• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Back Cover






Title: Nieuwe West-Indische gids
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00099461/00047
 Material Information
Title: Nieuwe West-Indische gids
Alternate Title: New West Indian guide
NWIG
Abbreviated Title: Nieuwe West-Indische gids
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: Dutch
Publisher: M. Nijhoff
Place of Publication: 's-Gravenhage
's-Gravenhage
Publication Date: 1 1962
Frequency: four no. a year
quarterly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Civilization -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Citation/Reference: America, history and life
Citation/Reference: Historical abstracts. Part A. Modern history abstracts
Citation/Reference: Historical abstracts. Part B. Twentieth century abstracts
Language: Dutch or English.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 40. jaarg. (juli 1960)-
General Note: Published: Dordrecht : Foris Publications, <1986->
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00099461
Volume ID: VID00047
Source Institution: University of the Netherlands Antilles
Holding Location: University of the Netherlands Antilles
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: alephbibnum - 000273853
oclc - 01760350
notis - ABP9733
lccn - sn 86012467
issn - 0028-9930
 Related Items
Preceded by: West-Indische gids
Preceded by: Christoffel
Preceded by: Vox guyane

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Half Title
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
    Copyright
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 186a
        Page 186b
        Page 186c
        Page 186d
        Page 186e
        Page 186f
        Page 186g
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 257a
        Page 257b
        Page 257c
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 288a
        Page 288b
        Page 288c
        Page 288d
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
    Back Cover
        Page 314
Full Text



Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Felhoen Kraal, Mr. Johanna L. G., Menkman, W.R., Westermann, Dr. J.H., Wagenaar Hummelinck, Dr. P., Kruijer, Dr. G.J.


nl



Voorkaft













Nederlands West-Indische Gids




nl



Titelblad



NIEUWE WEST-INDISCHE GIDS










Nederlands West-Indische Gids




nl



Titelblad



NIEUWE WEST-INDISCHE GIDS ONTSTAAN UIT DE WEST-INDISCHE GIDS VOX GUYANAE CHRISTOFFEL TWEE EN VEERTIGSTE JAARGANG 'S-GRAVENHAGE MARTINUS NIJHOFF 1962-1963










Nederlands West-Indische Gids




nl



Titelblad



/<// riyA/i rerc</, inc/urf/ny /w rijAf /o fronj/are or /o rrpro</uce /n/i 600* or par/ j rtcreo/in any/orm PRINTED IN THE NETHERLANDS










Nederlands West-Indische Gids




nl



Inhoud



INHOUD VAN DE TWEE EN VEERTIGSTE JAARGANG Alphen, G. van, Suriname in een onbekend journaal van 1693 303-313 Arends, H., BoA6/>rcAtng 58-59 Felhoen Kraal, J. L. G., BoAAes^rAtHg 61-66 Feriz, H., Een merkwaardige stenen kraal uit Suriname (A remarkable stone bead from Surinam); 7 afb. buiten de tekst 255-258 Gonggryp, J. W. & Dubelaar, C, De geschriften van Afaka in zijn Djoeka-schrift (The papers of Afaka in his Djuka script); 21 afb. 213-254 Henriquez, P. C, Problems relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao. Questions and answers i~54 Hoetink, H., Boe&fo;s/>re&mg 75~77 Hurault, Jean, Les Indiens de Guyane Francaise.



Problemes pratiques d'administration et de contacts de civilisation (The Indians of French Guiana: practical problems of administration and of contacts with civilization. De Indianen van Frans Guyana: Problemen van practische bestuursvoering en contact met 'de beschaving'); 6 afb. buiten de tekst 81-186 Kooyman, J., Boe^es/>re^ing 55~57 Kruijer, G. J., J3oees/>retng 66-71 Luyken, R., Voedingsfysiologisch onderzoek in Suriname (Research into nutritional physiology in Surinam) 190-200










Nederlands West-Indische Gids




nl



Inhoud



VI INHOUD VAN DE TWEE EN VEERTIGSTE JAARGANG Prins, J., Een Surinaams rechtsgeding over een Moslimse verstoting 201-207 Riemens, Hendrik, Simn Bolivar 289-302 Speckmann, J. D., Enkele uitkomsten van een sociologisch onderzoek onder de Hindostaanse leerlingen van de Mulo-school in Nieuw Nickerie 208-211 72-75, 77-79 Steen, L. J. van der, Boe6es/>r<;A:mg 57 Voorhoeve, J., De nalatenschap van A. H. A. Mamin, 1804-1837, en de Plantage Vrouwenvlijt. De Surinamica van het Surinaams Museum II (The estate left by A. H. A. Mamin, and Vrouwenvlijt plantation) 259-268 W. E. H. Winkels: Blankof'cier met palet en papier. De Surinamica van het Surinaams Museum III (W. E. H. Winkels: a Surinam draughtsman); 4 afb. buiten de tekst 269-288 Wagenaar Hummelinck, P., Fred. Oudschans Dentz, ; portreJ buitel de teteJ 2^7-2^ 60-61 BOEKBESPREKING Busch, Harald, en Hans Hermans, Cwrofao. Zowwige rfen t>aw en sonntg et/awd Sttwwy ^tc^wres 0/ a sunny is/anrf, i960 (P.W.H.) 60 Busch, Harald, en William C. Hochstuhl, der Kiwi^e /ente. /s/anrf o/ eteyna/ s^)n'^, i960 (P.W.H.) 60 Hartog, Joh., Cwyafao. Fan fto/owie to< aMtowomie, 1961 (J.



Kooyman) 55-57 Hoetink, H., //e< />airoo ua rf oz<rf Curapaose sawn/e)iMg. socto/ogiscAe s/wrfie, 1958 (G.J.K.) 66-71 rf, 1962 (J. D. Speckmann










Nederlands West-Indische Gids




nl



Inhoud



INHOUD VAN DE TWEE EN VEERTIGSTE JAARGANG VII Klass, Morton, Eos/ /n^tans n 7>mW: ^ s/tu/y o/ Ci4//wra/Periwtem:*, 1961 (J. D. Speckmann) 77~79 Mancius, W. van, O/w o <fc Go/wn, 1961 (L. J. van der Steen) 57 Ozinca, M. D. en H. van der Wal, De wonm^/ti i>ai Cwrofao in tfoord en 6eWrf, 1959 (J.F.K.) 63-66 Poll, Willem van de, SKmiawu, 1959 (P.W.H.) 61 Z> JVedeWanrfse ^n///en, i960 (P.W.H.) 61 Pool, John de, Zo was Curasao ()/ Cwrazao ^u 5* t/a), 1960 (H. Hoetink) 75~77 Rosenstand, E. E., Cuoi/anau /?M6tano, 1961 (H. Arends) 59 Terlingen, Juan, Las /4n///*s AVeWatufrsas n su fec*nt</a</.



Len^ua y /t/era/ura es/>aAo/as en /as .-J n/i/Zai iVeeWan^^as, 1961 (H. Arends) 38 W'alle, J. van de, .dcAter rfe S/>f/, 1959 (J.F.K.) 61-62










Nederlands West-Indische Gids




nl



Inhoud



NIEUWE WEST-INDISCHE GIDS Redactie Nederland Mr. Johanna L. G. Felhoen Kraal, Prof. Dr. G. J. Kruijer, W. R. Menkman, Dr. J. H. Westermann en Dr. P. Waoenaar Huumeunck, cretar, Sweelincklaan 84, Bilthoven.



Redactie Suriname Dr. Mr. J. H. Adhin, Dr. C. F. A. Bruijning, Dr. D. C. Geijskes, W. L. Salm en Mr. H. Pos, Mcrtfar, Postbus 291, Paramaribo.



Redactie Nederlandse Antillen Dn. O. Beaujon, Drs. Carlos Romer, Mr. Eroo de los Santos, Dr. L. W. Statius van Eps en Dr. Hans Hermans, Ktrrtara, Landhuis Brievengat, Curasao.



Eindredactie Dr. C. F. A. Bruijning, Oegstgeest, Dr. L. W. Statius van Eps, Curacao, en Dr. P. Waoenaar Huuueunck, cre/ar, Bilthoven. .Yo. /, december 1962, p. 1-80 samengesteld door Redacties Ned. Antillen & Nederland .Vo. f, februari 1963, p. 81-212 samengesteld door Redactie Nederland Ab. 5, mei 1963, p. 213-302 samengesteld door Redactie Suriname










Nederlands West-Indische Gids




nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


P. C. HENRIQUEZ PROBLEMS RELATING TO HYDROLOGY, WATER CONSERVATION, EROSION CONTROL, REFORESTATION AND AGRICULTURE IN CURACAO QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS Table of Contents No. of question and answer Difference between hydrological conditions on the islands constituting the Netherlands Antilles. i Comparison of hydrological situation on Curacao with other semi-arid regions. 2-4 Influence of dams is a complex problem. 5 What happens to the rain falling on Curacao ? 6 Number of dams in former times and their function. 7-8 Slow penetration of water caught by dams. 9-13 Function of dams in fruit groves. 14 Influence of dams on ground-water level. 15, 18-19, 59-61 Old versus new methods of dam-building. 16 Function of Shell dams. 17 Percentage of 'run-off'. 20 'Run-off' of paved areas. 21 Infiltration basins in residential areas. 22 Hydrological situation of limestone areas. 23-25 Which areas on Curacao can still be dammed ? 26 Government help for plantation owners in building dams. 27-29 Erosion and erosion control. 3^-35 Lowering of the water table and infiltration of sea water; overpumping, influence on wild vegetation and fruit groves; 'Radulphus Report' versus 'Krul Report' (see also Nos. 79-83)- 36-43 Control of ground-water extraction; a 'water law', influence of cesspools; influence of improvements in seawater distilling technique. 44~59 Forestation and climate in former times. 62-64 Influence of goats on the vegetation. 65-73, 76 Possibilities for reforestation; which areas, which plants to use; plants not palatable to goats; introduction of new plants, etc. 74-78








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


2 P. C. HENRIQUEZ Reforestation, versus deforestation as advocated in the 'Krul Report'. 7 Deforestation still practised on Curacao. 84 Geological data and hydrology. 85 Economic importance of agriculture in former times, and its decline. 86 Possibilities of re-establishing agricultural activities; evaluation for agriculture proper, horticulture, fructiculture, stock for meat production, dairy cattle, poultry, dry farming, rationalisation of horticulture and fructiculture. 87-104 Possibilities of cheap storage of water. 103 Summary of recommendations. 105 REFERENCES INDEX and Answers /s /Ae Aydro/o^ica/ st/wa/iow wore or /ess /A same /or a// /Ae si* ts/awds 0/ /A iVe/Aer/ands /ln/i//esj> The hydrological situation differs considerably from island to island.



It depends on a) total rainfall, 6) pattern of rainfall, c) topographical : pecularities, d) soil, e) subsoil, /) vegetation. There is a large difference ; in rainfall between the islands of Curacao, Aruba and Bonaire (Leeward j Group) with a yearly average of about 500 mm (= 20 inches) and the ;i islands of St.Martin, Saba and St. Eustatius (Windward Group) with j: a yearly average of about 1,000 mm (= 40 inches). Factors c, d, e and / |j are different for all the islands. Hence, few general statements are possible about the hydrological conditions on the islands, and any methods considered for use in improving the situation have to be studied for each island separately. /s /Aere any sigwi/ieaw/ dt//erewce oe/a/ee /Ae ^wan/t/y 0/ subsoil uia/r (rea/ire /o size, 0/ course) t' Cwrapao awd i o/Aer we//-Ano!tm semi-arid regions swcA as /Iruotia, New Mexico, i*7orida and /srae/P There is a substantial disadvantage on the side of Curacao.



Woo can /Ais 6e One significant factor is the size of the island. Being surrounded by the sea, a small, hilly island is, of course, much more in danger of spilling its water (underground mostly) into the ocean or being infiltrated by sea water than large land masses. Large landlocked basins (as in Israel), in whose subsoil the water collects from extensive mountainous areas, are (of course) non-existent in Curacao. Another very important factor








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 3 is the 'water-holding capacity' of the subsoil. There are two main types of subsoil out of which water can be extracted on Curasao, viz: diabase and limestone. Let us consider the diabase first. Diabase is a magmatic rock. In unaltered condition it is a very hard and tough material with a blue colour. Its chemical resistance is, however, comparatively low, so that it is attacked by the salts and/or the carbon dioxide present in surface water. Hence, fissures appear, which spread slowly throughout the mass of the rock as the centuries pass. The diabase in its 'weathered' condition has a brown colour and is neither hard nor tough. The water-holding capacity of the intricate network of mostly capillary fissures is, however, low compared with the water-holding capacity of sedimentary material such as sand, clay and peat. This explains why the underground water situation of Curacao is much worse than that of many other areas of like climatological condition. Only in the valleys, or in front of artificially built dams, is there enough sedimentary material and humus to guarantee a larger capacity for water storage. 4 How, /Aen, ts t7 possiWe /Aa/, n es/iwo/tn Me agnctW/urai ^>o/en/ta/*7tes 0/ /Ae ts/an^, />/acs /Ae Arizona and /sraW, wAere agWctW/f 6y irri^a/oti is />ra{ts<? an a /arg< sca/e, arc 50 o//t! ^>otn/ed out as ia/)/ to tv/ucA u/e The reason is that the profound topographical and geological differences and their implications are very often not clearly realized. The erratic behaviour of the subsoil water in Curacao is well known; 'good' wells occur very near 'poor' ones, 'salty' wells next door to 'sweet' ones. Everyone who has been engaged in digging wells on Curacao will realize how bewilderingly complicated the subsoil structure is. Systematic knowledge of this subsoil is still completely lacking, and many observed facts are still unexplained. The diabase is often interspersed with impervious layers and pockets of 'caliche' (tightly packed fine-grained limestone) and clay (sometimes buried under layers of 'undisturbed' diabase). The weathered diabase itself has quite a different appearance and properties from place to place; there are layers and pockets of friable tuffs, etc. 5 Does no/ /Ae ow7dtn o/ dams Ae/ wafcWa//y n msrt/ing tca/er n /A* suo-The influence of dams on water conservation is a very complex problem.



The real function and usefulness of dams can only be understood by a careful examination of the combined influences of the factors previously mentioned, viz: pattern of rainfall, condition of the soil, condition of the subsoil, vegetation and local topographical situation.



J3k/, aar/ /row any ae/at'fed efa/tta/ton 0/ /Ae jw//wence 0/ dams, ts 1/ no/ /rue ZAaZ a /arge />roor/io 0/ /Ae ratn/a// is itas/ed as rwn-o// into ZAe sea, and et/ery dro re<ajnrf 6y daws 's a osi/i/e gain?








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


4 P. C. HENRIQUEZ First of all, it is certainly not true in the particular case of Curacao that a large proportion of the rainfall is lost by run-off into the sea. The pattern of rainfall is such that every six years there is usually one 'good' and (generally consecutively) one 'fairly good' rainy year. Only in these years is there any important amount of run-off (disregarding the paved areas such as roads, and areas with a large proportion of built-up surface, of which more will be said). In four (sometimes even five) out of the six years which compose every 'rain cycle' there is no run-off of any importance; but when it occurs (in a 'good' year) in a heavy and prolonged shower, the effect is very spectacular and dramatic. It 'sticks in the mind', creating a false impression about the percentage of rain water lost in the sea by surface run-off.



_ Much more water is lost in the 'dry' years with comparatively light showers of short duration. Only the 'upper crust' is drenched by these showers, and most of the water is quickly evaporated by the sun. Prolonged, not too heavy showers and/or showers following each other at fairly short intervals are best for 'deep penetration', thus benefiting the ground-water reserve.



The overall fate of the rain water, /aA?i as an average /or a swr-years cyc/e, is as follows: a) A relatively small percentage penetrates deeply enough to replenish the ground-water reserve. This occurs especially in the 'good' years of the rain cycle. The subsoil, however, is a 'leaky' reservoir, to be compared with a barrel pierced with holes at different heights. The higher the water level the more subsurface run-off there is into the sea. (In the dry years there is probably little subsurface run-off into the sea.) A second part of the stored water is taken up by deep-rooting plants, and the rest is extracted by wells. 6) Another much smaller percentage 'runs off' at the surface and is lost into the sea if not checked by dams. (Taken over one rain cycle, this percentage can be calculated to be 0.5% (at the most 1%) (see below).) c) A large percentage penetrates only superficially and is subsequently lost by direct evaporation or taken up by plant roots. 7 Can Mese co/e/ioMs be nwrf? .4 mo" '/ 50, wAa* is <Ae use 0/ /Ae daws?



To understand the function of the dams on our island let us first consider those which were built and used formerly, that is to say in the years before the economy of the island changed drastically owing to establishment of the oil company, and agriculture was abandoned by most people. If we study the old topographical map of Curasao we shall see a host of small dams, most of them 40-100 m long and perhaps 0.8-1.5 m high. More Man a /Aowsawrf daws can be counted in the region 16 km wide surrounding the city and the Schottegat (the area between a line from the eastern boundary of plantation Klein Piscadera to Hato mansion and a parallel line running from Fuik Bay to Seroe Mainshi, east of St. Joris Bay). This was the situation at the beginning of the century. In the subsequent building splurge and the abandonment of agricultural activity, after establishment of the oil refineries and the tremendous increase of the population, nearly all these dams were removed in preparing building sites or have broken down through lack of maintenance. _The total number of dams which can be counted on the topographical map is 1,400.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 5 8 twis /A us 0/ /* smai/ dams to <A />/afUa^<m oamr or <A smo The water caught in the dam basin infiltrated into the soil 'downstream' and the soil surrounding the basin, and kept it moist for a longer time than would have been the case if no dam had been present. The result of the dam was to prolong the planting and growing season. In the ground downstream and surrounding the dam basin sorghum, maize, several kinds of beans, ochro, peanuts, Curacao cucumber (Cucumis angurta) and some other vegetables were grown. In the dam basin itself, water-melons, melons and squash were the usual crops, following the receding edge of the water (the pool disappeared slowly through penetration and evaporation).



_ It has to be emphasized that the dams could only function in the few 'good' years of the rain cycles (one or two every six years). The economic importance of this once-in-a-blue-moon agricultural activity n /Ae /ortner marginal economy of the island was still considerable. 9 /n to/er years SAW/ Curacao N. K. (/ormer/y: CuracaoscAe Pe/ro/eum 7ndus/rt Maa/scAa/>^>i/, C.P. .Af.) and /Ae Government Aave but// AtgA dams, /A 6<isin5 o/ tcAt'cA can Ao/d /arge ^uan/t/tes o/ tva/er. /n some cases /A /^nWra/ion tn/o /Ae subsot/ 0/ /Ae u>a/<rr caupA< by /Aese dams ts very />oor.



TAe tfa/er stoys /or a very /ong /itne, et>a/>ora/ng and /eaAtng au>ay tn a /ArougA /Ae base 0/ /Ae dam. H^Aa/ ts /Ae reason /or /Ats s/010 In several places the condition of the soil is such (denudation!) that a fine silt is carried along with the run-off water. This silt accumulates in the 'infiltration areas' of the dams, depositing a clayey layer which impedes or greatly hinders the penetration of the water.



There is yet another reason why the water stays above ground instead of penetrating. As already said, the storage capacity of the diabase subsoil is not large. Whereas in the 'bad' years the percentage of rainfall 'penetrating deeply' to supplement the ground water is negligible, it may be relatively high in the few 'good' years. In these good years the subsoil becomes saturated (all the interstices being filled up). In particular, the subsoil below the dam basin and downstream in the neighbourhood gets saturated. This also hinders penetration. Some spectacular dams of Curacao, for example the large Muizenberg dam of the Shell Co. and several dams built by the Government in the second and third districts, show this phenomenon very clearly. In certain valleys in the third district it can be seen that the subsoil in a good year is so saturated with water that wells overflow. Then the water flows slowly through the dams from one basin to the other till it is lost in the sea. 10 WAa/ oookI p/ougAing w/> /A tn/tftra&m areas 6e/are <A rains stort?



This might help in some cases, provided again that the subsoil is not too saturated. But ploughing will not be possible where the infiltration area is too uneven, rocky or stony or studded with trees.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


P. C. HENRIQUEZ II il n<?l os posstWe <o dt/j 'iw/t/irarion tiW/s' n <A dam fcasinj, n tj o/ Leading silt-laden run-off water into these wells will tend to clog the pores, defeating the purpose for which they were dug. 12 no/ fe/ Me st7f .seM/e /ir5< 6/ore arfmttft <Ae wafer to *A 'tn/t/Zra/ton The silt, if present, is very fine and settles very slowly. But even if it were to settle it would not help much when the subsoil has not enough extra 'storage capacity' for the mass of water which it should absorb.



0/ /JenWrafion wo< countered tftlA <A stnaiJ dant5 0/ With the old small dams the difficulties were less. At each particular (low) dam there was a relatively small amount of water; a much larger percentage could penetrate without actually saturating all the surroundings and so impede further penetration. Secondly, the amount of silt deposited per unit of surface was smaller. Thirdly, this layer was mixed with organic material from the plants which were grown in the dam basin. Note that the function of the small dams was to maintain moisture as long as possible in the 'root region* of the soil in as many places as possible which weie particularly suited to agricultural activities. This purpose was quite different from the endeavour, by means of a few big dams, to force large quantities of water to penetrate deeply and join the ground-water reserve for storage there.



Now w/tal was <Ae /unc/tow 0/ <A dams ' /Ae /rut/ groves ('Ao/;'es') 0/ /Ae /arge The plantations are situated mostly in broad valleys with a deep layer of sedimentary topsoil which is rich in humus. This makes the soil's capacity for water absorption large, much larger than in 'fissured diabase'.



Moreover, owing to the innumerable roots in the hofjes and a thick cover of decaying leaves, the silt will not so readily form an impervious layer.



_ The function of the dams in fruit groves is not only to replenish the ground-water reserve. Firstly, the water in the ground is always more or less brackish. A fruit grove evaporates large quantities of water, the dissolved solids stay behind and a 'salting-up' of the soil would occur if it was not 'flushed out' from time to time by a good quantity of fresh water.



_ The dam also adds topsoil (as already stated, not as an impervious layer, since it is mixed with all kinds of organic matter from the grove).



_ It has also to be emphasized that the functioning of the dams in a plantation was always carefully watched and regulated. The spillway of the








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 7 dam was closed by wooden planks, which could be taken out. Usually there were several dams in succession, one behind the other, and the water could be passed from one basin to the other by manipulating the sluices. If the soil became saturated and the water remained in the grove too long, the trees would be endangered (suffocation of the roots through lack of air). Draining-off the water was another function of the wooden sluices. 5 5owt aVtm5 fruiM by /A Governmen/ Wafer 5w/>/>/y Snftc aii SAW/, and mos< 0/ /A* dams oki// around /950 6y /A* Gouerntnen/ Depar/men/ 0/ -4^rtcu/<wr, Ao/d u/> a// run-o// 6/ore '/ reaAs /A /oaw-/ying t'a/Zeys u'Aere /Ae /rut/ grot/es are usua/Zy /oca/ed. /n <A ZiffA/ 0/ u>Aal Aas /tis* 6#n said, couid /Ais Aare any de/e/eriou5 e//ec/ on /As /ri/ groves?



It certainly could. It has been contended that the water which was checked upstream (i/ it penetrated and / it was not pumped out) would reach the groves by subsoil flow anyway, and thus bestow its beneficial influence in any case. This view, however, does not seem justified. Owing to the system of dams in front of and in the groves (or even without dams), the run-off reaching the groves would drench the subsoil through and through. The water table would rise to overflow the wells, and the accumulated salt would be flooded out. This thorough drenching of the soil and rise of the water table to above ground level will generally not occur with the slow and gradual subsoil seepage of water from the highersituated land. This is one reason why the 'modern' system of dambuilding may have damaged the vegetation and may have contributed to the 'salting-up' of the valleys adjoining the sea. 16 _ /Ae years around f950 a// Got'ernnwuZ-oitti/r^ /and on Curasao teas ^roi/ided an/A /air/y /arge dams, e/Aod*ca//y preventing- a// 'run-o//'. Has /Ais Aad an ap/>r?ciaA/ e//erf on /Ae water /eve/ 0/ a/e//s in /A areas during /Ae dry periods?



To make a really reliable comparison it would have been necessary to collect numerous data from different wells before and after the building of the dams. This would have had to be done over a fairly long series of years, as the height of the water table changes between wide limits from year to year. In general it is not very probable that dams do have great influence on the water table in the dry years. They function in the good years, and the water which is added 'extra' through these dams is dissipated mostly through leakage underground and above ground, and used by the vegetation (wild or cultivated). However, it can be assumed that the fairly large number (many dozens) of dams built by the Government in the second and third districts are of material help to the small agriculturists in that area, when they use their ground in 'good' years, in keeping the soil moist for a longer period. In 1952 Mr.



J. Beijering, who was in charge of the dam-building programme, started investigations to collect systematic data about the functioning of the dams, but unfortunately these investigations were discontinued. It








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


8 P. C. HENRIQUEZ must be emphasized, however, that this relatively small number of big dams seems to have a much less beneficial influence on agriculture than the very large number of small dams (1,400) which existed formerly. Moreover as already pointed out they may also endanger the fruit groves in the lower-lying valley by cutting off the necessary supply of run-off water ('flush effect'). 17 // ffc oW system 0/ (/am co?ts<ruc/ton (many swa aVzms) 15 /A 625/ one, u/Ay mas /As system no< <ufo/>fea' arotn<? J950, wfcn <Ae Government undertook to a// its /a>KJ tw<A iaras?



The construction, but especially the maintenance of the many dams would have been much more difficult. The relatively few big dams which were built block the run-off practically completely. Most of them never overflow, and a concrete spillway is unnecessary. The small dams, however, in most cases need a specially constructed spillway. This spillway is the weak spot of the dam. Often the dam breaks at the boundary between earth and concrete; breaking of one dam also endangers the other dams downstream. Moreover, it has to be borne in mind that the small dams were, so to speak, 'custom-built'. They took advantage of minute topographical and structural peculiarities of the terrain which were only known by those who had lived nearby for many years. 18 SAW/ Co. Aos but// on/y lu>e/ve dams on '/s extensive ground Ao&ftngs.



do The few big Shell dams are quite effective in checking all run-off. Even if the penetration is bad the dams serve their purpose very well a purpose which is, of course, quite different from that of what we may call 'agricultural' dams. Take the very illuminating example of the big Muizenberg dam. Let us say this dam has cost NA / 100,000 and is filled up only once in every six years, with 150,000 tons of water, which does not penetrate. Shell will withdraw this quantity of water in, let us say, six months, and in the meantime will import by tanker 150,000 tons less water. The water brought in by tanker will cost more than / 1 per ton. The dam therefore means a saving of at least 150,000 every six years. Hence the building cost proves to be a good investment. 19 _$ i/ ossWe to give a rottgA guan/tlalti>e es/inate 0/ /Ae tn//ece 0/ daws on iA 0/ /Ae This influence can be very roughly estimated in the case of the Shell dams. The total holding capacity of those dams is about 500,000 tons. We may assume that once in a six-years cycle they catch 500,000 tons, and once 250,000 tons, total 750,000 tons. Of these, 400,000 tons may infiltrate.



Now compare this with the quantity extracted by Shell in six years. This is roughly 5,000,000 tons. To this 5 million tons must be added the quantity which is lost in the sea by subsurface run-off, and the quantity taken up by








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURACAO 9 plant roots. These quantities (x and y) are certainly important, but they are unknown. If at the end of each six-years rain cycle the situation is exactly as it was six years before, the quantity of water infiltrated must be equal to the quantity which was used up in one way or another, i.e.: total infiltration (It) = 5 million + x + y. Now the total infiltration is equal to the infiltration outside the dam basins (Io) plus the infiltration inside the dam basins (Id), therefore: I + Id = 5 million + x + y. As Id is 400,000 tons, it follows that Id is only a small fraction (much less than 10%, probably only a few percent) of I<>. This means that nearly all the water infiltrating into the soil to join the ground water does so outside the dam basins. Hence <Ae tw//un<* 0/ dams on /A /oto/ roMn<f-ii>afer reserve s smatf. This is an indication that, contrary to general belief, the function of dams formerly was no/ to ensure a general rise of the ground-water table but primarily to help agriculture in the way already discussed. 20 May >< <An be contended </kJ <A tn//uence 0/ dams on <Ae water W 0/ sttoaled rfotfns/ream /rom <Ae dam is no/ grea^ Such a statement is not permissible. Temporarily the influence may even be very great. Even if the dams add only a few percent to the infiltration in the entire catchment, a relatively large quantity of water is collected by the dam in a very restricted area. Hence, in places the water level downstream from the dam may be raised considerably. However, the many specific conditions of the locality determine how long this influence will last, that is, how fast or how slowly the locally collected water will dissipate, through subsoil flow and use by vegetation. 21 7s < ossi6/e <o gi/e an es/tmate 0/ <A rwn-o// stressed as a ercen/age 0/ /Ae to/a/ ratn/a//.^ Yes, this is possible. In the foregoing it was estimated that about 750,000 tons of water were caught by the Shell dams in every six-years cycle.



Shell extracts an average of about 5 million tons in six years. The company's policy is to limit the extraction to 3% of the total rainfall. The total rainfall on Shell's combined catchments is therefore about 165 million tons. Since virtually all run-off on the Shell catchments is held back by the dams, Me <o<a/ rwn-o// /aAen as a />ercew/age 0/ /Ae <ota/ rain/a// n a si*-years cyc/e ts on/y aoou/ 0.5% (not taking the paved areas into account, of course). This value is very much lower than is suggested by popular belief. But even if there might be some difference of opinion about the quantity of water held back by the dams, by no stretch of imagination would it be possible for that to exceed 1%. 22 /n /Ae /oregotng, *'< was stoted <Aa/ <Ae case 0/ 'aued and 6Kt//-w areas' it>o/d fee /reated searate/y. WAa* is /Ae dt'//erence between <Aese and o<Aer areas?



The big difference is that in the 'paved and built-up areas' there is much more run-off much more frequently. Even a light shower will not penetrate








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


10 P. C. HENRIQUEZ a paved road. Accordingly, even in 'dry' years there would be run-off, while the subsoil is not saturated. This run-off would be quite useful if forced to penetrate. The tragedy is, however, that it is just in these residential districts that there is no room for dams, with their 'infiltration areas'. 23 SAow/d we no< /a <A deue/omen< 0/ WtWemsfcai in sucA a way <Aa<, tt/i<A /w/MKe rpawsion, tufc^uate room is /// in u/AicA to 6m7d dams, and /ad /Ae fwn-o// /ram /Ae roads and roofs to /Aese in/i/<ra/ion areas.' From the standpoint of mere water conservation this should certainly be encouraged. There are, however, several considerations which make a solution extremely difficult. Let us take a practical example. The residential area called Damacor seems very well suited to water conservation: a broad valley with a relatively deep layer of topsoil rich in humus of high absorptive capacity. From the standpoint of water conservation the houses should have been built in the hills around the valley, whilst the valley itself should have been used as infiltration area, with dams all over it to catch all run-off from the surrounding roads, etc. It is, however, easy to see that houses in the hills have a number of disadvantages compared with houses in the valley. Some houses (at the top of the hills and on the eastern slopes) will be too windy, some others (at the western, lee side) not cool enough. Site preparation and building will be more expensive.



