100 feet (30.5 meters) above MSL.
This karst plain is more poorly drained than the Branford Karst Plain to the north (Evans et
al., 2004). Many springs occur within the karst plain. The entire karst plain is underlain by either
Upper Eocene Ocala Limestone or the Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation. Undifferentiated
Quaternary siliciclastics overlie the karstified limestone in varying thicknesses.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Crystal River Karst Plain

The Crystal River Karst Plain occurs between the Gulf Coast and the southern Brooksville
Ridge in Citrus and Hernando Counties, south of the Withlacoochee River (OFMS 100; Plate 3,
Figure 3). It is an area of low relief with mature karst features and elevations ranging from sea level
to 50 feet (15.2 meters) above sea level. Within the mapped area, elevations range from 30 feet (9.1
meters) to 50 feet (15.2 meters) above MSL. Karst features are usually shallow depressions.
Springs are very common. The area is often well drained, becoming more poorly drained toward
the coast. Sand dunes are common along the boundary with the Brooksville Ridge.
The Upper Eocene Ocala Limestone and Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation underlie
most of the karst plain, and there is often a thin layer of undifferentiated Hawthorn Group sediments
on top of the Ocala Limestone in this part of the map area. Undifferentiated Tertiary and
Quaternary siliciclastic sediments cover the karst plain.


Fairfield Karst Hills

The Fairfield Karst Hills occur from southernmost Alachua County to northwestern Marion
County (OFMS 100; Plate 3, Figure 3). The karst hills occur to the south of the Hawthorne Lakes
Region and to the west of the Ocala Karst Hills. The extent of the province is very similar to the
Fairfield Hills as delineated by White (1970). The elevations in this area range from a low of 20
feet (6.1 meters) to 190 feet (57.9 meters) above MSL and the area has greater relief than the Ocala
Karst Hills.
The Fairfield Karst Hills province is well drained, with swampy conditions existing only in
the low-lying karst features. The Fairfield Karst Hills is the only province in the study area with
well-developed surface streams, reflecting the relatively impermeable nature of the underlying
Hawthorn Group sediments. Springs are generally not found within these karst hills. The Fairfield
Karst Hills developed in response to karstification of the Ocala Limestone and subsequent erosion
of the Hawthorn Group sediments. Hills composed of Hawthorn Group sediments are common in
the province where the karst is less mature. Quaternary siliciclastic sediments of varying
thicknesses blanket the area.


Ocala Karst Hills

The Ocala Karst Hills occur from north-central Marion County southward to northeastern
Sumter County (OFMS 100; Plate 3, Figure 3). Elevations in the province within the mapped area
range from 20 feet (6.1 meters) to 190 feet (57.9 meters) above MSL, with overall lesser relief than
the Fairfield Karst Hills. Many of the higher hills in the province are erosional remnants of
Hawthorn Group sediments (OFMS 100; Plates 1 and 2). Overall, the province is well-drained
internally by karst and surface streams are not common.
Several springs are present in the Ocala Karst Hills, including Silver Springs, which occurs
at the eastern edge of the province along the boundary with the Central Lakes District. The karst in
this province is more mature and the Hawthorn Group sediments are thinner to absent than in the
Fairfield Karst Hills province. There are isolated hills of remnant Hawthorn Group sediments
scattered throughout the province (see OFMS 100, Plate 1). Quaternary siliciclastic sediments of






OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


varying thicknesses blanket the area. There is a small area in the Ocala Karst Hills along the eastern
boundary of the mapped area which has Cypresshead Formation sediments at the surface (see
OFMS 100, Plate 1).


Williston Karst Plain

The Williston Karst Plain, located on the eastern flank of the Brooksville Ridge (OFMS
100; Plate 3, Figure 3), extends eastward to the Hawthorne Lakes Region, the Fairfield Karst
Hills and the Ocala Karst Hills and is underlain by the Ocala Limestone. It is covered with
variable thicknesses of undifferentiated Quaternary sediments (Scott and Paul, in preparation).
It merges with the Branford Karst Plain and Chiefland Karst Plain northwest of the study
area (OFMS 100; Plate 3, Figure 3). Within the mapped area, elevations of the Williston Karst
Plain range from 10 feet (3.1 meters) to 100 feet (30.5 meters) above MSL. A few outlier hills,
composed of weathered Hawthorn Group sediments, are present within this area and locally may
exceed 140 feet (42.7 meters) above MSL. Much of the plain is well drained and a number of
springs, including Rainbow Springs, occur within this area.


LITHOSTRATIGRAPHIC UNITS

Tertiary System

Eocene Series

Avon Park Formation

The Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation (Tap), first described by Applin and Applin
(1944), is the oldest unit investigated in the present study area. The unit, which only occurs in the
subsurface in the study area, consists of cream to light-brown to tan, poorly-indurated to well-
indurated, variably fossiliferous limestone (grainstone to wackestone, with rare mudstone). The
limestones are interbedded with tan to brown, very poorly- to well-indurated, very fine to
medium crystalline, fossiliferous (molds and casts), vuggy dolostones. Fossils present in the unit
include mollusks, foraminifera (Spirolina sp., Lituonella floridana, Bolivina sp., and
Dictyoconus americanus), echinoids, algae, organic and carbonized plant remains.
Because the Avon Park Formation is entirely a subsurface unit within the mapped area, it
was only investigated for wells utilized for cross sections in the project. The top of the Avon
Park ranges from 160 feet (48.8 meters) below MSL in W-18919 (cross-sections A-A' and F-F';
OFMS 100, plate 2) to 17 feet (5.2 meters) above MSL in W-1174 (cross-section E-E'; OFMS
100, plate 2). No wells utilized for cross-sections penetrated the entire section of the Avon Park
Formation. The Avon Park Formation forms part of the Floridan aquifer system (Southeastern
Geological Society Ad Hoc Committee on Florida Hydrostratigraphic Unit Definition, 1986).






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Ocala Limestone

The Upper Eocene Ocala Limestone (To), first described by Dall and Harris (1892), is a
biogenic marine limestone comprised largely of foraminifera, mollusks, echinoids and
bryozoans. The unit, which sits unconformably on the Avon Park Formation, may be dolomitized
to varying degrees within the study area, making the contact between the two units difficult to
discern, particularly in cuttings. Based on lithologic differences, the Ocala Limestone can be
informally subdivided into an upper and lower unit (Scott, 1991 la). This subdivision, while often
apparent in cores and quarries, is not readily apparent in cuttings. As a consequence of this, the
geologic cross sections do not break out the upper and lower Ocala Limestone.
The upper unit is typically a white to cream, fine- to coarse-grained, poorly- to well-
indurated, moderately to well sorted, very fossiliferous limestone (wackestone, packstone, and
grainstone). Fossils commonly include foraminifera (Lepidocyclina ocalana), bryozoans,
mollusks, and a rich diversity of echinoids. The lower unit is typically a white to cream, fine- to
medium-grained, poorly- to moderately-indurated, moderately to well sorted limestone
(grainstone to packstone). Fossils include foraminifera (Amphistegina pinarensis cosdensi,
Nummulites [Camerina] vanderstoki, Nummulites [Operculinoides] ocalana), bryozoans, algae,
mollusks, echinoids, and crabs.
The top of the Ocala Limestone, which is often heavily karstified (see Photo 2 on OFMS
100, plate 3), ranges from over 150 feet (45.7 meters) above MSL in field exposures to 11 feet
(3.4 meters) below MSL in W-18919 (cross sections A-A' and F-F'; OFMS 100, plate 2). Most
of the wells utilized for geologic cross sections penetrate the entire thickness of the Ocala
Limestone. In these wells, the thickness of the Ocala Limestone ranges from less than 10 feet
(3.5 meters) in W-1 194 (cross-section D-D'; OFMS 100, plate 2) to 176 feet (53.6 meters) in W-
18877 (cross-sections A-A' and E-E'; OFMS 100, plate 2). The Ocala Limestone is generally
highest where it has been protected to some extent from dissolution by thick sequences of
Hawthorn Group sediments, such as in the Fairfield Hills area (see Plate 1, OFMS 100). The
Ocala Limestone forms part of the Floridan aquifer system (Southeastern Geological Society Ad
Hoc Committee on Florida Hydrostratigraphic Unit Definition, 1986).


Miocene Series

Hawthorn Group

Sediments of the Miocene Hawthorn Group are thought to have been deposited over the
Ocala Platform throughout the area, but post-Miocene erosion and karstification has removed
sediments from the crest of the Ocala Platform, exposing the Eocene carbonates in the central
and southern portion of the map area (Cooke, 1945; Espenshade and Spencer, 1963; Scott,
1981b). Fossils in the Hawthorn Group are sparse but may include vertebrate remains, corals,
and mollusks. Williams et al. (1977) report that the most commonly found fossils are oysters and
coral heads. Within the mapped area, the Hawthorn Group (Th) is composed of the Middle
Miocene Coosawhatchie Formation (Thc) and undifferentiated Hawthorn Group (Th) sediments.
Where present, Hawthorn Group sediments unconformably overlie the Ocala Limestone
(Scott, 1988). They are unconformably overlain by either the Cypresshead Formation (Tc),
undifferentiated Quaternary sediments (Qu), or undifferentiated Tertiary/Quaternary sediments






OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


(TQu; see OFMS 100, Plate 1). Permeability of both the Coosawhatchie Formation and the
undifferentiated Hawthorn Group sediments is generally low and they form part of the
intermediate aquifer system intermediate confining unit (Southeastern Geological Society Ad
Hoc Committee on Florida Hydrostratigraphic Unit Definition, 1986).