Layout of roads is more difficult, and building them more expensive.



Moreover, it would be very difficult to keep gardens, since good topsoil and well water are both lacking in the hills! To ensure water conservation in residential areas, a very strict zoning law would have to be adopted. This, however, would deprive landowners and prospective house-builders of the best and most valuable building sites! It is very doubtful whether such a law would ever be passed and enforced. A zoning law to regulate the development of the city, the valleys and the outlying districts is very necessary, not only from the standpoint of water conservation, but also from every other standpoint which has to do with proper city planning, if we want to avoid or curb the chaos which is now threatening to engulf us. From 1945 on the Department of Public Works has been urging this kind of law, but nothing has been achieved so far. We have to take into consideration the fact that the old 'liberal' principle of tinkering as little as possible with private property is still powerful here. In many European countries this principle has been abandoned (especially in Holland, where there is exemplary town and landscape planning), but even in the United States, notwithstanding the growing influence of planners and conservationists, it is still causing much irreparable damage. Nevertheless, it might be possible to do something.



Mr. Beijering of the Department of Public Works, who was in charge of the Government dam building programme around 1950, has proposed that the run-off of the roads should be led off along the side walks into numerous small infiltration basins alongside the road. A careful planning of new housing development would be necessary to ensure this. At least a fraction of the run-off might be saved in this way, and trees might be planted in the infiltration basins.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO II 7* <A /orgotnf, <A si/ua/<m n /Ae rf"a6as areas Aai teen rfiscussed. WAa/ al>ow< <Ae /tmestone anfas?



The limestone plateaux we have are porous and an excellent agent for holding water. A yearly average of about 40 million tons of water falls on the plateaux, and if a considerable amount penetrates and is stored it may be a very valuable contribution to our ground-water reserves. They could probably be tapped without much damage to the vegetation. The only permanent springs which we have on Curacao (at Hato and San Pedro) originate in the northern limestone plateau. The very existence of the springs, however, indicates that the limestone at least in some places meets more or less impervious underlying layers dipping towards the sea, so that the water runs off (mostly underground, probably) to the sea. There are some indications that in other places the impervious layer may dip in an opposite direction, thus leading the water 'inland'. Just as previously stated regarding the diabase areas, the subsoil structure of the limestone plateaux is of a bewildering complexity. In a few places where there is enough topsoil for cultivation on the plateaux wells have been drilled, giving a relatively abundant water supply (plantation Noordkant and north of Ronde Klip; in both places there is a dairy farm with irrigated 'green food'). It would perhaps be worth while investigating the underground water situation of the limestone plateaux by systematic drilling and/or with the help of modern physical methods, which would enable, for instance, continuous subsurface profiles to be constructed. This, however, would only be of practical value if there is enough topsoil for agricultural purposes at the location (which generally is not the case) or in the near vicinity (e.g. diabase valleys to the south of the northern limestone plateau). 25 _/ /A* /tmes/one p/afeaui may 6e good sources 0/ water u>Ay were /Aey wo* iw /omter /imes 6y /aw/a/tons bordering Formerly there was no mechanical drilling equipment on the island, and hand-digging of wells in the hard limestone is virtually impossible. 26 _/ /Ae /tfnes/one /j/a/eaM^r Aave a food ttia/er-reteining' caact7y, u/ow/d i< no< fee a>or<A iflAi/e /0 6ut/d daws e^racWy in <Aese areas.' Unfortunately the topographical situation in most cases does not seem to facilitate the building of dams. Moreover, infiltration seems to be so good in many places that there is very little run-off. This question might, however, be worth studying more closely. 27 .4 re /Aere s<*7/ e#fcnstfe areas on <A is/and u>AtcA co/d oe dammed.' On the map we can see that nearly all Shell and Government-owned land (except the residential areas) has been provided with a system of dams








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


12 P. C. HENRIQUEZ which prevents a very great part of the run-off from being wasted in the sea. But there are still large tracts of privately owned land where the system of dams could probably be improved. The total area concerned is, however, less than that of the Shell and Government ground. 28 SAou/d /Ac Goi/ernment sfe in and o//er to Ae/p tAe estate ownrs to roi>t< tAeir fott</ an/A a system 0/ dams or to im/>roi>e tAe system 0/ <fams u/AicA tAey a/rearfy Aave?



It has to be borne in mind that most of the estate owners would not be willing or be in a position to contribute financially to the implementation of such a scheme. Most probably they would not object to it, provided the dams were built on places approved by them. 29 5AouU tAere 6e a /aw ^ermttttng tAe Government to 6utW t/te dams at tAe spots on tAe estates wAere tAe Government e^r^er/5 want tAem to oe sttMated?



Such a law would not be without danger. In many cases the experts of the Government would not be justified in trying to impose their views on the plantation owner. As long as so little (virtually nothing) is known of the structure of the subsoil, judgement about the location of dams, etc., is to a considerable extent empirical, and the estate owner, who 'knows his ground' is in a much better position to judge than others. Moreover, as is clear from the foregoing, the dams have to fit a certain agricultural pattern. Hence, we have to decide first uiAat we will do with the soil (horticulture, fructiculture, staple-food production or production of green food) and wAere we are going to do it, before we decide how and where to build the dams. 30 So tAere migAt 6e controversies oetween tAe estate owners and tAe Government experts?



This would certainly be the case. One example may be mentioned. The broadest valleys with the greatest extent of flat land and the deepest layer of topsoil are generally situated near the sea. There the fruit groves used to be located, and agricultural activities were most pronounced.



Damming of the 'upstream' parts of the catchment would deprive the lower-lying lands of much surface water which is deemed essential for the growing of fruit and for the other agricultural activities (this has already been explained). But damming of the upstream parts of the catchments was exactly what the Government did in the third district around 1950, in the expectation that the water caught upstream would somehow benefit the lower-lying valley ground. In the foregoing, however, the reasons why this view cannot be accepted have already been discussed.



is t/te situation witA regard to erosion.?



Soil erosion is indeed serious in several places. As the hills have been denuded for the purpose of cultivation and charcoal burning, a great deal of








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 13 soil is washed away every time there is considerable run-off. As pointed out, this run-off water contains much silt. In the hills which are still well provided with forests, such as those in Zevenbergen and Wacao, the runoff water is much clearer.



WAa* Aa/>u to /A si// earned away u*7A M run-o//?



Formerly the silt which was washed away was deposited in the basins of the innumerable little dams strewn all over the country. Nowadays it collects in the basins of the big dams built by Shell and the Government. In places where the former dams have been destroyed and no others have been built (e.g. in the residential areas around the Schottegat) the silt is lost in the sea. 33 /s any/At'ng i ^>ar/ci</ar fcetng dcm to cAerA erost'owj* Js contour />toMgAiMg In the little patches in the hills which are still cultivated, ploughing is actually often done in the right way. However, most of the deforested hills are not cultivated any more. Especially to the east of the Schottegat, many have not recovered a secondary vegetation, and with others this secondary vegetation is so poor that it offers scant protection against erosion. Formerly, some fruit groves in other places seem to have had a series of low stone banks, perhaps only about 20 cm high, one after the other, to prevent the topsoil from being washed away. It is said that the banks were of diorite, and, this being a hard and valuable stone and scarce on the island, they were sold for building purposes after the decline of plantation activities. These low stone banks were called 'fahas'. 34 Were /Aese '/aAos' 0/ 2>ui// in /A AjV/s?



As far as is known, they were built in only a few places in Curacao. In Aruba, however, they can still be seen at various places, and they really serve their purpose very well. 35 SAoWd o< /Aese '/aAos' ow /Ae AiWsides fee fr-ted ou/ a^atn in Curafao;> It would be very worth while. In Aruba, however, they are much easier to construct, as most hillsides are themselves strewn with (diorite) blocks, so that the building material is ready to hand. In Curacao this is not the case. 36 // Aas een roosed /o 'ring-' /Ae diabase Ai//s, wAicA means /o dig sAa/fotc /rencAs e^ery /en to /a>en/y waters afong <Ae contowr /tnes and /Aroiti /> a /i/e daw a/i/A /A soi/ retwored /rom /Ae /rencA. ComW /Ais ^nwide a sa/tsac/ory so/u/ion?








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


14 P. C. HENRIQUEZ The method was tried out on a small scale at Klein Kwartier in 1950 on a not very steep hill. At the moment, its influence is clearly to be seen.



All the trenches and dams are overgrown with dense shrubbery of Mimosa dtstacAya (ufla di gatu), a shrub up to 2 m high with very sharp, clawhke thorns. It is, however, doubtful whether this method is applicable to steeper hills. But the greatest practical difficulty is that the very hills which need erosion protection most are private property near the residential areas, and may be used for housing projects at any moment. 37 i4r# //mre any smoKs signs 0/ louwtn; 0/ tA ira/er Ja6fe fry </nr extraction 0/ ground" waAfr tArougA tt>eWsj> There are certainly many alarming signs. 38 re/iaWe <ia/a iwdtca/irjg ;'ms< Aow /ar tAe /owertng 0/ /Ae groM<i-Aas ^rocwderf in <Ae a///icted areas?



Unfortunately there are no reliable data. Many systematic observations in various places and throughout many years would have been necessary before and after the start of water extraction. Even now, in 'good years', wells may overflow, but in the subsequent dry years prolonged extraction does dangerously affect the water level. 39 /s Me dying 0/ trees in /orwier /ruit gnwes ('Ao/;'es') a/teays a sure sign 0/ overjumping? SAW/ assures us i< Aeeps tracA 0/ tAe sa/t content 0/ a// its tve//s, and tAat very care/u//y/ Dying of trees in former groves is not necessarily a sign of overpumping.



Some fruit groves (situated on higher ground) have always needed irrigation, at least in drought periods. When the plantations were abandoned the trees died, since irrigation stopped. Neglect of the dams (the influence of which has already been discussed) may also have hastened their decay.



_ Sure signs of overpumping are, however: death of the trees in groves which have not been neglected and which did not need artificial irrigation; death of 'natural' wild vegetation; and, most objective of all, salting-up of the wells through the penetration by sea water.



Keeping track of the salt contents of wells, when used as an argument, is quite beside the point. If the wells which Shell uses for its groundwater extraction, and which are all situated at a distance of several kilometers from the sea, begin to 'salt up', much harm has already been done in the groves nearer to the sea. Any 'watch' for sea-water penetration through overpumping should be kept near the sea. When the Shell wells react it is already much too late! 40 WAre can tAese signs 0/ of erutning oe ofrservea? Js i< not c/atm<i /Aat e*act/y in /Ae ^>/antations ou>ned fry SAeW tAe situation 0/ tAe /ruit groves is satis/actory? /n tAis connection Groot St. /oris and Groot Piscaaera are mentioned.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 15 These signs can be observed, for instance, in the residential areas at the east side of the Schottegat (Groot and Klein Davelaar, Zeelandia, Suikertuintje, Pos Cabaai, Rooi Catootje, part of Mahaai), St. Barbara, Brakke Put, Zuurzak, and at the west side of the Schottegat (Klein Piscadera, Groot Piscadera, Blauw and Rafael).



Again, there are some pathetic and very recent examples proving that the dying of fruit groves cannot be attributed only to neglect. The owners of Rooi Catootje and Blauw and the tenant of Groot Piscadera are fighting a losing battle against the decline of their fruit groves, notwithstanding their frantic and ceaseless efforts to save them. The fruit grove of Blauw died well-nigh completely in the drought-stricken year 1961, since no water was available for irrigation, notwithstanding deepening of the wells to far below former depths. The water table in the splendid 'big' fruit groves of Groot Piscadera (situated so low that it never needed irrigation) has fallen so much that many trees (even some of the very hardy tamarind trees) have perished. The 'little' fruit grove of the same plantation, replanted in 1950 with excellent varieties of mango trees, citrus and dwarf coconut, and thriving splendidly at one time as a result of the unremitting efforts of the tenant, is now in a sorry state, with the exception of the coconut trees. This 'small' grove (3-4 ha), situated on somewhat higher ground than the 'big' one, had always to be irrigated during the dry seasons with 80 tons of well water daily. This quantity could no longer be extracted in 1961, and the salt content of its two wells jumped from 250 and 400 ppm chlorine to 4,000 and 5,000 ppm respectively I Here we have two striking instances where there is no question of neglect or adverse influence by roads and residential areas in the neighbourhood! Shell's claim is not true, unfortunately. In Groot St. Joris more than 5,000 coconut and many mango trees died in the late twenties after Shell started pumping in that area. Sea-water penetration seems to have occurred in those parts of the grove nearest to the sea. Again, in the last drought period many sapodilla (mispel) trees succumbed, even when they were much farther away from the shore. In Groot Piscadera the large low-lying fruit grove is in a state of extreme suffering, to such an extent in fact that even the very hardy tamarind trees are languishing away.



The wells in the well-kept 'upper' fruit grove turned brackish in 1961. 4i Former/y it Aas a/ways 6een etn/>AattcaWy denied oy tAe Government Water S/>/)/y Service and &y SAeW tAat tAe deatA 0/ /ruit groves and otAer vegetation was due to ground-water e^/rac/ton. WAat is tAeir standpoint at tAe time, and u>Aal ua/ue can fee assigned to tAeir arguments?



The Government Water Supply Service now readily admits the influence of its water-extraction operations. The standpoint of Shell Curacao N.V., however, is different. The company claims that only a maximum of 20% of the water percolating into the soil is extracted, and that if this were not pumped off it would in any event be lost by running underground into the sea. Furthermore, it is said that the water table would inevitably drop towards the end of the dry period, irrespective of whether water was pumped out of the soil or not. The estimate that only 20% of the water which penetrates to replenish the ground-water reserve is








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


l6 P. C. HENRIQUEZ extracted may be right (by chance, for sufficient data to back such an estimate are lacking), but this is beside the point. The same applies to the obviously very true argument that "the water table would inevitably drop towards the end of the dry period".



The situation is as follows. After the 'good years' of the rain cycle the water table steadily drops. At a certain moment it will be as low or nearly as low as the sea level, in the valleys adjoining the sea. This means that the (heavy) vegetation in these valleys (fruit groves!) will evaporate as much water as it receives by subsoil seepage from the higher ground.



The 'certain moment' will be reached the earlier the more water is extracted by wells in the catchment. When this is so, a dangerous situation arises: the vegetation may evaporate more water than it receives underground from 'higher up'. In that case the water table drops below sea level, and sea water penetrates. It is exactly this that has happened all around the Schottegat I Very generally it can be said: drought periods are critical periods for the vegetation. The situation is 'marginal', and even moderate lowering of the water table, or extension of the 'most dangerous period' in each rain cycle for a few months, may mean death for splendid and luxuriant fruit groves. The fact remains that the quantity of water which is extracted daily from the subsoil in critical drought periods by Shell and the Government would be enough to help many dozens of lush fruit groves, each the size of Zuikertuintje, through this critical period! In other words: the argument that only 20% of the water infiltrated to join the underground reserve is extracted, if this figure is calculated as an average for a complete rain cycle, does not mean much. In the critical period at the end of a rain cycle the extraction may become a dangerous competitor of the vegetation, perhaps using up a considerable part (much more than 20%) of the water which would have been available for the use and survival of the latter.



TAis way 6e /rwe, 6m< SAeM se* ww/i //or* o wafer consm>a*to measttres /iAe fiam ftwiWtwg. May <Ae iw/iftyafton o< Aaf e fceen waferta/ty tm^roued by In the foregoing it has already been calculated that the 'extra' quantity of water penetrating into the soil through the Shell dams is not more than about 10% of the quantity extracted by Shell. 43 So a>Aa* afco< /Ae c/atw /Aa/ wafer wawagemew/ fey SAeW Aas fceew e#ceWe/, and /Aa/ wo 'oi>erpjng' Aas occjorea?



Let us assume that the Shell data indicate that the water levels in the control wells return to their previous heights after each rain cycle. From the standpoint of the man who extracts water and who wants to go on extracting the same quantity every rain cycle this is, of course, a good indication that no 'overpumping' is taking place (though it could be intimated that in many places the relation between storage capacity and deeply penetrating water is such that the water levels in the wells would more or less return to their previous heights after the 'good' years, even if








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURA?AO 17 in the 'bad' years every drop had been extracted from the subsoil).



As already pointed out, however, this by no means implies that no damage is done to the vegetation, or that no sea water will penetrate in the valleys adjoining the sea. The glaring facts indicating to the contrary cannot be 'talked away' (see, for example, the situation at Klein Piscadera, Groot Piscadera, Blauw and Raphael, already discussed). 44 LooAtng bocA a/tor a *rtoi 0/ 75 yars, tt'Aa/ can be sat<2 abou/ <A a*ir rJcrtois awi uarungs 0/ /Ae 'J?a<iu//>Aus .Re/wlV (In 1945 the Governor of the Netherlands Antilles appointed a Committee to investigate the complaints about the alleged harm done by ground-water extraction to agriculture, horticulture and scenic beauty. This committee was known as the 'Commissie Radulphus' (Radulphus Committee).) Although, of course, not every one of the contentions in that report can be accepted as scientifically sound, it can be said that in general its forebodings were justified by subsequent events. It is only fair to acknowledge this and pay belated tribute to the authors laymen whose views were repudiated and made to appear more or less ridiculous by the 1949 'Krul Report', prepared by experts. (Of this latter report more will be said presently.) In fact, we have had in Curacao a repeat performance of what has happened in Holland. In that country there has been a decades-long controversy between nature lovers and conservationists on the one side and experts of the Water Supply Service on the other side, the first claiming that water extraction from the dunes had caused much harm to vegetation, the last denying this and branding the contentions of the first as 'old wives' tales'. Eventually the ground-water situation became so critical that water from the River Rhine had to be pumped into the dunes. Soon after, the water table was rising and vegetation and wild life were re-establishing themselves splendidly! 45 CouW we be opftmis/ic obow/ <A results 0/ sto/nng <Ae tfo/er e*fracftOM by <Ae Gouwtimenf and It is to be feared that much optimism at least at short-term is not warranted. It seems difficult to 'push back' the sea water which has penetrated, not to speak of restoring the fruit groves which fringed the south coast of the 'second district'. This, of course, does not mean that it is unnecessary to stop the extraction. If this is not done the situation will get worse and worse. 46 How mimcA tvofer is being exlrac/erf /rom //te subsoi/ in <Ae area around" <Ae ScAoHega/, awi by a<Aow;> Shell extracts from about 1,100 tons/day (in the dryest years) to about 3,500 tons/day (in the best years); the Government Water Supply Service has diminished its extraction to a few hundred tons/day. (Formerly, up








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


l8 P. C. HENRIQUEZ to i.ooo or 1,500 tons/day was pumped.) On an average, 3,000-3,500 tons of water used to be withdrawn daily from the second district by Shell and Government. Moreover, there are a great many wells attached to private homes. How many we do not know, but it may well be a few thousand.



Much less is it possible to guess the total quantity of water extracted from these wells. It varies in most cases from a few hundred liters to a few tons per day. 47 /s *Are awy/Aiwg to 6e dcm to sto/> or /t< /Ats water tfi-acf ion:> The Government Water Supply will stop as soon as the new water-distilling plants, that have now been ordered, are installed, which will be presumably within a year or so. After installation of these plants Shell will buy large quantities of water from the Government, and it may be possible to persuade this Company to stop the extraction altogether (at least in very dry years) or to reduce it considerably. 48 about /A* o*Aer />Wfafe tee// oumeri.^ /s / possiWe to too?



The promulgation of a 'water law' has been advocated, according to which all subsoil water would be declared Government property. Every well owner would be compelled to attach a water meter to his pump.



A government agency would be organized to record periodically the readings of these water meters. Moreover, the water level and salinity of each well would also be recorded periodically. Out of all the information gathered in this way criteria would have to be established stipulating how much water each well owner would be allowed to use. 49 It is to be feared that an endeavour to ensure 'water management' in this way is fraught with difficulties. There is such a great difference from year to year and from place to place that at least two 'rain cycles" would be necessary in order to obtain any notion of the 'subsoil hydrological cycles', even with the most careful observation and elaborate organisation.



To distil any criterion out of these observations would be a hazardous enterprise, Would there be an allotment 'per well' or per unit of land owned?



What if a man has a nice fruit grove around his house, or a well-kept garden ? Should he let it die in dry years, when the Government orders him to limit his pumping? To give another practical example: most wells in Damacor have enough water even in the worst years. The houses in that area have nice gardens. Must we restrict pumping in Damacor, thus endangering the vegetation in that area, in order to save the vegetation in some parts of Mahaai, where welk are salting tip, even if we were certain that the extraction in Damacor affects Mahaai ? Then take this example. A gentleman in Mahaai has quite a number of fruit trees








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 19 around his house. His garden is part of the grove of a former large plantation. If the trees evaporate let us say x m' water per day, and he was to irrigate with x m* water, the salt concentration of the moisture in the root region of his garden would increase tremendously and the trees would die. To hold down this salinity he has to use much more water than x m* per day. This water, however, is not used up, but is largely recirculated.



Can we prohibit the man with the nice garden from irrigating with the quantity of water he needs, and thus condemn the remnants of the former splendid grove to a certain death ? Would we not defeat our own purpose by such actions? And these are only a few of the problems which would arise if we were to try to control all privately owned wells. It would surely lead to a hopeless tangle of bureaucratic red tape, disputes and controversies. 5O _/ ttia/r management in //it's way is uir/ua//>' im/wssiWc to />u/ into />rac/ic?, must if /Aim resign ours/t>s to a ii/ua/io wAicA u/t// g< worse /rom year to year?



Certainly we must not, nor do we need to. First of all, as already said, the Government Water Supply and Shell have to stop their pumping. Then we have to strive for very large distilling plants turning out water at very much lower cost than at present. New developments in distilling technique point to the possibility of providing the public with water at say about 40 ct per ton (= 80 e per 1,000 gallons). (The price is now five times as high!) With this price, very many people will eventually stop extracting water from the subsoil: wells and pumps need maintenance, good technical service is very difficult to get. Any repair on a windmill or electric pump is usually a headache, and an expensive headache at that.



But if the people do not stop of themselves, the Government delivering such low-priced water will be perfectly justified in prohibiting water extraction, possibly making exceptions for vegetable gardens, fruit groves, etc.



So o/e may be sauea* 6y im^>roi'emn/s in sea-tcater ds/j7/tng tecAni^Me/' That is correct. In this connection, another very important factor has to be mentioned which is as often as not no, always overlooked. This is that the private well owners in the residential areas not only extract water from the subsoil but also replenish the ground-water reserve. The situation is generally such that the owners of wells use well water for their gardens and tap water (which is at the moment almost purely distilled water and in the near future will be 100% distilled water) for household purposes. The houses which do not have wells use tap water both for household purposes and for their gardens, but usually cannot afford a garden of any size, in view of the present price of tap water (NA / 2 per m' or about 4 per 1,000 gallons). Now the water used for household purposes in the residential areas is drained into cesspools and thus infiltrates nearly 100% into the soil, replenishing the ground-water reserve (only part of the city proper has a sewage system leading the water into the sea as waste).








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


20 P. C. HENRIQUEZ It can be estimated that in the residential areas a few thousand tons of water per day are already being added to the ground-water reserve, and that in the future much more water will be added to the soil than extracted from it by the citizens. The total quantity of water delivered by the Government Water Supply Service to the citizens is at the moment about 6,500 tons/day. At the Punda side there is a sewage system up to Julianaplein, at the Otrabanda side up to Plantersrust. The director of the Government Water Supply system estimates that those parts of the city consume about 2,000 tons of water per day. Hence, about 4,500 tons per day is supplied to houses with cesspools. If, of this 4,500 tons, one third is 'lost' (mainly water used for gardens; this is a liberal allowance), 3,000 tons are daily returned to the ground water, all in the areas around the Schottegat. This has a very important implication, namely that prohibition of extraction by the small consumers is morally not very justified unless the Government can provide cheap water. 52 So regw/a/'on 0/ grownd-water .arfrac/ion by /Ac 'sna// consMwers' n// fee t'tn^racftca/ and 0/ doubf/M/ necessity and mora/ I think this is quite correct! Most small consumers not only extract water from the subsoil but also add water to it.



Incidentally, this fact may provide us with a certain criterion of what we want in order to make a 'water law'. Such a law might, for example, contain the following provisions: a) A general ban on the use of well water except in the following cases: ) For household purposes when the house is also connected to a water supply system using water which was not extracted from the subsoil. *) For household purposes when the house is situated in a place where it cannot be served by the water supply system. ) For agricultural purposes. t>) For industrial purposes (e.g. laundries) after grant of a permit, when the used water is returned to the subsoil or used for agricultural purposes. fc) The Government should be entitled to control the depth of all wells. 53 Now wAa< oiottt /A* ground witer e*/ra<:ted fry SAeW? .Does t< re/wrn /o Me so7 tn any manner?



The houses of the Shell colony do not have cesspools. The water is collected in a sewage system and discharged into the sea. 54 B< at Me new Got;ern>ieti< /otc-cos/ Aausing estate a/ Brtevengaf an e/aborate sew age system Aas been cotis/rwcted, wj<A ^>um/>ing sto/tons /o <aAe /Ae water <o <Ae sea on <Ae nor/Aern coos* 0/ <Ae t's/and. H^Ay was <Aa< done?



Presumably considerations of maintenance of cesspools and hazards to health have played a role.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 21 55 Aat/e cas/ mor /Aan / No, this is not the case; cesspools, if well constructed, require little maintenance; the pump of the sewage system also requires upkeep.



Bui is / not /rue /Aai sspoois un# only /wnc/ton we/i /or a /imt/eo* 0/ years.^ TAa/ /Ae u>a//s /ArowgA wAicA /Ae water Aas to n/ra<<j /y ctog, so /Aa/ a new />oo/ Aas to 6 dug?



This is the case if the water of kitchens and laundries is allowed to drain into the cesspool. The fat in kitchen water is not easily decomposed by bacterial activity, whilst the detergents in kitchen and laundry water may kill a lot of the bacteria. For this reason kitchen and laundry water have to be disposed of separately in a septic tank with two compartments.



The sludge deposited in the tank has to be cleaned out every year or two, which is quite easily done. 57 Bui e*/>er/ aoVtce was a/>aren//y so/tct/ed be/or <Ae <&ci.son to cons/rue/ a system was That is so. The question was asked whether it would be economically feasible to collect the sewage, purify it in a sewage treatment plant, and use the water thus treated for any good purpose. The answer of the experts to that question was quite rightly no. 58 WAa/ are /Ae adrantegM 0/ a cess/>oo/i> The cesspool is a good device for replenishing the ground water (and for adding nutrients to the soil). Silt-free water of very low salinity is introduced into the ground in small portions in many places; moreover, this water is not exposed to sun and air. 59 Bu/ couW no/ cess/>oo/s be <ftzngrous to AeaZ/Aj' When a well is dug too near to a cesspool, and the water of the well is used for an unsuitable purpose (e.g., for drinking or washing dishes without boiling), there is certainly a possibility of infection; but at Brievengat none of the houses was provided with a well.



It has to be borne in mind that water passing through the soil is subjected to biological purification. Wells and cesspools in the same garden have always been standard practice in the residential areas around Willemstad. Care is taken to construct them as far apart as possible. I do not think they present any problem, as everyone is well aware that unboiled well water should only be used to irrigate the garden and to flush the toilets.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


22 P. C. HENRIQUEZ 60 does /A* ^wan/ify 0/ wafer tn/t/fazftng /AroKgA /Ac ces5/>oo/s compare wi/A /A* yaan/Jy 0/ water saned 6y /Ae dams?



It has already been stated above that about 400,000 tons of water are forced into the ground by all the Shell dams during every rain cycle.



This compares with about 6,500,000 tons infiltrating through cesspools.



_ Moreover, the dam-saved water we get in one big gulp, at a few places, whilst the cesspool-saved water is evenly distributed from day to day and from place to place. 61 Bm< perAaps more imter coW 00 saiva* fry dams tn /Ae areas around /Ae ScAo/tega/?



This would not be so, since Shell has taken very great pains to catch as much of the run-off as possible on the vast tracts of land which it possesses. The same applies to the Government. An explanation has already been given as to why it is virtually impossible to build dams in existing or prospective residential areas. 62 _/ seems, /Aen, /Aa/ /Ae in//wnce 0/ /Ae dams in /A toto/ ^irfwre 0/ water conservation ts very smaf/, and /Ae awesrion migA/ 6e asAed wAe/Ar damoui/dtng Aas any sense a/ a//?



The influence of dams in the total picture of the subsoil water situation is indeed smal/, but that certainly does not mean that the buifding of dams is of no value. Dams do have a localized influence, and are of great importance precisely at those spots where a 'gulp' of fresh water once in a while has a beneficial effect. This is at those places where 'plantation activities' are going on, as extensively explained above. Moreover -as already said dams are useful for catching the topsoil washed away from the many denuded hills. 63 C/tmate, vegeta/ton and Aydro/ogy are considered to fre interrelated. TAere is a /air/y widespread fce/ie/ among /aymen /Aa/ /Aere was mwcA more aegea/iow on Cwrafao a< /Ae <ime wAen /Ae is/and was /irs/ co/oni-zed by /Ae DwteA, more /Aan <Aree Aundred years ago, and ZAa< on account 0/ <Ais Aeavier /ores/a/ion /Aere was more rain/a//. ^4 re any /ac<s *otwi wAicA sufrs<an<iafe /Ais 6e/ie//> On the contrary, everything points to the fact that three hundred years ago the climate was the same as it is now. There seems to be a simple proof of that. One of the few important export products appears to have been pockwood (the wood of the 'lignum vitae' tree, Guayocwm o//icinate, Dutch: pokhout). Now, everywhere where this tree abounds it is a sure sign of drought conditions. (This, of course, does not mean that it does not thrive in a wetter climate. In fact, it grows better on a lot of water that on just a little; but whereas in a dry climate it will have an edge on








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 23 less drought-resistant species, in humid areas it cannot hold its ground against other trees which grow faster.) The alleged beneficial influence of forestation on rainfall is based on a theory which now seems to have been discarded. But even if this theory were valid for large land-masses it is a priori improbable that it would be so for a small island like ours. _5 if to 6* in/wea* /rom < A ooove MaJ f A* vegefciJion Aas a/tvays been nor* or fcss <A sam< as if is By no means! Man has had a thoroughly devastating influence on the vegetation ot the island. The primary forest has been felled a) for home sites; 6) for purposes of cultivation; c) to export valuable wood: pockwood (Guayacum o//i<;iHa&) and logwood (//motory/on orosifctto, Dutch: verfhout, brazielhout); a*) for charcoal burning; e) for immediate use as fuel; /) for lime burning. 65 Aos no/ <Ae t>ee<afion rstorrf i/se// a/ter <A /Wing 0/ <A frws ana" Restoration to the original condition, even if the process were allowed to proceed undisturbed, would take many centuries.



At the moment the situation is as follows. Scores of hills are naked or nearly naked. On others there has developed a 'secondary growth' which varies considerably from place to place. Often herbaceous shrubs, such as 'willensalie' (Croton //avns), 'flaira' (/a/ropAa gossy/>i/o/ia) and cacti, are the first to appear. At places with more moisture 'palu di lechi' (Cry/>-tos/egia grandi/tora) is a scourge and chokes every decent tree which might try its chance. At best we get a 'secondary forest' in the valleys and lower hills with 'divi-divi' (C#esa//>tnta coriaria), 'wabi' (/Icocia tor/uosa), 'watapana shimarn' ('mata di galia', Acacia viWosa) and 'indju' (Prosopos ;w/i//ora). _/ is wirfe/y assum^rf /Aa/ a grea< rfa/ 0/ /Ae 6/awte /or <A rf/oreste<ion 0/ Curafao Aas to 6e />m< on <Ae goa/s. /s /Aaf so.^ A sweeping statement like that is very misleading. The situation is not quite so simple. First and foremost, man has to be blamed. In forested areas which have not (or only moderately) been disturbed by the predatory activity of man there is no sign of any serious denudation, even when large herds of goats are kept. Good examples are the areas of Wacao, Zevenbergen and St. Christoffel, which are largely covered with thick, nearly impenetrable forest.



In fact it is surprising how little barren ground there is on Curacao, in />/oces a/Atfre wan Aas nof desfroyea" <A origina/ i/ege/a/ion too mucA. In drought periods, when the trees and shrubs lose all or most of their fohage,








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


24 P- C. HENRIQUEZ there is a superficial impression of barrenness. In any good rainy season, however, we observe a forestation of such abundance that we greatly wonder how all these trees and shrubs could have survived the preceding severe and long-sustained periods of drought, and why they have not killed each other in mutual competition for the little moisture left in the soil. 67 /45.sumtng Mat tAe goat cannot i// a /w//-groum tree, as Ae ts not aWe to ntoofe at tAe AigAer orancAes, ts it not incontestaWe tAat Ae wiW destroy aW young trees, ana" in tAis way impede any new growtA 0/ trees on dnM(ied soi/? y4nrf tfouW not tAe naAed or cacti- ana" croton-in/ested Ai//s (/ormer/y ienurfed /or cu/tiuation 6t now /ying waste) grow a secondary vegetation 0/ trees i/ goats were oannea?



Again, a general statement of this kind cannot be accepted. The remarkable thing is that the valleys adjoining the same hills are often overgrown with impenetrable secondary forest of 'divi-divi', 'wabi' or 'indju'. The 150 ha (425 acre) plot near Julianadorp (the northernmost part of the former plantation of Groot Piscadera), which was denuded (allegedly for water-conservation purposes!) fourteen years ago, is now overgrown with a large number of wabi trees up to 3 m high! It seems that in places where enough topsoil is left and the moisture content is great enough, secondary growth of trees can be expected notwithstanding the presence of goats. 68 5i<t tAe 'wat' is a /ree witA /arge tAorns, and /or tAat reason erAas is not entire/y destroyed 6y tAe goat?



Thorns seem not to be absolutely indispensable to enable a young tree to survive the attacks of goats. For example, in the area of Korporaal (opposite Zuurzak), whereas the higher hills are nearly absolutely barren, the lower ones carry many small divi-divi trees. And in the adjoining area of Bottelier, which was stripped of its vegetation approximately four years ago, many small divi-divi trees are also struggling ahead. In other places, abundant new growth of the equally thornless Acacia utWosa or of Prosopis ;'w/i//ora, indju or qui (with only small thorns) can be seen. In all these areas there are many goats. 69 Afay tAe goat tAen oe aosofoed 0/ ZAe sins w/iicA are charged against Aim?



Only partly! There are young trees which doubtless will succumb if not left alone by goats. For example: that pockwood (Gwayacwm o//icina/e) can be actually prevented from spreading by goats was clearly demonstrated on Blauw plantation. Near to the beach of Blauw Baai (which is a limestone plateau) there was a little house surrounded by some fenced-off ground. Inside and outside the fence there were a few large 'lignum vitae' trees. Whilst, however, inside the fence there were numberless small saplings, apparently grown from falling seeds, outside of it there were








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


-.*_ PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 25 only a few, and those showed clear marks of 'nibbling'. Apparently most of the young, very slowly growing trees succumb to the attacks of browsing animals. Quite contrary to popular belief, cattle do eat pockwood leaves, at least in periods of severe drought. The garden of the Curacao Museum and some gardens on Scharloo (all unirrigated) are further proof that pockwood will spread profusely when goats are absent. 70 <? goo/ do any conjttfcra/e <iamag to / In the dry months there is little sign of any 'grass cover', but as soon as the rains start we see an abundance of grass growing on many barren places.



The roots survive even after long spells of drought. There seems, however, to be a marked difference between places where goats abound and fencedoff areas, which provides strong evidence for the belief that goats are detrimental to the growth of grasses (perhaps by tearing out the roots ?), though some observations in dry regions in Africa do not substantiate this belief (see Edwards: E. Afr. Agric. Journal, 1948, p. 223). 71 a"one by goa/s <fc/>n<fr vry mttf/i on <A <y/><? 0 and ^rooao/y on many o<ter /actors.'' Quite so! It can even theoretically be inferred that in some cases the goat may have a beneficial influence! Let us assume that I have a plant growing in a concrete trough, in a certain amount of soil (evaporation direct from the soil is prevented by a layer of plastic foil). After the soil has been provided with plenty of water, my plant will burst forth, producing luxuriant foliage which will evaporate a lot of water. If I do not replenish the water quickly it will soon be used up completely, and the leaves will wilt; and if I keep on with my experiment the plant will die. Now suppose I clip off part of the foliage; less water will be evaporated, the moisture in the soil will last longer, and my plant will survive a period of 'drought' which would have killed an 'undipped' plant. Of course, this is only a 'theoretical' possibility (which, however, is by no means contradicted by the facts), only serving to emphasize that no general statement is possible; many plants may be seriously hindered by foraging goats, while some others, in certain particular circumstances, may eventually be helped. 72 _< fats >-e/>afea7y been m^Aasi>e^ /Aa/ a law .s/wu/a' 60 6/isAing <Ae WgW 0/ </te Goverwweni to con/ro/ <Ae grastttg 0/ sma/I <Ats no< been Theoretically, this is very easy. If every goat caught on land which is not the owner's is forfeited, goat-keeping by people who do not possess the land to sustain their animals will soon cease. However, the goat is the poor man's moneybox. It is possible to keep some small livestock with only a little trouble. When the owner needs some extra cash (for a feast, to pay the doctor, etc.), he will sell a goat or two.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


26 P. C. HENRIQUEZ 73 _/ Aas a/so 6*en repeafedVy proposed /Aa/ a me/Aod o/ 'a/lernale graying' sAou/d be a/>/td. TAis means itt/ttitng' /Ae grattng grounds in/o /o/s. // a Aare, /or o|)fe, /ite to/s, on /o< wi// be geared <Ais year and /Ae o/Aers iw// Aai/e fim to 'recover'. iVe*7 year /Ae ne*/ p/o* ifi// be used, e/c. WAy Aas /Ais m/Aod net/er 6een /ried This recommendation is typical of people who do not know the actual situation here. First of all the method would be utterly impractical. There are no well-defined 'grazing grounds' for the poor man's goats. They browse along the roads, on a little tract of government land here, another little or larger tract of private, unused land there. Moreover, to carry out such a recommendation (if possible) might have precisely the reverse effect. Confinement of many goats to successive small pieces of land could result in the utter destruction of all small trees 'beyond recovery'. 74 yj/fain, i/ Aas fceen recommended /Aa/ /Ae e.rfensi>e meMorf o/ goa/-Ae/>tng sAou/d 6e abandoned i /at'owr o/ an tntenstfe tn/Aod. So, ttts/ead o/ <Ae goa/s ftet'ng a/toa/ed /o roam a6o?<<, </iey j7iomW 6e cow/tned /o /Ae owner's /and and /ed on green /ood cufttca/ed 6y Aim 6y trrt'ga/ion me/Aods. Cot*/d /Ats 6e a Certainly not! Food produced by irrigation is much too expensive for animals bred for meat. Moreover, as irrigation water is so scarce, only a limited number of head could be kept alive in this way. (Cows maintained for the production of milk do get some green food grown by irrigation, but this is only for 'vitamin supply'. They are really kept alive by imported food, and fresh milk produced thus is very expensive.) 75 5om eo/>/ or ra/Aer many eo/>/e seem to e*ec/ <Aa/ /encing o// />ar/ o/ a n/derness to fcee/> ou/ a// goa/s rot// resw// tn a ra/)td m^rovemen/ in /Ae ^>a//ern o/ rege/a<ton. /s /Aa/ e-r^>ec/a<ton 6y any means ;'us/t/ted.^ By no means! What happens after a piece of wilderness or denuded area is fenced off depends on very many factors: the amount of topsoil present, the structure of the subsoil, the ground-water level, the moisture-absorbing capacity of the soil, the topography bearing on the hydrological situation, the vegetation already present (which will yield seeds for new growth), etc. In many cases, very little change would take place, at least not perceptibly within a reasonable period. In the long run there may be more vegetation, or the type of vegetation may alter. Any such change, however, would be very slow! 76 Assuming <Aa/ /Aere is a oasic ossiftt/i<y 0/ tm/)rot)jng /Ae pattern 0/ vegeta/ion, bul /Aal /Ais u>ouW laAe a very /og /mie i/ /e/l to na/ure (a/ter banning /Ae goa/s), uw</d i/ no< be /Jossib/e to acce/era/e /Ae process by Auman in/erren/ion, /Aa/ is to say by re/ores/a/io?








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 27 There is much glib and unrealistic talk about reforestation. It is very easy to cry fie and shame about the really terrible state to which the island's vegetation has been reduced, to demand that 'something be done about the situation', to point to the fact that in Israel or some other country success has been achieved with tree planting, etc. However, to prove the practical feasibility of reforestation under the particular conditions existing here, we have to come down to hard facts. We have to visualize which areas we want to use, which trees we would choose for each particular site, how (eventually) we keep out the goats, which techniques of site preparation have to be chosen, how we help the young plants through severe drought periods, how we prevent them from being choked by 'weeds' like 'willensalie' (Croton //auens), 'flaira' (ya<ro^)Aa gassy/n'/o/ta), 'palu di lechi' (Oy/>/os<gia grandt/Zora) or 'ufla di gatu' (Mimosa iii5/o<:Aya), whether and how it is possible to keep the cost down to reasonable proportions, etc.



Each one of these problems is fraught with difficulties and calls for study and experimentation. Above all, however, we need the advice and judgement of people who, through long experience, have an intimate knowledge of the indigenous vegetation; who know why certain plants grow on certain sites and not on others; who can give an opinion about drought-, salt-, wind- and goat-resistance of the plants, about their speed of growth, crown development, shedding of leaves, methods of propagation, etc.



Realizing the difficulty of fencing off a large tract of Government land and keeping it fenced off (the goat owners always try to cut the fence to let the goats in), Mr. E. J. van der Kuip, Aruba's Government veterinary officer, proposes to plant young 'indju' trees (Proso^ts /u/t/Zom) in the good years of the rain cycle, without any fencing. The experiment is worth trying, but success depends very much on the site chosen. On flatlying, friable, water-retaining soil growth can, of course, take place much faster than on rocky hillsides. In fact, on these last locations growth will be very slow indeed.



On the bare Curacao hills (as examples of which, the higher hills on Korporaal were mentioned), it is improbable that success will be attained without 'ringing' the hills (see later). Perhaps in these cases we ought to think about trees which are even more drought-resistant than 'indju'.



In this respect, pockwood (GwayacHm o//tcina/e) is the champion. Due, among other things, to mechanisms by which evaporation of water through the leaves is reduced in the extreme, this tree retains its foliage in full glory throughout the severest droughts. However, its growth, especially on dry hillsides, is very slow and as previously pointed out -the planting area should be fenced off. Ba/anifes ae/?y/ica (corona di hesus), ZizyAi*s s/)twa-cArts/i (apeldam), Prosopts /tt/t/Zora (indju), Acacia /oWwosa (wabi), PiMecetfobtum uwgwis-ca/t, and perhaps some other carefully selected trees, might do without any fencing. If we do not insist on leaf-bearing trees, euphorbias, agaves and aloes can, of course, be used. 77 Cow/d />7ia/>s /A re/ores/a/iow 0/ aAerf At//s oe />ro/i/a6/y combined erosion can/ro/ oy /oa dams smcA as Aare />7wiot*s/y 6een








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


28 P. C. HENRIQUEZ The trenches in front of the dams would certainly be the best places to plant trees for reforestation, but they are also good places for Mimosa rfts/ac/ya, Oo/o //ai;en5, a/ropAa gossy/>i/o/ia and Cry^><05/egta grancft//ora, which, once they get a foothold, will tend to choke the young trees. 78 Bu/ */ <A Ai//s mere /orner/y /oresto^, u;Ay no/ simply cAoose <Ae same s/>ect#5 tt/AtcA cons/t/wterf <Ae origiwa/ This is not quite so simple as it looks. It is very difficult for any young tree, with its shallow root system, to establish itself on a naked, windswept and shadeless hillside without a layer of good topsoil, and still more difficult for it to maintain itself against the competition of some hardy shrubs, such as those just mentioned, which do not need a forest habitat in which to thrive. 79 WAa/ fe^tiremn/s mus/ a /ree salts/y in order to 6e used /or /A re/ores/a/on 0/ AiWstdes?



The following factors, among others, are of importance: a) resistance to drought; 6) ability to retain its foliage or parts thereof during drought periods; c) resistance to wind; d) speed of growth; e) resistance to attack by goats; /) ability to resist weeds when young; g) beauty.



It is very possible that we shall not find any one tree which fulfills all these requirements, and we should content ourselves with a combination of trees, some of which have certain and others other good qualities.



_ First of all, we have to make a thorough search in the stock of twdtgenous tui/d /rees which we possess. However: 'the proof of the pudding is in the eating', and we shall have to do quite some experimenting. 80 IV Aa/ a6ou/ /Ae use 0/ agaves awd cerews cac/t? TAis is 0/ ac/ua/ re/ores/a/tow, 6m< sure/y i/ 6eer <Aa wafcea" AtWs?



There are several kinds of nice agave and cereus species, and they might certainly be tried out. 81 WAicA areas ow /Ae ts/and cou/d oe designated /or re/oresto/ion.^ This is a difficult question. The areas which need reforestation most are those in the 'second district' (= the eastern part of the island, with the exception of Willemstad, which town may be called the 'first district'), around the Schottegat. Nearly all, however, are private property. As they are situated near the city they would be expensive for the Government to buy and, moreover, they are in danger of being parceled out and used for building sites at any moment. In the third district (= the western part of the island) there are, of course, also hills which have been denuded, but many of those which are not cultivated have established a secondary vegetation. It may be dangerous to tamper with this secondary growth, so such hills had better be left alone.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 29 82 _/ /A r/of-M/a/o 0/ aVnwaVa' Attfs 5 so di//urw//. u*>uW _'/ 0/ 6 <wsik to s/ar/ tw/A a care/uWy se/ic/erf i'a//y "** '** ctrenmstoiifM are /xir/tcw/ar/y One such area might be ironically enough the 150-ha (425-acre) stretch of flat land near Julianadorp mentioned before, which was wilfully deforested about 1946 for the alleged purpose of water conservation. The area was densely wooded ; there is a deep layer of good topsoil; there are several wells provided with windmills on hand and three dams. Another area would be the Government-owned Klein Kwartier, at present also for the most part denuded of trees. If Shell and the Government would stop ground-water extraction in these places there would be ideal opportunities for creating park-like reforested areas.



As already pointed out, at the present time the Shell area is overgrown with 'wabi' trees (the heavily spined ^cacta for/MOsa) and, on the moistcst places, with a nearly impenetrable tangle of 'palu di lechi' (Crytos/i'a grandt/fora), the rubber-containing shrub with its twining branches and its faintly violet, trumpet-shaped flowers. In some places the poisonous i/tomaK mac!)i<//3 (manzanilla) occurs. The following trees could be considered for reforestation of this area: y4/6ita /ebfcecA (barba di jonkuman), Ba/amtes a^yp/tca (corona di hesus, lamunchi shimarn), Bon/ta rfa^Anotdes (olijfi), Bursera bonasrensis (palu di sfa corra), Bursera simaruba (palu di sia blancu), Bursmi /otnntosa (takamahak), BumWta obofafa (placa chiquitu, rambeshi, palu di lechi), Caso//><nta coriart'a (divi-divi, watapana), Caesa//>*nia /w/cAerrt'ma (tuturutu), C*t6a pen/an<2ra (katunbom), Ccmocarns erec/a (manguel blancu), Cocco/ofca tiui/wa (dreifi, sea grape), Cocco/oba diverst/o/ia (kamari), Cordia sefces/ena (cawara spano), Cocdia a/fca (cawara di mondi), Crescen/ia c;e/e (calbas, calabash), dwarf coconut, De/owi* regia (flamboyant), uca/yp/us rofrusto, Fjcus briWoni (mahok di mondi), Ficus 6n;amtna (waringin), Ftcws e/os/tca, Ftcws Ae/erotwor^Aa, Fjcms re/usa, Ftcws urbantana, G/trtci'Jta se^ium (mata raton), Guayocuwj o//tct'na/e (pockwood, lignum vitae), Afa//>igAja />Mmci/o/'a (shimarucu), Aforinga o/ei/era (benbom), Pe//o/>AorMn inerme, PyesAia gnanacAo, Proso/>ts ;/t/ora (indju), PAoewi^ dac/y/i/era (dader, date), Samanea satnan (rain tree), Su/ietema tnaAa^tmy (mahok, mahogany), Termina/ia (almond tree), Spondta /u/ea (hoba, yellow plum, hog plum), crysan/Aa (kibrahacha), Tabebtiiapa//i(fa (white cedar), Tabeuta ^entopAy/-a, Taiart> ga//tca, Tamart'n^us lWtca (tamarind), Tecotna s/ans (kelki geel), Zt^y^Aws s^)twa-cAm/ (apeldam). Of course, the areas would have to be well fenced off, and a supervisor would have to live there.



With the help of a little irrigation it should be possible to have a nice young forest with quite some shadow within, say, seven years. Fastgrowing species which will be of much assistance in achieving a quick result are ^/biwt'a, Crescen/ia, .De/owi*, Pe/to/>Aornm stm'ngart, G/irtctrfta, Zizy^Aws, and the Ficms species mentioned. Naturally, the wabi trees now growing in the Shell area should not be cut down at once, but only gradually, as the other trees grow up. Eradication of the 'palu di lechi', however, would be necessary and may prove to be a tough job. If this scheme were to succeed, the cutting-down of the original forest near








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


30 P. C. HENRIQUEZ Julianadorp would be vindicated to some extent, for its former tangle of trees and shrubs would have been transformed into a recreational area with nice shady trees, under the crowns of which it would be pleasant to walk and sit. Bu/ /Ais acAiei/emew/ iw/d oe nei/Aer easy or cAea/>.' PrsMma6/:y {fere are some />/a?i/s tcAicA are no/ eaten fry goals. CouW /Aese 6e Msed /Jro/i/a6/y /or re/ores/a/icm?



There are more plants which are not attacked by goats than most people realize. They may contain a milky rubbery fluid (a) or irritating substances (b) or be covered with thorns (c) or have a bitter or otherwise unpleasant taste (d).



The following plants of Curacao belong to this category: Trees: many ficws species (a), TAes^esia o/nea (otaheit) (d), Cap/>aris species (oliba, palu pretu) (d, probable), /oc^Mtttta oaroasco (mata di pisca) (d), Hi^wnawe wawciweWa (manzanilla) (b), Conocar^ws erec/a (manguel blancu) (d, prob.), Cocco/ooa wtn'/era (dreifi) (d, prob.), Cocco/o6a dit>erst'/o/'a (dreifi shimaron) (d, prob.). Casearia /retwu/a (palu di Bonaire) (d), P/wmeria species (oleander) (a), Bewreria sttcctt/ew/a (watakeli) (d, prob.).



Shrubs. Crofon ntveus (lumbra blancu) (d), Bon/ia da/7Anotdes (olijfi) (d), Surtana manlima (d), ATertum o/eander (Franse bloem) (a), Ca/o/rois />rocera (katuna di seda) (a), 7~/tfe/ia prwriaa (a).



Cacti. O^wwria, Cereus-like and Me/ocac/ws species (c).



Euphorbias. />Aor6ta co/oni/o/ia (manzanilla bobo) (a), 2sk/>A. om^jo/ta (a), /ac/ea (cactus Surinam) (a), weri/o/ia (cordon santu) (a), <t>Mca//t (potloodplant) (a), s^/erfews (corona di sumpina) (a), pw/cAerrijna (poinsettia( (a), and several small 'herbaceous' euphorbias.



Miscellaneous. /Igaue and ^4/oe species (d), Fiwca rosea (madalena) ATywewocaWis cartta^a (leli) (d), Lan/ana camara (flor di sanguer) (d), Cro<o species (welisali) (d), 7a/ro/>Aa gossy/>i/a/ia (llaira) (b), Cry/>/os/egia gradi//ora (palu di lechi) (a), and Da/wra species (d).



There are a number of plants which, though the leaves are highly palatable to goats, still manage to survive their attacks fairly well, e.g. Cosa/-n'nta coriaria (divi-divi) and Proso^is /w/i/fora (indju or qui). These trees, being by nature deciduous, do not suffer too much when robbed of all their foliage during drought periods. A tree like Gwayacww o//icina/e (guayaca), however, being non-deciduous, succumbs when deprived of its leaves for a long time. Which of the above-mentioned plants can be used for planting can only be estimated by a careful study of the sites and the circumstances for each particular case. 84 S^eaftiMg aoottl eraa'ieafrow 0/ w/ee^s, Mere seews /o oe a ca<er/n//ar itiAicA Aas 6ee used w/A good resu/fs i /las/ra/ia to con6a< <Ae very o&wo*iows cac/us. I^Ay cokW i/ no/ 6e im^or/ed Aere.^ Certainly success has been attained in this respect with Cac/o/as/is cacotmi. However, the troublesome Ott/ia is the last 'resort' of the cattle








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 31 owner in periods of prolonged drought. It is fed to the animals after burning off the thorns! Destroying the opuntia would mean destroying the 'iron ration' of the cattle breeder. 85 / not be ^>osstl>/ to tntroiiuce /otrtgn />/anl$ a>AicA are fceMer SMi/ed /or purposes /Aan /Ae Some people expect miracles from 'new introductions', but we have to keep in mind the fact that our own plants have adapted themselves to the specific conditions prevailing here in a very long evolutionary process.



While we have to look at them first and foremost, this does not, of course, mean that new introductions might not be valuable. To find really good ones, however, requires much experimentation and time. In our three and a half centuries of colonization a lot of this experimentation has been going on, and many obviously adequate species have been introduced, nearly all of them, however, only for cultivation (ornamental or other purposes).



It may be emphasized that introducing a foreign species for cultivation is something quite different from introducing it for reforestation, in which last case it has to fend for itself without help (or with only a little help) from man. A good example of a tree which has been introduced and is doing well in a semi-wild state is the tamarind, whilst e.g. tia/anifes aegyp/jca (coronadi hesus) and Zi*y/>AKS sna-c/im< (apeldam), both from the Middle East, have gained a firm foothold in very many places. 86 How can a// <Ais /a/A 0/ re/ores/a/ion 6e reconci/ed tw/A /Ae recowintnrfattons given in /Ae Aydro/ogica/ re/>or/ wAicA appeared tn 1949.^ .4 /ter an e-tr/ensiue e#er/ s/wdy 0/ /Ae Aydro/ogica/ si/ualton, no/ re/o-es<a<ton 6m/ de/ores/a/ton was recommended/ Now, wAo is rig*/, /Ae au/Aors 0/ /Ae 7949 '.KVu/ flexor/', or <Ae adfoca/es 0/ re/ores/a<ion.> Everywhere and always, reforestation is regarded as the first prerequisite for water conservation, and infinite pains are taken to achieve this end.



Curacao is probably unique in all the world in that experts have recommended tree felling for water conservation. 87 s /Ae in//Mnc 0/ i>ege/a/icm ow water conseri/a/ion regarded as 6en-This influence is considered beneficial for the following reasons: a) The network of roots binds the soil together, thus preventing erosion (washing-away of the humus-containing topsoil with high water-retaining capacity). 6) The vegetation breaks the impact of hard rain, which tends to aggravate erosion. c) It provides organic matter which enriches the soil with humus, thus improving its penetration, absorption and retention capacity for water.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


32 P. C. HENRIQUEZ d) It provides shade for the soil, greatly reducing evaporation and protecting the humus from the destructive action of direct sun rays. e) It acts as a windbreak, preventing wind erosion and reducing evaporation. 88 Bn/ i/ /Awe ttiere wo nega/it/e sides to /Ais ptc/Kre, Aow cou/d /Ae au/Aors o/ /Ae 1949 'A"rw/ J?e/>or/' ever Aave recommended des/ruc/ion 0/ /Ae fegetorion so em/>Aa/ica//yj> Decidedly there is a negative side. The vegetation does use up a lot of water; this is undeniable. But, on striking the balance, it is accepted almost as an article of faith by all hydrologists that the favourable influence of vegetation on water conservation outweighs its unfavourable influence, not to speak of its aesthetic value (recreation, tourist industry).



_ Moreover, it has to be borne in mind that the plants, being adapted to an arid climate, all have mechanisms which greatly reduce their water consumption, especially during periods of drought. Shedding of leaves, small leaves, waxy layer on the leaves, folding of the leaves, small stomata, reduced number of stomata, closing of the stomata, are all part of these mechanisms. The authors of the 'Krul Report' do not seem to have had much understanding of drought-resistant plants. They repeatedly say that the cactus is a deep-rooting plant which extracts much ground water. It need hardly be said that, much to the contrary, the cactus is the classic example of a shallow-rooting plant with extremely small water consumption, which certainly does not use up one drop of 'ground water'. 89 Bid tn /Ae J949 repor/ /Ae endeavoMr was made to give a ^uatt/itative pic/wre 0/ /Ae Aarm done fry /Ae uege/a/ion to water conseri>a/ion, oy e*/ensve and careu/ ca/cM/aftons. PFAa/ is wrong wi/A /Aese ca/cw/a/ions.'' To draw up any quantitative picture of the infiltration of water into the soil, the flow of underground water, the storage capacity of the subsoil, the influence of evaporation by direct exposure of the soil, the evaporation by the vegetation, the influence of dams, of goats, etc., a great variety of data would have been necessary, based on careful, systematic observations and experiments throughout many years. These data being virtually non-existent, the researchers used estimates, which can only be called wild and arbitrary guesses, and which, in many instances, betray the superficiality of their knowledge of the country (the entire duration of their stay in the Netherlands Antilles was four months). It may be stated that the report was prepared with a lot of intelligence but little wisdom! 90 WAa/ were /Ae matn conc/usions and recommendations in /Ae reor/ concerning /Ae re/a/ion be/ween ground-itia/er e*/rac/ion and i/ege/a/ion?



The main conclusions were the following: a) The quantity of ground water pumped out of the wells is small compared with the quantity used up by the vegetation.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURAAO 33 6) The influence of ground-water extraction on vegetation and groundwater table is small. c) There is no need to stop or reduce the extraction of ground water. <f) If necessary, the withdrawal can be stepped up. e) The water table will rise as a result of deforestation; this has to be done to help the water supply system of the Government and Shell. /) Areas where no ground-water extraction for the Government Water Supply System had yet been practised (third district) could be tapped, if necessary. g) Deforestation, which is recommended, will not increase erosion appreciably.



Curacao can consider itself fortunate that these recommendations of the report were not carried out, though they have done considerable damage by delaying any action to stop the ground-water extraction. 91 7s mucA <fe/or.sto{tcm stfW got'ng on in fA is/a*<2f> Deforestation for agricultural purposes, for charcoal burning and for lime burning has virtually stopped. For the preparation of housing sites, of course, stretches of land are cleared regularly. It is a pity that frequently this clearing is not done very judiciously, so that many trees are felled which could have been spared. Often much more land is cleared than can be sold in many years to come, so that this land is lying waste and is prone to erosion.



Again, a silly prejudice against manzanilla bushes sometimes leads to their destruction. To be sure, the manzanilla is poisonous, and the skin of sensitive people may become severely irritated when the wet leaves are touched; but everyone knows this, and accidents are very rare, even at places which are very much frequented by children (such as the beach at Piscadera Bay). On the other hand, manzanilla trees are excellent for shade and often act as windbreaks. Since the manzanilla bushes east of the splendid fruit grove of Santa Cruz were cleared away a few years ago, serious damage has been done by the wind to the front rows of mango trees Very recently the manzanilla bushes at Ronde Klip were cut down by the Government organisation for relief work, out of misdirected zeal to 'save' the remnants of the old fruit grove. Well might these remnants muse: 'God protect me against my friends'. The manzanilla haters do not seem to understand that, whilst it is very easy to destroy a lush stand of these trees, it is extremely difficult and in most cases so expensive and time-consuming as to be virtually impossible to artificially establish a vegetation of 'better' trees instead. Destruction of manzanilla trees may be necessary, e.g. when they tend to suffocate fruit trees; but such destruction has to be carried out very judiciously. Again, enthusiasm in 'clearing' roadsides prevents the growth of shade trees which would spontaneously establish themselves if left alone. In and next to trenches (for drainage) beside the roads, many young indju trees try their luck. Whilst, of course, it is essential to remove the trees in the trenches, those a/ongside should be left alone I By following this simple policy, in time the roads in the residential areas would be lined with these providers of shade. It has to be borne in mind that conditions for growth are favourable along the paved roads, with their high run-off.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


34 P. C. HENEIQUEZ 92 in <Ae /oregotng *' **s *> stated /Aa/ t order to ge< a drtda& gietere 0/ <Ae Ayc^ro/o^tca/ si<ua/ion man}/ wore <&i/a ivott/d 6e necessary. ^4re geofogtca/ da/a very mpor<an< t </is r Geological data are certainly important. A lot of geological surveying has been going on during the last hundred years, but only on the surface.



As already indicated, the structure of the subsoil of Curacao is extremely complicated. Drillings could give an idea of what is going on under the ground. 93 / /Ae /oregotng 1/ Aas re^eate^y feeen said /Aat agricw/lure on Curacao ts Aainng, and Aas a/ways Aad, /o /igA< againsf grea< odds. A/euerfAe/ess, '< was con/ended <Aa/ /ormer/y i/ was 0/ considerable importance /or Me inAafo'tanls, <AougA t< s 0/ i/ery Ji/e importance mow. f/ow can <Ais fee e.r/>/ained?



First of all, we have to consider the vast difference between the economy and the standard of living of the average person now and formerly. The average standard of living before the establishment of the oil refinery was very low indeed compared with what it is at present, and a little produce from the land means a lot to people living a marginal existence.



Secondly, we have to take into account the phenomenal increase in the population. From 30,000 forty years ago it has jumped to nearly 130,000 now. But let us try our hand at some calculations.



A recent aerial photographic survey showing us the deforested areas which are supposed to have been cultivated formerly, and the topographical map of 1910, which shows us the areas that were provided with dams, enable us to make a very rough estimate of the acreage under cultivation.