Coosawhatchie Formation

The Coosawhatchie Formation (Thc) is present near the surface in the north-central and
southeastern portions of the study area, where it unconformably overlies the Ocala Limestone.
There are numerous hills of isolated Hawthorn Group sediments scattered throughout the study
area. These appear to be outliers of Coosawhatchie Formation sediments which are erosional
remnants from the original extent of Hawthorn deposition over the area (see OFMS 100, Plate 1).
The Coosawhatchie Formation consists of gray to bluish-gray sandy clay or clayey sand with
phosphate grains, sands, and sandy limestone to dolostone. Lenses of relatively pure quartz
sands, clays, or carbonate are uncommon (Scott, 1988). This unit is lithologically variable and
beds may pinch out and interfinger both laterally and vertically. Outcrops of Coosawhatchie
Formation in the study area are typically very weathered and consist of reddish-brown to white,
clayey, calcareous quartz sands to sandy clays with leached phosphate grains and limonitic and
calcareous pebbles. The reader is referred to Scott (1988) for a complete discussion of the unit.
Where present, the Coosawhatchie Formation ranges from over 180 feet (54.9 meters)
above MSL in field exposures in the vicinity of W-18877 (cross sections A-A' and E-E'; OFMS
100, plate 2) to 18 feet (5.5 meters) below MSL in W-18289 (cross section A-A', OFMS 100,
plate 2). Thickness of the unit ranges up to 122 feet (37.2 meters) in W-9449 (cross section A-
A', OFMS 100, plate 2).

Undifferentiated Hawthorn Group

Undifferentiated Hawthorn Group sediments are light olive gray and blue gray in
unweathered sections and reddish brown in weathered sections. They consist of poorly to
moderately consolidated, clayey sands to silty clays and relatively pure clays with little to no
phosphate (Scott, 2001). These sediments are present along parts of the Brooksville Ridge, and
in the south-central portion of the map area, where they are often deeply weathered (see OFMS
100, Plate 1). In the Brooksville Ridge area, undifferentiated Hawthorn Group sediments are
often overlain by more than 20 feet (6.1 meters) of undifferentiated Tertiary and Quaternary
sediments (TQu). Hard-rock phosphate deposits are associated with the undifferentiated
Hawthorn Group sediments in several places along the eastern flank of the Brooksville Ridge.
These hard-rock phosphate deposits were formed by dissolution of phosphates from the
Hawthorn Group and subsequent precipitation in karst features within the Ocala Limestone
(Scott, 2001).
Sediments of the undifferentiated Hawthorn Group were only penetrated in a few wells in
the western portion of the map area. In these, the top of the Hawthorn Group ranges from 62 feet
(18.9 meters) above MSL in W-18894 (cross-section D-D'; OFMS 100, plate 2) to near sea level
in W-6903 (cross-section D-D'; OFMS 100, plate 2). The undifferentiated Hawthorn Group
ranges from approximately 20 feet (6.1 meters) thick in W-18894 (cross section B-B'; OFMS
100, plate 2) to 30 feet (9.1 meters) thick in well W-6903 (cross section D-D'; OFMS 100, plate
2).






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Tertiary/Quaternary Systems

Pliocene Series

Cypresshead Formation

The Cypresshead Formation (Tc) was originally named by Huddlestun (1988) and was
extended into Florida by Scott (1988). It is a mottled reddish-brown to reddish-orange to white,
unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, fine to very coarse grained, variably clayey to clean
quartz sand. Cross-bedded sands are common within this formation. Discoid quartzite pebbles,
mica, and ghosts of nearshore mollusks are often present.
In general, the Cypresshead Formation is exposed at the surface above 100 feet (30.5
meters) above mean sea level (Scott, 2001). The Cypresshead Formation is a nearshore, shallow
marine deposit equivalent to the deltaic sediments of Citronelle Formation and the Miccosukee
Formation prodeltaic sediments (Scott, 2001). It is present at or near the surface east of the study
area and south of Trail Ridge. Limited exposures of Cypresshead Formation were observed and
sampled in sand pits east of Belleview in a small area along the eastern edge of the map (OFMS
100, Plate 1).
The Cypresshead Formation is unconformably overlain by undifferentiated Quaternary
sediments (Qu). Permeable sediments of the Cypresshead Formation form part of the surficial
aquifer system (Southeastern Geological Society Ad Hoc Committee on Florida
Hydrostratigraphic Unit Definition, 1986).


Undifferentiated Tertiary/Quaternary Sediments

Undifferentiated Tertiary/Quaternary sediments (TQu) are siliciclastics that are separated
from the undifferentiated Quaternary sediments solely on the basis of elevation (Scott et al.,
2001). Pleistocene sea levels reached a maximum of approximately 100 feet (30.5 meters) above
MSL (Colquhoun, 1969). The sediments which occur above 100 feet (30 meters) MSL are
predominately older than Pleistocene but may have been reworked during the Pleistocene. They
are present along the western edge of the map area in the Brooksville Ridge (OFMS 100, Plates 1
and 2). These poorly consolidated to unconsolidated siliciclastics are white to gray to orange to
blue-green, fine to coarse grained, clean to clayey unfossiliferous sands, sandy clays and clays
with variable admixtures of clay and organic. Permeable sediments of the undifferentiated
Tertiary/Quaternary sediments form part of the surficial aquifer system (Southeastern Geological
Society Ad Hoc Committee on Florida Hydrostratigraphic Unit Definition, 1986).

Pleistocene Series

Undifferentiated Quaternary Sediments

Undifferentiated Quaternary sediments (Qu) lie unconformably on either the Eocene
Ocala Limestone (To), undifferentiated Hawthorn Group sediments (Th), the Coosawhatchie
Formation of the Hawthorn Group (Thc), or the Cypresshead Formation (Tc). Along the eastern






OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


edge of the map area, they are likely derived from erosion and re-deposition of sediments from
the Coosawhatchie Formation and the Cypresshead Formation.
The areas of undifferentiated Quaternary sediments present in the southern and western
portions of the mapped area are highly irregular in thickness. Data from this project indicates that
the surface of the Ocala Limestone in these areas is heavily karstified. Overlying sediments may
range from 20 feet (6.1 meters) to over 60 feet (18.3 meters) thick. Relief on the surface of the
Ocala Limestone can easily exceed 30 feet (9.1 meters) in these karstic areas (OFMS 100; Plate
3, Photo 2). Much of these undifferentiated sediments are derived from erosion and weathering
of Hawthorn Group and younger units, and sinkholes may contain Hawthorn Group sediments
(Scott, 1992a). Field evidence also shows that pinnacles of Ocala Limestone and outliers of
weathered Hawthorn Group sediments can occur in these areas.
Generally, these undifferentiated Quaternary sediments consist of white to gray to orange
to blue-green, fine to coarse grained, clean to clayey unfossiliferous sands, sandy clays and clays
with variable admixtures of organic. These sediments form part of the surficial aquifer system
(Southeastern Geological Society Ad Hoc Committee on Florida Hydrostratigraphic Unit
Definition, 1986).


Holocene Series

Undifferentiated Holocene Sediments

Undifferentiated Holocene sediments (Qh) are mapped within the Silver River valley and
tributaries along the southeastern boundary of the study area. These sediments may include
quartz sands, marls, organic, and minor carbonate sands and mud (Scott, 2001). While not
recognized by the Florida Geological Survey as lithostratigraphic units, they are utilized in order
to facilitate a better understanding of the State's geology. The undifferentiated Holocene
sediments are part of the surficial aquifer system (Southeastern Geological Society Ad Hoc
Committee on Florida Hydrostratigraphic Unit Definition, 1986).


HYDROGEOLOGY

The hydrogeology of the map area consists of (in ascending order) the Floridan aquifer
system (FAS), the intermediate aquifer system intermediate confining unit (IAS ICU), and the
surficial aquifer system (SAS) (Southeastern Geological Society Ad Hoc Committee on Florida
Hydrostratigraphic Unit Definition, 1986). The FAS, which is the primary source of drinking
water in the region, is generally comprised of carbonate units of the Avon Park Formation and
the Ocala Limestone. The sands, silts, clays and carbonates of the Hawthorn Group comprise the
IAS/ICU. The IAS/ICU is highly localized and laterally discontinuous in the study area. The
SAS is comprised of the Pliocene Cypresshead Formation, undifferentiated Tertiary/Quaternary
sediments (TQu), undifferentiated Quaternary sediment on karstified Eocene Limestone (Quk),
undifferentiated Quaternary sediments (Qu), and the Holocene undifferentiated sediments (Qh).
Where siliciclastic sediments of the Hawthorn Group and younger units are thick, they
provide confinement for the FAS, but where the siliciclastic sediments of the Hawthorn Group
and younger units are thin or missing, karst features often occur. "Swallets" (stream-to-sink






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


features) are of particular concern to geoscientists and hydrogeologists in the area. These
generally occur in the vicinity of the Coosawhatchie Formation, where the sediments thin and are
breached by karst features. Overland flow is captured by the karst features thus allowing for
direct recharge to the FAS by surface water and runoff from agricultural and urban areas (OFMS
100; Plate 3, Figure 1).