From this it can be deduced that a total of perhaps 5,000 ha (12,500 acres) was used for sorghum. Unfortunately, there are no reliable estimates as to the average yield per ha. Generally speaking, 4,000 kg per ha under favourable conditions can be considered a good yield. Taking into account the quantity which is needed for seeding, and the losses incurred through insect pests, parakeets and doves, maybe 3,000 kg remains as net yield. This is a 'good' yield, a 'fair' net yield being perhaps 2,000 kg per ha. If we take one 'good' and one 'fair' yield in a six-years rain cycle, we get 5,000 kg per ha, meaning a total harvest of about 25,000 tons per six years on the entire island, or an average of about 4,000 tons per year.



If we now assume that, of the 30,000 inhabitants, 10,000 living in the city were totally independent of agriculture (the mainspring of their livelihood being the trade and harbour activity of Willemstad), then every one of the 20,000 remaining people could get a ration of 200 kg sorghum per year, or more than | kg per day. Even if this figure is too high and should be halved, it would signify a marginal subsistence level when supplemented with home-grown beans and vegetables (grown by irrigation), goats' milk and meat from own goats, sheep, pigs, fowl and casual wild iguanas and self-caught fish. Money for buying imported dried fish, fish from local fishermen, clothes, corn meal (maize) and beans was obtained by selling to the city poultry, eggs, small livestock, some vegetables, fruit and peanuts. The value of the 4,000 tons of sorghum produced yearly








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 35 (on an average) would be at present-day prices about NA / 1,200,000.



As regards other agricultural products, it is really very hard to make an estimate. The nearest we can get to doing this is to establish an 'order of magnitude'. Statistics for the number of goats, sheep and pigs raised on the island are non-existent. Figures which we encounter in various publications are at the most 'guestimates'. If we take a 'guestimate' of a goat population of 30,000, of which 10,000-15,000 are consumed, this makes about / 300,000 at present-day value. The production of beef and pork, goats' and cows' milk, poultry, eggs, vegetables and fruit is even more difficult to estimate. But, all in all, the total value of the agricultural production could not have exceeded a few million guilders (present-day value) per year. The plausibility of this assumption can also be confirmed by another kind of reasoning. Let the value of the agricultural production be / 4,000,000 per year. We have assumed 20,000 of the 30,000 inhabitants to have been dependent on agriculture. This would mean an average annual income of about / 200 per person, or about / 1,200 per average family.



It is obvious that, in those times, with the people's life as simple as it was, this income could not have been more. F 200 per year is / 0.55 per day. If the average daily consumption of cereal meal is kg, at a value of / 0.15, / 0.40 is left for the rest. This rest is nearly exclusively nutrition.



Clothing was exceedingly simple (virtually no footwear, or else self made footwear, little underwear); transport did not cost anything (long distances being covered by foot or otherwise on a home-bred donkey); housing was gratis (self-built daub and wattle huts); furniture virtually non-existent or self-made; and amusement a communal affair. Tobacco and rum were almost the only luxuries.



If we compare this picture with the situation as it is now, the following can be remarked. From the foregoing it is apparent that the region most intensively cultivated was the 'second district', which is the area around and in the neighbourhood of the Schottegat, Spaanse Water, St. Joris Bay, Jan Tiel Bay and Piscadera Bay, and which, as already stated, contained a thousand dams, which is more than two thirds of all the dams on the island. Nowadays, in this region agricultural activity has been reduced to a very small fraction of what it formerly was. The reasons have already been expounded above: use of land for industries, housing sites and roads; 'salting-up' of the valleys by the penetration of sea water; employment of the inhabitants in industry and trade.



In the 'third district' only the last factor has been active (even people living in 'Westpunt' are daily picked up by bus to work in the city I). But its influence has been great enough to put an end to most agricultural activities there as well. Let us take a closer look at the situation as it is at the present time: 1) Planting of sorghum, beans, peanuts: a vast decline. 2) Horticulture: virtually only in a few irrigated gardens, by Chinese and Portuguese. 3) Fructiculture: nearly wiped out by the decline of fruit groves, as extensively explained before. 4) Cows, goats, sheep, pigs for meat: probably not declined. 5) Poultry and eggs: probably increased, but dependent to a large extent on imported chicken feed.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


36 P. C. HENRIQUEZ 6) Milk from goats and sheep: not produced any more. 7) Milk from cows: has probably increased, but to a very large extent dependent on imported food. A 'luxury item', very expensive. 94 tAe coMomt'c situation de<ertora<jwg anrf Knww/j/oymewf increasing, it no/ 6e ^05si6/ to restore agnciW/ura/ ^ro^McttOM to its /orer or ven surpass tAis Let us consider the situation in detail! To answer this question we will use the classification of agricultural production just given. j) The production of sorghum (grain), beans and peanuts is only economically feasible without irrigation. In the second district, large plots of the best land have been lost to industry, housing sites and roads, and the intricate system of dams has broken down 'beyond repair,' as previously explained. Owing to the population pressure, land which could still be available for planting will be needed for housing sites in the near or little distant future. There is not much sense in trying to bring this land back into agricultural use. In the third district there is indeed a possibility of doing so (if we disregard for a moment the psychological and economic difficulties), but we could not hope for more than 2,000 ha, taking into account the fact that we have to carefully avoid any tampering with the forestation of the steeper hills (such as those of Groot St. Martha, Zevenbergen, Savonet, Wacao and Knip). a) In contrast to the production of staple foods (sorghum, beans), which can only be practised in the wet seasons of the 'good' years of the rain cycle, horticulture can be a year-round business. The yield in money per m^ is very much higher than from the production of staple foods, so that the cost of irrigation can be easily afforded. The surface of land needed is comparatively small, and hence even in the second district there would be enough land to meet a great proportion of the demand on the island (e.g. Klein Kwartier and the deforested plain of Groot Piscadera). If the Government and Shell were to stop pumping, a thousand tons of well water per day could be used for horticultural purposes and would suffice for about 50 ha. j) In the second district a large part of the valleys best suited for fructiculture has been spoilt by the infiltration of sea water (it has already been said that this has occurred all around the Spaanse Water, Jan Tiel Bay, Schottegat and Piscadera Bay). Other such valleys have been used for building sites (e.g. Isla, Rio Canario, Julianadorp, Van Engelen, Cas Cora, Groot Kwartier, Zeelandia, Poos Cabaai, Mahaai, Damacor). In the third district the number of groves has been much smaller than in the second district, most of the existing ones having deteriorated through neglect (breaking of the dams, encroachment of manzanilla). In principle there are possibilities of: a) keeping the still more or less 'flourishing' groves in good condition (e.g. St. Joris and Choloma in the second district, St. Cruz in the third district); fc) trying to save the ones which are threatened, by stopping groundwater extraction by Government and Shell and/or repairing the dams and/or replanting trees (e.g. Groot Piscadera, Rooi Catootje, Brakkeput,








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 37 Scherpenheuvel, in the second district; Groot en Klein St. Martha in the third district). c) Replanting the groves which have died (restoring dams, irrigation systems etc.) or creating new ones. For the time being, and probably for quite some years to come, this will only be possible on that ground which has not been spoiled too much by the infiltration of sea water (e.g. in the second district: Ronde Klip, Hato Mansion, Blauw, Klein Kwartier, St. Michiel, the northern deforested plain of Groot Piscadera, Malpais; and in the third district: Ascencion).



The economic side of these 'possibilities' will be dealt with later on.



In the following I have tried to compile a list of the most important fruit groves which existed in the first decades of this century, with details of their condition at the present time. This list is the result of only a cursory examination, and it would certainly be advisable to make a more detailed inventory. Of course, there were formerly several other small groves, a few of which still exist but do not appear in the list. In perusing this compilation it has to be borne in mind that at one time most of these groves were also connected with horticulture and sometimes with dairy activities. (See the map on p. 198.) Name (Second District) Klein St. Joris Choloma Groot St. Joris Santa Barbara Wilhelminapark Koraal Tabak Santa Catharina Jan Zoutvat Brakkeput Ariba Brakkeput Meimei Brakkeput Abau Jan Tiel Bottelier Zuurzak Scherpenheuvel Korporaal (several) Ronde Klip Bonnam Maria Maai Brievengat Semi-Kok Jongbloed Zapateer Janw Vredeberg Bloemfontein Klein Davelaar Groot Davelaar Present condition has suffered badly. good. good in part, rest has suffered badly. dead, completely; encroachment of sea water. good. dead. has suffered considerably. dead. i$ beginning to suffer. ; is beginning to suffer. is beginning to suffer. has suffered very badly. still fair, but suffering. nearly gone; encroachment of sea water. nearly gone. nearly all gone. nearly all gone. . still fair, but suffering. dead. dead. dead. dead. dead. dead. .". nearly gone. dead. dead; encroachment of sea water. dead; encroachment of sea water.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


Name Girouette I Girouette II Zeelandia Pos Cabaai Zuikertuintje Rooi Catootje Mahaai Cerito Bloemhof Jonchi Klein Kwartier Gaito Groot Kwartier Van Engelen (several) Urdal CasCora Marchena Veeris Raphael Klein Piscadera Groot Piscadera (high) Groot Piscadera (low) Blauw Groot St. Michiel Klein St. Michiel Malpais Hato Papaya (Third District) Hermanus Rif Villa Maria Jan Kok Siberi San Pedro St. Jan Ascencion Zumbu Patrick Groot Santa Martha Klein Santa Martha St. Nicolaas Santa Cruz Savonet Barber P. C. HENRIQUEZ Present condition dead. still fair. dead; encroachment of sea water. dead; encroachment of sea water. nearly all gone; encroachment of sea water. critical; encroachment of sea water. nearly all gone; encroachment of sea water. dead; encroachment of sea water. has suffered considerably. nearly all gone; encroachment of sea water. dead. dead; encroachment of sea water. dead; encroachment of sea water. nearly all gone. dead. nearly all gone. dead. dead. suffering; encroachment of sea water. dead; encroachment of sea water. started suffering in 1961. suffering badly. died completely in 1961. nearly all gone. has suffered considerably. practically all gone. dead. dead. dead. dead. dead. nearly all gone. dead. has suffered very badly. suffering. dead. dead. has suffered considerably. has suffered considerably. has suffered considerably. fair. has suffered somewhat, but is still good. dead. nearly all gone. 4) Increase of the numbers of animals must be considered virtually impossible. There is already overgrazing, and many perish during drought periods. Improvement of the quality of the stock has been advocated








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 39 by the introduction of male thoroughbred animals and castration of the indigenous males. The crossbreds may be heavier, but it is not certain that they will produce more meat per pound of food under the conditions prevailing here. On the other hand, it is certain that the crossbreds are less hardy than the indigenous race. 'Big' plantation owners do sometimes import animals to improve their herds. Repeated efforts by the Government in this direction, especially to help the 'small' farmers as well, have failed. 5) Poultry and egg production was formerly only on a small scale.



With the tremendous increase in prosperity and population, and the demand for their products zooming, several medium-sized, reasonably well-organised chicken farms have made their appearance. The nine largest keep 800-2,000 hens each, with a total of perhaps 12,000-15,000.



There are two large broiler farms, one with about 14,000, the other with about 4,000 fowls. In addition, a fairly large number of people keep from 100 to 200 birds, for both meat and egg production. A production of 175 eggs per hen per year is considered to be quite good. Nevertheless, yearly imports into the island are still more than 500,000 kg of poultry and more than 300,000 dozen eggs, at a fob value of more than three quarters and one quarter of a million guilders, respectively. 6) Goat's and sheep's milk were formerly in use, but no longer nowadays. There was no question of keeping animals of a special milk-producing breed. The same animals which were kept for meat were sometimes milked. Increase in prosperity, and the introduction of cheap imported condensed and powdered cow's milk, have put an end to this unreliable source of milk. Keeping goats of a special milk-producing breed seems to make little sense for the small farmer. These goats are not hardy enough to roam about in search of their own food. They have to be properly taken care of and fed with imported food if they are to thrive and produce properly. Time and again the different 'departments of agriculture' which have been organised, functioned a few years, and again disbanded in the course of the last one and a half centuries have attempted to introduce this kind of animal, but without any success. 7) There are several fair-sized dairy farms on Curacao, some of them very well organised, with highly productive cattle. The stock has to be fed on imported mixed food, and on green food (sorghum) locally produced with the help of irrigation. There is little scope for expansion in this branch of husbandry. The milk is very expensive (/ 0.70 per liter, compared with / 0.35 for powdered milk and / 0.27 for evaporated milk), and is only bought by well-to-do-people who insist on fresh milk. 95 .Fro tt>Aa< Aa5 /us/ 6ee saiif i/ caw fee Educed <Aa< on/y in /Ae /oWoiw'ng is /tere any astc /wssit/i/y 0/ expansion, to an/: agricwZ/Kre proper /a/;/e /oods; sorgAutn and fteans), Aor/icwZ/u-*, /ruc/icuZ/wre an^ /arming. PFAa/ economic im^or/ance can 6e aWacAed /o /Aese /ie/ds; in /ia< way cout im^ro^emen/ 6e achieved; and a/Aa/ ro/e comW government in/eruen/iot! et>en/wa//y /ay?



Let us try to answer these questions one by one. As already said, production of staple foods is only possible by making use of seasonal rains (irrigation being too expensive and the quantity of well water available








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


40 P. C. HENRIQUEZ too small). It has also been estimated that, of 5,000 ha formerly planted in the second and third districts, only 2,000 ha in the third and perhaps 1,000 ha in the second district could be brought back into agricultural use.



The production of sorghun from these fields would have an average value of about / 750,000 per year (taken over a six-years rain cycle with two succesful crops). If we add to this the value of beans, squash, watermelons and ochro produced with the help of seasonal rains we may reach perhaps, very roughly speaking, an average of one million guilders per year. Of course, this figure depends on a big 'if: i/ we can get enough people back to this kind of not very remunerative, irregular agriculture. 96 WomW 7 no/ 6e />osst6fe /o acAtv 6eer yeswWs, .: to ge/ sa/is/ac/ory cro/>s o/Zner <Aan /twee in a swr-years ratn eyc/e, dy using '<2ry-/armtng' me/tods.' Application of dry-farming techniques has repeatedly been studied, but the prospects offered under the specific conditions existing on the island are far from impressive. For example: deep ploughing and 'mulching', often recommended elsewhere, seem to have adverse instead of beneficial effects here; and 'summer fallow' is of no use (see: report by B. A. Bitter in 'Photo-geological Observations and Land Capability & Land Use Survey of the Island of Bonaire'). Also, the following has to be kept in mind: the execution of specialized measures for moisture and weed control may be economically feasible when we have large tracts of land with the proper machinery, a tight organisation, and strict central supervision and control of the necessary operations, but is impracticable with little tracts of land each belonging to another farmer and without a central control. 97 /, apar/ /rotn 'dry /arming', ace Mer no/ o/Aer measures aiAicA cowW oe /o ZAfi /armers, in order /o improve /Aeir yieW? For am/)/e /erZt/mng, eon/ro/, and se/ecZion 0/ 6e//er varieties?



These measures necessitate research of long duration and a good organisation with specialists. The money outlay, organisation and time needed are always very grossly underestimated. The intermittent character of the kind of agriculture which we are considering (twice in a six-years cycle) also makes it exceedingly difficult to achieve any definite results and to keep one's organisation in good shape. 98 S/i/7, i< is said /Aa/ success/w/ agrict*//>' is or /jas 6een prac/ised un'ZA rain/aW /igwres tiAicA are mwc/ /ess /Aan /Aose on Cwrafao. ^4 sZrting sm^fe is /Ae /ormer ATaia/ean Aingdotn in /Ac iVeget/ deser/ 0/ Pa/es/ine. i?ain/aW is said to 6e ott/y 5-J0 inctes year/y 6Z agricuJZure seems to Aaue /tourisAed.' This is certainly true. Paradoxically enough, this flourishing agriculture was made possible by the vast expanses of naked hills and mountains in the region. The very high run-off of these was collected in a relatively small area with good soil by a highly ingenious system of walls, terraces and trenches. On Curacao we do not have the large 'collecting areas' or the high and regular run-off!








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 41 99 Wt/A aW <A$e /Aings n mittd, Aote cottW w summarise /Ae st'fua/tott /o /A posstW/i<y o/ im^roi'ewmn/ n /A I think we have to admit frankly that, given the psychological, economic and sociological resistance to bringing the people back to unrewarding staple-food production; the low maximum value of the production, even if it were possible to overcome this resistance; and the intermittent and unreliable character of the production, it is very unlikely that government intervention, even if much money were spent on it, would meet with any considerable success. 100 Me same g/oomy />rogno5ts a/>/y to AoWtcu/<ur:> The situation with regard to horticulture is in many respects quite different. Basically the prospects are considerably better. First of all, it is economically quite feasible to practise horticulture with the help of irrigation, and we shall have fairly large quantities of well water at our disposal if the Government and Shell stop pumping. Moreover, the yield per m' with rationally practised horticulture is such that even distilled water could be used, e.g. at a cost of / 0.50 per m', which price level will certainly be reached in the not too distant future. (It has already been remarked that the growth of plants, especially during drought periods, will be much better with distilled water than with well water, owing to the latter's salt content.) Hence horticulture can be a year-round business giving reasonable rewards. It is no wonder that it is practised with success by Chinese and Portuguese. Certainly, the market situation warrants a considerable extension. 101 is i< no< signt/icaM/ /Aa< AoWicw/Zure nowadays is uiWuaWy e*c/usiu/y y CAinese and It is indeed significant. It reflects several circumstances and facts. Firstly, that considerable skill and long-standing tradition play an important role in successful horticulture. Secondly, that in this field especially, people accustomed to a low standard of living and to working hard in order to earn a livelihood, have an edge on others. 102 TAa< giues a raMer dim wu> 0/ <A native inAai/aw/'s rosec<s 0/ feeing em^/oyed in AoWicuWure, doesn't itf For the moment, the prospects are certainly not very bright. There might be a change, however, and the Government might try to do something about it. In the last few years some indigenous inhabitants have already been employed by Chinese and Portuguese horticulturists. What the Government might try to do is to introduce more rational and less back-breaking methods of horticulture than those currently applied.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


42 P. C. HENRIQUEZ 103 WAa/ are /Ae ra/iona/isa/tons tvAicA sAow/a" fee aimed a/?



The most important rationalisations, which seem desirable and possible, are the following: a) Mechanisation of irrigation, using methods which involve a minimum loss of water. (A 'flat spray' is recommended.) 6) Using plastic-bottomed cultivation beds to further reduce the loss of water. c) Reducing to a minimum the work of periodical loosening of the soil, and creating the best conditions for growth by improving the soil structure (addition of large quantities of peat moss to the cultivation bed), a") Using distilled water instead of well water as soon as the former becomes available at low prices. This, of course, has to be seen in the light of the drastic reduction in distilled-water price which has to be aimed at (discussed elsewhere). (It has already been remarked in the foregoing that plants grow much better on distilled water than on well water.) e) Optimal fertilization.



The economic and more detailed technical sides of these improvements have been discussed elsewhere. It suffices to mention here that the investment can be much less than with 'gravel culture', and operation much simpler. 104 /* // we// and oorf, fctd Aou; cou/a* />eop/e oe tna'ucea' to fry /Aetr Aand a/ Aor/tc//wre, using /Ae /ecAntca/ im^rowewien/s, / /Aey rfo no/ even Aave /Ae 6e 0/ any It all depends on what kind of schooling. Organising a kind of 'course' with theoretical lessons would not lead to any success under the prevailing conditions. However, the following solution might be considered. Perhaps a horticultural farm could be set up with the help of the Government and leased to a young, experienced horticulturist from Holland to run for his own account. The people whom he takes into his service would learn by practice. 105 Now, /tow aoow/ /ruc/icu/<urfi/> _5 <A st/Ma/ton Aere o6om{ /A* same as No, fructiculture has its own peculiar problems. An indication of what could be basically possible to improve the situation has already been given. Let us now consider the economic and practical feasibility of the measures recommended in more detail. St. Joris and Choloma are in good condition. Government intervention does not seem necessary, except perhaps to help the owners to obtain good varieties of trees, and maybe to give them a loan if they want one and submit a sound plan. St. Cruz is very nice; it consists nearly entirely of huge mango trees, which are actually too high to enable the fruit to be collected cheaply. It has little importance for fruit production, but has considerable recreative value.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 43 It should be bought by the Government for touristic purposes. Groot Piscadera and Rooi Catootje could perhaps be saved, and Blauw replanted, if a water law was enacted as previously advocated. They are excellently managed.



The groves mentioned are the last remnants of a large number with which the countryside was formerly studded. The quantity of fruit they supply covers only a dwindling fraction of the demand of the island. The problem of how to stimulate the creation of new groves is not easily solved. This problem is aggravated by the fact that the pieces of land best suited to the purpose have been rendered unusable by encroachment of sea water, as already repeatedly discussed. These were the valleys adjoining the sea, in which the ground-water level was so high as to make irrigation unnecessary for full-grown trees. Hence the eventual creation of new groves can only be effected in valleys at a higher elevation. In most cases these groves would need irrigation at least during the dry season. Well water would be available only if Government and Shell stop pumping. 106 H-'ouW //jre 60 any 5co/>e /or tm^rovem^nts tn tAe iana^m< 0/ /rut'f grovel Improvements might entail: careful choice of varieties (special attention should be paid to dwarf varieties, which make picking the fruit so much easier and cheaper), judicious methods of irrigation, proper fertilizing practices. These improvements might help in making fruit-growing a more rewarding business than it is at present. 107 But wAal eowW Me Government do to sttmufafc im/>/tHenla/i'on 0/ /Aese improvements?



Perhaps more or less the same course should be followed as already recommended for horticulture, viz: that a man be sought with t/iorougA practica/ experience of fructiculture and that the Government help him financially to set up a farm along the most modern lines using the best varieties available. The site should, of course, be carefully chosen.



It should have a deep layer of topsoil, the ground-water level should not be too low, and it should be provided with wells with a capacity of, say, 150 tons a day. 108 Zsn't t/ <r tAat tAe Government Aad arf w^enewces some time ago /Ais &ind 0/ arrangement, in teAicA it Ae//>ed a man to set k a 'mode/' dairy /arm.'' Well, technically the enterprise was a big success; a flourishing farm was created. But the juridical side of the contract concluded between the Government and the farmer was quite wrong. The man was provided with a house and a fertile tract of land with plenty of well water. He had to finance all the building-up of the farm himself, but the Government








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


44 P- C. HENRIQUEZ paid him a salary 'to instruct the small farmers in the neighbourhood' and was obliged to take over the farm at full value if it wanted to annul the contract. As, however, small farmers to be instructed were nonexistent, the Government decided to cancel the arrangement after some eight or more years, and failed to renew it on a reasonable basis or seek another good tenant. So the farm deteriorated and the Government lost all it had paid for it. 109 _n /Ae /oregotng / Aas 6n satd <Aa/ unfA Aor/tcu/tur <Ae yiWd in money er m' is so AigA </a< even tmga/ton u>i/A rfts/t/fca* water mtgAf fee .Does <As a/so a/y to /rutf-grotvtng?



From fructiculture, the yield per square meter is appreciably lower than from horticulture; hence the water used for irrigation should be substantially cheaper too. Let us consider, for example, a water price of / 0.20 per m', and let us assume that the grove needs a daily supplement of 30 tons of water per ha for 200 days every year. This makes 6,000 tons per ha per year, costing / 1,200. It is not easy to estimate at all accurately what value per ha a fruit grove could yield under existing circumstances; much more data would have to be collected to make this possible. According to the best obtainable guess from an experienced farmer this could be around / 5,000 per ha. Accordingly, the cost of the water would be a very important item on the budget of exploitation. The good quality of the water, however, may be reflected in the yield and counterbalance this extra cost, at least partly. no aiow/d t/ f 6 oss6/e to aWiuer a'ts/t/lea' owi/ec a< a rtce 0/ / 0.20 It has been shown elsewhere that, in the future, if we combine very largescale distillation processes (which are now being developed), and largescale production of electricity, it might perhaps be possible to produce water at a price (at the plant site) of / 0.20-/ 0.25 per m'. To this, however, we have to add the cost of bringing the water to the grove and of distributing it evenly by means of an irrigation system.



A discussion with Mr. F. Faber resulted in the following idea for reducing the water price even more. During the rainy season, water consumption always drops. The extra capacity of the distilling plant could then be used to produce water for agricultural purposes, which could be sold at differential cost. This differential cost is not much more than the fuel cost, which would be about / 0.07 per m'. Unfortunately, the rainy season is just the period in which fruit or vegetable gardens need no water or little water. The water would therefore have to be stored for use in the dry season. Now, contrary to popular belief, storage of water is expensive if we use conventional methods. The cost, however, could be brought down very considerably if we were to build extremely large reservoirs and make use of plastic both for the bottoms and for the covers of these reservoirs. Imagine, for instance a reservoir with a volume of 1,000,000 m', built by constructing an earthen dam on a flat plain. Im-








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 45 permeabilisation could be achieved by covering the bottom with a thin plastic film (this was done in 1959 in three large reservoirs near Salt Lake City). The cover could consist of white foam plastic plates floating on the water. If this kind of reservoir, of the capacity mentioned, could be built for about / 500,000 (which will perhaps be possible), it would mean an investment of / 0.50 per m*. If the cost of building the reservoir is to be recovered at a rate of 10% per year, the cost of storage will be / 0.05 per m*. Taking into account also the cost of delivery from the water-distilling plant to the storage tank, and the distribution to and in the planting area (which, of course, has to be very near to the reservoir), we may have an ultimate cost of irrigation of / 0.15-/ 0.20 per m'. Naturally all this would have to be investigated in much greater detail. With a reservoir of 1,000,000 m', between one hundred and two hundred ha | of fruit groves and horticultural land could be irrigated I i in 5om />eo/>fe /At'nA Ma/, gtven /A marAi?/ tfcmand on CMfOfao (500 94), iA#r 5/u>m2<? 6 a ossifri/i/y 0/ *atiding ou/<ry and egg ^rorfKcfto* constrfmiWy.



Can <As opinion 6 con/irtneaV ! Any really serious technical and economic study of the matter will reveal ; that the desired expansion is not so easy as it seems. It is true that about 4 million eggs are imported yearly, but these are used chiefly in restaurants and bakeries. They are considerably cheaper than the fresh ; eggs produced on the island: / 1.10 per dozen as against about / 1.50 per dozen. The same applies to poultry. More than 500 tons per year is ; imported, as already stated; but this frozen commodity is sold at ap- ; proximately / 2 per kg as compared with approximately / 3 for the fresh article. We have to take into account several facts which make it difficult for the home product to compete with the imported stuff, one of which is that all the poultry food has also to be imported. Disregarding tariff barriers, it seems that a considerable expansion of the island's i production can only be absorbed by the market if prices are reduced. The i profit margin of the producers, however, is low, and it is doubtful whether I there are any real possibilities of reducing the cost of production. _! i' Recommendations 112 !, _ < />osfc/e <o gj'f a swnwiing w 0/ /A discussions?



These recommendations can be formulated as follows: 1. To halt the infiltration of sea water and the deterioriation of the vegetation, which have reached very serious and deplorable proportions in the 'second district', it is necessary to stop ground-water extraction by the Government and Shell Curacao N.V. as soon as possible (see Nos. 37-44)-








Nederlands West-Indische Gids







Henriquez, P.C.





Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


46 P. C. HENRIQUEZ 2. A 'water law', should be promulgated on two main principles, to wit: a) whether the water extracted is used for the creation of vegetation (agricultural or ornamental) or not, and 6) whether the party extracting the water does or does not replenish the ground-water reserves to a degree comparable with the extraction. — From these principles it can be deduced that Government and Shell have to stop extraction, but private citizens not. — An elaborate system of checking all private wells is both impracticable and unjustified (see Nos. 45-60). 3. The cesspools of the private houses in the second district have a considerable effect on the replenishment of ground water an effect which is, in fact, many times as important as the effect of all the dams in the second district. It is a mistake to install sewage systems, which lead the used water to the sea, in low-cost housing projects. This practice has to be abandoned (see Nos. 51, 53-60). 4. The function of the multitudinous dams formerly found on the island is generally misjudged. They did not materially help to effect a general rise of the ground-water level. In fact, the quantity of water forced into the soil by dams could have represented no more than a small fraction of the total replenishment of the ground water. — The influence of the dams (only functioning in about two rainy seasons out of every six-years rain cycle) was mainly a) to extend the 'growing season' of non-irrigational crops, and 6) to 'flush' the salt, which accumulated in the 'dry' years, out of the fruit groves and intensively used, irrigated horticultural lots. — From this it follows that the 'old' method of building a very large number of low dams at the particular places where they serve agriculture best is better than the 'new' method of building a few big dams to 'systematically' block all run-off from the catchment areas. — All Government and Shell land has now been dammed by the new method. — In view of the radically changed pattern of residential areas, and the drastic decline of nonirrigational agriculture, in most cases there is little sense in destroying the big dams once they have been built and trying to recreate the old pattern of low dams (see Nos. 5-21, 60-62). 5. There is not much point in the Government's trying to improve the dam system of the private ground by using the same methods as were used by them in the dam-building campaign round about 1950, and by Shell (the function of the Shell dams is quite different from what the Government should strive for.) — Dams should only be built after an 'agricultural pattern' has been planned for a given piece of land, and they have to be designed so as to fit this pattern. Otherwise they may do more harm than good. — If the Government wants to go in for such 'land-use' planning for private ground as well, it is recommended that efforts be concentrated on horticulture and fructiculture rather than on staplefood production (see Nos. 27-30). 6. Whilst, contrary to popular belief, the 'run-off' from non-paved areas taken as an average for a six-years rain cycle, is very low (0.5-1% of the total rainfall), it may be considerable in paved and built-up areas.



For this reason it would be worth while, from purely hydrological considerations, to have dams and infiltration basins in these areas. Unfortunately, however, to avert the danger of flooding roads, gardens and








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 47 houses. Public Works has to plan a discharge of the run-off water as quickly as possible into the sea. If, at long last, a 'zoning law' were to be promulgated on the island, it is recommended that serious study should be given to the possibility of whether infiltration areas could be spared in drawing up the development plans ('bestemmingsplannen') according to this law (see Nos. 21-23). 7. Deforestation for the export of valuable wood (pockwood and logwood), for the preparation of agricultural land and home sites, for charcoal and lime burning, and even for alleged water-conservation purposes has taken a heavy toll of the island's vegetation, bringing in its wake considerable erosion. Contrary to common opinion, the influence of goats on deforestation seems not to have been important. On the other hand, these animals, freely roaming about, may endanger attempts at artificial reforestation, whilst also preventing the (slow) natural recovery of certain kinds of valuable vegetation (especially the spreading of pockwood in areas which are denuded by man). The Government should buy the tracts of land in the third district which are still densely wooded. Parklike areas should be created in some easily reforestable tracts of flat land (e.g. Klein Kwartier, northern part of Groot Piscadera). The possibility of reforestation and erosion control on the many naked or nearly naked hills in the second district should be studied. For several reasons this is a very difficult task, the different aspects of which have been extensively discussed above. Ringing' of the hills with low earthen dams or terracing with low stone banks might be part of the answer (see Nos. 63-90). 8. Attempts at reforestation should be combined with efforts towards appropriate landscaping of the city and the countryside. This is of primary importance for touristic development. In this connection the first thing to do is to compose a 'Manual of the Use of Indigenous Plants', in which the habits and properties of these plants are carefully described (drought-, wind-, salt- and goat-resistance, shedding of leaves, speed of growth, crown development, flowers, etc.). It is proposed to assign this task primarily to the author of the 'Gekweekte en nuttige planten van de Nederlandse Antillen' and the 'Zakflora. Wat in het wild groeit en bloeit op Curacao, Aruba en Bonaire'. Secondly, it is necessary to obtain the services of a professional landscape architect who is well acquainted with drought-resistant tropical and sub-tropical plants.