DERIVATIVE PRODUCTS

Several derivative products will come from this project. During the mapping project, data
from several hundred wells (Appendix A) were analyzed. Formation picks, made on all available
wells with cores and cuttings samples, will allow for the creation of a structure contour map of
the top the Floridan aquifer system, along with the creation of structure contour and isopach
maps of the intermediate confining unit in the area. Additional derivative data that is anticipated
to come from this mapping effort includes an aquifer vulnerability assessment map. Data derived
from prior STATEMAP products has often been used to augment other Florida Geological
Survey and Florida Aquifer Vulnerability Assessment (FAVA) projects in the State (Arthur et
al., 2009; Baker et al., 2007).

REFERENCES

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Applin, P., 1951, Possible future petroleum provinces of North America Florida: American
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Arthur, J.D., Baker, J., Cichon, J., Wood, A. and Rudin, A., 2009, Florida Aquifer Vulnerability
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Campbell, K.M., 1992, Geologic map of Levy County, Florida: Florida Geological Survey Open-
File Map Series 11, Scale 1:126,720.






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Campbell, K.M., and Scott, T.M., 1992, Geologic Map of Citrus County, Florida: Florida
Geological Survey Open-File Map Series 10, Scale 1:126,720.

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portion of the USGS 1:100,000 scale Gainesville quadrangle, northern Florida: Florida
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portion of the USGS 1:100,000 scale Gainesville quadrangle, northern Florida: Florida
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Groszos, M. and Rupert, F.R., 1992, An isopach map of the Hawthorn Group in the Suwannee
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April, 1920.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Huddleston, P.F., 1988, A revision of the lithostratigraphic units of the Coastal Plain of Georgia-
The Miocene: Georgia Geological Survey Bulletin 104, 162 p.

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[abstract]: Florida Scientist, v. 44, Supplement 1, p. 42.

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of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 23, p. 126.






OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


Scott, T.M., 1991b, A geological Overview: in Scott, T.M., Lloyd, J.M. and Maddox, G.L., eds.,
1991, Florida's ground-water quality monitoring program, hydrogeologic framework:
Florida Geological Survey Special Publication 32, 97 p.

Scott, T.M., 1992a, Geologic map of Marion County, Florida: Florida Geological Survey Open-
File Map Series 13, scale 1:126,720.

Scott, T.M., 1992b, Geologic map of Putnam County, Florida: Florida Geological Survey Open-
File Map Series 6, scale 1:126,720.

Scott, T.M., 1997, Miocene to Holocene history of Florida, in Randazzo, A.F. and Jones, D.S.,
eds., 1997, The Geology of Florida: Gainesville, University Press of Florida, 327 p.

Scott, T.M., 2001, Text to accompany the geologic map of Florida: Florida Geological Survey
Open-File Report 80, 29 p.

Scott, T.M., 2005, Revisions to the geomorphology of Florida focusing on the eastern panhandle
and north-central Florida, in Southeastern Geological Society Field Trip Guidebook 44, p.
18-36.

Scott, T.M., and Campbell, K.M., 1992, Geologic map of Alachua County, Florida: Florida
Geological Survey Open-File Map Series 12, scale 1:126,720.

Scott, T.M., and Paul, D.T., (in preparation) Geomorphic map of Florida: Florida Geological
Survey, scale 1:750,000.

Scott, T.M., Campbell, K.M., Rupert, F.R., Arthur, J.A., Green, R.C., Means, G.H., Missimer,
T.M., Lloyd, J.M. and Duncan, J.G., 2001, Geologic map of Florida: Florida Geological
Survey Map Series 146, scale 1:750,000.

Scott, T.M., Means, G.H., Means, R.C. and Meegan R.P., 2002, First magnitude springs of
Florida: Florida Geological Survey Open-File Report 85, 138 p.

Scott, T.M., Means, G.H., Meegan, R.P., Means, R.C., Upchurch, S.B., Copeland, R.E., Jones, J.,
Roberts, T. and Willet, A., 2004, Springs of Florida: Florida Geological Survey Bulletin 66,
377 p.

Sinclair, W.C., and Stewart, J.W., 1985, Sinkhole Type, Development, and Distribution in
Florida: Florida Geological Survey Map Series 110, scale 30 miles to 1 inch.

Southeastern Geological Society Ad Hoc Committee on Florida Hydrostratigraphic Unit
Definition, 1986, Hydrogeological units of Florida: Florida Geological Survey Special
Publication 28, 8 p.






FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Upchurch, S.B., Champion, K.M., Schnieder, J.C., Hornsby, D., Ceryak, R. and Zwanka, W.,
2004, Defining springshed boundaries and water-quality domains near first-magnitude
springs in north Florida [abstract]: Florida Scientist, v. 67, Supplement 1, 52 p.

U.S. Geological Survey, 1978, 1:100,000-scale metric topographic map of Ocala, Florida:
Reston VA, U.S. Geological Survey, 1 sheet.

Vernon, R.O., 1951, Geology of Citrus and Levy Counties, Florida: Florida Geological Survey
Bulletin 33, 256 p.

White, W.A., 1970, The geomorphology of the Florida peninsula: Florida Geological Survey
Bulletin 51, 164 p.

Williams, K.E., Nicol, D. and Randazzo, A.F., 1977, The geology of the western part of Alachua
County, Florida: Florida Geological Survey Report of Investigation 85, 97 p.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The authors extend many thanks to the personnel that assisted with access to land
holdings: Diane McKenzie and Janice Ellison with the Division of State Lands, Steve R. Miller,
R.H. Davis and Connie Rightmire with the Saint Johns River Water Management District, Chuck
Lane and Kim DeVary with the Halpata Tastanaki Preserve of the Southwest Florida Water
Management District, Mickey Thomason with the Marjorie Harris Carr Cross-Florida Greenway,
Christine Dorrier with Silver River State Park, Elliot Mallard with the Mid-Florida Mine, Randy
Bullock with Counts Construction, Walter W., Jr. and Dorothy Leipold who granted access to
State land via their property for coring, Leon Gary who offered to take us to a sinkhole on his
property, Justin Kilcrease with the Indian River and Ross Prairie State Forests and Colleen
Werner with the Withlacoochee State Forest, Pamela Szydlo and Gary Lackey with Rainbow
Lakes Estates and their Fire Department, Larry Ackerson with the Florida Department of
Transportation, and Kendall Fountain and Andy Hirko with the Plum Creek Timber Company,
Inc. who worked out a way for us to complete escorted reconnaissance of some of their land
holdings.
Don Boniol and Jeff Davis of the Saint Johns River Water Management District supplied
access to their GIS coverage. Tiffany Horstman provided both top of rock data and core picks for
ROMP 128 and Anna Janosik provided core picks for ROMP 132 for the Southwest Florida
Water Management District region. Jerry "Reg" Mallams and Jim Clayton also assisted with
questions regarding Southwest Florida Water Management District data.
Ken Campbell, Brie Coane, Bob Cleveland, Guy Richardson, Drew Butler, Jesse Hurd,
Eric Thomas, Jake Mast, James Bobrycki and John Carroll provided field support for drilling
operations. Rick Copeland, Jackie Lloyd and Frank Rupert are thanked for reviewing, discussing
and editing the product. The geologic map was funded in part by the Florida Geological Survey
of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and by the United States Geological
Survey National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program under USGS assistance award number
08HQPA0003.








OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


APPENDIX A: WELLS UTILIZED FOR STUDY


Map Well Data Sample Longitude Latitude 24K Quad Elevation (feet) Total Depth (feet)
ID Label Source Type
1 W-6903 FGS Core 82 26' 44.64" W 29 5' 22.09" N Dunnellon 85 442
2 W-12415 FGS Core 82 19' 50.65" W 29 11' 4.09" N Cotton Plant 75 352
3 W-12581 FGS Core 82 29' 36.62" W 29 24' 37.11" N Williston 70 158
4 W-15167 FGS Core 82 27' 25.40" W 29 26' 16.43" N Williston 70 1184
5 W-15495 FGS Core 82 19' 6.03" W 29 11' 0.36" N Cotton Plant 75 548
6 W-18798 FGS Core 82 19' 16.59" W 29 1' 53.49" N Dunnellon SE 60 1207
7 W-18877 FGS Core 82 15' 37.55" W 29 23' 28.97" N Flemington 183 308
8 ROMP-132 SWFWMD Core 82 18' 34.89" W 29 19' 36.82" N Fairfield 109 1500
9 W-18894 FGS Core 82 28' 58.19" W 29 9'0.02" N Romeo 111 230
10 W-18919 FGS Core 82 3' 19.30" W 29 26' 20.60" N Citra 63 263.5
11 W-18920 FGS Core 82 27' 3.90" W 29 13' 5.20" N Romeo 79 127.8
12 W-9449 FGS Core Chips 82 20' 50.64" W 29 23' 45.10" N Flemington 161 335
13 W-18 FGS Cuttings 82 17' 35.40" W 29 6' 45.88" N Dunnellon SE 79 6020
14 W-170 FGS Cuttings 82 27' 13.60" W 29 24' 39.75" N Williston 84 125
15 W-742 FGS Cuttings 82 9'29.06" W 29 23' 15.13" N McIntosh 98 690
16 W-937 FGS Cuttings 82 16' 8.65" W 29 14' 8.09" N Cotton Plant 196 240
17 W-1153 FGS Cuttings 82 2' 21.19" W 29 9'43.43" N Ocala East 78 92
18 W-1174 FGS Cuttings 82 14' 39.06" W 29 2' 38.46" N Shady 90 99
19 W-1183 FGS Cuttings 82 22' 40.65" W 29 2' 25.08" N Dunnellon 64 73
20 W-1194 FGS Cuttings 82 25' 38.64" W 29 2' 41.08" N Dunnellon 66 141
21 W-1200 FGS Cuttings 82 28' 40.03" W 29 2' 38.96" N Dunnellon 40 80
22 W-1699 FGS Cuttings 82 27' 4.20" W 29 23' 13.62" N Williston 76 158
23 W-1934 FGS Cuttings 82 9'3.67" W 29 9'35.08" N Ocala West 164 185
24 W-2719 FGS Cuttings 82 17' 32.64" W 29 26' 42.11" N Flemington 138 312
25 W-6104 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 40.76" W 29 24' 6.92" N Citra 79 63
26 W-7631 FGS Cuttings 82 14' 59.65" W 29 10' 23.09" N Ocala West 74 160
27 W-8331 FGS Cuttings 82 3'5.40" W 29 13' 29.37" N Ocala East 57 97
28 W-8775 FGS Cuttings 82 9'30.96" W 29 1' 33.66" N Shady 95 100
29 W-8883 FGS Cuttings 82 3'20.68" W 29 5'24.07" N Belleview 83 520
30 W-10393 FGS Cuttings 82 5'51.06" W 29 9'42.06" N Ocala East 66 600
31 W-10789 FGS Cuttings 82 3'43.67" W 29 17' 18.09" N Anthony 76 185
32 W-10950 FGS Cuttings 82 27' 51.63" W 29 21' 6.11" N Morriston 65 100
33 W-11652 FGS Cuttings 82 11'38.66" W 29 10' 17.09" N Ocala West 70 445
34 W-15312 FGS Cuttings 82 2' 43.26" W 29 3' 17.30" N Belleview 76 240
35 W-15353 FGS Cuttings 82 3' 8.27" W 29 6' 25.84" N Belleview 79 470
36 W-15643 FGS Cuttings 82 14' 8.69" W 29 1' 33.82" N Shady 73 500
37 W-16223 FGS Cuttings 82 5' 45.67" W 29 19' 54.09" N Anthony 75 230
38 W-18289 FGS Cuttings 82 3' 45.67" W 29 25' 53.10" N Citra 60 115
39 W-17511 FGS Core 82 9'3.66" W 29 16' 23.09" N Reddick 82 70
40 ROMP-128 SWFWMD Core 82 25' 38.92" W 29 6' 17.72" N Dunnellon 50 --
41 W-77 FGS Cuttings 82 16' 25.65" W 29 14' 0.09" N Cotton Plant 155 920
42 W-171 FGS Cuttings 82 29' 5.62" W 29 23' 34.11" N Williston 74 114
43 W-173 FGS Cuttings 82 21' 1.63" W 29 27' 37.11" N Flemington 97 142
44 W-177 FGS Cuttings 82 0' 59.46" W 29 29' 8.02" N Citra 76 95
45 W-204 FGS Cuttings 82 8'9.40" W 29 4'9.81" N Shady 64 115
46 W-205 FGS Cuttings 82 12' 11.67" W 29 3'3.08" N Shady 67 105
47 W-206 FGS Cuttings 82 17' 3.66" W 29 3' 11.08" N Dunnellon SE 82 125
48 W-207 FGS Cuttings 82 20' 52.65" W 29 3' 0.08" N Dunnellon SE 64 110
49 W-208 FGS Cuttings 82 24' 57.64" W 29 3' 10.08" N Dunnellon 61 107
50 W-651 FGS Cuttings 82 22' 1.65" W 29 3'44.08" N Dunnellon SE 64 160
51 W-653 FGS Cuttings 82 28' 22.10" W 29 21' 43.57" N Morriston 70 130
52 W-888 FGS Cuttings 82 8' 8.67" W 29 11' 10.08" N Ocala West 141 455
53 W-891 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 22.49" W 29 23' 45.03" N McIntosh 83 370
54 W-892 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 27.92" W 29 18' 36.26" N Reddick 92 380
55 W-901 FGS Cuttings 82 15' 44.65" W 29 20' 10.10" N Fairfield 165 4334
56 W-1147 FGS Cuttings 82 1'0.15" W 29 10' 55.65" N Ocala East 56 91
57 W-1150 FGS Cuttings 82 0' 45.68" W 29 11' 9.08" N Ocala East 49 92
58 W-1152 FGS Cuttings 82 1'44.68" W 29 10' 17.08" N Ocala East 42 112
59 W-1154 FGS Cuttings 82 2' 43.68" W 29 9'25.08" N Ocala East 70 76
60 W-1155 FGS Cuttings 82 2' 43.68" W 29 8'33.08" N Ocala East 86 93








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Map Well Data Sample Longitude Latitude 24K Quad Elevation (feet) Total Depth (feet)
ID Label Source Type
61 W-1156 FGS Cuttings 82 3' 43.68" W 29 8'32.08" N Ocala East 102 82
62 W-1157 FGS Cuttings 82 3' 43.68" W 29 7'40.08" N Ocala East 75 83
63 W-1158 FGS Cuttings 82 4' 43.68" W 29 7'40.08" N Ocala East 77 55
64 W-1161 FGS Cuttings 82 4' 42.68" W 29 6' 48.08" N Belleview 70 94
65 W-1163 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 40.68" W 29 5'3.08" N Belleview 65 74
66 W-1165 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 40.68" W 29 4' 11.07" N Belleview 69 77
67 W-1166 FGS Cuttings 82 7' 40.67" W 29 4' 10.08" N Shady 75 81
68 W-1168 FGS Cuttings 82 8'40.67" W 29 3' 18.07" N Shady 73 53
69 W-1169 FGS Cuttings 82 9' 39.67" W 29 3' 18.08" N Shady 79 88
70 W-1171 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 40.03" W 29 2' 48.20" N Shady 92 101
71 W-1172 FGS Cuttings 82 11'39.67" W 29 2' 25.08" N Shady 71 79
72 W-1173 FGS Cuttings 82 13' 40.66" W 29 2' 23.08" N Shady 83 91
73 W-1175 FGS Cuttings 82 15' 40.66" W 29 2' 24.08" N Dunnellon SE 73 81
74 W-1176 FGS Cuttings 82 16' 39.66" W 29 2' 26.08" N Dunnellon SE 79 87
75 W-1177 FGS Cuttings 82 17'22.25" W 29 2'37.01" N Dunnellon SE 48 57
76 W-1178 FGS Cuttings 82 17' 40.66" W 29 2' 24.08" N Dunnellon SE 55 53
77 W-1179 FGS Cuttings 82 18'39.65" W 29 2'24.08" N Dunnellon SE 72 72
78 W-1180 FGS Cuttings 82 19' 38.08" W 29 2' 39.11" N Dunnellon SE 63 72
79 W-1181 FGS Cuttings 82 20' 40.65" W 29 2' 24.08" N Dunnellon SE 64 72
80 W-1182 FGS Cuttings 82 21' 39.65" W 29 2' 24.08" N Dunnellon SE 60 69
81 W-1185 FGS Cuttings 82 23' 39.65" W 29 2' 26.08" N Dunnellon 63 72
82 W-1192 FGS Cuttings 82 24' 38.65" W 29 2' 44.08" N Dunnellon 64 62
83 W-1193 FGS Cuttings 82 23' 37.65" W 29 2' 54.08" N Dunnellon 65 86
84 W-1198 FGS Cuttings 82 27' 36.64" W 29 2' 42.09" N Dunnellon 31 115
85 W-1199 FGS Cuttings 82 27' 57.64" W 29 2'28.09" N Dunnellon 37 83
86 W-1369 FGS Cuttings 82 3'28.68" W 29 7'27.08" N Belleview 77 133
87 W-1482 FGS Cuttings 82 0' 39.14" W 29 6' 1.95" N Belleview 64 4630
88 W-1766 FGS Cuttings 82 11'40.61" W 29 23' 26.51" N McIntosh 97 305
89 W-1868 FGS Cuttings 82 9' 52.98" W 29 29' 23.00" N McIntosh 64 125
90 W-1904 B FGS Cuttings 82 3'21.05" W 29 15' 27.07" N Anthony 69 195
91 W-1919 FGS Cuttings 82 5'0.91" W 29 5'22.76" N Belleview 65 35
92 W-1921 FGS Cuttings 82 13' 2.39" W 29 27' 24.84" N McIntosh 63 455
93 W-1929 FGS Cuttings 82 14' 16.47" W 29 27' 8.93" N McIntosh 166 260
94 W-1930 FGS Cuttings 82 12' 59.50" W 29 28' 4.24" N McIntosh 74 80
95 W-1932 FGS Cuttings 82 7'17.47" W 29 9' 11.30" N Ocala East 132 109
96 W-1935 FGS Cuttings 82 15' 5.65" W 29 14'43.09" N Cotton Plant 131 108
97 W-1936 FGS Cuttings 82 20' 11.64" W 29 22' 30.10" N Flemington 142 260
98 W-1965 FGS Cuttings 82 5'15.71" W 29 17'23.83" N Anthony 77 80
99 W-1967 FGS Cuttings 82 5'59.27" W 29 11'21.94" N Ocala East 90 140
100 W-1975 FGS Cuttings 82 14' 49.65" W 29 13' 46.09" N Ocala West 157 170
101 W-1984 FGS Cuttings 82 8' 8.42" W 29 15' 23.94" N Reddick 95 90
102 W-2217 FGS Cuttings 82 8'5.51" W 29 10' 27.19" N Ocala West 115 105
103 W-2219 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 20.79" W 29 15' 13.49" N Anthony 77 105
104 W-2569 FGS Cuttings 82 7'45.72" W 29 11' 56.82" N Ocala West 74 1080
105 W-2596 FGS Cuttings 82 7'31.53" W 29 13' 1.60" N Ocala West 63 175
106 W-3142 FGS Cuttings 82 14' 59.64" W 29 24' 43.70" N McIntosh 156 110
107 W-3149 FGS Cuttings 82 14' 43.65" W 29 23' 49.10" N McIntosh 103 70
108 W-3231 FGS Cuttings 82 5'42.67" W 29 11' 10.08" N Ocala East 105 215
109 W-3294 FGS Cuttings 82 7'20.57" W 29 9'30.59" N Ocala East 101 120
110 W-3295 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 34.75" W 29 11'29.58" N Ocala East 97 110
111 W-3688 FGS Cuttings 82 5'22.67" W 29 11' 42.08" N Ocala East 83 190
112 W-3691 FGS Cuttings 82 8' 59.45" W 29 11' 18.48" N Ocala West 72 165
113 W-3734 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 18.02" W 29 7'35.22" N Ocala East 92 86
114 W-3834 FGS Cuttings 82 9'31.01" W 29 13' 54.66" N Ocala West 73 110
115 W-4004 FGS Cuttings 82 3'50.63" W 29 3'37.02" N Belleview 84 100
116 W-4009 FGS Cuttings 82 26' 29.64" W 29 2' 36.09" N Dunnellon 53 39
117 W-4010 FGS Cuttings 82 26' 45.64" W 29 2' 38.09" N Dunnellon 45 68
118 W-4251 FGS Cuttings 82 8'21.77" W 29 10' 52.77" N Ocala West 118 385
119 W-4789 FGS Cuttings 82 13' 28.66" W 29 11' 44.09" N Ocala West 95 260
120 W-4790 FGS Cuttings 82 13' 44.66" W 29 11' 28.09" N Ocala West 86 230
121 W-5526 FGS Cuttings 82 3' 19.75" W 29 3'35.37" N Belleview 100 205
122 W-5539 FGS Cuttings 82 13' 15.66" W 29 10' 10.09" N Ocala West 73 90
123 W-5626 FGS Cuttings 82 13' 40.65" W 29 29' 9.11" N McIntosh 85 56
124 W-5679 FGS Cuttings 82 9'40.66" W 29 12' 0.09" N Ocala West 60 145








OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


Map Well Data Sample Longitude Latitude 24K Quad Elevation (feet) Total Depth (feet)
ID Label Source Type
125 W-5766 FGS Cuttings 82 9'38.67" W 29 11' 9.09" N Ocala West 75 80
126 W-5789 FGS Cuttings 82 0'37.25" W 29 0' 19.89" N Belleview 95 112
127 W-5968 FGS Cuttings 82 13' 16.66" W 29 10' 33.09" N Ocala West 74 105
128 W-6016 FGS Cuttings 82 2' 33.42" W 29 2' 6.00" N Belleview 81 80
129 W-6023 FGS Cuttings 82 3' 5.92" W 29 4' 5.44" N Belleview 69 75
130 W-6260 FGS Cuttings 82 12' 0.14" W 29 22' 33.45" N McIntosh 85 110
131 W-6473 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 55.41" W 29 11' 19.36" N Ocala West 70 403
132 W-6915 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 33.49" W 29 17' 24.15" N Anthony 87 125
133 W-6918 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 47.12" W 29 10' 10.54" N Ocala West 70 95
134 W-7029 FGS Cuttings 82 11' 13.66" W 29 8' 51.08" N Ocala West 79 105
135 W-7034 FGS Cuttings 82 11'33.66" W 29 17' 57.09" N Reddick 84 185
136 W-7038 FGS Cuttings 82 3'54.55" W 29 12' 48.09" N Ocala East 54 115
137 W-7039 FGS Cuttings 82 11' 39.66" W 29 12' 56.09" N Ocala West 76 177
138 W-7092 FGS Cuttings 82 14' 40.65" W 29 12' 59.09" N Ocala West 62 134
139 W-7094 FGS Cuttings 82 8' 40.67" W 29 14' 41.09" N Ocala West 80 60
140 W-7392 FGS Cuttings 82 7'20.96" W 29 18' 24.13" N Anthony 78 75
141 W-7529 FGS Cuttings 82 11' 0.22" W 29 5'50.04" N Shady 98 155
142 W-7530 FGS Cuttings 82 11' 1.82" W 29 5'35.43" N Shady 94 125
143 W-7534 FGS Cuttings 82 26' 36.64" W 29 0' 55.08" N Dunnellon 110 4490
144 W-7605 FGS Cuttings 82 11' 12.66" W 29 11' 12.09" N Ocala West 71 150
145 W-7663 FGS Cuttings 82 5' 18.68" W 29 9'6.08" N Ocala East 75 200
146 W-7697 FGS Cuttings 82 2' 43.69" W 29 0' 40.07" N Belleview 97 230
147 W-7744 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 28.49" W 29 9'43.59" N Ocala West 77 153
148 W-7841 FGS Cuttings 82 14' 48.65" W 29 24' 23.10" N McIntosh 100 130
149 W-7899 FGS Cuttings 82 24' 57.64" W 29 7'38.09" N Romeo 43 46
150 W-7900 FGS Cuttings 82 25' 4.64" W 29 4'48.09" N Dunnellon 50 93
151 W-7902 FGS Cuttings 82 18' 6.65" W 29 6' 23.08" N Dunnellon SE 80 60
152 W-7903 FGS Cuttings 82 19' 6.65" W 29 4' 12.08" N Dunnellon SE 97 84
153 W-7904 FGS Cuttings 82 19' 6.65" W 29 3'7.08" N Dunnellon SE 61 60
154 W-7905 FGS Cuttings 82 19' 11.65" W 29 1' 4.08" N Dunnellon SE 60 45
155 W-7907 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 12.67" W 29 7'43.08" N Ocala West 100 82
156 W-7908 FGS Cuttings 82 9'28.43" W 29 4'0.91" N Shady 74 80
157 W-7909 FGS Cuttings 82 9'2.61" W 29 2' 57.70" N Shady 80 82
158 W-7910 FGS Cuttings 82 8' 14.67" W 29 1' 34.07" N Shady 79 70
159 W-7912 FGS Cuttings 82 4'47.37" W 29 9' 16.42" N Ocala East 68 45
160 W-7913 FGS Cuttings 82 2' 56.18" W 29 8' 18.48" N Ocala East 90 110
161 W-7915 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 8.44" W 29 11' 11.68" N Ocala East 108 90
162 W-7916 FGS Cuttings 82 4'55.53" W 29 13' 15.91" N Ocala East 50 40
163 W-7917 FGS Cuttings 82 0' 26.65" W 29 10' 40.53" N Ocala East 61 180
164 W-7988 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 11.56" W 29 11'30.69" N Ocala West 81 120
165 W-8009 FGS Cuttings 82 7'26.37" W 29 22' 46.44" N Citra 80 105
166 W-8332 FGS Cuttings 82 11'38.66" W 29 13' 47.09" N Ocala West 85 155
167 W-8406 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 37.66" W 29 12' 2.09" N Ocala West 80 130
168 W-8411 FGS Cuttings 82 1' 55.70" W 29 11'31.93" N Ocala East 54 192
169 W-8419 FGS Cuttings 82 25' 10.64" W 29 2' 25.08" N Dunnellon 64 83
170 W-8423 FGS Cuttings 82 3'34.68" W 29 8' 26.08" N Ocala East 79 136
171 W-8432 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 18.84" W 29 12' 7.58" N Ocala East 81 100
172 W-8562 FGS Cuttings 82 2' 43.68" W 29 12' 55.09" N Ocala East 45 105
173 W-8579 FGS Cuttings 82 29' 18.64" W 29 2' 16.09" N Dunnellon 56 196
174 W-8581 FGS Cuttings 82 3'9.68" W 29 9' 55.27" N Ocala East 80 87
175 W-8770 FGS Cuttings 82 12' 51.65" W 29 25' 3.10" N McIntosh 120 410
176 W-8771 FGS Cuttings 82 17' 51.64" W 29 24' 52.10" N Flemington 110 150
177 W-8772 FGS Cuttings 82 0' 44.84" W 29 6' 47.38" N Belleview 55 140
178 W-8795 FGS Cuttings 82 5'53.87" W 29 10' 5.31" N Ocala East 66 140
179 W-10266 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 9.75" W 29 20' 23.97" N Anthony 97 130
180 W-10268 FGS Cuttings 82 8' 24.66" W 29 21' 6.10" N Reddick 90 148
181 W-10277 FGS Cuttings 82 19' 53.64" W 29 26' 50.11" N Flemington 137 615
182 W-10329 FGS Cuttings 82 0' 4.69" W 29 5'35.07" N Belleview 90 226
183 W-10350 FGS Cuttings 82 5'42.67" W 29 12' 2.09" N Ocala East 34 205
184 W-10391 FGS Cuttings 82 27' 49.92" W 29 0' 33.97" N Dunnellon 120 450
185 W-10395 FGS Cuttings 82 0' 45.68" W 29 12' 54.08" N Ocala East 64 160
186 W-10439 FGS Cuttings 82 26' 23.47" W 29 1' 40.21" N Dunnellon 50 280
187 W-10578 FGS Cuttings 82 0' 44.69" W 29 4' 10.07" N Belleview 100 158
188 W-10792 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 37.66" W 29 14' 41.09" N Ocala West 71 125