This man should also help with the introduction of new plants which could be used for reforestation and landscaping. Lastly, the mania for having 'clearing gangs' of relief workers to cut down young trees alongside roads has to be held in check. 9. There seems to be a reasonable chance of considerably developing horticulture and fructiculture. The best way should be to help persons with a thorough practical knowledge in these fields to start large farms on selected sites and according to rationalized methods (see also report: 'Rationalisatie van de tuinbouw'). Development in the other branches of agriculture seems doubtful or impossible (see Nos. 94-111). 10. Cheap distilled water is of great importance for the vegetation on the island. If this is available, ground-water extraction for household and








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


48 P. C. HENRIQUEZ garden use will automatically diminish greatly, and it will materially help horticulture and landscaping. In close cooperation with Shell Curacao N.V., the Government should strive to obtain very large distilling equipment, utilizing the most advanced techniques, which will probably be available within five years or so, in order to reduce the cost of water drastically and fundamentally. Possibilities should also be studied of cheap water storage in large basins lined with plastic foil (see Nos. 50-51, 100, no). 11. It is recommended that a series of boreholes should be drilled in conjunction with geological investigations, to examine the underground water situation, especially in the limestone areas (see Nos. 24-36 and 92).



REFERENCES (arranged chronologically) Geo/oge en GeoAydro/ogte na Ae< et/anii Curasao, by G. J. H. Molengraaff.



Thesis, Delft, 1929; Part II: 'Geohydrologie', p. 99-126, with 2 plates and 5 loosely inserted folding tables & maps. 'Radulphus Report': i?apor< en noto/en fan de Commissie iwgesteW ... ter fces/wdeering wan Ae< growdtt/a<e>'/'oWe>w o/> Cwrofao. i?a^or/ fan Ae/ ffoo/d van den Landstoaterfooraeningsdiens* inae.' de growdwa/mintfyeftAing voor de Water-Doom'eningsdiens/ o^> Cwrafao; en Ae/ grond- e t>a/teiu>ate' o .<4ru6a ...



Curasao, (April) 1946, iv + 58 pp. mimeogr., 17 folding maps. 'Krul Report': i?a/>or< insaAe de u/a/eWiwis/iOwding' fan Cwrapao en ylruoa, by W. F. J. M.



Krul. Rijksinstituut voor Drinkwatervoorziening, 's-Gravenhage, (July) 1949, (iv) + 43 pp. mimeogr. With 3 annexes: I, Beschouwingen over de regent/a/, by W. C. Visser, i + 8 pp., 4 separate drawings. II, Note tmaAe de Aydro/ogie fan Curasao en /Irttoa, by G. Santing, (v) + 85 pp., portfolio of 10 maps and tables. Ill, ATo<a 6etre//ende de /andoowtu fan Cwrafao en y4rMoa, by W. C. Visser, ii + 56 pp., 4 separate drawings and 1 folding table.



fan de s/nrfte faw A< ra^>or/ van Pro/. W^. .F. _. M. i^rw/: 'Z)e fan Cwrapao en ^Irwoa' .. Meded. Voorlichtingsinstituut voor het Welvaartsplan Nederlandse Antillen, Amsterdam, No. 2, 1950, 26 pp. mimeogr. With critical comments by J. H. Westermann.



De water AKJs/jottding f an Cwraf ao en ^r6a, by P. Wagenaar Hummelinck. 'De West-Indische Gids' jj, 1950, p. 21-42. Review of the report by Prof. Krul and collaborators on the hydrology and water supply of Curacao and Aruba; with critical comments.



fraagsfwA fan Ae* 6e/ioud fan Ac/ mater o Curofao, by J. Beijering. 'De West-Indische Gids' JJ, 1950, p. 65-79, 4 figs. Summary: on water and soil conservation on Curacao.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO 49 GrondtMjter/>et/ en u>atervoor.riening o Curasao, voorAeett n tAans, by N. van Meeteren. 'De West-Indische Gids' ji, 1950, p. 129-169, 1 fig.



_ Sinopsis: El nivel del agua en el subsuelo de Curacao y su explotacin antes y hoy.



Een otuforroeA naar de tt/a/frAuisAowdAwndife gronds/agen van aV /atia*6oMt(; o/> de fin(^iunn(lse i7andn, by W. C. Visser. 'Landbouwkundig Tijdschrift' 6j, 1951, p. 293-301.



De waferAutsAoua'tng o de A^iirr/an<is /4ntt//en tn a> /aatste ftn jaren' by G. Santing. Jaarboek 1948-1951, Uitgaven 'Natuurwetenschappelijke Studiekring voor Suriname en de Nederlanden Antillen' Utrecht, No. 6, 1951, p. 67-74.



en nuMtge planten van de ATe<fcWan<fc /JwhV/isn, by Fr. M. Arnoldo (A. N. Broeders). Uitgaven 'Natuurwetenschappelijke Werkgroep Nederlandse Antillen' Curacao, No. 3, June 1954, viii + 149 pp., 225 photographs on 63 plates excluded. Cultivated and useful plants of the Netherlands Antilles.



in /iet unt groetf en 6/oett o CMrafao, /I ruba en BonatVe. ZaA//ora, by Fr. M. Arnoldo (A. N. Broeders). Uitgaven 'Natuurwetenschappelijke Werkgroep Nederlandse Antillen' Curacao, No. 4, October 1954, viii -f-170 pp., 156 photographs on 68 plates excluded. The Pocket Flora of Curacao, Aruba and Bonaire.



TAe Kege/arion 0/ /Ae JVefA7and.s i4n/7/5, by A. L. Stoffers. Uitgaven 'Natuurwetenschappelijke Studiekring voor Suriname en de Nederlandse Antillen' Utrecht, No. 15. 1956; Utrecht 1956, iv + 142 pp., 12 figs., 52 photographs on 28 plates, 4 loosely inserted coloured folding maps.



Ofcseruattons and Land Caa6t7'ty 6- Land t/se Survey 0/ /Ae Ls/and 0/ Bonaire, by J. H. Westermann & J. I. S. Zonneveld.



Mededeling Koninklijk Instituut voor de Tropen, Amsterdam, No. 123 (Afd. Trop. Prod. No. 47), 1956, 100 pp., table on p. 101-131, 5 figs., 61 photographs on 35 plates excluded. Dry-Zartmng and ifc tecAntca/ os6tittes /or /Ae JVetAer/ands ^nti/Zes, by B. A. Bitter, p. 75-79-Rationa/isa/ie van de tuinbouw, by P. C. Henriquez. Report appended to 'Deel I, Tienjarenplan van de Centrale Regering der Nederlandse Antillen', July 1962.



Acknowledgements: The author is much indebted to Brother M.



Arnoldo, for much useful information on botanical problems, and to Dr. P. Wagenaar Hummelinck, for his critical scrutiny, comments and suggestions in editing this publication.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


conservation measures completed in 1947-ater conservation measures started in 1952 but not completed Pimping areas (pumping by Government and Shell Ciraeao N.V.



CURAQAO CATCHMENT AREAS 1 Mahoema 2 Phlip 3 Ronde Klip 4 Rio Magdalena 5 Lelinberg 6 Barber 7 Soto 8 Dokterstuin 9 Pannekoek/Groot St. Martba 10 St. Jan 11 Ascencion 12 St. Nicolaas 13 Patrick 14 Wacao 15 Klein St. Martha 16 St. Hyronimus 17 Zuurzak (Government) 18 Rooi Domi 19 Zevenbergen 20 Lagoen 21 Knip 22 Rooi Beroe 23 Klein St. Joris 24 Savonet 25 St. Christoffelberg 26 Cas Abau 27 Port Marie 28 Siberi 19 Ja K.,k 43 Suffisant (Shell) 44 Buena Vista (Government) 45 Rozendaal (Government) 46 Veens 47 Savaan 48 Groot Piscadera (Shell) 49 Groot St. Michiel (Shell) 50 Blauw 51 Mount Pleasant (Shell) 52 Zorgvliet 53 Meiberg 54 Duivelsklip 55 Santa Crur 56 Spaanseput 57 Seroe Pilaar 58 Klein Kwartier (Government) 30 Groot St. Joris (Shell) 31'Santa Catharina 32 Brakkeput (Shell) 33 Choloma 34-JanTiel 35 Koraal Tabak 36 Welgelegen (Government) 37 Santa Barbara 38. Newport 39 Rooi Sjon Tata 40 Brievengat 41 Zapateer (Shell) 42, Groot Kwartier (Govern ment)








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURASAO INDEX ATos. o/ and anstoers Agriculture, areas cleared for 93 _, dry-farming methods 96 _, formerly and now 93~94 _, former importance 93 _, in Negev desert 98 _, organisation needed for improvement 97 _, possibilities of restoring 94-109 Cacti, caterpillar eating 84 Caliche 4 Capacity of subsoil to hold water 3 Cesspools, compared with dams 60 _-, replenishment of ground water by 51-60 Chicken farming, see: poultry City planning, water conservation and 23 Climate, alleged change of 63 Complexity of subsoil 4 Dairy farming 93-94 Dams, areas completely provided with 27 _, areas not completely provided with 27 _, big 9. 16-17 _, compared with cesspools 60 _, former number of 7 _, function in fruit groves 14-15 _, function of 8 _, influence on water table 16, 18-21,62 _, on private estates 27-30 _, penetration of water in front of 9-14 _, quantity of water caught by 19,21,42,60-61 _, small versus big 17 _, use in agriculture and horticulture 8 Deforestation, and water extraction 90 _, through water extraction 39~45 _, causes of 64 51








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


52 P. C. HENRIQUEZ JVos.



_, for alleged water conservation 82, 90 _, see 'Krul Report' and 'Radulphus Report' _, still practised 91 _, versus reforestation 86-90 Denudation, see: deforestation Diabase, structure 3 _, water-holding capacity 3, 4 Distilled water 50-51 _, cheap for horticulture and fructiculture .... no _, cheap reservoirs for no Dry fanning 96 Egg production, possibilities of improvement . 94, in Erosion 31-32 _, control 33-36 'Fahas' 33-35 Forest, primary and secondary 65 _, vegetation in secondary 65 Fructiculture, possibilities for improvements . 94, 104, 109 _, yield per ha 109 Fruit groves, death of 39-41. 43 _, list of 94 Fruits, see: fructiculture Goats, and primary forest 66 _, and secondary growth 67, 71 _, control of grazing 72-73 _, destroying pockwood 69 _, fencing-off of ground against 75 _, intensivation of keeping 74 _, plants not eaten by 83 Government, building of dams on private estates by 27-30 Grazing, see: goats Ground water, see: water Guayaca, see: pockwood Hills, reforestation 36, 77-78 Horticulture, possibilities for improvement .... 94, 100, 104 Hydrology 1-30 _, and drilling 92 _, differences between Neth. Antillean islands . 1 _, difference from other semi-arid regions .... 2, 3 Infiltration of sea water (see also: water extraction) 39-40 Infiltration of water through cesspools 51-60 _, of water in dam basins 9-13 'Krul Report' 44, 86-90








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


PROBLEMS RELATING TO WATER IN CURA9AO 53 ATos.



Landscaping, see: reforestation Lignum vitae, see: pockwood Limestone areas, hydrological condition of . 24-26 Opuntias, destruction of 84 Overpumping, see: water extraction Paved areas, run-off in 21 _, water conservation in 23 Penetration of water in dam basins 9-13 _, of water in residential areas 23 Plants, see: deforestation, reforestation, goats, water extraction Pockwood 63 Poultry production, possibilities for improvements 94, ill Private estates, building of dams by government on 27-30 'Radulphus Report' 41, 44 Rain, fate of falling on the island 6 Recommendations, summary of 112 Reforestation 76-88 _, adverse influence on water conservation ... 88, 89 _, and water table 90 _, areas to be reforested 81 _, combined with erosion control 77 _, difficulties 76 _, good influence on water conservation 87 _, introduction of new plants for 85 _, of hills 77-78 _, of valleys 82 _, requirements for trees used in 79 _, trees for 82 _, use of cacti and agaves 80 _, use of goat-resistant plants 83 _, versus deforestation 86-90 Residential areas, water conservation in 23 'Ringing' of hills 36, 77 Roads, see: paved areas _, trees along 91 Run-off 6, 18, 21 _, from paved areas 22 Sea-water distillation 50-51 Sea water, infiltration of (see also: water extraction) 39-40 Sedimentary material 3 Sewage system versus cesspools 54~6o Silt, deposited in dam basins 9-*3. 3^ Sorghum, see: staple food








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl

Henriquez, P.C.



Problems Relating to hydrology, water conservation, erosion control, reforestation and agriculture in Curacao


54 P- C. HENRIQUEZ NOS. an<i answers Staple food, production formerly 93 _, production, possibilities for improvement ... 91, 95-98 Stock, for meat, production formerly 93~94 Stone banks 33~35 Subsoil, capacity to hold water 3, 6, 9, 24 _, complicated structure 4 'Terracing' 34~35 Trees, see: deforestation, goats, reforestation, water extraction Trenches for reforestation 77 _, on hillsides 36, 77 Tuffs 4 Vegetables, see: horticulture Vegetation, see: deforestation, reforestation, water extraction, forest _, original 64, 66 Water, penetration of 9-13 _, replenishment of ground water by cesspools . 51-60 Water conservation, see: dams, run-off, penetration, erosion control, reforestation, deforestation, water law, water extraction _, in residential areas _,,, 2j Water extraction 37~45 _, and deforestation 90 _, by Government and Shell 21, 41-42, 46-47,53 _, death of trees through 39~45 _, stopping of 47, 50 Water distillation 50-51 Water-holding capacity, limestone 24 _, subsoil 3, 24 Water law 48-49, 52 Water management, see: water law Water table, lowering of (see also: water extraction) 37-45 Wells, erratic behaviour of 4 _, in limestone areas 24 _, salting-up 39~4 Wood, export of 64 Zoning 9








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


BOEKBESPREKING Curafoo. Kan Ao/ont> /o/ autonomtf, door Joh. Hartog.



D. J. de Wit, Aruba, 1961, 2 delen, 1156 blz., 72 foto's buiten de tekst (_59,50).



Na y4rw6a en Bonaire 1 heeft dr. Johan Hartog met de publicatie van Curafao een fikse stap gezet op de weg naar zijn einddoel, de beschrijving van de geschiedenis der Nederlandse Antillen, waarbij hij nu de etappes betreffende de Benedenwindse eilanden achter de rug heeft.



Bij het doornemen van Hartog's boeken gaan de gedachten onwillekeurig uit naar de misschien legendarische historicus die eon goede kwart eeuw geleden het plan zou hebben opgevat de geschiedenis van Curacao te beschrijven. Daartoe bezocht hij het Algemeen Rijksarchief in Den Haag en verzocht inzage in de daar aanwezige Antilliaanse archieven. Nadat hij naar de ruimte was gebracht, waar deze worden bewaard, overzag hij de duizenden aanwezige bundels en gaf zijn voornemen op, na de verschrikte verzuchting dat hier voor n man werk voor eeuwen lag.



We mogen Hartog dus niet verwijten dat hij niet volledig is, daarvoor zou hij immers eeuwen nodig hebben gehad.



Er is echter een ander type onvolledigheid, die voortvloeit uit do keuze van de historicus uit het wel direkt ter beschikking staande materiaal.



Een dergelijke keuze is voor iedere onderzoeker die produktief wil zijn noodzakelijk, maar tevens strikt persoonlijk en we moeten haar als zodanig respecteren. Dit brengt met zich mee, dat schrijver voor zijn selectie verantwoordelijk blijft en dat wanneer deze eenmaal haar neerslag heeft gevonden in een publikatie, volgende onderzoekers slechts dan kunnen voortbouwen op de geleverde prestatie indien de keuze ook voor hen zinvol blijkt te zijn.



Andere onderzoekers immers en ook de recensent kiezen uit datgene dat hun bekend is, en het zal Hartog langzamerhand wel ergeren, dat niemand over zijn werk als historicus schijnt te willen oordelen zonder te overwegen, dat zijn loopbaan hem ook langs de paden van het dagbladbedrijf heeft gevoerd, maar het hoge woord moet er toch uit: zijn 'Curacao' schijnt mij een vlotte en onderhoudende aaneenschakeling van 'weeken jaaroverzichten" met betrekking tot het binnenlands gebeuren van j Curafao, zonder dat men dit 'week- en jaar-' zo letterlijk behoeft te nemen.



Bij deze kwalifikatie moeten we niet vergeten, dat de kennis van onze historie nog heel wat fragmentarischer is dan ons lief is, en we kunnen in de geschiedschrijving niet veel verder komen voordat we zeer uitvoerig kunnen kennis nemen van al hetgeen het verleden ons nog te vertellen heeft. Daarna zal pas een analyse zin hebben. Reproduceren van het ver- ; haal van het verleden is waarmee Hartog zich voornamelijk heeft bezig Zie W.7. Gi<fc J5, 1955, blz. 229, en j#, 1958, blz. 180. 55








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


56 BOEKBESPREKING gehouden. En dan toch nog anders dan ik graag had gezien. Hij steunt wel heel erg op de bestaande, wel omvangrijke, doch niet altijd betrouwbare en maar zelden diepgaande literatuur enkele zeer degelijke uitzonderingen niet te na gesproken wat Hartog zich gelukkig maar al te goed bewust is; en zijn bronnenonderzoek beperkt zich als regel tot het enigszins uitdiepen van wat reeds bekend is, waarbij hij, dit moet tot zijn eer vermeld worden, soms interessante vondsten naar boven weet te halen, zoals b.v. de door Walbeeck getekende kaart, die hij op blz. 135 laat afdrukken.



En zoals gezegd, het is voornamelijk binnenlands gebeuren. Dit te beschrijven is kennelijk de bedoeling van Hartog geweest. Het is ook nodig dat men zich daar van tijd tot tijd toe zet en, aangezien sinds Hamelberg geen belangrijke ideografische werken over de Antilliaanse geschiedenis meer zijn verschenen, was het hoog tijd dat iemand het weer eens ter hand nam. Sinds Hamelberg zijn er talloze publikaties verschenen, vooral nadat in 1919 De West-Indische Gids werd opgericht, en Hartog > ons het opzoeken een flink stuk hebben AMnnn vergemakkelijken met een bibliografie.



Er is echter nog een ander aspekt. Hartog noemt op blz. 158 het werk van Hamelberg verouderd en ongetwijfeld heeft hij gelijk, doch niet alleen omdat er sindsdien materiaal aan het licht is gekomen waarover Hamelberg niet beschikte.



In de sociale wetenschappen komt men steeds meer tot het inzicht, dat er onvermijdelijk in haar beoefening en de uitkomsten daarvan een subjectief element schuilt, en dat dit niet noodzakelijk verwerpelijk is, zoals vroeger algemeen werd gesteld. In de wetenschap der geschiedenis leidt deze opvatting er toe, dat iedere generatie, gebonden als zij is aan haar eigen omstandigheden, een eigen visie ontwikkelt op de geschiedenis.



Hartog's visie wijkt dus af van Hamelberg's visie en in deze gedachtengang mag hij haar ook terecht verouderd noemen. De visie van Hartog zal echter eenzelfde lot beschoren zijn in de ogen van de generaties die na hem komen.



Maar laten we terugkeren tot Door de opzet van zijn werk is Hartog ten prooi gevallen aan een bijzonder 'insularisme', wat misschien mede veroorzaakt is door het feit, dat de algemene Caribische geschiedenis voor ons Nederlands-Antillianen tot nog toe een tamelijk onbekend terrein is gebleven. Zo vernam ik b.v. onlangs in een gesprek met professor Meivin H. Jackson, thans verbonden aan de Smithsonian Institution te Washington, die een studie maakt van de onderlinge relaties in het Caribische zeebekken in de tijd van de Amerikaanse en Franse revoluties, dat in de jaren na 1789 de Franse gebieden zeer scherp tegenover elkaar stonden en dat hun agenten op de andere eilanden, ook op Curacao, als regel zeer aktief waren in hun pogingen steun te krijgen voor hun positie. Welke gevolgen dit kan hebben gehad voor het gedrag van gouverneur Lauffer zou een interessant onderwerp van studie vormen.



Hartog komt ook nauwelijks toe aan de geschiedenis buiten die van de Antilliaanse elite: politiek, economisch en cultureel. Hij maakt wel telkens kleine uitstapjes naar het leven van de niet-lite, maar hier vooral wreken zich de eerder genoemde 'eeuwen' van noodzakelijk onderzoek.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


PUST* F BOEKBESPREKING 57 Want de gegevens die over deze bevolkingsgroepen uit het verleden zijn bewaard gebleven vermoedelijk niet in ruime mate zijn nog maar zeer spaarzaam bewerkt, zodat juist bier intensief bronnenonderzoek dringend geboden is.



Met deze kritiek op Hartog's opzet en werkwijze heb ik slechts getracht enkele wegen aan te geven uit de vele die nog openliggen waarvoor het werk van Hartog een voetsteun *ou Autinen zijn voor de sprong naar nieuw onderzoek; want niemand zal zo naef zijn te denken, dat de geschiedenis der Benedenwindse eilanden nu wel bekeken is, zelfs niet voor Hartog's eigen generatie.



Met opzet schreef ik tweemaal, dat het werk van Hartog iets *ou Aunnen.



Hij is namelijk nog niet klaar.



P.W.H, introduceerde in de genoemde recensie van fionatr 'Hartog's alfabet'. Na A(ruba) en B(onaire) is thans C(uracao) verschenen en is ons D(e Bovenwindse eilanden) beloofd. Ik zou willen zeggen: in dit speciale geval is niet drie-, of zelfs vier-, doch pas vijfmaal scheepsrecht. Er moet nog de E volgen, de E van E(en register en bibliografie). Dit is als een punt van ernstige kritiek bedoeld, want de boeken zijn zo omvangrijk, dat zij zonder deze E volslagen onhanteerbaar zijn voor een ieder die het werk van Hartog ook maar iets meer aandacht wil schenken dan hij gemeenlijk de 'weekoverzichten' in zijn krant doet.



En dat zou jammer zijn van de vele arbeid die Hartog er aan ten grondslag heeft gelegd.



J. Kooyman 0W o/> de Go/t/en, door W. van Mancius. Amsterdam, N.V. De Arbeiderspers, 1961, 267 biz. (/5.50).



Het moet voor hen die zich beijveren goede voorlichting te geven over Curacao wel een bijzonder onprettige gewaarwording zijn, een boek als dit onder ogen te krijgen: zij zullen bemerken dat er nog altijd mensen zijn romanschrijvers zelfs die er in slagen een dergelijk verdraaid beeld van de toestanden op dit eiland te geven, dat zouden de gebruikte aardrijkskundige namen niet iedere twijfel hieromtrent uitsluiten men het er nauwelijks uit herkent.



Hoewel het boek niet op Curacao zlf speelt, is het eiland toch z op de achtergrond van de gesprekken en de gedachten van de hoofdfiguren aanwezig, dat men het tot de 'Cura?aose boeken' kan rekenen.



Men zou het goedkope sensatie-verhaal vol clich-termen en -situaties voor lief kunnen nemen (als ontspanningslectuur is het misschien niet kwaad), wanneer de schrijver een of ander gefingeerd eilandje als achtergrond had gebruikt, en er zich van had onthouden allerlei quasi-filosofische beschouwingen ten beste te geven over de verschillende bevolkingsgroepen op Curacao. Wat hij zegt is nergens onwaar, maar halve waarheden zijn soms erger dan duidelijke onjuistheden. Verder is zijn slordige manier van schrijven af en toe bijzonder hinderlijk. Mocht de auteur Curacao uit eigen aanschouwing kennen, dan heeft hij er waarschijnlijk f maar heel kort gewoond, f er bijzonder slecht en oppervlakkig rondgekeken.



L. J. van der Steen








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


58 BOEKBESPREKING Las /4/Was A'eeWaMaesas en sm recintaW. Lengwa y /tfera/ura es/>aio/as en /as ^4n/i//as JVeer/awa'esas, door Juan Terlingen. Uitgave van het Ministerie van Culturele Zaken en van de Regeringsvoorlichtingsdienst, Nederlandse Antillen, (1961), 39 blz.



Voor de lezer die nader kennis wilde maken met de literatuur in de Nederlandse Antillen, bestonden tot nu toe alleen de overzichten van Cola Debrot in het Sticusa jaarboek 1953 en in de Antilliaanse Cahiers, eerste jaargang nummer 1. Ondanks het feit dat de geschiedenis van deze literatuur stellig nog aanvulling behoeft en een inventaris als iets noodzakclijks wordt gevoeld, zijn er geen publicaties verschenen die er op wijzen dat hieraan wordt gewerkt.



Daarom waren wij aangenaam verrast met het werkje van de Nijmeegse hoogleraar en hispanoloog Prof. dr. J. H. Terlingen, waarin de Spaanse literatuur in de Antillen van 1870 af behandeld wordt. De schrijver beoogt de aandacht te vestigen op het feit dat de Antillen een belangrijke rol gespeeld hebben als brug tussen Europa en Latijns-Amerika, vooral op het gebied van de letteren.



Door het gebrek aan gegevens hoeft de schrijver zich niet laten afschrikken, hij is deze zelf gaan opzoeken en met succes. Uit kranten in het Spaans, die veelal als uitlaatklep fungeerden voor auteurs, zijn tal van gegevens verkregen, welke, om met de schrijver te spreken, het beeld van de literatuur veel duidelijker maken. De kranten die tussen 1870 en 1920 verschenen, zoals 'Civilisad', 'El Heraldo', 'El Imparcial' en 'La Manana', bleken uitstekende bronnen te zijn, ondanks de onvolledigheid der jaargangen welke de schrijver ter beschikking stonden. Zeer interessant zijn zeker de gegevens over personen die op Curacao hun eerste liefde voor de Spaanse taal opdeden, zoals J. Putman en Victor Zwijsen, die later b.v. in Nederland belangrijk werk verrichtten voor de Spaanse taal en cultuur; evenals de artikelen over hispanistische schrijvers, artikelen die daarna nooit meer zijn gepubliceerd! Van b.v. Jacinto Benavente, de Nobelprijswinnaar die vanuit Madrid zijn stukkon schreef, stukken die in zijn levensbeschrijving ontbreken.



Zodoende kan er maar n conclusie getrokken worden: een wetenschappelijk onderzoek van de bronnen is een noodzakelijkheid, waarmede niet te lang gewacht kan worden, gezien de snelheid waarmede deze bronnen plegen te verdwijnen.



Het werkje dat zeer onderhoudend geschreven is, verscheen eerder in een enigszins andere vorm in de 'Boletin de Filologfa' van het Filologisch Instituut van de Universiteit van Chile. De vorm waarin het nu verschenen is maakt het uiteraard voor een veel groter publiek toegankelijk, mede omdat het kosteloos verspreid wordt door de Regeringsvoorlichtingsdienst Nederlandse Antillen. Het is te hopen dat het vooral in Middenen Zuid-Amerika onder de aandacht zal komen, gezien het belang dat ook deze landen hebben bij een eventueel bronnenonderzoek op de Nederlandse Antillen. Enkele zetfouten zullen bij een volgende uitgave wel verdwijnen. H. Arends








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


BOEKBESPREKING 59 i?Mfciatio, door E. E. Rosenstand. Impriml na: General Printing Co., (Aruba), (1961), 93 blz. (NA / 1,75).



Meer dan gewone aandacht dient te worden geschonken aan het boek van E. E. Rosenstand, dat verschenen is op Aruba. De titel: 'Cuentanan Rubiano' doet vermoeden dat men hier met iets Arubaans gaat kennis maken en dit vermoeden wordt bewaarheid wanneer men de bundel korte kinderverhalen gelezen heeft. Deze serie kindervertcllingen stelde de schrijver samen voor de 'Ora infantil' (Kinderuurtje) van een radioomroep op Aruba en enkele van deze verhaaltjes werden reeds, zij het in een enigszins andere vorm, op de kinderpagina van het inmiddels opgeheven weekblad 'Semanario' gepubliceerd.



Dit werkje voorziet in de grote behoefte aan kinderverhalen die men op Aruba gevoelt.



Als indirecte bron voor inspiratie fungeerde de geschiedenis, en dan vooral dat deel van de Arubaanse geschiedenis welke de indianen- en piraten-episoden omvat. Deze sfeer leent zich uiteraard bijzonder goed voor kinderverhalen en het spreekt het Arubaanse kind des te meer aan, omdat het een deel van zijn eigen historie is. Dit werk mag zodoende ook beschouwd worden als een voorbeeld van een geslaagde aanpassing aan het eigen Arubaans volkskarakter, in tegenstelling tot de onophoudelijke stroom buitenlandse invloeden welke zich op allerlei gebied manifesteert.



In het voorwoord van de auteur wordt duidelijk gezegd, dat al de vertellingen op fantasie berusten, ofschoon zij soms de indruk wekken in werkelijkheid te zijn gebeurd. Vooral in enkele verhalen (vgl. Andicuri, Paradera, Jaburibari, Casibari, enz.) waarbij een verklaring van een typische Arubaanse plaatsnaam gegeven wordt, krijgt de oudere lezer heel sterk de indruk dat dit werkelijk heeft plaats gehad. Van kinderen, waarvoor deze verhalim in de eerste plaats bestemd zijn, mag men niet verwachten dat zij dit verschil tussen fantasie en werkelijkheid, waarmee zelfs de volwassen lezer moeite heeft, bemerken. Een kind zal in een kabouter of fee die in een sprookje optreedt geloven, tot dat het op een gegeven leeftijd ontdekt dat deze niet bestaan. Geheel anders is het wanneer een kind hoort dat een indiaan hier heeft staan graven (papiamentu: para dera) en dat sindsdien deze streek Paradera heet. Deze verklaring, die zo nauw met de werkelijkheid verweven is, zal een kind moeilijk van zich af kunnen zetten, omdat zowel de indiaan als het plaatsje Paradera werkelijkheid zijn! Het zal aan het geheel geen afbreuk doen, indien de schrijver in de toekomst deze verklaringen, die een foutief leermoment representeren, vermijdt. De paedagogische waarde zal hierdoor aanmerkelijk groter worden.



De taal is gelukkig heel eenvoudig gehouden en waar er moeilijker woorden gebruikt worden, volgt onmiddellijk een uitleg. Daarnaast komen er soms storende zinsconstructies voor, die waarschijnlijk het gevolg zijn van het feit dat de schrijver deze verhalen eerst in spreektaal geschreven heeft voor de radio programma's.



In ieder geval heeft Rosenstand hiermede een uniek terrein betreden en bewees hij meteen dat er prachtige aangepaste verhalen te schrijven zijn voor de Arubaanse kinderen.