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Map Well Data Sample Longitude Latitude 24K Quad Elevation (feet) Total Depth (feet)
ID Label Source Type
189 W-10796 FGS Cuttings 82 26' 37.64" W 29 1'51.08" N Dunnellon 53 90
190 W-10805 FGS Cuttings 82 3'42.68" W 29 3' 18.07" N Belleview 87 89
191 W-10849 FGS Cuttings 82 14' 51.65" W 29 23' 15.10" N McIntosh 190 185
192 W-11189 FGS Cuttings 82 3'43.68" W 29 11' 10.08" N Ocala East 85 76
193 W-11190 FGS Cuttings 82 25' 36.64" W 29 4'28.09" N Dunnellon 42 140
194 W-11191 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 42.67" W 29 12' 1.09" N Ocala East 105 87
195 W-11192 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 36.66" W 29 9'2.08" N Ocala West 90 150
196 W-11195 FGS Cuttings 82 8'32.47" W 29 13' 41.86" N Ocala West 63 93
197 W-11199 FGS Cuttings 82 5'42.67" W 29 10' 17.08" N Ocala East 63 160
198 W-11201 FGS Cuttings 82 3'44.12" W 29 13' 48.30" N Ocala East 65 120
199 W-11202 FGS Cuttings 82 14' 38.65" W 29 13' 47.09" N Ocala West 120 121
200 W-11391 FGS Cuttings 82 3' 42.68" W 29 4' 10.07" N Belleview 80 140
201 W-11392 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 40.67" W 29 5' 1.08" N Shady 70 200
202 W-11602 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 51.66" W 29 25' 7.10" N Citra 75 68
203 W-11635 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 40.67" W 29 6' 48.08" N Belleview 67 67
204 W-11638 FGS Cuttings 82 7' 41.67" W 29 12' 55.09" N Ocala West 75 131
205 W-11649 FGS Cuttings 82 5'42.68" W 29 7'41.08" N Ocala East 80 90
206 W-11654 FGS Cuttings 82 9' 18.87" W 29 15' 35.20" N Reddick 76 120
207 W-11655 FGS Cuttings 82 11' 40.66" W 29 9'25.08" N Ocala West 80 345
208 W-11673 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 42.67" W 29 8' 32.08" N Ocala East 76 390
209 W-11703 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 40.67" W 29 0' 38.07" N Shady 87 256
210 W-11775 FGS Cuttings 82 4' 43.67" W 29 17' 18.09" N Anthony 68 110
211 W-11813 FGS Cuttings 82 27' 33.64" W 29 0' 56.08" N Dunnellon 80 184
212 W-11930 FGS Cuttings 82 7'43.67" W 29 16' 22.09" N Reddick 70 145
213 W-11932 FGS Cuttings 82 11' 41.66" W 29 15' 57.09" N Reddick 70 245
214 W-11942 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 15.67" W 29 7'34.08" N Ocala West 77 305
215 W-11944 FGS Cuttings 82 11' 40.66" W 29 12' 1.09" N Ocala West 62 135
216 W-12037 FGS Cuttings 82 1' 43.69" W 29 2' 25.07" N Belleview 75 162
217 W-12039 FGS Cuttings 82 11' 39.66" W 29 11' 9.09" N Ocala West 72 120
218 W-12086 FGS Cuttings 82 2' 43.68" W 29 10' 18.08" N Ocala East 105 190
219 W-12184 FGS Cuttings 82 9'35.66" W 29 13' 44.09" N Ocala West 65 142
220 W-12336 FGS Cuttings 82 5'41.68" W 29 4' 11.07" N Belleview 78 255
221 W-12490 FGS Cuttings 82 5'41.68" W 29 5' 55.08" N Belleview 80 100
222 W-12491 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 43.67" W 29 13' 48.09" N Ocala East 65 90
223 W-12492 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 40.67" W 29 7'41.08" N Ocala East 66 165
224 W-12499 FGS Cuttings 82 4'42.68" W 29 4' 10.07" N Belleview 110 100
225 W-12500 FGS Cuttings 82 27' 36.64" W 29 0' 5.08" N Dunnellon 153 160
226 W-13084 FGS Cuttings 82 11' 51.65" W 29 22' 26.10" N Reddick 85 141
227 W-13087 FGS Cuttings 82 6' 42.67" W 29 17' 18.09" N Anthony 84 113
228 W-13142 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 36.66" W 29 16' 26.09" N Reddick 107 240
229 W-13144 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 50.66" W 29 16' 24.09" N Reddick 97 260
230 W-16212 FGS Cuttings 82 7'42.67" W 29 17' 18.09" N Reddick 90 120
231 W-16215 FGS Cuttings 82 10' 37.66" W 29 15' 34.09" N Reddick 90 150
232 W-16233 FGS Cuttings 82 4'42.68" W 29 5'3.08" N Belleview 70 80
233 W-16799 FGS Cuttings 82 4'43.67" W 29 18' 10.09" N Anthony 75 180
234 W-17483 FGS Cuttings 82 9'32.65" W 29 28' 37.11" N McIntosh 68 13
235 W-17780 FGS Cuttings 82 7'37.66" W 29 28' 37.10" N McIntosh 60 41
236 W-18274 FGS Cuttings 82 3'21.68" W 29 3' 5.07" N Belleview 100 --
237 -111931001 SRWMD Water Well 82 27' 15.99" W 29 29' 16.99" N Williston 81 --
238 -112033001 SRWMD Water Well 82 18' 26.99" W 29 29' 3.99" N Flemington 172 --
239 -112035001 SRWMD Water Well 82 16' 35.99" W 29 29' 11.99" N Flemington 90 --
240 -112132001 SRWMD Water Well 82 13' 56.99" W 29 29' 12.99" N McIntosh 84 56
241 -112136001 SRWMD Water Well 82 9'47.99" W 29 29' 3.99" N McIntosh 61 81
242 -112136002 SRWMD Water Well 82 9'58.99" W 29 28' 7.99" N McIntosh 64 125
243 -111835001 SRWMD Water Well 82 28' 44.99" W 29 29' 28.99" N Williston 102 --
244 -062210003 SRWMD Water Well 82 5'4.99" W 29 29' 8.99" N Citra 160 --
245 -062010011 SRWMD Water Well 82 17' 29.99" W 29 28' 47.99" N Flemington 90 --
246 -082227002 SRWMD Water Well 82 4'49.99" W 29 28' 40.99" N Citra 150 --
247 -121812001 SRWMD Water Well 82 27' 50.99" W 29 27' 24.99" N Williston 74 --
248 -121813001 SRWMD Water Well 82 28' 9.99" W 29 27' 17.99" N Williston 75 --
249 -121823001 SRWMD Water Well 82 29' 21.99" W 29 25' 41.99" N Williston 67 --
250 -121826001 SRWMD Water Well 82 28' 29.99" W 29 24' 29.99" N Williston 71 30
251 -121836001 SRWMD Water Well 82 27' 59.99" W 29 23' 43.99" N Williston 100 --
252 -121931001 SRWMD Water Well 82 26' 53.99" W 29 24' 8.99" N Williston 75 --








OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


Map Well Data Sample Longitude Latitude 24K Quad Elevation (feet) Total Depth (feet)
ID Label Source Type
253 -121932001 SRWMD Water Well 82 26' 4.99" W 29 23' 8.99" N Williston 87 --
254 -121933001 SRWMD Water Well 82 24' 59.99" W 29 23' 19.99" N Williston 85 --
255 -122016001 SRWMD Water Well 82 18' 50.99" W 29 26' 52.99" N Flemington 160 --
256 -131801001 SRWMD Water Well 82 27' 45.99" W 29 23' 2.99" N Williston 85 --
257 -131824001 SRWMD Water Well 82 27' 26.99" W 29 20' 20.99" N Morriston 60 --
258 -131836001 SRWMD Water Well 82 27' 30.99" W 29 18' 41.99" N Morriston 65 --
259 -131903001 SRWMD Water Well 82 24' 0.99" W 29 22' 52.99" N Williston 99 83
260 -131905001 SRWMD Water Well 82 26' 15.99" W 29 23' 14.99" N Williston 67 --
261 -131906001 SRWMD Water Well 82 26' 48.99" W 29 23' 4.99" N Williston 74 158
262 -131908001 SRWMD Water Well 82 26' 18.99" W 29 22' 9.99" N Morriston 67 --
263 -131915001 SRWMD Water Well 82 23' 49.99" W 29 21' 5.99" N Morriston 93 --
264 -132009001 SRWMD Water Well 82 18' 24.99" W 29 21' 45.99" N Fairfield 120 --
265 -141814001 SRWMD Water Well 82 28' 24.99" W 29 16' 0.99" N Morriston 60 84
266 -141824001 SRWMD Water Well 82 27' 18.99" W 29 14' 34.99" N Romeo 75 --
267 -141907001 SRWMD Water Well 82 26' 50.99" W 29 16' 19.99" N Morriston 69 75
268 -141919001 SRWMD Water Well 82 27' 5.99" W 29 14' 34.99" N Romeo 70 --
269 -141931001 SRWMD Water Well 82 27' 13.99" W 29 13' 36.99" N Romeo 64 --
270 -151810001 SRWMD Water Well 82 29' 11.99" W 29 11' 59.99" N Romeo 105 --
271 -151813001 SRWMD Water Well 82 26' 31.99" W 29 10' 55.99" N Romeo 57 --
272 -151823001 SRWMD Water Well 82 27' 35.99" W 29 9'29.99" N Romeo 55 --
273 -161801001 SRWMD Water Well 82 26' 53.99" W 29 6' 44.99" N Dunnellon 56 --
274 -161813001 SRWMD Water Well 82 27' 6.99" W 29 5' 13.99" N Dunnellon 113 482
275 -161814001 SRWMD Water Well 82 27' 20.99" W 29 5'37.99" N Dunnellon 135 --
276 -161827001 SRWMD Water Well 82 28' 14.99" W 29 3'25.99" N Dunnellon 52 --
277 -061929002 SRWMD Water Well 82 25' 27.99" W 29 26' 3.99" N Williston 125 --
278 3-001-005 SJRWMD Water Well 82 3' 59.00" W 29 28' 57.00" N Citra 81 --
279 810072 SJRWMD Water Well 82 15' 25.00" W 29 29' 33.00" N Flemington 109 --
280 A-0456 SJRWMD Water Well 82 8' 1.00" W 29 27' 20.00" N McIntosh 65 --
281 A-0728 SJRWMD Water Well 82 4'37.00" W 29 26' 42.00" N Citra 54 --
282 A-0736 SJRWMD Water Well 82 4'3.00" W 29 26' 54.00" N Citra 54 --
283 A-0737 SJRWMD Water Well 82 3' 31.00" W 29 27' 30.00" N Citra 54 --
284 A-0746 SJRWMD Water Well 82 4' 2.00" W 29 26' 44.00" N Citra 54 --
285 M-0010 SJRWMD Water Well 82 7'30.00" W 29 5'49.00" N Shady 74 --
286 M-0015 SJRWMD Water Well 82 8' 13.00" W 29 13' 2.00" N Ocala West 59 --
287 M-0016 SJRWMD Water Well 82 11' 1.00" W 29 12' 22.00" N Ocala West 73 --
288 M-0018 SJRWMD Water Well 82 6' 55.00" W 29 11' 1.00" N Ocala East 120 --
289 M-0019 SJRWMD Water Well 82 7' 52.00" W 29 10' 18.00" N Ocala West 103 --
290 M-0052 SJRWMD Water Well 82 2' 28.00" W 29 22' 4.00" N Anthony 69 --
291 M-0055 SJRWMD Water Well 82 8' 29.00" W 29 20' 21.00" N Reddick 76 --
292 M-0057 SJRWMD Water Well 82 5'4.00" W 29 22' 32.00" N Citra 64 --
293 M-0063 SJRWMD Water Well 82 6' 42.00" W 29 20' 20.00" N Anthony 95 --
294 M-0072 SJRWMD Water Well 82 8' 7.00" W 29 0' 33.00" N Shady 70 --
295 M-0074 SJRWMD Water Well 82 4'47.00" W 29 1' 39.00" N Belleview 88 --
296 M-0077 SJRWMD Water Well 82 9'6.00" W 29 2' 0.00" N Shady 68 --
297 M-0082 SJRWMD Water Well 82 4'33.00" W 29 3'36.00" N Belleview 74 --
298 M-0084 SJRWMD Water Well 82 4' 22.00" W 29 4' 14.00" N Belleview 104 --
299 M-0085 SJRWMD Water Well 82 0' 17.00" W 29 4' 17.00" N Belleview 76 --
300 M-0086 SJRWMD Water Well 82 8' 27.00" W 29 12' 39.00" N Ocala West 49 --
301 M-0093 SJRWMD Water Well 82 3'27.00" W 29 7' 14.00" N Belleview 86 --
302 M-0100 SJRWMD Water Well 82 4'39.00" W 29 9'7.00" N Ocala East 82 --
303 M-0101 SJRWMD Water Well 82 11' 2.00" W 29 9'32.00" N Ocala West 89 --
304 M-0102 SJRWMD Water Well 82 4'0.00" W 29 9'35.00" N Ocala East 75 --
305 M-0106 SJRWMD Water Well 82 2' 55.00" W 29 10' 5.00" N Ocala East 72 --
306 M-0107 SJRWMD Water Well 82 3'42.00" W 29 10' 6.00" N Ocala East 87 --
307 M-0111 SJRWMD Water Well 82 3'40.00" W 29 10' 27.00" N Ocala East 87 --
308 M-0119 SJRWMD Water Well 82 2' 48.00" W 29 11' 16.00" N Ocala East 103 --
309 M-0122 SJRWMD Water Well 82 5'26.00" W 29 11'49.00" N Ocala East 74 --
310 M-0125 SJRWMD Water Well 82 2' 49.00" W 29 13' 34.00" N Ocala East 64 --
311 M-0126 SJRWMD Water Well 82 5' 12.00" W 29 13' 41.00" N Ocala East 64 --
312 M-0127 SJRWMD Water Well 82 9' 15.00" W 29 13' 44.00" N Ocala West 64 --
313 M-0128 SJRWMD Water Well 82 7'54.00" W 29 13' 46.00" N Ocala West 74 --
314 M-0135 SJRWMD Water Well 82 7'34.00" W 29 17' 25.00" N Reddick 87 --
315 M-0139 SJRWMD Water Well 82 11' 2.00" W 29 18' 20.00" N Reddick 90 --
316 M-0141 SJRWMD Water Well 82 12' 58.00" W 29 20' 32.00" N Reddick 144 --








FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


Map Well Data Sample Longitude Latitude 24K Quad Elevation (feet) Total Depth (feet)
ID Label Source Type
317 M-0147 SJRWMD Water Well 82 6' 16.00" W 29 21' 6.00" N Anthony 77 --
318 M-0148 SJRWMD Water Well 82 11'43.00" W 29 21' 28.00" N Reddick 109 --
319 M-0152 SJRWMD Water Well 82 12' 53.00" W 29 21' 58.00" N Reddick 93 --
320 M-0154 SJRWMD Water Well 82 10' 5.00" W 29 23' 43.00" N McIntosh 59 --
321 M-0157 SJRWMD Water Well 82 7'22.00" W 29 24' 2.00" N Citra 78 --
322 M-0162 SJRWMD Water Well 82 1' 52.00" W 29 26' 14.00" N Citra 74 --
323 M-0164 SJRWMD Water Well 82 15' 55.00" W 29 28' 53.00" N Flemington 176 --
324 M-0205 SJRWMD Water Well 82 9'32.00" W 29 10' 44.00" N Ocala West 68 --
325 M-0231 SJRWMD Water Well 82 8' 5.00" W 29 10' 51.00" N Ocala West 124 --
326 M-0239 SJRWMD Water Well 82 7'26.00" W 29 11' 49.00" N Ocala East 94 --
327 M-0244 SJRWMD Water Well 82 8' 36.00" W 29 12' 4.00" N Ocala West 59 --
328 M-0250 SJRWMD Water Well 82 4'28.00" W 29 12' 25.00" N Ocala East 64 --
329 M-0301 SJRWMD Water Well 82 4'3.00" W 29 11' 5.00" N Ocala East 99 --
330 M-0302 SJRWMD Water Well 82 3'25.00" W 29 10' 43.00" N Ocala East 86 --
331 M-0303 SJRWMD Water Well 82 5'8.00" W 29 24' 0.00" N Citra 58 --
332 M-0304 SJRWMD Water Well 82 6' 34.00" W 29 24' 58.00" N Citra 68 --
333 M-0305 SJRWMD Water Well 82 13' 55.00" W 29 27' 9.00" N McIntosh 159 --
334 M-0308 SJRWMD Water Well 82 1' 30.00" W 29 8' 41.00" N Ocala East 64 --
335 M-0345 SJRWMD Water Well 82 12' 31.00" W 29 25' 37.00" N McIntosh 72 --
336 M-0347 SJRWMD Water Well 82 14' 16.00" W 29 26' 45.00" N McIntosh 109 --
337 M-0351 SJRWMD Water Well 82 12' 51.00" W 29 27' 0.00" N McIntosh 63 --
338 M-0355 SJRWMD Water Well 82 2' 14.00" W 29 13' 8.00" N Ocala East 59 --
339 M-0356 SJRWMD Water Well 82 2' 33.00" W 29 2' 15.00" N Belleview 91 --
340 M-0361 SJRWMD Water Well 82 9'33.00" W 29 25' 24.00" N McIntosh 59 --
341 M-0363 SJRWMD Water Well 82 10' 36.00" W 29 24' 24.00" N McIntosh 73 --
342 M-0367 SJRWMD Water Well 82 13' 17.00" W 29 26' 22.00" N McIntosh 158 --
343 M-0368 SJRWMD Water Well 82 12' 59.00" W 29 26' 21.00" N McIntosh 89 --
344 M-0370 SJRWMD Water Well 82 13' 9.00" W 29 26' 32.00" N McIntosh 109 --
345 M-0372 SJRWMD Water Well 82 13' 8.00" W 29 26'5.00" N McIntosh 131 --
346 M-0374 SJRWMD Water Well 82 13' 0.00" W 29 27' 0.00" N McIntosh 67 --
347 M-0382 SJRWMD Water Well 82 8' 19.00" W 29 6' 2.00" N Shady 74 --
348 M-0420 SJRWMD Water Well 82 1' 5.00" W 29 29' 10.00" N Citra 69 --
349 M-0425 SJRWMD Water Well 82 3' 12.00" W 29 17' 9.00" N Anthony 67 --
350 M-0428 SJRWMD Water Well 82 1' 18.00" W 29 11'34.00" N Ocala East 48 --
351 M-0430 SJRWMD Water Well 82 3'6.00" W 29 12' 25.00" N Ocala East 54 --
352 M-0444 SJRWMD Water Well 82 5'48.00" W 29 8'25.00" N Ocala East 118 --
353 M-0447 SJRWMD Water Well 82 7'0.00" W 29 24' 15.00" N Citra 84 --
354 M-0452 SJRWMD Water Well 82 7'27.00" W 29 13' 21.00" N Ocala East 74 --
355 M-0457 SJRWMD Water Well 82 4'48.00" W 29 1' 55.00" N Belleview 106 --
356 M-0518 SJRWMD Water Well 82 14' 37.00" W 29 6' 31.00" N Shady 84 --
357 M-0528 SJRWMD Water Well 82 3'43.00" W 29 8' 23.00" N Ocala East 89 --
358 M-0529 SJRWMD Water Well 82 11' 51.00" W 29 25' 20.00" N McIntosh 59 --
359 NPN21 SJRWMD Water Well 82 6' 11.00" W 29 27' 13.00" N Citra 69 --
360 62 SWFWMD Water Well 82 26' 50.34" W 29 0' 41.91" N Dunnellon 108.19 36
361 360 SWFWMD Water Well 82 15' 23.33" W 29 2' 15.91" N Dunnellon SE 76.97 51
362 382 SWFWMD Water Well 82 12' 8.32" W 29 2' 38.91" N Shady 64.7 65
363 387 SWFWMD Water Well 82 28' 36.35" W 29 3'25.90" N Dunnellon 80.92 115
364 467 SWFWMD Water Well 82 28' 40.35" W 29 2' 13.90" N Dunnellon 44.28 78
365 1122 SWFWMD Water Well 82 12' 57.33" W 29 19' 10.88" N Reddick 170 186
366 1123 SWFWMD Water Well 82 24' 39.34" W 29 5'45.89" N Dunnellon 45 155
367 1124 SWFWMD Water Well 82 14' 43.34" W 29 15' 55.89" N Reddick 70 84
368 1126 SWFWMD Water Well 82 28' 14.35" W 29 6' 13.89" N Dunnellon 55 --
369 1131 SWFWMD Water Well 82 26' 22.35" W 29 12' 6.88" N Romeo 55 --
370 1132 SWFWMD Water Well 82 21' 17.34" W 29 8'29.90" N Cotton Plant 100 --
371 1134 SWFWMD Water Well 82 14' 14.33" W 29 5' 15.90" N Shady 80 80
372 1142 SWFWMD Water Well 82 21' 29.34" W 29 13' 54.91" N Cotton Plant 65 85
373 1144 SWFWMD Water Well 82 26' 59.35" W 29 4' 10.90" N Dunnellon 50 --
374 1145 SWFWMD Water Well 82 17' 39.34" W 29 19' 25.90" N Fairfield 140 185
375 1149 SWFWMD Water Well 82 25' 24.35" W 29 8' 45.88" N Romeo 70 106
376 1150 SWFWMD Water Well 82 27' 19.35" W 29 8' 55.89" N Romeo 60 243
377 1151 SWFWMD Water Well 82 23' 9.34" W 29 5' 10.90" N Dunnellon 70 --
378 1155 SWFWMD Water Well 82 14' 52.33" W 29 11' 52.92" N Ocala West 85 --
379 1158 SWFWMD Water Well 82 17' 14.35" W 29 25' 40.89" N Flemington 120 105
380 1159 SWFWMD Water Well 82 17' 44.34" W 29 8' 45.91" N Cotton Plant 75 85








OPEN-FILE REPORT 93


Map Well Data Sample Longitude Latitude 24K Quad Elevation (feet) Total Depth (feet)
ID Label Source Type
381 1160 SWFWMD Water Well 82 15' 18.34" W 29 22' 25.90" N Fairfield 140 90
382 1161 SWFWMD Water Well 82 18' 39.86" W 29 27' 6.93" N Flemington 150 16
383 1162 SWFWMD Water Well 82 14' 26.33" W 29 17' 40.88" N Reddick 160 145
384 1166 SWFWMD Water Well 82 23' 9.34" W 29 6' 20.91" N Dunnellon 70 --
385 1168 SWFWMD Water Well 82 10' 56.32" W 29 0'27.91" N Shady 85 95
386 1171 SWFWMD Water Well 82 21' 39.35" W 29 24' 20.90" N Flemington 130 120
387 1174 SWFWMD Water Well 82 13' 26.33" W 29 13' 22.89" N Ocala West 85 120
388 1341 SWFWMD Water Well 82 22' 53.34" W 29 1' 27.91" N Dunnellon 60 1000
389 1342 SWFWMD Water Well 82 20' 22.34" W 29 9'4.92" N Cotton Plant 75 88
390 1343 SWFWMD Water Well 82 20' 15.34" W 29 4'48.91" N Dunnellon SE 85 204
391 1345 SWFWMD Water Well 82 20' 36.34" W 29 3'27.91" N Dunnellon SE 50 80
392 1348 SWFWMD Water Well 82 27' 19.36" W 29 8' 55.90" N Romeo 60 143
393 1349 SWFWMD Water Well 82 25' 54.34" W 29 5' 18.90" N Dunnellon 100 60
394 1350 SWFWMD Water Well 82 26' 59.36" W 29 4' 10.91" N Dunnellon 70 --
395 1351 SWFWMD Water Well 82 27' 43.35" W 29 11'54.89" N Romeo 100 --
396 2224 SWFWMD Water Well 82 18' 53.69" W 29 1' 58.09" N Dunnellon SE 52.86 216
397 2492 SWFWMD Water Well 82 23' 43.63" W 29 15' 48.54" N Morriston ...-
398 2496 SWFWMD Water Well 82 11'38.90" W 29 9'5.80" N Ocala West -- 180
399 2502 SWFWMD Water Well 82 24' 41.32" W 29 7' 13.58" N Dunnellon .- -
400 2507 SWFWMD Water Well 82 25' 9.89" W 29 6' 17.05" N Dunnellon ...-
402 11582 SWFWMD Water Well 82 22' 9.34" W 29 9'35.90" N Cotton Plant 100 180
403 11586 SWFWMD Water Well 82 19' 54.34" W 29 7'55.90" N Cotton Plant 90 105
401 10721 SWFWMD Water Well 82 27' 47.35" W 29 6' 14.90" N Dunnellon 110.6 137
404 11729 SWFWMD Water Well 82 22' 14.36" W 29 27' 26.88" N Flemington 110 110
405 11730 SWFWMD Water Well 82 15' 34.33" W 29 4' 15.91" N Dunnellon SE 90 100
406 11779 SWFWMD Water Well 82 20' 48.34" W 29 5' 17.90" N Dunnellon SE -- 180
407 11780 SWFWMD Water Well 82 19' 52.34" W 29 4'24.91" N Dunnellon SE -- 170
408 11783 SWFWMD Water Well 82 14' 14.32" W 29 0' 40.92" N Shady -- 50
409 11784 SWFWMD Water Well 82 16' 26.34" W 29 17' 18.89" N Fairfield -- 200
410 11785 SWFWMD Water Well 82 29' 29.35" W 29 3'45.90" N Dunnellon -- 161
411 11786 SWFWMD Water Well 82 17' 32.33" W 29 9'9.90" N Cotton Plant -- 150
412 11787 SWFWMD Water Well 82 17' 32.34" W 29 9'9.90" N Cotton Plant -- 150
413 11788 SWFWMD Water Well 82 14' 14.33" W 29 6'35.91" N Shady -- 105
414 11790 SWFWMD Water Well 82 15' 9.33" W 29 12' 12.90" N Cotton Plant -- 105
415 11791 SWFWMD Water Well 82 29' 44.35" W 29 7'40.90" N Romeo -- 160
416 11857 SWFWMD Water Well 82 20' 44.34" W 29 7' 10.90" N Dunnellon SE 90 90
417 11858 SWFWMD Water Well 82 25' 36.34" W 29 2' 10.91" N Dunnellon 50 82
418 11859 SWFWMD Water Well 82 19' 2.33" W 29 0' 38.92" N Dunnellon SE 50 65
419 27703 SWFWMD Water Well 82 25' 56.10" W 29 15' 49.93" N Morriston ...-



*NOTE: Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD) Well Label is the well's
township, range, and section location. The format is as follows: + or indicates township north
(+) versus south (-); there is no need to include an east / west indicator for the range, as the entire
SRWMD is east of the Prime Meridian. Following the +/- are 6 digits representing the township,
range, and section (TTRRSS), and finally a 3 digit unique identifier assigned consecutively to
each well within a given section to differentiate wells with the same +/- and 6 digit number.


For example: -031224004 means Township 03 South, Range 12 East, Section 24, unique well
004.