H. Arends








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


60 BOEKBESPREKING Zonnige beeWen van en zonnig et/atuf. Sunny o/ a sunny is/anrf. Foto's Harald Busch.



Tekst Hans Hermans. 8 blz. tekst, 4 blz. kleurenfoto's, 160 blz. zwart-wit foto's. .i4 roa. t/anrf tier eeMttn'ge /te. /s/ana* 0/ e/erna/ sering.



Foto's Harald Busch. Tekst William C. Hochstuhl. 14 blz. tekst, 4 blz. kleurenfoto's, 160 blz. zwart-wit foto's.



Uitgave Aruba Boekhandel (D. J. de Wit), Aruba, z.j. (i960); Brnners Druckerei, Frankfurt am Main (per stuk geb. / 32,50).



De zich sterk ontwikkelende toeristenindustrie heeft het verschijnen mogelijk gemaakt van twee nieuwe fotoboeken, waarvoor ieder die zich bij tijd en wijle, met enige weemoed pleegt over te geven aan zijn zonnige Antilliaanse herinneringen stellig gaarne een plaatsje in zijn boekenkast zal inruimen, naast het indrukwekkend aantal plaatwerken en boeken van groot formaat dat wij nu langzamerhand al van de Nederlandse Antillen bezitten.



Opvallend goed geslaagd zijn de reproducties van de kleurenfoto's, waardoor de stofomslag van het deel over Curasao uitzicht over zee uit Hotel Avila, met het Octagon op de voorgrond tot een illustratief hoogtepunt is geworden.



De zwart-wit foto's daarentegen 160 in elk deel zijn van een meer wisselend gehalte. Er zijn prachtige opnamen bij, maar ook foto's waarvan het niet duidelijk is wat hun plaats rechtvaardigt in een album als dit waarbij elke afbeelding op een bladzijde van 26J bij 2o cm is geplaatst. Sommige hebben de sterke vergroting niet kunnen verdragen, en vele maken een bepaald zwaarmoedige indruk; foto's waaruit de zon is weggemanipuleerd, wat toch niet erg past in een werk dat 'Zonnige beelden' wil geven van het zonnige eiland /Ifufta, welks dwaze bijnaam 'Eiland der Eeuwige Lente' bovendien een prijs voor afgezaagdheid verdient.



Overigens staat /Irwfca stellig niet op een minder hoog peil dan Curasao, ook al krijgt men soms de indruk dat de samensteller het hierin ng moeilijker heeft gevonden zijn aantal van 160 foto's op verantwoorde wijze vol te krijgen.



Het spreekt vanzelf dat het accent bij Cwrafao ligt op stadsgezichten, gebouwen en dergelijke (bijna de helft van de foto's heeft hierop betrekking), terwijl in ^rwfco het landschap vl meer op de voorgrond treedt.



Hoewel in deze albums natuurlijk ook foto's staan die even goed niet op deze eilanden zouden kunnen zijn genomen (b.v. die van een zich aan de Arubaanse kust vermakend gezelschap) blijft het opvallend dat het merendeel kenmerkend voor deze eilanden genoemd kan worden.



De tweetalige tekst waardoor men over Aruba heel wat meer te weten komt dan over Curacao heeft duidelijk bijzaak moeten blijven. Toch mogen wij hopen dat men bij een volgende uitgave, behalve nietszeggende onderschriften, ook nog enkele nadere aanduidingen van het onderwerp zal willen opnemen, op een plaats waar het de lezer niet stoort.



P. W. H.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


BOEKBESPREKING 6l Swrtnam. Foto's en tekst van Willem van de Poll.



N.V. Varekamp & Co, Paramaribo; N.V. Uitgeverij W. van Hoeve, 's-Gravenhage, 1959; 27 blz. tekst + 96 blz. foto's; kaart, 2 gekl. foto's op omslag (_7,50).



Z)e iVte&Watuke /Init/fon. Foto's en tekst van Willem van de Poll. N.V. Uitgeverij W. van Hoeve, 's-Gravenhage, i960; 32 blz. tekst -f- 96 blz. foto's; kaart, 2 gekl. foto's op omslag (/ 7,50).



Het is wel goed dat wij nog eens herinnerd worden aan deze twee fotoboeken van van de Poll, ook al zullen zij door hun inhoud zeker langer hun jeugd behouden dan vele andere uitgaven die juist door hun actualiteit zo snel verouderen.



De door de Pers gewekte voorstelling als zou het hierbij gaan om een 'gestroomlijnde' uitgave van van de Poll's gelijknamige fotoreportages welke tien jaar eerder het licht zagen, is slechts ten dele juist: de foto's -aangevuld met enkele van meer recente datum uit andere bron (waaronder de van Mevrouw Klaasesz afkomstige afbeelding op de band van SuWnami in het bijzonder zij genoemd) zijn niet dezelfde en ook de tekst is nieuw, terwijl het afwijkende formaat (15 bij 22} cm in plaats van 20 bij 26 cm) en de kleurrijke, geplasticeerde, buigzame omslag deze uitgave een geheel ander karakter geven. Moderner practischer doelmatiger ook met het oog op het zich snel ontwikkelende toerisme. De onderschriften zijn deze keer k in het Engels gesteld en de inleidende tekst is nog veel beknopter gehouden. Soms krijgen wij hierdoor wel eens de indruk van een propagandageschrift, zoals bijvoorbeeld in het hoofdstukje over Brokopondo waarbij de passage waarin de schrijver de regelen van het Surinaamse volkslied 'Suriname's trotse stromen, Suriname's heerlijk land, Suriname's fiere bomen, Trouw zijn wij aan U verpand!' aanhaalt, terwijl hij neerziet op het "wonderschoon gebied, dat gedoemd is in het water ten onder te gaan", stellig wel niet ironisch zal zijn bedoeld.



De uitgave van van de Poll's grote fotoboeken over Suriname (1949) en De Nederlandse Antillen (1950) moge al een daad van veel grotere betekenis zijn geweest n door hun rijkere inhoud n door hun verschijnen op een tijdstip toen wij minder dan tegenwoordig met plaatwerken over de Rijksdelen Overzee waren verwend dze uitgave, in zoveel handiger en ng aantrekkelijker vorm, zal door velen zeker ng meer op prijs worden gesteld. Niet in het minst omdat deze kleinere boeken zich zoveel beter lenen als middel tot het wekken van belangstelling voor deze landen in ruimere kring, waarbij zij hun waarde als 'relatiegeschenk' reeds schijnen te hebben bewezen.



P. W. H.



de S/>tge/, door J. van de Walle. P. N. van Kampen en Zoon N.V., Amsterdam, z.j. (1959), 180 blz. (_7,90).



De korte samenvatting op de stofomslag, die het de eventuele lezer en de haastige recensent gemakkelijk moet maken van deze novelle kennis te nemen, concludeert "In zijn algemeenheid stelt 'Achter de spiegel' de vraag welke waarde we moeten hechten aan technische vooruitgang met








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


62 BOEKBESPREKING zijn winst aan comfort en welvaart..." Een open vraag, die ook de schrijver niet beantwoordt in dit verhaal, dat op Cura9ao speelt zonder ergens de naam van het eiland te noemen. Voor degenen die het kennen laat de beschrijving van landschap en toestanden geen twijfel en men is zelfs geneigd plaatsen en personen te herkennen. De gespleten samenleving wordt hier, op andere wijze dan Hoetink de term gebruikt, gedemonstreerd aan de hoofdpersoon.



De Cura9aonaar Kaai, in New York opgeleid, technicus bij de oliemaatschappij, komt, met in zijn hoofd een enigszins wild plan voor de aanleg van een nieuwe haven, logeren op de plantage van zijn oom, die hij tot de verkoop ervan voor dit doel hoopt te bewegen. Het geheel van de moderne wereld afgekeerde, op de natuur gerichte leven van de eigenaar en zijn dochter, zijn onevenwichtige zuster en de oude negerbediende, kapselt de jonge man tenslotte in, zodat hij de tijd vergeet en het plan opgeven wil.



Maar zo eenvoudig is het niet. Van de Walle weet in de dialogen en monologen, het landschap, de watergeest waaraan de mensen geloven, de zee, de flash-backs New York voor Kaai en een mislukte revolutieperiode in Venezuela voor de oom en diens zuster de tegenstellingen tussen het rauwe leven en de rust van het vervallen landhuis en zijn omgeving te suggereren op een manier die de situatie reel doet lijken. De sfeer en de spanning zijn van het begin tot het open gelaten einde aanwezig, ondanks bepaalde literaire zwakheden en een ietwat nadrukkelijke symboliek.



Men vraagt zich echter af, of Van de Walle het algemene probleem van de technische vooruitgang die de mens geen tijd gunt om te 'leven', in een Cura9aos decor heeft geplaatst omdat inderdaad op dit kleine eiland in een afgelegen hoekje het 'keer tot de natuur terug' nog practisch mogelijk zou zijn. Zoals Cola Debrot het een kwart eeuw geleden omschreef: "Hier blijven maar.. Tussen de meloenen, de rozen, de palmen . Droevig wordt het leven, maar vol van een zinrijkheid die het elders mist" (Mijn zuster de negerin, 2de druk, p. 67). Of heeft Van de Walle speciaal de Antilliaan willen tekenen in zijn ambivalentie van hang naar het tijdeloze verleden n wil tot actief meespelen in de moderne wereld? "Die twee zullen wel levenslang met elkaar blijven vechten. .. de man die tevreden is met het spiegelbeeld en de man die achter de spiegel wil kijken" (p. 162). Dit is een der karakteristieken die de auteur zijn hoofdpersoon meegeeft.



Zal de lezer die de Caribische eilanden niet kent en zelfs degene die iets van Cura9ao afweet, aan de hand van de schrijver achter de spiegel kijkend, meer begrip krijgen voor de 'gespletenheid' van de Antilliaanse mens?



In elk geval levert Van de Walle met zijn tweezijdige spiegel een belangrijke bijdrage aan de beeldvorming over de Antillen, zoals ook John de Pool, Cola Debrot en de jongeren, Tip Marugg, Boeli van Leeuwen, Maria Miranda op hun wijze hebben gedaan.



J. F. K.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


BOEKBESPREKING 63 De monumcnte van Curasao in twora" n tee/a", door M. D. Ozinga, met tekeningen en foto's van H. van der Wal. With English summaries. Uitgegeven door de Stichting Monumentenzorg Curacao; Staatsdrukkerij- en Uitgeverijbedrijf, 's-Gravenhage, 1959; xx + 278 blz., 86 fig., 296 foto's en 3 kaarten buiten de tekst (f 40,_). "Ook ten aanzien van de monumentenzorg wordt aanbevolen, dat, evenals reeds op Cura9ao geschied is, voor de overige eilanden der Nederlandse Antillen en voor Suriname een beschrijving van de bestaande monumenten wordt samengesteld. Men zal in deze landen dienen te komen tot een wettelijke regeling voor het behoud van monumenten, terwijl wordt aanbevolen, dat een monumentencommissie in het leven wordt geroepen en een officile monumentenlijst wordt samengesteld".* In deze overwegingen van de culturele adviesraad van het Koninkrijk in zijn tweede vergadering (Curacao, oktober 1961) wordt het boek van professor Ozinga, .De monuffWBfen van Curafao in iwora" en 6M, slechts impliciet vermeld. Mag men hieruit concluderen dat het als inventarisatie van de Cura9aose oudheden reeds algemeen bekend is ? In elk geval heeft het begrip monumentenzorg met en door de verschijning van deze publicatie meer ingang gevonden en ziet men op Curacao de toeristische waarde van restauratie van oude gebouwen in. Brievengat was de pionier van de jonge stichting Monumentenzorg en thans zijn het zowel huizen in de stad als andere landhuizen die hersteld worden, mede met het oog zoals bij Groot Santa Marta op het creren van meer hotelruimte. Bij de bouw van het grote hotel El Curacao International, in en op de muren van het oude Waterfort, is het niet zozeer herstel als wel aanpassing aan moderne eisen die de doorslag heeft gegeven.* Toch is de discussie die rondom de plannen voor dit hotel is ontstaan wellicht mede oorzaak geweest van verhoogde algemene belangstelling voor de problemen van monumentenzorg.



Door wat men zou kunnen noemen het late begin, zal Curacao ten minste het voordeel hebben enkele fasen te kunnen overslaan van het moeizaam zoeken naar de juiste methoden. Incidentele restauratie van oude gebouwen heeft door de eeuwen heen altijd en overal plaats gehad, zowel uit de overweging 'onderhoud is behoud' als uit overtuiging dat belangrijke bouwwerken na brand of oorlogsverwoesting hersteld moesten worden.



Maar een meer algemene en systematische aanpak, die men kan samenvatten in de term monumentenzorg^ is in Nederland pas omstreeks de 3de jrg., nr. 19 (27/io-3/ii/'6i), p. 2. 2 Zie in Ozinga de platen 137 en 138 voor het verschil in aanzicht van het Waterfort in 1954 en 1957. 3 Gegevens ontleend aan: Ir. R. Meischke, directeur Rijksdienst voor de Monumentenzorg, 'Monumentenzorg 1911-1961' in S/ryd on ScAoon-Aetd: 50 /aar Heemse/juf, Amsterdam 1961, p. 42-73; idem, 'Stedelijke Monumentenzorg' in PwWteAe W-VrAen, jrg. 27, jan. 1959, p. 2-8; Mr.



R. Hotke, hoofddirecteur Rijksdienst voor de Monumentenzorg, De MowMmn/enttie<, Actuele Onderwerpenreeks (Stichting I.V.I.O., Amsterdam), 3 nov. 1961.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


64 BOEKBESPREKING eeuwwisseling tot bloei gekomen en het heeft tot 1961 geduurd voordat een monumentenwet de "voorzieningen in het belang van het behoud van monumenten van geschiedenis en kunst" een wettelijke basis gaf.* In die tussentijd hebben verschillende verenigingen geijverd voor behoud en restauratie en daaraan actief bijgedragen door aankoop van panden en uitvoering van herstelwerkzaamheden. Men bekijke slechts de platen in het gedenkboek uitgegeven bij het vijftigjarig bestaan van de Bond Heemschut (1911-1961) om zich te overtuigen hoeveel waardevols hiermede behouden is. Doch ook toont dit boek hoezeer de opvattingen over de wijze van restaureren en de doelstellingen zijn veranderd. Alleen al de vraag op welke stijlperiode men moet teruggrijpen bij een gebouw dat in de loop van zijn bestaan is verbouwd, waaraan stukken zijn toegevoegd of ontnomen, dat een andere bestemming heeft gekregen, geeft aanleiding tot verschillende oplossingen. En wanneer men een huis beschouwt niet als eenling maar in een rij of als een deel van een stadswijk, komen weer andere punten aan de orde waarbij die van de stads-planning niet de minste zijn. Doorbraken terwille van het verkeer (men kan voor Curacao b.v. denken aan de consequenties van de toegangswegen voor een verhoogde brug over de St. Annabaai), sanering door krotopruiming in een binnenstad, city-vorming die van woonhuizen winkels en kantoren maakt, dit zijn alle omstandigheden waarvan een beslissing over bepaalde restauraties afhankelijk kan zijn. En dan wordt nog gezwegen van de financile aspecten, eigendomsrechten, onteigening of oplegging van servituten enerzijds en de kosten van restauratie mede berekend naar de lonen van deskundige arbeiders (als die te vinden zijn!) anderzijds.



Belangrijk is dus dat men als basis voor overall planning een overzicht heeft van hetgeen bestaat aan oude gebouwen in een gebied. In Nederland zijn sinds 1903 twaalf delen van een 'voorlopige' lijst der monumenten samengesteld, voor elke provincie een en een voor Amsterdam.



Het boek van professor Ozinga is voor Curacao als een dergelijke inventarisatie te beschouwen, maar het geeft meer dan alleen een beschrijving met architectuur-tekeningen (plattegronden, doorsneden, details) en fraaie foto's ter illustratie.



De historische inleidingen zijn ook voor de leek op het speciale gebied van bouwkunst interessant omdat zij ondanks de wat moeilijke stijl -een inzicht geven in de ontwikkeling van de Cura?aose maatschappij, n in de ontwikkeling van de belangstelling voor Curacao zoals deze zich uit in beschrijvingen van het eiland.



Alleen al het overzicht van de litteratuur en van de kaarten zal menigeen een duidelijker beeld geven van die groei.



Het is begrijpelijk dat kaarten van het eiland en plattegronden van de Willemstad in de eerste plaats zijn vervaardigd om de behoeften van de defensie uiteen te zetten aan de bewindhebbers van de West Indische Compagnie en de latere autoriteiten in het 'moederland'. Daarom verwondert het ons niet dat professor Ozinga een groot gedeelte van zijn boek kon wijden aan de opeenvolgende verdedigingswerken en de daarmee samenhangende stadsaanleg. Van de vele projecten, die hiervoor in de Wet van 22 juni 1961, houdende voorzieningen in het belang van het behoud van monumenten van geschiedenis en kunst (Sfaa/sWad ianinAn; A J96J, nr. 200).








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


BOEKBESPREKING 65 loop der eeuwen zijn gemaakt, zijn er talrijke in de archieven teruggevonden en ook uit oude platen kon gereconstrueerd worden hoe tenslotte de uitgevoerde werken er hebben uitgezien. In de tijd dat forten en wallen nog een wezenlijke betekenis hadden kon de stad niet willekeurig wordon uitgebreid, huizen buiten de muren mochten niet in het schootsveld van de batterijen liggen en de straten en pleinen binnen de wallen werden compact volgebouwd.



Toen, nu ongeveer een eeuw geleden, de wallen werden geslecht en een stuk van het Waaigat gedempt, was dit merkwaardigerwijze voor een groot deel op particulier initiatief. De huizenblokken tot aan wat later de van Speyckstraat heette werden toen gebouwd en verderop langs Pietermaai en eveneens op Scharloo werden de bestaande huizen aangevuld tot een reeks.



Na de behandeling van de forten, de openbare gebouwen buiten het hoofdfort en de Portugees-Isralitische synagoge, geeft professor Ozinga van vele van deze fraaie woonhuizen een zeer gedetailleerde beschrijving, met tekeningen gebaseerd op nauwkeurige opmetingen. Uit de archieven soms de successieve koopbrieven nog in het bezit van de laatste eigenaar heeft hij bijzonderheden over bouw en verbouwing weten bijeen te garen, maar in sommige gevallen is de datum van de bouw slechts bij benadering uit de stijl op te maken.



Dit geldt ook voor de landhuizen, waarvan de auteur de behandeling heeft onderverdeeld in een hoofdstuk 'landhuizen nabij de stad' (geografisch gerangschikt) en die der buitendivisin (alfabetisch). Van de eerste categorie worden er negen genoemd, hieronder ook het in 1956 afgebroken Marchena. Er waren echter voordien reeds vele aan de olieraffinaderij opgeofferd moeten worden, vooral in het z.g. Jodenkwartier waar het emplacement van de C.P.I.M. (Shell Curacao) begon.



De landhuizen buiten de directe omgeving van de stad een grens die vervaagt naarmate de uitbreiding van de woningbouw verder voortschrijdt zijn uiteraard nog iets talrijker; Ozinga beschrijft er achttien van het vijftigtal dat op de schetsmatige kaart (overzichtskaart II) voorkomt. De plantagekaart van de Shell-wegenkaart van Curacao noemt in totaal meer dan honderdtwintig namen, maar niet op alle plantages stond een landhuis.



Van het landhuis Brievengat kon de auteur een beschrijving geven na de restauratie, welke mogelijk werd toen de C.P.I.M. de bezitting die niet meer als 'waterplantage' voor haar bedrijf benodigd was, afstond aan de stichting Monumentenzorg. De bouwdatum moest ook hier geschat worden naar de stijl en wellicht naar een op de zolder gevonden balans met jaartal 1723. In vroegere reisbeschrijvingen van het eiland wordt het huis niet vermeld, zegt professor Ozinga.



De heren R. Dennert en J. Kooyman vonden echter in het Oud-archief Curacao en in dat van de West Indische Compagnie aanwijzingen dat 1747 en in 1753 Brievengat enkele slaven moest leveren (mogelijk voor arbeid aan de vestingwerken).* Zo zullen wellicht nog wel enkele details bij naarstig speuren te voorschijn komen, die de gegevens van Ozinga kunnen aanvullen. Maar zijn 1 Oud Archief Curacao 179: 59, 31-3-174(7?); archief West Indische Compagnie 599: 589-593, 30-1-1753; idem 599: 862-863, 26-(6?)-i753.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


66 BOEKBESPREKING boek bevat zoveel en het is zo goed gedocumenteerd dat Curacao n de beoefenaars van haar historie n de toekomstige monumentenverzorgers voorlopig tevreden kunnen zijn. De inhoudsopgave vindt een complement in de lijsten van figuren en afbeeldingen (drie honderd fraai gereproduceerde foto's met ook Engelse onderschriften), een register op personen en plaatsen vergemakkelijkt het opzoeken en een Engelse summary bij ieder onderdeel maakt het boek voor buitenlanders toegankelijk. Met recht mag het een standaardwerk worden genoemd. Het is te hopen dat de verzamelde gegevens veel zullen worden gebruikt en tot een weloverwogen plan voor restauraties zal leiden. Wanneer het landsbesluit van 3 maart i960, dat de uitvoer uit de Nederlandse Antillen verbiedt van goederen van archaeologische of andere cultuur-historische waarde, 1 wordt gevolgd door een wettelijke regeling tot behoud van monumenten die immers ook roerende zaken kunnen omvatten en men Suriname navolgt met een verordening tegen ontsierende reclame,2 dan zal Curacao ook in andere zin de leuze toepassen: 'Houdt Uw eiland schoon'.



J. F. K.



rfe owde Cwrapaose same/etnw. Zsew e, door H. Hoetink. Diss. Leiden; Van Gorcum & Comp. N.V., Assen, 1958, 187 blz. (_ 11,50).



Omdat ook voor de Curacaose samenleving geldt, dat het heden niet zonder studie van het verleden kan worden gekend, heeft Hoetink, die een aantal jaren leraar aan het Peter Stuyvesant College is geweest, er goed aan gedaan een boek te schrijven over de sociale geleding en culturele uitrusting van de bevolkingsgroepen die de Curacaose samenleving van voor-de-olie' uitmaakten.



Bij zijn beschrijving gaat hij ideaaltypisch tewerk, door bij de Cura-9aonaars van Europese afkomst het 'herengedragspatroon' te accentueren en bij de Curacaonaars van Afrikaanse origine de nadruk te leggen op afrikanismen.



Zijn gegevens zijn ontleend aan andere schrijvers, vooral aan J. H. J.



Hamelberg's De A/edeWawders o/ de Wes<-/dtsc/fe tiade (I, 1901).



Ondanks het feit dat Hoetink niet in de gelegenheid was een bronnenonderzoek te verrichten, is een originele studie tot stand gekomen. Door zijn sociologische visie op het verleden heeft de schrijver onze kennis omtrent Curacao's verleden verrijkt, gelijk Van Lier met zijn Samen/eiuwg' iw een Grensgebied meer inzicht in de Surinaamse samenleving verschafte.



Het is een groot voordeel als een sociograaf of etnograaf zijn stof op een aantrekkelijke wijze weet te presenteren. Hoetink kan dit: zijn boek is op een literaire wijze geschreven, levendig en oorspronkelijk van stijl en woordkeuze. Niet alleen hierdoor, maar ook door de bewijsvoering lijkt het boek op een roman. 1 Landsbesluit houdende algemene maatregelen van de 3de maart i960 ter uitvoering van de artikelen 1 en 6 van de Uitvoerverbodenverordening 1944 (P.B. -T944, no. JJ7), PwWco/ieb/ad J960, no. 25. 2 Ontwerp bij de Staten van Suriname ingediend, oktober 1961.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


BOEKBESPREKING 67 Een goede roman over een sociologisch onderwerp bewijst (maakt de uitspraken aannemelijk) door op een impressionistische wijze op wezenlijke trekken en samenhangen te duiden.



Op een dergelijke wijze maakt Hoetink het waarschijnlijk, dat de z.g. hogere protestanten van Curacao benvloed zijn door hun Latijnsamerikaanse omgeving. Zou men bij de studie van dit latiniseringsproces meer methodisch tewerk gaan dan zou waarschijnhjk een onderscheid moeten worden gemaakt tussen cultuurtrekken die overal voorkomen, speciale kenmerken van de betreffende cultuur en de minder wezenlijke trekken.



Verandering van laatstgenoemde culturele kenmerken is uiteraard iets geheel anders dan een wijziging van de fundamentele trekken.



Voorts is het zinvol om bij een veranderingsstudie de cultuurcontactsituatie in aanmerking te nemen. Er is in dit geval sprake van een acculturatieproces in een koloniale samenleving, van een plantagesysteem waarbij Afrikaanse slaven en Westeuropese meesters betrokken zijn, en er is voorts de gesegmenteerde Curaaose samenleving waar de protestanten naast de Latijnsamerikaans benvloede joden leefden.



Om b.v. te bewijzen dat het Curacaose protestantse gezin van omstreeks 1900 gelatiniseerd was, zou men moeten uitgaan van de kenmerken van het Nederlandse gezin bij de hogere standen in b.v. 1850. Deze sociale groeperingen zijn namelijk de referentiegroepen, d.w.z. de gedragsbepalende groepen, van de Curacaose hogere protestanten. Er moet met een vroegere Nederlandse situatie worden vergeleken, omdat het waarschijnlijk is, dat de Curacaose sociale situatie een vroegere Nederlandse weerspiegelt. (Dit moet uiteraard worden waar gemaakt.) Als er dan verschillen tussen de vergeleken Curacaose en Nederlandse gezinnen blijken te bestaan, moeten ook de kenmerken worden opgespoord van de gezinnen van groeperingen in het Nederland van omstreeks 1850 die kort te voren en na een snelle maatschappelijke stijging tot de hoogste standen werden toegelaten. Zijn er ook dan nog onverklaarde verschillen, dan zou de aandacht zich kunnen richten op de gezinnen van Nederlanders in eindnegentiendeeuwse tropische koloniale samenlevingen die afwijken van de Westindische.



Vervolgens zouden de Nederlandse gezinnen in met Curacao overeenkomende Westindische samenlevingen uit dezelfde tijd in het onderzoek moeten worden betrokken. Pas daarna zou de benvloeding door Latijnsamerikaans ingestelde groepen (b.v. de Curacaose joden) kunnen worden bestudeerd.



Vermoedelijk zou de conclusie dan luiden, dat het Curacaose gezin een aantal universele cultuurtrekken heeft; dat sommige trekken zich laten verklaren uit de sociale positie in een koloniale samenleving en andere uit de specifiek Westindische situatie. Wellicht blijven er dan enige trekken over die aan Latijnsamerikaanse groepen werden ontleend. Het is interessant te weten welke eigenschappen wel en welke niet werden overgenomen en waarom dit zo was. Telkens moeten de belangrijke van de minder centrale cultuurtrekken worden onderscheiden.



In Hoetinks boek wordt geen van deze vergelijkingen systematisch uitgevoerd. Te gemakkelijk wordt aangenomen dat veronderstelde verschillen met het Nederlandse gezinsleven in de negentiende eeuw het gevolg zijn van latinisering.



Veronderstelde verschillen inderdaad, want nergens wordt ons een








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


68 BOEKBESPREKING blik gegund in het Nederlandse gezinsleven in de negentiende eeuw waarmee wordt vergeleken. Dit wordt blijkbaar als bekend verondersteld.



De bewijsvoering heeft soms het volgende karakter: aangezien de gesegmenteerde Curacaose samenleving afwijkt van de Nederlandse zal het wel zo zijn dat de kolonisten anders waren dan de Nederlanders in het moederland.



Het oude Cura9aose gezin werd gekenmerkt door o.a. een groot respect voor de ouders, door een patriarchaal optreden van de vader en tuchtiging van de jongens, doch Hoetink zegt zelf dat dit alles weinig vreemd was aan het Hollandse burgergezinsleven van de achttiende en de negentiende eeuw.



Vervolgens wordt de aandacht gevestigd op de grote gesoleerdheid van de Cura9aose vrouw, op de gescheiden opvoeding der sexen, op de chaperonage etc, hetgeen wordt aangeduid met de term 'maagdelijkheidscomplex'. De man heeft daarentegen alle vrijheid. Dit zou, aldus Hoetink, nog wel 18e of 19e eeuws 'feodaal' kunnen zijn, maar Latijnsamerikaans is het 'manbaarheidscomplex', zich kenmerkend door vele en vroege sexuele relaties van de Heren met vrouwen uit de volksklasse. Het zou mij niet verbazen als bij onderzoek zou blijken, dat soortgelijke opvattingen onder de welgestelden in het negentiende-eeuwse Nederland heersten.



Als er in de West sprake was van een iets openlijker tolereren van vooren buitenechtelijke sexuele verhoudingen, dan moet m.i. in de eerste plaats worden gedacht aan het karakter van de slavenkolonie, waar voor de mannen volop gelegenheid tot sexuele relaties met vele vrouwen was, doch waar dit moeilijker dan in Europa was te verbergen.



Als een mogelijke verklaring (mede-oorzaak) van de positieve waardering van vroege sexuele relaties tussen jonge Heren en meisjes uit de negergroep wijst Hoetink op een economisch motief: de wens van de meesters 'to augment their herds'. Hij heeft hiervoor geen enkele aanwijzing en het lijkt mij dan ook onwaarschijnlijk dat dit zo was. Want het verwekken van kinderen kon men gerust aan de negers zelf overlaten.



De aldus verkregen zwarte kinderen waren bovendien gemakkelijker in een slavenpositie te houden dan de lichter gekleurde nakomelingen van blanke vaders. Deze genoten allerlei voorrechten en verkregen vaak zelfs de vrijheid.



Een zwak punt in Hoetink's bewijsvoering is voorts het aandragen van gegevens uit Braziliaanse streken, die ongetwijfeld Latijnsamerikaans doch tevens slavenkolonin waren. Als een verschijnsel in een Latijnsamerikaanse slavenkolonie wordt geconstateerd, kan aan Latijnsamerikaanse invloeden of aan de invloed van de sociale structuur of aan beide worden gedacht.



In het eerste hoofdstuk 'Over de Blanken' wordt behalve over het latiniseringsproces ook nog over de sociale structuur van de oude Curacaose samenleving geschreven. Hoetink wijst daarbij op de ruimtelijke verspreiding van de diverse bevolkingsgroepen over het stadsgebied van Willemstad. De veronderstelling dat de St. Annabaai als geografische barrire er toe bijdroeg dat er zo weinig sociale spanningen waren tussen protestanten en joden, lijkt onwaarschijnlijk, temeer daar de protestanten die op Otrabanda woonden hun werk vooral op Punda hadden. Op p. 63








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


BOEKBESPREKING 69 wordt trouwens opgemerkt dat de gemeenschappelijkheid van 'shon' (heer) te (willen) zijn de blanken, ondanks onderlinge differentiatie, steeds verbond. Misschien was het ook de ongunstige getalsverhouding ten opzicht van de 'slavenmacht' die het saamhorigheidsbesef onder de blanken bevorderde.



Het tweede hoofdstuk 'Over de Slaven en de Vrijgelatenen' bevat o.m. een interessante beschrijving van de vrije negers en kleurlingen, die in meerderheid in ongunstige economische omstandigheden leefden en in een onzekere sociale positie verkeerden. Dit hoofdstuk bevat voorts een beschrijving van een aantal aspecten van de materile en geestelijke cultuur van de negergroep, waarvan verondersteld wordt dat ze van Afrikaanse oorsprong zijn. Er wordt verteld hoe men (aan het eind van de vorige eeuw) woonde, werkte, danste en muziek maakte, wat men at en geloofde, wat voor gebruiken er bij geboorte, sterfte enz. waren en op welke wijzen er onderlinge hulpverlening plaats vond. De beschrijving van deze volkscultuur is op zichzelf erg interessant, maar als studie van afrikanismen toch niet geheel en al bevredigend, daar vrijwel niet met Afrikaanse cultuurelementen wordt vergeleken. Ook als studie van de verwantschap tussen de Curacaose negercultuur en die van de andere Carabischc eilanden is het door Hoetink gepresenteerde niet ideaal; er wordt te weinig systematisch vergeleken. De belangwekkende stelling dat de cultuur der negride groep op Curacao enige invloed van het contact met negers en kleurlingen uit het overige Carabische gebied onderging, steunt slechts op enkele opmerkingen over contact tussen Curacao en andere eilanden (zonder dat blijkt dat dit contact tot cultuuroverdracht leidde) en op de gelijkenis van het Papiamentoe woord lagarou met de op Hati voorkomende term loup-garou.



Het gezinsleven wordt verklaard door naar Afrika en de slavernij te verwijzen en naar buitenechtelijke betrekkingen van de 'shons' van de Heren, doch helaas wordt geen aandacht besteed aan meer recentere opvattingen waarbij de specifiek Westindische gezinsverhoudingen in de lagere volksklassen worden betrokken op de contemporaine sociale situatie. Het in 1956 uitgegeven boek van Raymond T. Smith over TAe Ategro Fami/y in BririsA Guiana, dat een nieuwere opvatting dan die van Herskovits bevat, werd niet vermeld. (Hoetink's artikel in Mens n MaafscAa^-i/, 1961, p. 81 e.v. bevat hiervoor wellicht een verklaring, daar hieruit blijkt dat Hoetink Smith's opvattingen niet deelt.) In het derde hoofdstuk 'Over het Contact der Groepen' wordt gesteld, dat er tijdens de slavernij op Curacao een betrekkelijk milde heer-slaafverhouding was. Hoetink geeft daar een aantal verklaringen voor, doch hij wijst niet op de geringe uitwijkmogelijkheid die er op Curasao bestond.



Weliswaar vluchtten er tijdens de slavernij enkele slaven naar eilanden waar vrijheid heerste, doch de mogelijkheid tot ontsnappen was in 't algemeen zeer gering. Bovendien zou men op Curacao als vrije man bijzonder moeilijk in zijn eigen onderhoud hebben kunnen voorzien. Ontvluchten was dus, anders dan in Suriname, niet goed mogelijk. Dit verklaart wellicht dat op de plantages in Suriname een veel harder regime werd gevoerd. Deze verklaring is genspireerd door de stelling van Nieboer, die -vereenvoudigd als volgt luidt: als er voor een ieder de mogelijkheid








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


7O BOEKBESPREKING bestaat op eigen kracht in zijn onderhoud te voorzien (als er open resources zijn) is er slavernij, want dan moeten de machthebbers de minder machtigen dwingen voor hen te werken.



Het derde hoofdstuk geeft voorts een heldere beschrijving van de relatie heer-slaaf onder vermijding van vakjargon, hetgeen een verdienste is, daar sociologische termen niet altijd verduidelijken. Het valt op, dat de schrijver overvoorzichtig is in het uitspreken van een ethisch oordeel over in het verleden verrichte daden, hetgeen o.a. uit de volgende zin blijkt: vanuil Ae< 5<au?^>un/-i>an-va?t<fa<ig dienen we met de grootste waardering te spreken over de moeite die de missie zich getroostte om het peil van ontwikkeling onder de negergroep op te voeren. Wil hij hiermede zeggen, dat er destijds toen de missie de moed had het voor de negers op te nemen minder reden tot waardering was? Wiens maatstaven worden hierbij aangelegd ? Schrijvend over een blanke dame die negerstrijders hielp en over de slaven die de negerleiders Toela en Bastiaan gevangen namen, zegt Hoetink: "Het hedendaags gelijk zal juffrouw Lesire graag als een nobele heldin en Anthony Zapateer es. als 'verraders' willen beschouwen; we kunnen daar vrede mee hebben, als men de beperktheid van dit hedendaags gelijk maar wil erkennen". Ook hier weer: wie bepaalt wat in het heden en wat in het verleden 'gelijk' en 'ongelijk' was?



Er wordt ook in dit hoofdstuk over de overblijfselen van de Afrikaanse cultuur gesproken (retenties noemt Hoetink ze). Ze worden ingedeeld in economische, sociaal-organisatorische, artistieke en magisch-religieuze.



In deze indeling en ook in de verdere beschouwingen wordt Herskovits min of meer op de voet gevolgd. Zo wordt ter verklaring van het zich taai handhaven van gebruiken in de magische en religieuze sfeer gewezen op de veronderstelling dat deze zaken in West-Afrika in het culturele brandpunt stonden. Hoetink wijst er zelf reeds op dat er ook tal van religieuze elementen verdwenen, maar dat het vooral de magie was die zich krachtig handhaafde. Deze tovenarij en alles wat daarbij behoorde was ook de Europeanen vertrouwd, merkt Hoetink terecht op, maar hij laat niet voldoende uitkomen dat de magie voor de slaven wellicht een nuttige functie had tijdens de slavernij, o.a. om de overheersers vrees aan te jagen en in ieder geval als ventiel van haat- en jaloeziegevoelens diende.



Het komt mij voor dat de door Herskovits ingevoerde term herinterpretatie van cultuurgoederen door Hoetink een wel erg ruime omvang wordt gegeven. Als iets wordt overgenomen, wanneer Nanzi's vrouw in de spinverhalen een andere naam krijgt of wanneer de muziek der negers door Europese liederen is benvloed, is het niet juist om van herinterpretatie te spreken. Wel is dit b.v. het geval als een christelijke rite zoals de doop een geheel andere inhoud, een Afrikaanse inhoud, verkrijgt, wanneer zij als bescherming tegen magie wordt gebruikt. Dit werd door recensent o.a. op de Bovenwindse eilanden geconstateerd.



Omdat zijn boek meer dan een descriptie is (het bevat tal van interessante interpretaties van de feiten) behoort het tot het beste wat over de met Nederland verbonden landen in West-Indi is geschreven. Datgene wat het boek boven vele andere verheft, de interpretaties, maakt het tevens kwetsbaar. Hoetink is zich hiervan bewust, want hij beschouwt zijn werkstuk als een "tot tegenspraak prikkelende bijdrage aan het debat








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


BOEKBESPREKING 71 omtrent de sociologie van de gesegmenteerde, tropische maatschappij".



Deze handschoen werd door mij opgenomen, zoals uit het bovenstaande blijkt, maar uit het feit dat kritiek wordt geleverd mag niet tot het ontbreken van waardering worden geconcludeerd. Hoetinks dissertatie is een het denken stimulerende studie van een heldere en originele geest.



G. J. K.



De s/>fcfen samen/evtng in A< CartbtscA geted, door H. Hoetink. Van Gorcum & Comp. N.V., Assen, 1962, Anjer-Serie No. 7, 314 blz. (/ 20,50).



Het is geen eenvoudige opgave dit nieuwe boek van de socioloog H.



Hoetink hij schreef eerder een sociaal-historische studie over Curacao -te bespreken. De reden daarvan is, dat de schrijver in het kader van driehonderd bladzijden vele problemen aansnijdt, die ieder op zich een afzonderlijke studie zouden rechtvaardigen.



Het hoofdthema van het boek wordt gevormd door een beschouwing van de rasrelaties in het Caribische gebied. Hoetink verdeelt dit gebied in twee kulturele varianten: een Westeuropese, omvattende de voormalige Britse, Franse en Nederlandse kolonin, en een Iberische variant, waartoe Cuba, de Dominikaanse republiek, Puerto Rico en de Noordoostkust van Brazili behoren. In de Iberische variant typeren de rasrclaties zich door een mildere atmosfeer dan in de voormalige Westeuropese bezittingen, waar sprake is van een sterke neiging tot segregatie. Vele onderzoekers hebben dit verschil in verband gebracht met het kulturele patroon van de koloniserende mogendheden. Hoetink aanvaardt deze verklaring, echter alleen voor de sektor van de niet-intieme sociale betrekkingen tussen de rasgroepen. Hieronder dient men de relaties te verstaan in het oppervlakkige kontakt van alledag. Maar voor de tweede sektor, die van de intiem-persoonlijke interraciale betrekkingen, bezit de hierboven genoemde verklaring geen gelding. In dit vlak hoort het verschijnsel van de biologische menging tussen de rassen op basis van de sociale gelijkwaardigheid der betrokkenen thuis. Voor een verklaring van een verschil in de raciale betrekkingen op dit niveau, voert Hoetink twee nieuwe begrippen in: somatisch normbeeld en somatische afstand.



Alvorens deze begrippen nader uit te werken, analyseert de schrijver (in het tweede deel van zijn boek, dat de originele titel 'spiegelbeeld van tropenkolder' draagt) het referentiekader van de outsider-onderzoeker van koloniale samenlevingen. Deze onderzoeker is er gemakkelijk toe geneigd als buitenstaander de inheemse blanke groep in dergelijke maatschappijen buiten zijn objekt te plaatsen, omdat deze groep ogenschijnlijk gelijkt op de moederlandse gemeenschap, waaruit onderzoeker afkomstig is. Daardoor worden bij de analyse grove fouten gemaakt. Deze blanke groep namelijk Hoetink gebruikt de term 'blanke kleurlingen' heeft een geheel eigen patroon van sociaal gedrag en denken ontwikkeld, waardoor zij in de betrekkingen tot de andere rassegmenten geheel andere referentiekaders bezit dan door de outsider op grond van de vermeende overeenkomst wordt verondertseld.



Nog door een ander verschijnsel wordt de visie van de outsider op de








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


72 BOEKBESPREKING rasverhoudingen in deze maatschappijen benvloed. Hier noemt de schrijver het ethisch-psychisch schuldcomplex, dat de blanke onderzoeker bij zijn beoordeling van de rasrelaties parten speelt, een schuldemotie, die een reaktie is op een archetypische afkeer bij de blanke voor 'het zwarte', 'de zwarte'. Een emotie, die nog versterkt wordt door wat Hoetink noemt een 'historisch schuldgevoel'. Dit heeft betrekking op de schuldbeladen inzichten over de historische betrekkingen tussen de wereld en het Westen. In de studies van Toynbee is dit schuldgevoel duidelijk aanwijsbaar. Schuldgevoelens zijn echter niet bevorderlijk voor de objektiviteit. Zij vormen een facet van de beeldvorming van de moederlandse outsider tegenover koloniale en soortgelijke samenlevingen.



Het is daardoor een facet van het spiegelbeeld van tropenkolder.



Hoetink richt zich ook tegen die benadering van het rassenvraagstuk, waarbij de raciale vooroordelen worden verklaard uit de sociale struktuur van de maatschappij met een heterogene bevolking. Dit noemt de schrijver de reduktie van het rassenvraagstuk tot een sociaal vraagstuk, reden waarom hij spreekt van een sociologistische visie. Deze visie is optimistisch, omdat wanneer de socioloog de rasvooroordelen als mythen ontmaskert, daarmee de psychisch-sociale realiteit van deze vooroordelen nog niet ongedaan is gemaakt. Hoetink stelt daar tegenover, dat indien een samenleving verschillende groepen kent met duidelijk verschillende somatische karakteristieken, het bestaan van raciale vooroordelen niet te loochenen zal zijn. Daarom verzet hij zich tegen de optimistische sociologistische visie. Ook al weten wij hoe het vooroordeel zich heeft gevormd, de distinktiezucht op grond van somatische verschillen verdwijnt daardoor niet. "Het gesignaleerde optimisme komt voort uit een charmante vermenging van vurig idealisme en te groot vertrouwen in de sociaal-economische basis van psychisch-sociale groepsverschijnselen". (P- 144) Naast een verklaring vanuit sociaal strukturele faktoren, zijn er andere verschijnselen, die mede verantwoordelijk zijn voor het bestaan van een rassenvraagstuk. Bij de rasrelaties speelt namelijk het zg. 'somatische normbeeld' een rol. Hieronder verstaat de schrijver het geheel van die somatische kenmerken, die door de leden van de groep als norm en ideaal worden aanvaard. Daarin zijn twee elementen te onderkennen. Een sociaal aspekt, in zoverre dit normbeeld door de groep wordt overgebracht op de enkeling en een psychologisch moment, omdat het een vorm van narcisme is, dat bij de ik-bewustwording van het individu pas werkzaam wordt. Het somatisch normbeeld is derhalve een sociaal-psychologisch verschijnsel, dat het geestelijk bezit is van de groep. "Het grote verschil met de 'optimistische' sociologen is wel mijn opvatting, dat de 'racial attitudes' in gesegmenteerde maatschappijen niet uitsluitend door milieufactoren-in-de-gebruikelijke-zin (gezin, school, maatschappelijke klasse etc.) worden bepaald, maar daarnevens door een 'milieu'-factor, die in beginsel gebonden ... is aan de somatische kenmerken van de groep waarvan men deel uitmaakt: het somatisch normbeeld". (p. 208/209) Hoetink koppelt aan dit begrip 'somatisch normbeeld' de notie van 'somatische afstand', zijnde "de mate waarin het verschil tussen twee somatische normbeelden (of beter: tussen het eigen somatisch normbeeld en een tweede somatisch type) sw/ec/ie/ ervaren wordt", (p. 251) In beginsel heeft dus ieder ras zijn eigen somatisch normbeeld en derhalve








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


BOEKBESPREKING 73 heeft iedere rasgroep de neiging de eigen somatische kenmerken als esthetisch superieur te beschouwen. Ras wordt daarom door Hoetink omschreven als een "mensengroep, die op grond van eigen kenmerkende erfelijk-lichamelijke trekken, in origine over een eigen somatisch normbeeld beschikt", (p. 225) Hoetink hanteert deze begrippen nu in het bijzonder bij een beschouwing van de Caribische samenleving en de gesegmenteerde maatschappijen, die men daar aantreft. Bij de analyse van de struktuur van de gesegmenteerde maatschappij (een term, die Hoetink heeft overgenomen van R. A. J. van Lier) kan het verschil in ras tussen de segmenten niet worden verwaarloosd. Waar M. G. Smith de gesegmenteerde samenleving definieert als een maatschappij met verschillende kuituren en sociale systemen, meent Hoetink, dat deze anthropoloog ten onrechte het kenmerk ras en rasverschil elimineert en herleidt tot kulturele en sociaalstmkturele verschillen. Het verschil in ras is juist essentieel in de gesegmenteerde samenleving.



Het begrip 'gesegmenteerde maatschappij' omschrijft Hoetink tenslotte als een samenleving, waarin naast aanvankelijke verschillen in kuituur, ook duidelijk onderscheidbare somatische normbeelden leven, "waarbij in het intersegmentaire acculturatie-proces een nzijdige overdracht en aanvaarding van het dominante somatische normbeeld plaatsvindt", (p. 225) Want een van de merkwaardigste verschijnselen in het Caribische gebied is wel, dat het somatische normbeeld van de dominante groep (de blanken) in de loop van het akkulturatieproces eveneens het normbeeld is geworden van de andere, onderliggende segmenten. De 'white wish', zo meent de schrijver, is bij de negrode bevolking duidelijk aanwezig. Kroeshaar is slecht haar; de rechte neus, de dunne lippen en de blanke huidskleur worden esthetisch superieur geacht. Er is dus in dit akkulturatieproces sprake geweest van een eenzijdige overdracht van het somatische normbeeld. Deze vorm van akkulturatie is voor de nietdominante segmenten in hoge mate frusterend, omdat bij hen immers het normbeeld niet in overeenstemming is met de somatische verschijning.



Daarin schuilt naar het inzicht van Hoetink het pathologisch karakter van de gesegmenteerde samenlevingen.



Teruggrijpend op het eerder vermelde onderscheid in rasrelaties tussen de Iberische en Westeuropese gebieden, merkt Hoetink op, dat in de Latijnse variant meer kleurlingen worden opgenomen in de blanke bovengroep dan in de Westeuropese. Als verklaring voor dit verschijnsel voert hij aan, dat het somatisch normbeeld in de Latijnse variant verschilt van dat in de Westeuropese gebieden. De Latijnse blanken beschouwen een deel der kleurlingen naar de maatstaven van hun blank somatisch normbeeld als blank. "In de Latijnse variant is de conceptie van 'blank' anders, en daardoor de conceptie van 'kleurling' anders dan in de Westeuropese variant. Zij die opgenomen raken in de Latijnse blanke groep, mogen 'biologisch' kleurlingen zijn, naar de maatstaf van het dominante somatische normbeeld zijn zij blanken", (p. 271) Ik ben uitvoerig op de inhoud van dit boek ingegaan (enkele aspckten bleven niettemin nog buiten beschouwing), omdat ik meen, dat Hoetink een uiterst boeiend betoog heeft geschreven. Hier is een socioloog aan het woord, die de moed heeft dit moeilijke onderwerp van een nieuw ge-








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


74 BOEKBESPREKING zichtspunt uit te benaderen en daarbij gevestigde theoretische systemen kritisch te beschouwen. Hoetink brengt daarbij zijn nieuwe ideen en dat zijn er vele in een bijzonder goed geschreven betoog naar voren.



Wel meen ik, dat hij in het kader van zijn onderwerp teveel hooi op de vork heeft genomen, teveel heeft willen zeggen, waardoor hij op verschillende plaatsen te weinig toetst en uitwerkt. Zeker, er zit vaart en gloed in dit boek en de nieuwe koncepties zijn gedurfd en getuigen van inspiratie, maar vaak heb ik mij toch afgevraagd: is dat nu wel zo ? is het wel zo algemeen als Hoetink doet voorkomen ? Heeft de schrijver zich niet teveel laten meeslepen door zijn talent voor de theoretische konstruktie en voor de polemiek, waardoor de aandacht voor het konkrete en afwijkende ontbreekt? Ongetwijfeld is het begrip 'somatisch normbeeld' vruchtbaar en biedt het nieuwe aanknopingspunten voor een analyse van de rasrelaties (geen geringe verdienste!), maar theoretisch gezien blijft het voor mij de vraag of wij hieraan zo'n zelfstandige verklaringsbetekenis mogen hechten als Hoetink doet. Is de bewustwording en de drang tot handhaving van het eigen normbeeld als groepsverschijnsel niet nauw verbonden met het kulturele patroon van de groep? Is de onderscheiding tussen een 'publieke sektor' en een persoonlijk-intieme in het interraciale verkeer in de gesegmenteerde samenleving niet te scherp getrokken, waarbij voor de tweede sektor teveel als uitsluitende verklaring het somatisch normbeeld wordt gebruikt ? Het ligt immers voor de hand, dat tussen deze beide relatie-niveaus een grote mate van interdependentie bestaat, waardoor de faktoren, die het klimaat in de publieke sfeer bepalen ook doorwerken naar het meer persoonlijke ontmoetingsvlak. Let wel: ik onderken het belang van de notie 'somatisch normbeeld', maar meen, dat niet altijd en zeker niet als exclusieve faktor in welke sektor van de raciale betrekkingen ook dit koncept een verklaring biedt.



Wanneer Hoetink schrijft, dat het typerend is voor de gesegmenteerde samenlevingen, dat het somatisch normbeeld van de bovengroep wordt overgedragen aan de ondergeschikte segmenten, dan bevat deze konstatering zeker een element van waarheid, maar in feite is de situatie gekompliceerder. Zeker kan men bij de bovengroep in een gesegmenteerde samenleving spreken van een bewustwording van het eigen somatische normbeeld, maar ik geloof, dat bij de bewustwording ook een relativering van dat somatische normbeeld optreedt. In het frekwente kontakt met de andere rasgroep worden de eigen somatische kenmerken en voorkeuren in eerste instantie scherp bewust, maar bij voortduring van dat kontakt wordt de waarde, die men hecht aan die voorkeur, tevens gerelativeerd.



Dat in de gesegmenteerde Caribische samenlevingen voorts bij de verschillende negrode segmenten een zg. 'white wish' kan worden bespeurd, is zonder twijfel waar, maar Hoetink verliest uit het oog, dat daarnaast binnen het segment wel degelijk nog een eigen somatisch normbeeld, gent op de eigen somatische kenmerken, bestaat. Het is daarom misschien juister te spreken van een dubbel-somatisch normbeeld, waarbij naast de 'white wish' ook van een voorkeursschema op grond van eigen somatische kenmerken kan worden gesproken. Ook in sociaal-kultureel opzicht bestaat er bij de volksklasse een dubbele standaard. Al komt bijvoorbeeld het kerkelijke en burgerlijke huwelijk een hogere status toe dan het illegitieme samenlevingsverband, niettemin wordt die eigen huwelijksvorm positief gewaardeerd, zonder dat als gevolg van de dubbele standaard








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


BOEKBESPREKING 75 van een frustratie kan worden gesproken. Het effekt van een eenzijdige overdracht van het somatische normbeeld van de bovengroep is daarom niet zo dramatisch als Hoetink ons wil doen geloven, noch is dat normbeeld van de bovengroep zo konsistent en bewust.



Ik heb mij bij deze bespreking beperkt tot een aantal kritische opmerkingen, terwijl dit boek feitelijk een meer uitgebreide beschouwing verdient.



Ik meen echter, dat een dergelijke recensie elders thuis hoort. Hier was het vooral mijn bedoeling ondanks de bezwaren, die ik heb aandacht te vragen voor dit originele boek.



J. D. Speckmann Zo was Curafao, door John de Pool. Vertaling van De/ Curorao 0e se va (Editorial Ercilla, Santiago de Chile, 1935) door J. A. van Praag, Henk Dennert, W. Chr. Rohde en Cola Debrot, met een voorwoord van Cola Debrot. ^ln/iWiaanse CaAiers jrg. 4, nr. 1 t/m 4, dec. i960. Sticusa; De Bezige Bij, Amsterdam, 1961, 406 blz. (/ 10,_).



Van de oorspronkelijke editie van ZW Curozoo grue se va zijn maar heel weinig exemplaren meer over. De redactie van de /4 n/t//iaanse Ca/iiers heeft dan ook recht op welgemeend applaus, nu dank zij haar goede zorgen een in het Nederlands overgebrachte heruitgave van De Pool's 'boek van mijn herinneringen' tot stand is gebracht. Er is geen ander boek, dat ons zo een intiem beeld verschaft van het Curacao rond de eeuwwisseling, en deze mededeling dient letterlijk opgevat: De Pool's werk hft geen concurrent; zijn waarde ligt goeddeels in zijn uniekheid besloten : de kostelijkheid is van de zeldzaamheid niet goed te scheiden.



Bij afwezigheid van Cura9aos vergelijkingsmateriaal dringen andere, en onrechtvaardige, parallellen zich op: De Pool is geen Hildebrand, zijn mmoires werden geen Camera OscMra van het fin-de-siclc-Curacao, ondanks de interesse voor de fotografie die de familie De Pool kenmerkte.



Het is niet met milde ironie dat De Pool zich van het Curacao zijner jeugd distanciert, ons de curieuze mengeling van dorpsheid en cosmopolitisme, van monotonie en bizarre veelvormigheid in berustende relativering schilderend. Veeleer was het de nostalgie, de tot vertedering aanzettende weemoed, die de schrijver leidde. Het is daardoor de Curacaose jongeman De Pool geworden die ons hier zijn ongekunstelde schetsen geeft van de enige samenleving die hij kent; de grijsaard De Pool, veelbereisd en welhaast erudiet, laat deze laatste verworvenheden niet te zeer merken, en treedt slechts als bejaarde vermaner zo nu en dan een hoofdstukje binnen om ons te bezweren dat veel zaken ten ongunste zijn veranderd en terecht dat Curacao zijn belangrijke eilandgenoten niet dient te vergeten. In zijn voorwoord spreekt Debrot in dit verband van de 'exilado'-stemming waarin De Pool zijn herinneringen neerschreef.



Debrot tracht verder aannemelijk te maken dat een duidelijke compositie De Pool bij het verhalen van zijn mmoires voor ogen stond: er zou sprake zijn van "een opwaartse vlucht. . van het singuliere naar het universele". Ik ben mij van deze vlucht helaas niet bewust geworden.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


76 BOEKBESPREKING Twee duidelijke kernen zijn er in de compositie wel te vinden: daar zijn de schetsen over gewoonten en gebruiken op de eerste honderd bladzijden, en de portretten van vooraanstaande eilandelijke persoonlijkheden (hoe ontroerend is De Pool's verslag over pater Baralt) op de pagina's 275-318.



Daartussen en daarachter heeft De Pool ons verteld wat hem in de zin kwam: een essay over Piar en Brion, korte aantekeningen over scholen, kerken, theaters, straten; anecdotische gegevens over de meest uiteenlopende zaken, waarbij ik niet vermag in te zien dat de mededelingen over 'kakusji' zich alreeds meer 'opwaarts' in Debrot's 'vlucht' bevinden dan het opstel over 'Bisschoppen die ik me herinner' (resp. p. 264 en 202).



De Pool beziet Curacao vanuit de sociale positie der kleine bovenlaag waartoe hij behoorde. Deze groep representeert voor hem eigenlijk 'het' Curacaose leven dat zo 'idyllisch' was en waarin "onze gemeenschap uit n grote familie" bestond (p. 14), en het is zijn beschrijving van de figuren en 'folkways' dezer 'grote familie', die ons het waardevolst uit het gehele boek lijkt, uit een oogpunt van 'objectieve', tevens sfeervolle, informatie.



De Pool's aantekeningen over de gebruiken van 'het volk' (ocho dia, zumbi, ze, tamboe) daarentegen zijn eerder curieus en interessant doordat zij de neerbuigend-belangstellende, half-geamuseerde, half-gentrigeerde houding der blanke elite tegenover deze zaken weerspiegelen, dan door de feitelijke inlichtingen die zij bevatten.



De Pool's herinneringen aan buitenlanders in Curacao doen mij hopen dat er eens een boek geschreven wordt over de rol, die Curacao als vluchthaven en plaats van samenzwering in het Caribisch gebied heeft gespeeld: hoe boeiend zou het zijn in een bundel essays de Hatiaanse keizer, de 'Libertador', de Venezolaanse en Dominikaanse president, en dat hele leger van Caribische revolutionaire terug te vinden, wier verblijf op zijn eiland door De Pool even wordt aangeduid.



En wat de Curacaoenaars in het buitenland betreft, over wie De Pool met zoveel kennis van zaken schrijft: hier bekruipt me de lust hem na te volgen in een opsomming der Curacaose namen die men elders in het Caribisch gebied tegenkomt: op Puerto Rico denk ik aan de pasgestorven Huyke (over wie ook De Pool spreekt) en aan Vanderdijs; op Santo Domingo ken ik de naam Evertsz (gouverneur van een provincie), Vanderlinde, Schotborg, Muller, Vanepps, Marchena, Curiel, Lopez Penha, Hoepelman, Bogaert, en niet te vergeten Don Max Henriquez Urefia, broer van de nog vermaarder literatuur-historicus Pedro, wier vader, Don Francisco, en wier oom, Don Fderico Henriquez y Carvajal, beiden presidenten van de Republiek waren, vrienden van Hostos en Martf, en geparenteerd aan de Nouels en dus. . familie van Cola Debrot. Maar ik dwaal af.



Wat tenslotte de essays betreft waarin De Pool, op onnauwkeurige inlichtingen steunend, zich inlaat met gebeurtenissen, die voor 'zijn tijd' plaatsgrepen (bijvoorbeeld de 'affaire' Sassen) daar dient men hem, zoals ook Debrot in zijn voorwoord suggereert, met een korrel zout te nemen.



De vertalers hebben het m.i. juiste standpunt ingenomen om deze en dergelijke aanvechtbare interpretaties niet met voetnoten of anderszins te lijf te gaan *-. Dit soort storende subjectiviteiten wordt echter, althans 1 'Dat er wl een voetnoot geplaatst werd op p. 378, verwijzende naar de dissertatie van K. H. Crporaal over .De








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


BOEKBESPREKING 77 naar mijn smaak, ruimschoots elders goedgemaakt door opmerkingen als deze: "Onze volkstypen kunnen worden onderscheiden in nuttige en schilderachtige. Nuttig noem ik hen, die binnen de eenvoud van hun werkzaamheden een bepaalde rol spelen in het sociale bestel van hun tijd.



Schilderachtig zijn zij, die, hoewel in feite van weinig belang voor de gvmeenschap, toch kunnen dienen om bepaalde eigenschappen van een tijdperk te kenschetsen" (p. 318). Dergelijke kostelijke catalogiserende waarnemingen komen in voldoende mate voor om De Pool's eerder gesignaleerde hebbelijkheden van harte te vergeven.



Het lijkt me dat de vertalers zich goed hebben gekweten van hun taak het somtijds verwarde proza van De Pool in helder Nederlands over te brengen. Onjuist dunkt mij de vertaling van de toemba op p. 94: 'Paskoe' dient vertaald met 'Kerstmis' (Pascuas) en niet met 'Pasen'; de echte tamboe-tijd is trouwens ook rond Nieuwjaar.



Het verschijnen van de Nederlandse 'De Pool' is voor een ieder die in de Curafaose samenleving belangstelt, en misschien in het bijzonder voor de 'exilados' onder hen, een heugelijke gebeurtenis.



H. HOETINK 0/ Cw/lwra/ Persistent*, door Morton Klass. Columbia University Press, New York/Londen, 1961, 265 biz. (J6).



De belangstelling voor de Hindostaanse gemeenschappen in het Caribische gebied is lange tijd gering geweest. In de sociaal-wetenschappelijke literatuur richtte de aandacht zich, in navolging van Herskovits, vooral op de studie van het plantagesysteem, de slavernij en het akkulturatieproces bij de Neger-bevolking. Ook bij de beschouwingen over de rasverhoudingen bleef het thema 'neger blanke' favoriet.



Het boek van Klass is een van de eerste monografien over een Hindostaans dorp in het Caribische gebied. Morton Klass een anthropoloog van Columbia University heeft in de jaren I957/'s8 een studie gemaakt van het Trinidadse dorpje 'Amity' (de naam is fiktief), dat bijna uitsluitend bewoond wordt door Hindostanen. De auteur geeft in deze studie een volledige beschrijving van de sociaal-strukturele en kulturele aspekten van deze kleine gemeenschap. Een 'community study' derhalve, waarover Conrad M. Arensberg in zijn voorwoord opmerkt "The community study method has come to yield rich and progressive understanding of the dynamics of culture and society and of individual aspirations in it".



Klass behandelt o.m. het kastensysteem, de struktuur van de huishoudgroep, de verwantschapsstruktuur, de huwelijksritus, de religieuze voorstellingen van de groep (de dorpsbewoners zijn bijna allen Hindoe), de magie, de sociale struktuur van het dorp en enkele aspekten van de politieke verhoudingen. Het boek geeft in menig opzicht een voortreffelijk tosscfen A/eder/and en Fne.?ttg/a J#r6-J920, lijkt wat arbitrair. Hier kan ook vermeld worden dat De Pool's bewering dat het huidige St. Thomas College door zijn oom werd gesticht (p. 182), door Hartog (Cwrofao /_, p. 1124, noot 340) 'te dwaas' werd bevonden.








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


78 BOEKBESPREKING inzicht in het sociale leven van deze groep. Vooral de analyse van de verwantschapsnomenklatuur en het hoofdstuk over de religie vormen hoogtepunten in deze studie.



De stelling, dat de Indiase kuituur zich bij deze immigrantenbevolking grotendeels heeft gehandhaafd, is het stramien van dit boek. De ondertitel luidt dan ook "a study of cultural persistence". Klass stelt dat "the intent of this book is to demonstrate, first, that the village of Amity is a highly integrated, cohesive community, and second, that <As community is s/rwcfuraMy /n^ian ra/Aer Man Wes<-/n<ftan" (p. 3). "The settlers of Amity succeeded in reconstituting a new community. It exhibited the structure of what might be called the generalized north Indian society" (p. 231). Dit openbaart zich vooral in de rekonstruktie van het verwantschapssysteem, de kastenstruktuur, de zg. praja-verhouding (een geinstitutionaliseerde vorm van wederzijds bestaande verplichtingen bij twee of meer personen), het Hindoesme en het levenspatroon.



Het is vooral deze stelling, waartegen wij bezwaar maken. Hoe sterk bepaalde kulturele trekken bij deze groep ook mogen herinneren aan het moederland India en hoe treffend in sociaal-struktureel opzicht de overeenkomst met het dorpsleven in Noord-India op het eerste gezicht mag zijn, deze Hindostaanse groep is onderdeel van de Caribische samenleving. Taal en kleding wijzen er al op dat deze groep niet los te denken is van het Trinidadse milieu, waardoor een vergelijking met de Indiase samenleving spekulatief wordt. Klass ontkent niet, dat er ook sprake is van akkulturatie, maar hij schrijft "Yet in some ways Amity is a closed world and it is easy for an observer living there to forget that Amity is part of a "Creole"-Trinidad" (p. 243). Deze omschrijving geeft juist het manco van deze studie weer. Klass heeft dit dorp teveel gezien als een zijn boek enkele voorbeelden aan, waaruit blijkt, dat Amity toch verbonden is met het sociale systeem van de samenleving van Trinidad als geheel, maar in zijn analyse van deze dorpsgemeenschap blijkt nergens iets van een funktioneel verband met de buitenwereld. Schrijft Raymond Smith niet, dat de 'community study' alleen dan zinvol is, wanneer de gemeenschap wordt gezien "as part of a wider social system which cannot be regarded as being merely 'external' to the village" ? Klass heeft aan deze voorwaarde niet voldaan.



Indien dit dorp inderdaad een afgesloten wereld-op-zichzelf zou zijn, dan mag men de vraag stellen of in dit geval de keuze van het 'sample' gelukkig is geweest. Amity is dan een uitzonderlijk fenomeen, dat ons geen inzicht geeft over de Hindostaanse gemeenschap op het 'platteland' van Trinidad, terwijl daarentegen de titel van het boek een ruim perspektief belooft.



Bijzonder interessant zijn de gegevens over de kastenstruktuur in Amity.



Men wrijft zich de ogen uit, wanneer men leest hoe groot de betekenis van de kaste nog is in dit dorp. Niet alleen vormt de kaste hier nog een bijna volledig endogame eenheid, maar ook is er sprake van een zekere geografische koncentratie van de onderscheidene kasten. Zo merkt Klass op, dat de Camars (een van de lagere kasten) de grootste groep vormen, maar niettemin treft men geen camar familie aan in de betere huizen van het dorp. Maar ook nu rechtvaardigen deze feiten nog niet de konklusie van Klass, dat "these nations [de term voor kaste in Amity]








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl





Boekbespreking


BOEKBESPREKING 79 are Indian castes", (p. 56) Er zijn verschillende andere voorwaarden, waaraan moet worden voldaan, wil men van een Indiaafts kastesysteem spreken.



Wij denken aan het korporatief karakter van de kaste, aan het bestaan van een kastepaficayat, aan de korrelatie tussen kaste en beroep, kenmerken, die in Amity ontbreken. Zo geboeid is de schrijver door dit fenomeen kaste, dat een behandeling van de klasse-struktuur met een halve bladzijde wordt afgedaan. De vraag blijft open hoe het sociale stratifikatiesysteem van de Trinidadse samenleving zich verhoudt tot de sociale rangorde in Amity.



De konklusies van Klass leiden als vanzelf tot de vraagstelling, welke faktoren geleid hebben tot deze conservering van de Indiase erfenis. Op dit probleem gaat Klass in het kader van deze studie niet in. Begrijpelijk, want een antwoord zou alleen door een beschouwing van de gehele Hindostaanse groep in Trinidad en haar geschiedenis kunnen worden gevonden. Men kan overigens de vraag niet afdoen met de opmerking "it is instead the pressures from within, from the heart, from one's fellows and their needs of one another, pressures obviously not from outside except as defence, which have inspired the retention and reconstitution of culture we witness here", zoals Arensberg in zijn voorwoord schrijft.



Ondanks deze bezwaren blijft dit boek een bijzonder nuttige bijdrage voor onze kennis van de Hindostanen in het Caribische gebied, ook al heeft men de neiging zich na lezing af te vragen "zou de situatie in de andere dorpen in Trinidad ook zij zijn en hoe is de Hindostaanse gemeenschap in Port-of-Spain er aan toe ?" J. D. Speckmann








Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Henriquez, P. C.


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



JEAN HURAULT LES INDIENS DE GUYANE FRAN^AISE PROBLMES PRATIQUES D'ADMINISTRATION ET DE CONTACTS DE CIVILISATION Introduction 82 I. Les Indiens de Guyane et le milieu gographique ... 85 Les Indiens de la region ctire. Les Indiens de l'intrieur. Agriculture des Indiens de l'intrieur; genre de vie. Le village. Techniques. Gains et dpenses.



II. Causes de l'extinction des Indiens de Guyane 95 Historique. Situation dmographique actuelle des tribus indiennes. Pathologie des Indiens de l'intrieur. Le 'desert humain' de l'Amazonie.



III. Evolution sociale des Indiens de Guyane 112 Definitions des termes sociologiques utilises. Systme de parent et organisation sociale des Oayana. Evolution actuelle du systme social des Oayana. Influence de la degradation du systme de parent sur le mode de groupement et la cohesion des villages. Les Oyampi. Les merillon. Indiens de la fort et Indiens de la region ctiere.



IV. Problmes de contact de civilisation dans le pass 126 Attitude des Francais a l'gard des Indiens. Psychologie des Indiens. Essais d'assimilation. L'administration des Indiens. Le mtissage. Le commerce de traite. Travail. L'vanglisation.



V. Problmes actuels d'administration et de contacts de 146 CIVILISATION Contact des Indiens avec les Europens et Creoles. Administration. Les Indiens et les cadeaux. Les changes; le commerce. L'apparition du travail salari. Le problme de l'cole. L'assistance mdicale. Le problme du tourisme.



VI. L'avenir des Indiens de Guyane 164 L'assimilation des Indiens'. Importance de 1'adaptation au milieu gographique.



Notes 172 Resum. Summary. Samenvatting 175 8l










Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Hurault, Jean


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



Introduction Nous n'envisagerons pas ici les Indiens de Guyane sous Tangle de l'ethnographie. Leurs techniques, leurs langues, leurs croyances ont fait l'objet d'tudes approfondies, principalement en Guyane anglaise et a Surinam. Mais ces ouvrages, pour srieux et savants qu'ils soient, prsentent a des degrs divers une mme lacune fondamentale: techniques, langues, croyances, sont envisages comme des objets d'tude en soi, indpendamment des hommes qui les ont cres et transmises.



La structure sociale et la coutume familiale des Indiens demeurent peu connues, et n'ont fait l'objet que d'tudes abstraites; et quand on cherche ce qui a t crit sur les Indiens en tant qu'tres humains, on s'tonne de ne trouver que peu de chose.



Pourquoi les tribus de l'intrieur disparaissent-elles lentement et inexorablement depuis les premiers contacts avec les Europens ?



Peut-on preserver les groupements survivants, et de quelle facon ? Pourquoi au contraire les tribus de la region ctire ontelles un taux d'accroissement tres lev, un des plus levs que l'on connaisse ?



Quelle attitude doit-on avoir envers les groupements indiens ?



Faut-il chercher a les faire voluer, et dans quelle voie?



Sur tous ces points, les ouvrages des ethnologues restent muets.



Et si l'on envisage les problmes pratiques d'administration, on prend conscience de la distance qui spare l'ethnologie, telle qu'elle est comprise habituellement, du domaine ordinaire de la vie. Hommes politiques et administrateurs ignorent ces ouvrages ou n'en tiennent aucun compte, n'y trouvant rien qui se rapporte directement aux problmes pratiques qu'ils ont a rsoudre. Laisss sans directives, ils adoptent des solutions empiriques, plus ou moins heureuses, et les annes passent sans que l'on parvienne a une comprehension plus profonde du problme indien. 82










Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Hurault, Jean


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



LES INDIENS DE GUYANE FRANfAISE 83 Nous avons cherch a donner ici une synthese des travaux eflectus au cours des 15 dernires annes, au cours de missions gographiques et ethnographiques en Guyane Francaise. Nous avons tudi les groupements indiens sous l'angle de la dmographie et de la sociologie gnrale; les travaux que nous avions a conduire en leur compagnie nous ont notamment montr de nombreux aspects des problmes de contact de civilisation.



Les mdecins qui ont particip a ces missions ont tudi simultanment ces groupements sous l'angle de la physiologie et de la pathologie. Il ne nous appartient pas videmment de traiter ici de ces problmes, mais ils ont des connexions trop troites avec les autres aspects du problme indien pour que nous puissions les passer sous silence. Nous nous bornerons a citer des extraits des rapports des mdecins.



Les donnes recueillies ont t compltes par une tude historique; les fonds d'archives concernant la Guyane Francaise contiennent de nombreux documents, encore en grande partie indits, qui permettent de retracer avec prcision l'histoire des groupements indiens depuis leurs premiers contacts avec les europens, voici plus de 350 ans, et jettent une vive lumire sur Ie prsent. De 1952 a 1962, avec Ie concours de Madame Sarotte-Pouliquen, archiviste-palographe, nous avons fait un examen approfondi de ces fonds et transcrit la totalit des pieces se rapportant aux tribus indiennes. Ces travaux feront l'objet de publications ultrieures.



Dans eet article, nous envisagerons presque exclusivement les problmes poses par les Indiens de l'intrieur, et ne parlerons des tribus de la region ctire qu'a titre d'lments de comparaison.



Les Indiens de l'intrieur ne sont plus reprsents en Guyane Francaise que par trois groupements, Oayana, Oyampi, Emerillon, totalisant moins de 450 personnes. Malgr leur faiblesse numrique, ces populations presentent un grand intrt scientifique et humain, et mritent une sollicitude particuliere. Par ailleurs, des groupements beaucoup plus nombreux vivent dans les pays voisins, et nous pensons que nos collgues de Surinam, du Brsil et de Guyane anglaise, places devant les mmes problmes, pourront trouver intrt a ces reflexions.










Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Hurault, Jean


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



JEAN HURAULT Group d 100 | Group* d SO panonn Habitation boMat .__ Chamin Indian Fig. i. Les Indiens de la Guyane FRAN9AISE en 1958.










Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Hurault, Jean


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



Les Indiens de Guyane et le milieu gographique La region ctire et l'intrieur s'opposent fortement, offrant aux hommes des conditions de vie, des possibilits de dplacement radicalement diffrentes. Il n'est pas excessif de dire qu'en Guyane il existe deux types d'habitat et de civilisation distincts: Indiens de la region ctire et Indiens de l'intrieur appartiennent par ailleurs a des groupes anthropologiques bien distincts et ont une pathologie sensiblement diffrente, qui se traduit directement sur leur situation dmographique et leur devenir en tant que groupes. Les problmes de contact de civilisation se posent de facon tres diffrente pour les uns et pour les autres. les indiens de la region ctire. Galibi et Arawak sont avant tout des pcheurs en mer. Toute leur vie est oriente par les impratifs resultant du milieu gographique tres particulier du littoral. lis sont amens a vivre sur les estuaires, mais de preference directement sur les plages, o le vent de mer chasse les moustiques. Le dplacement rapide des bancs de sable et de la vase modifie sans cesse la configuration du littoral. Ces Indiens sont done amens souvent a abandonner, bien contre leur gr, leurs villages envahis par la mangrove, et a les transporter ailleurs. lis ne disposent pour faire leurs abattis que d'une surface limite, cordons littoraux sableux ou petites emergences au milieu des marcages. Ces conditions de vie s'opposent, elles aussi, a la creation de grands villages stables. Bien que vivant en contact troit avec les croles auxquels ils ont emprunt un certain nombre de techniques et d'habitude de vie, les Indiens de la region ctire n'en continuent pas moins a vivre en petits villages semi-nomades, exactement comme avant l'arrive des Europens. 85










Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Hurault, Jean


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



86 JEAN HURAULT Ce seul fait suffit a montrer la force de l'emprise qu'exerce sur les groupements humains le milieu gographique. Les savanes marcageuses et l'ensemble de la bande littorale sont infests de moustiques; mais contrairement a ce que Ton pourrait croire au premier abord, ces zones sont moins impaludes que l'intrieur du pays. Comme les populations des deltas de l'Asie du Sud-Est, les Indiens de la region ctire sont peu atteints par le paludisme. lis sont dans l'ensemble en bonne sant, et c'est ce qui explique leur natalit exceptionnelle; la fcondit est une des plus leves que l'on connaisse, atteignant 10,5 enfants par femme ayant achev sa vie gnitale (i).



Il est utile de prciser ici que Galibi et Arawak d'une part, Oayana, Oyampi et Emerillon d'autre part, appartiennent a deux groupes raciaux sensiblement diffrents au point de vue somatique et au point de vue physiologique. En particulier ils n'ont pas les mmes groupes sanguins. Il est possible que ces particularits aient elles aussi une certaine influence et expliquent en partie les differences constates dans la pathologie et les donnes dmographiques des uns et des autres. les indiens de l'intrieur. Bien qu'appartenant a des groupes linguistiques et culturels diffrents, Carabe pour les Oayana, Tupi-Guarani pour les Oyampi et Emerillon, les Indiens de l'intrieur forment un groupe remarquablement homogene sur le plan de l'anthropologie physiologique; ils constituent l'une des races humaines les mieux caractrises, prsentant cette particularit remarquable que la totalit des individus appartiennent au groupe sanguin o.



Les Indiens de l'intrieur, que des descriptions superficielles ont souvent reprsents comme "vivant de chasse et de pche", sont avant tout des agriculteurs. Et l'agriculture en fort guyanaise est soumise a des impratifs tres particuliers, qu'il importe de rappeler brivement ici, car s'ils sont bien connus des gographes, ils demeurent trop souvent ignores de ceux qui, au nom d'un ideal religieux ou politique, laborent des plans pour bouleverser la vie des Indiens: Les formes du terrain sont partout tres accidentes; c'est une succession infinie de petites collines aux pentes raides, baignant dans des marcages. Le parcours du terrain est tres










Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Hurault, Jean


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



LES INDIENS DE GUYANE FRAN^AISE 87 pnible, le transport des rcoltes sur de longues distances impraticable. C'est pourquoi la plupart des Indiens preferent s'tablir sur le bord des rivires navigables en pirogue, et faire les abattis ncessaires a leurs plantations au bord mme de l'eau. Le sol est presque partout tres dlav, tres pauvre, impropre a une mise en culture permanente. Aprs avoir fait un abattis en fort primaire, les Indiens font deux rcoltes successives, puis l'abandonnent dfinitivement. Une experience millnaire leur a montr qu'il tait nettement plus avantageux d'oprer ainsi que de reprendre d'anciens abattis envahis par la vegetation secondaire, car si l'abattage en fort primaire demande plus de temps, le sarclage se trouve tres reduit et le rendement est nettement plus lev*. Ce systme conduit a un semi-nomadisme. Un facteur cologique propre a la fort amazonienne, la fourmi-manioc, contribue galement a orienter la vie des Indiens vers un semi-nomadisme. La fourmi-manioc, qui ravage les plantes cultives, prolifre plus spcialement dans les zones anciennement cultives.



D'une facon gnrale, il faut bien comprendre que la fort amazonienne est hostile a Installation permanente des hommes.



Quand l'homme coupe un abattis dans la fort et tablit un village, il rompt un quilibre naturel qui tend irrsistiblement a se rtablir a son detriment... et y parvient tt ou tard, l'histoire des tablissements europens dans le Sud de la Guyane le montre assez clairement. Un tablissement permanent ne peut tre maintenu que par une volont tenace, au prix d'un gros effort supplementaire: le rendement des cultures baisse par l'puisement du sol et par la multiplication des rongeurs et des prdateurs; on est oblige de transporter les rcoltes sur de longues distances. Enfin les habitations sont envahies par toutes sortes de parasites et deviennent insalubres.



Ces considerations montrent clairement que le mode de vie des Indiens de l'intrieur, semi-nomades dans un primtre limit, le long de portions de rivires, constituant le territoire de chaque groupement, constitue une solution raisonnable au problme de la vie dans la fort equatoriale, et ne doit nullement tre inter-1 D'une faon gnrale les Indiens sont passs maltres dans l'art d'conomiser les heures de travail, et une tude rationnelle du problme ne peut la plupart du temps que con firmer la valeur de leurs methodes.










Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Hurault, Jean


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



88 JEAN HURAULT prt comme une preuve de paresse ou d'ignorance. Les Europens des sicles passs qui prtendaient 'rduire', 'policer' les Indiens, quand ils ont voulu passer de la theorie a la pratique, ont du se plier aux mmes ncessits. La mission St Paul, fonde au 18 sicle par les Jsuites sur Ie cours moyen de l'Oyapok, dut se dplacer a quatre reprises au moins, en une cinquantaine d'annes.



AGRICULTURE DES INDIENS DE L'lNTRIEUR; GENRE DE VIE.



Nous rappellerons brivement les methodes d'agriculture, de chasse et de pche des Indiens de l'intrieur: Les abattis ne sont pas groups, chaque mnage travaillant indpendamment, parfois fort loin des autres; la surface moyenne dfriche chaque anne est de 0,5 hectares par mnage. Au dbut de la saison sche, on fait l'abattage et on laisse scher environ un mois au soleil avant de bruler. Le briilage depose un poids de eendre suffisant pour assurer deux rcoltes. Puis remplacement est abandonn et on transporte ailleurs.



L'agriculture des Indiens diffre de celle des Noirs Rfugis sur les points suivants: ils ne cultivent pas le riz; a l'encontre des Noirs Rfugis qui abandonnent l'abattis aprs une seule rcolte, ils sarclent soigneusement, brulent sur place si la saison le permet les herbes sarcles et replantent. Cependant ils coupent un nouvel abattis chaque anne, de telle sorte qu'ils ont toujours deux abattis en exploitation.



Ils cultivent essentiellement le manioc, le petit igname appel napi, la canne a sucre, les bananes et plantains. Le mas, les ignames blancs, les dachines et choux carabes sont connus mais peu cultivs; les nombreuses varits de pois et de haricots qui jouent un si grand rle dans la nourriture des Creoles n'ont pas pntr dans l'agriculture des Indiens.



Le rendement de l'agriculture est faible. Le rendement en manioc ne dpasse gure 6.000 kgs a l'hectare, correspondant a 1.400 kgs de farine. Dans ces conditions l'abattis de 0,5 hectares ne produit gure, outre la nourriture du mnage, qu'un suppl-ment commercialisable de 300 a 500 NF (120 a 200 florins surinamiens) par an au maximum.



Les Indiens pourraient-ils cultiver davantage, et amliorer leur vie par la vente de leurs produits? En fait, tant donn la










Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Hurault, Jean


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



LES INDIENS DE GUYANE FRANCHISE 89 pauvret du sol et Ie faible rendement des cultures, ce ne serait gure avantageux; d'ailleurs il n'y a gure d'acheteurs pour ce genre de produits, vu l'isolement des groupements indiens dans Ie Sud du pays. La vente du poisson et de la viande de chasse constitue une ressource beaucoup plus avantageuse, de mme que Ie travail salari au profit des Creoles et des Europens.



La pche est pratique par trois procds principaux, Ie tir a Tare, la nivre (empoisonnement de la rivire par des lianes a rotnone) et l'hamecon. La pche a l'arc demeure Ie procd favori des Indiens; tireurs habiles, les Oayana rentrent rarement bredouilles. La consommation du poisson varie de 300 a 800 grs par adulte et par jour. C'est Ie principal apport de protides et aussi de lipides, certains de ces poissons tant tres gras.



En dpit de l'exemple des Boni, les Oayana ne salent pas Ie poisson et persistent a Ie boucaner, tant pour Ie mettre en rserve que pour la vente. Le poisson boucan se conserve mal et peut provoquer de graves intoxications, qui s'observent notamment quelque temps aprs les grandes 'nivres', prenant parfois l'apparence d'pidmies de dysenteries, et entrainant des morts. C'est un des rares points o les techniques des Indiens sont dfectueuses et pourraient tre amliores.



Les Indiens sont des chasseurs ns; ils chassent par gout autant que par besoin. Depuis quelques annes, ils sont presque tous pourvus de fusils de chasse modernes et font une grande consommation de cartouches: la viande de chasse prend une place croissante dans leur alimentation.



Les Indiens ne pratiquent pas l'levage au sens ordinaire du terme, considrant d'ailleurs comme impure la chair d'animaux qui se nourrissent des dchets domestiques. Ils ont quelques poules, mais principalement pour la vente, et pour les plumes blanches ncessaires a leurs parures de danse.



Ils lvent un grand nombre de chiens destines principalement a la vente, qu'ils dressent pour la chasse en les affamant et en les 'lavant' avec des mixtures complexes.



L'absence d'levage chez les Indiens a de tous temps provoqu l'tonnement et la commiseration des Europens, et quand on tudie les archives de la Guyane Francaise, on met en evidence de nombreuses tentatives toutes suivies d'chec, pour l'introduire chez eux. En fait, comme bien d'autres efforts pour modi-










Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Hurault, Jean


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



go JEAN HURAULT fier profondment la vie des Indiens, ces tentatives montraient une mconnaissance singuliere des conditions imposes par Ie milieu gographique. En fort guyanaise, les prdateurs, les vampires et les nombreux parasites hmatophages ne permettent d'lever du btail qu'au prix d'une surveillance de tous les instants, avec de alas considerables. Un Indien quip d'un bon fusil, en consacrant a la chasse deux jours par semaine, ramene aisment cent cinquante a deux cent legs de gibier par an. Pour obtenir par l'levage la mme quantit de viande, il lui faudrait entretenir un troupeau d'une cinquantaine de moutons; Ie gardiennage, l'entretien des paturages qui tendent a s'embroussailler rapidement, la lutte contre les prdateurs, etc, occuperait Ie plus clair de son temps. Les Noirs Rfugis de Guyane, comme les Indiens, preferent a l'levage la chasse, qui contribue par ailleurs a dfendre leurs abattis contre les prdateurs et est a leurs yeux Ie type mme de l'activit virile, en mme temps que la meilleure distraction.



D'une facon gnrale, les Indiens de l'intrieur se nourrissent bien et ne connaissent des periodes de disette que tres rarement.



L'abondance du poisson leur assure une ration de protines tres leve, bien superieure a celle de la plupart des populations intertropicales.



Les preparations culinaires sont peu varies: c'est ]'terneJ]e pimentade de poisson, dans laquelle on trempe les galettes de cassave. Les ignames sont simplement bouillis; l'usage du sel est general, mais Ie piment demeure Ie principal condiment.



Les Indiens consomment volontiers des fruits (papayes, ananas, mangues, pommes cajou), riches en vitamines, ainsi que des graines de palmier caumou en saison des pluies. lis consomment par ailleurs une grande quantit de produits de cueillette qu'ils trouvent en abondance dans la fort, notamment des graines, des larves de coloptres, et les termites ails au moment du vol nuptial.



Comme boisson, les Indiens n'utilisent d'ordinaire que l'eau de la rivire. Les jours de fte, on sert diffrentes sortes de cachiri, dont Ie plus courant est fait de manioc ferment. Sa teneur en alcool est extrmement faible. Les Indiens en absorbent sans sourciller des calebasses de deux litres; ils ont d'ailleurs la facult de vomir volontairement, sans sourciller davantage et sans paraitre en souffrir; leur estomac vide, ils recommencent a boire.










Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Hurault, Jean


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



LES INDIENS DE GUYANE FRANCHISE 91 Ce cachiri est certainement peu recommandable mais il entraine une indigestion plus qu'une ivresse. Il est absurde de lui attribuer l'extinction des Indiens car ils n'en boivent pas davantage que jadis, quand leurs nations taient nombreuses et fortes.



Les Indiens de l'intrieur ont un gout prononc pour l'alcool, et qumandent volontiers du tafia aux Europens et aux Creoles; mais ils ont peu tendance a en acheter de leurs propres dniers; au total leur consonunation d'alcool est bien infrieure a celle des Noirs Rfugis et des Creoles. Il n'est pas inutile de faire remarquer a eet gard que les Indiens de la region ctire, dont Ie genre de vie se rapproche de celui des Creoles, sont bien plus alcooliques que les Indiens de l'intrieur, ce qui ne les empche pas d'etre en bon tat physique et d'avoir dix enfants par m-nage. L'alcool a la plus terrible influence sur la vie familiale et la vie sociale, mais il est permis de penser qu'il n'a jamais dtruit aucune population. Les voyageurs des 18 et 19 sicle qui ont avance la lgre des affirmations de ce genre, notamment en ce qui concerne les Indiens d'Amrique du Nord, avaient affaire a des populations en proie simultanment a plusieurs flaux sociaux, a des endmies et pidmies; ils ne disposaient pas des connaissances ncessaires pour dpartager I'influence des uns et des autres, et n'ont pas tudi srieusement les causes des dcs.



Aucune population du pass n'a pu matriellement atteindre une consommation d'alcool comparable a ce qu'on observe actuellement dans les iles productrices de canne a sucre, dont les habitants n'en ont pas moins une dmographie florissante.



Dans l'ensemble, les Indiens de l'intrieur sont bien aliments, 1 et leur ration alimentaire est quilibre, sauf sur un point: elle est pauvre en elements minraux et notamment en calcium. Une tendance au rachitisme s'observe chez quelques enfants Oayana et Oyampi. Il est a noter qu'on n'observe rien de semblable chez les Noirs Rfugis, qui ont exactement la mme alimentation, lei encore, Noirs et Indiens ne ragissent pas de la mme facon aux conditions imposes par Ie milieu gographique. Les observations sur la nutrition des Indiens de l'intrieur ont t faites par Ie Dr. Etienne Bois en 1961. Elles n'ont que la valeur de sondages mais permettent d'affirmer que les Indiens sont convenablement aliments et que leur situation sanitaire et dmographique ne peut tre explique par la sous-alimentation. Une tude plus pousse est en cours.










Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Hurault, Jean


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



92 JEAN HURAULT le village. Les villages indiens de l'intrieur sont tous situs au bord mme d'une rivire a laquelle leur vie est troitement lie.



Jadis les Indiens vivaient dans des 'maloca', cases gantes o trouvait place tout un groupe de parent. Bien que la tendance a l'habitation distincte par mnage ait prvalu, il demeure quelque chose de cette ancienne coutume. Plusieurs mnages apparents mme d'assez loin cohabitent volontiers pendant des annes dans la mme case.



Les cases des mnages sont gnralement de simples abris ouverts construits sans aucun soin; les plus travailleurs construisent des cases protegees du vent par un auvent semi-circulaire a chaque extrmit.



Chaque mnage possde en outre une petite case dans son abattis; c'est la seulement qu'il peut trouver l'intimit conjugale, que la vie commune au village ne permet pas.



Les Indiens de la region ctire portent short et chemisette; mais les Indiens de l'intrieur demeurent fidele a leur vtement traditionnel, Ie calimb d'toffe rouge.



Les femmes Oayana portent les jours de fte la tangue, tablier de broderie de perles. Les autres jours, elles portent simplement un petit tablier d'toffe rouge; les femmes Oyampi et merillon En dpit de revolution de ces dernires annes, les Indiens de l'intrieur n'ont pas tendance a changer leurs habitudes vestimentaires. En particulier, ils s'opposent fermement a ce que les femmes s'habillent, pensant qu'elles deviendraient exigeantes et jalouses.



Hommes et femmes portent les cheveux longs et s'pilent cils et sourcils. Ils sont tres soigneux de leur personne et se contemplent longuement chaque jour dans leurs miroirs.



La parure est essentiellement constitue par des colliers de perles de porcelaine bleue ou rouge, obtenus des voyageurs ou de commercants europens ou croles.



Dire que les Indiens raffolent des perles serait une expression bien faible. Les perles sont pour eux un but, un ideal; ils en parlent sans cesse comparant les formes, les nuances, faisant des changes.










Nederlands West-Indische Gids

Hurault, Jean


nl
Hurault, Jean


les Indiens de Guyane Francaise



LES INDIENS DE GUYANE FRANAISE 93 Les flots de perles que Ie commerce a dverss sur la Haute Guyane depuis 1950 n'ont pas affaibli leur passion. Il leur en faut davantage pour la mme somme de travail, voila tout.



Certains en ont de pleines mallettes, qu'ils ouvrent pendant la journe, contemplant leur trsor comme un avare ses cus. Les jours de fte, hommes et femmes ploient sous trois a quatre kgs de colliers. techniques. Les Indiens ont conserve a peu pres intactes leurs techniques traditionnelles, modifies depuis deux sicles par l'emploi de la hache et du sabre.



Les constructions demeurent faites par ligature de bois simplement corcs. Les techniques d'quarissage et de sciage des Noirs Rfugis n'ont pas pntr chez eux, sauf pour la construction des canots, qu'ils russissent assez bien.



Les femmes filent Ie coton en vue de la fabrication des hamacs, tres apprcis et donnant lieu comme par Ie pass a une certaine activit de commerce et d'change.



Comme technique secondaire, on peut signaler la vannerie (hottes, pagaras ou malles a couvercle, tamis, etc.), orne de motifs reprsentant des animaux styliss. La poterie demeure une spcialit des Indiens Galibi de la region ctire. gains et dpenses. On peut difficilement parier de budget familial, les Indiens de l'intrieur dpensant de la facon la plus fantaisiste, principalement pour acheter des perles ou des parures.



Chez les Oayana, les hommes recherchent de un a trois mois par an de travail salari sur base de 7,5 NF (3 florins surinamiens) par jour. Chacun d'eux vend 50 a 100 kgs de poisson sec par an, sur la base d'environ 2,50 NF = 1 florin Ie kg.



On doit signaler comme ressource secondaire la vente des chiens dresses pour la chasse.



Depuis quelques annes les Oayana tendent a acheter des moteurs hors-bord pour leur canots, moteurs qu'ils conduisent avec beaucoup de soin et d'adresse. lis travaillent davantage et tendent a conomiser.



Les dpenses courantes sont les perles, les cartouches de chasse; viennent ensuite les ustensiles de mnage, les moustiquaires et les outils.







University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs