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Lithostratigraphic and hydrostratigraphic cross sections through Levy-Marion to Pasco Counties, southwest Florida
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 Material Information
Title: Lithostratigraphic and hydrostratigraphic cross sections through Levy-Marion to Pasco Counties, southwest Florida
Series Title: Open file report
Physical Description: 21 p., 10 folded leaves of plates : ill., map ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Arthur, Jonathan D
Lee, Richard A
Li, Li
Southwest Florida Water Management District (Fla.)
Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: Florida Geological Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 2001
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Geological cross sections -- Florida -- Southwest Florida Water Management District   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Jonathan D. Arthur, Richard A. Lee and Li Li ; Florida Geological Survey, Tallahassee, in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 19-21).
General Note: Florida Geological Survey open file report 81
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 47062012
issn - 1058-1391
System ID: UF00099447:00001

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        Page 30
        Page 31
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        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Acknowledgement
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Back Matter
        Page 39
        Page 40
Full Text












STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
David B. Struhs, Secretary




DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE AND TECHNICAL SERVICES
Edwin J. Conklin, Director



FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Walter Schmidt, State Geologist and Chief





OPEN FILE REPORT 81





LITHOSTRATIGRAPHIC AND HYDROSTRATIGRAPHIC CROSS SECTIONS
THROUGH LEVY-MARION TO PASCO COUNTIES, SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

By

Jonathan D. Arthur, Richard A. Lee and Li Li


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Tallahassee
in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District
2001


ISSN 1058-1391










LITHOSTRATIGRAPHIC AND HYDROSTRATIGRAPHIC CROSS SECTIONS
THROUGH LEVY-MARION TO PASCO COUNTIES, SOUTHWEST FLORIDA


Jonathan D. Arthur' P.G. 1149, Richard A. Lee2 P.G. 956, and Li Li".3

'Florida Geological Survey, Tallahassee, Florida, and 2Southwest Florida Water
Management District, Brooksville, Florida; current address: Schlumberger/GeoQuest, 5599 San
Felipe, Suite 1700, Houston, Texas 77056-2722



INTRODUCTION

A cooperative program exists between the Southwest Florida Water Management District
(SWFWMD) and the Florida Geological Survey (FGS) to construct geologic and hydrogeologic
cross sections throughout the 16 county SWFWMD region. The purpose of the program is to
delineate the extent of lithostratigraphic and hydrostratigraphic units within the region to aid in the
management and protection of ground-water resources. To systematically accomplish these goals,
the project is subdivided into four phases (or study areas): Phase I includes the southwest part of the
District, from Pinellas and Hillsborough to Charlotte Counties; Phase II includes the northwest part
of the District, from Levy and Marion to Pasco Counties (this study); and Phase HI (Arthur and
others, in review) includes the southeastern part of the District, encompassing all areas not covered
in Phases I and 1. Phase I is subdivided into Phase IA (Hillsborough and Pinellas Counties; Green
and others, 1995) and Phase IB (Arthur and others, in review; Manatee, Sarasota, Charlotte
Counties).

Interim reports on each project phase will be released as FGS Open File Reports (OFR).
The present report (Phase II) includes the following counties: Levy, Marion, Citrus, Sumter,
Hernando, Pasco and Polk. Similar reports for the Phase IB and Phase III regions are in
preparation. Eight west-east cross sections and two north-south cross sections through the study
area are presented in this report. The west-east cross sections spanning this region extend inland
from the coast an average of 48 miles. Figure 1 shows locations for cross sections in Plates 1
through 10.

Each cross-section characterizes regional lithostratigraphy of Eocene through Pliocene
formations, formation-specific gamma-ray log responses, and aquifer-system delineation within
each study area. Most of the data used to construct the cross sections were taken from wells drilled
as part of the SWFWMD Regional Observation and Monitor-Well Program (ROMP; Gomberg,
1975). In areas where ROMP data were not available, borehole data from the FGS and the United
States Geological Survey (USGS) were utilized.

CROSS SECTION CONSTRUCTION

Detailed lithologic descriptions, gamma-ray logs and hydrologic data comprise the bulk of
the information used to develop the cross sections shown in Plates 1 through 10. The dominant
sources of information for cross-section control are SWFWMD ROMP wells; FGS wells are
included to fill in appropriate data-point coverage for the cross sections. Where no lithologic data is
available, borehole geophysical logs are used. Of these geophysical logs, gamma-ray logs are the
most readily available and useful for correlative purposes within the study area. Gamma-ray logs
















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are included in the cross sections to allow comparison of the gamma-ray signatures relative to each
stratigraphic unit. The following discussion outlines the methods used for construction of the cross
sections for this study.

Topography

Topographic profiles are included on each cross section to facilitate comparison of surface
relief with subsurface stratigraphy. Data used to construct these profiles were taken from U.S.
Geological Survey 1:24,000 (7.5 minute) quadrangle maps. Land surface profiles are plotted above
the cross sections, along with selected roads, cultural boundaries and landforms.

Lithology

For each well in a cross section, a stratigraphic column is used to represent borehole
lithology. The column is based on either existing descriptions or new descriptions generated for
this report. Hatching patterns depict primary lithologies in the columns, with accessory minerals
shown on the right of the columns as text codes. Each cross section contains a legend that lists
definitions of mineralogic and lithologic codes and patterns. Accessory-mineral codes are generally
the same as those used in the FGS lithologic database (the Well Log Data System; GeoSys, Inc.,
1992). If accessory sand-sized mineral percentages are available from the lithologic descriptions, a
stippled sand pattern is used to denote greater than five percent quartz + phosphate. If the amount
of accessory sand-sized minerals is less than five percent or if the amount is not known based on
existing descriptions, the accessories are listed in the text codes. If the relative abundance of
accessory minerals is known, the mineral text codes are listed in decreasing order of abundance.

Table 1 provides information on borehole location and sample type (e.g., cores, cuttings or
both) available for this study. In general, more detailed lithologic descriptions exist for cores.

Minimum bed thicknesses represented on the stratigraphic columns are five feet due to
graphical constraints. There are several examples where lithologies and accessory minerals have
been averaged over a five to 10 foot interval to accommodate this graphical limitation. Detailed
lithologic descriptions for all wells used in this study are available from the Florida Geological
Survey (www.myflorida.com/environment/downloads/geology/index.html) or the Southwest
Florida Water Management District.

Gamma-ray logs

Gamma-ray logs, when available, are plotted to the right of stratigraphic columns on the
cross sections. These logs are used as a supplement to delineate formation boundaries and allow
comparison of gamma-ray activity between the various lithostratigraphic and hydrostratigraphic
units. The intensity units shown on the logs (horizontal axis) are in counts per second (CPS). Due
to inconsistency between logs with respect to different logging-parameter settings and borehole
characteristics (e.g., depth of casing and lack of caliper logs to determine wash-out of poorly
consolidated units), quantitative comparison of the logs shown in Plates 1 through 10 is not
possible. On the other hand, the logs are very useful for identifying correlative "packages" of
gamma-ray peaks between wells and for comparing gamma-ray signatures between formations.
Relatively high gamma-ray activity is generally correlative with phosphate, organic, heavy
minerals and high-potassium clays. More subtle changes often reflect dolomite and accessory
mineral content.

























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Delineation of boundaries


Formations

For the present study, all available borehole samples were inspected to determine formation
boundaries. Gamma-ray logs and fossil assemblages are used only to supplement the lithologic data
in the determination of the boundaries. Where uncertainty exists regarding the exact position of the
formation boundary, or where the boundary is inferred within an interval of poor or no sample
recovery, a dashed rather than solid line is shown on the cross sections (Plates 1 through 10).
Dashed contacts are also drawn where only a gamma-ray log was used and no samples were
available for inspection. In cases where sample quality is poor, as is sometimes true with cuttings,
the gamma-ray logs become more important in the determination of formation boundaries.

Lithostratigraphic units shown on the cross sections include the Avon Park Formation
through the Hawthorn Group (see Lithostratigraphy). On a regional basis, the post-Hawthorn
Group units are components of the surficial aquifer system. For the purposes of this study, post-
Hawthorn units are depicted as undifferentiated sand and clay (UDSC). Table 2 summarizes
lithostratigraphic data for each well used in the study.

Aquifer systems

Delineated aquifer systems are shown on the cross sections (Plates 1 through 10) as
hydrostratigraphic columns to the left of each lithologic column. Hatching patterns used in the
hydrostratigraphic columns identify the three major aquifer systems present in the study area.
Delineation of the aquifer systems are estimates based on the following: 1) available hydrogeologic
data collected during drilling, 2) water-level differences in monitor-well clusters, 3) hydrogeologic
characteristics of the samples (e.g., estimated porosity and permeability), and 4) correlation to
lithostratigraphic units. A summary of aquifer-system intervals for wells utilized in the cross
sections is given in Table 3. The Hydrostratigraphy section of this report describes hydrogeologic
properties of aquifer systems present in the study area.

LITHOSTRATIGRAPHY

The deepest boreholes used in this study penetrate Middle Eocene lithostratigraphic units.
Following is a discussion of lithologic characteristics of Eocene and younger units (Figure 2) and
their general gamma-ray log characteristics, which are shown in the cross sections (Plates 1 through
10). Table 2 summarizes the tops of these units relative to National Geodetic Vertical Datum of
1929 (NGVD).

Eocene Series

Avon Park Formation

The Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation (Miller, 1986) locally crops out in southern Levy
County and occurs in the subsurface throughout the study area. This unit varies from light gray to
brown dolostone to cream to light-orange limestone with minor clay beds and dispersed organic
laminations. Accessory minerals include chert, pyrite, and gypsum, with gypsum becoming more
abundant with depth. Although the uppermost part of the Avon Park Formation within the study
area varies between limestone and dolostone, dolostone predominates deeper within the unit,















Table 2. Upper boundaries of lithostratigraphic units delineated in cross-sections for this report; datum is
NGVD, units are in feet. All estimated contacts are in parentheses,"-" indicates unit not present;
TD" formation top is below total depth of well.

WELL ID NAME HAWTHORN TAMPA MEMBER SUWANNEE OCALA AVON PARK
GROUP (UNDIFF.) (ARCADIA FM.) LIMESTONE LIMESTONE FORMATION

A-A'

2010 -3
15682 ROMP 131 34 18 -75
15188 ROMP 134 62 -38
1936 93 (-67)
892 91 -74
50094 MR-25 (23) (-83)
8415 -44 TD

B-B'

14519 ROMP 124 -3 -25
15075 (-137)
6903 -2 -32
15643 ROMP 119 51 -24
8883 33 13 -107

C-C'

14885 TR 21-3 (-26) (-69)
720 80 -50
50088 ROMP 113 74 (-53)
10829 (-169)
16617 ROMP 112 34 -31
10622 -58 -118

D-D'

15685 ROMP 108C -6 -171
14917 ROMP 109 143 133 (103) TD
16611 ROMP 110 32 (10)
16311 LP-4 (19) (-2)
16022 ROMP 111 30 -82

E-E'

14873 TR 19-3 (-45) -275
15681 ROMP 105 84 18 -148
4205 (103) 38 -137
15942 (35) -51
50096 ROMP 102 (41) (-110)
12794 65 5 -135

F-F

15649 TR 18-2 2 -138 -278
14673 ROMP 97 (-1) -116 -275
707 25 -35 -200
6556 76 -44 TD
15933 202 85 58 -42 TD
16304 ROMP 99 60 30 -105
14880 ROMP 101 (72) 7
























Table 2. (Continued).


WELL ID NAME HAWTHORN TAMPA MEMBER SUWANNEE OCALA AVON PARK
GROUP (UNDIFF.) (ARCADIA FM.) LIMESTONE LIMESTONE FORMATION

G-G'

14675 TR 17-3 (-21) -251 -426
14046 15 -135 -355
14336 ROMP 93 68 -112 -262
5863 62 -108 -248
15647 ROMP 90 (50) 40 -90
5054 ROMP 89 (73) (-44)
15650 ROMP 88 98 -12

H-H'

16609 TR 16-2A 0 -84 -285 -424
13923 STARKEY MW-1 32 22 -233 -413
14669 ROMP 85 48 -32 -187 -312
662 41 31 -94 TD
14889 ROMP 87 95 20 -145
14389 ROMP 76 95* 70 -150

I-I'

15682 ROMP 131 34 18 -76
15075 (-137)
720 80 -50
15685 ROMP 108C -6 -171
14873 TR 19-3 (-45) -273
15649 TR 18-2 2 -138 -278
14675 TR 17-3 (-21) -251 -426
16609 TR 16-2A 0 -84 -285 -424

J-J'

892 90 -74
15643 ROMP 119 51 -24
16617 ROMP 112 34 -31
16611 ROMP 110 32 (10)
15942 (35) -51
16304 ROMP 99 60 30 -105
662 41 31 -94 TD

*Peace River Formation of the Hawthorn Group.


















Table 3. Estimated upper boundaries of aquifer-system units within the study area; datum is NGVD, units are in feet.
"-" indicates unit not present, "N/A' not applicable, well has gamma-ray log only.

WELL ID NAME SURFICIAL AQUIFER INTERMEDIATE AQUIFER FLORIDAN AQUIFER
SYSTEM SYSTEM/CONFINING UNIT SYSTEM

A-A'

2010 17 -- -3
15682 ROMP 131 72 34 18
15188 ROMP 134 -- -- 62
1936 142 93
892 -- 91
50094 MR-25 N/A N/A N/A
8415 74 --44

B-B'

14519 ROMP 124 -3
15075 73 -- -137
6903 85 -2 -32
15643 ROMP 119 -- 76 51
8883 83 33 13

C-C'

14885 TR 21-3 10 -26
720 170 -- 80
50088 ROMP 113 132 -74
10829 76 -169
16617 ROMP 112 54 -- 34
10622 65 -- -60

D-D'

15685 ROMP 108C -- -6
14917 ROMP 109 158 143 133
16611 ROMP 110 51 32
16311 LP-4 N/A N/A N/A
16022 ROMP 111 57 30

E-E'

14873 TR 19-3 20 -45
15681 ROMP 105 102 84
4205 128 103
15942 64 35
50096 ROMP 102 N/A N/A N/A
12794 125 65 5

F-F'

15649 TR 18-2 2
14673 ROMP 97 -1
707 70 25
6556 106 76
15933 301 202 58
16304 ROMP 99 85 60 30
14880 ROMP 101 101 72


























Table 3. (Continued).

WELL ID NAME SURFICIAL AQUIFER INTERMEDIATE AQUIFER FLORIDAN AQUIFER
SYSTEM SYSTEM/CONFINING UNIT SYSTEM

G-G'

14675 TR 17-3 29 -21
14046 35 15
14336 ROMP 93 78 68
5863 112 62
15647 ROMP 90 75 50
5054 ROMP 89 N/A N/A N/A
15650 ROMP 88 108 -- 98

H-H'

16609 TR 16-2A 35 0
13923 STARKEY MW-1 47 32
14669 ROMP 85 108 48
662 81 41
14889 ROMP 87 110 95
14389 ROMP 76 135 95 70

I-1'

15682 ROMP 131 72 34 18
15075 73 -137
720 170 80
15685 ROMP 108C -6
14873 TR 19-3 20 -45
15649 TR 18-2 2
14675 TR 17-3 29 -21
16609 TR 16-2A 35 0

J-J'

892 91
15643 ROMP 119 76 51
16617 ROMP 112 54 34
16611 ROMP 110 51 32
15942 64 35
16304 ROMP 99 85 61 30
662 81 41



















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especially towards the south. Porosity in this formation is generally intergranular in the limestone
section. Fracture porosity occurs in the more densely recrystallized dolostone, and intercrystalline
porosity is characteristic of sucrosic textures. Pinpoint vugs and fossil molds are present to a lesser
extent. The most diagnostic fossils include the foraminifers Dictyoconus americanus and
Coskinolinafloridana. The echinoid Neolaganum (Peronella) dalli is also common.

The Avon Park Formation is unconformably underlain by the Lower to Middle Eocene
(Braunstein and others, 1988) Oldsmar Limestone. Miller (1986) reports the top of Early Eocene
rocks (the approximate base of Avon Park Formation) at depths ranging from -1,100 feet to -1,850
feet NGVD. The Avon Park Formation varies in thickness across the study area, from 1,000 feet in
Levy County to 1,500 feet in Pasco County (Miller, 1986). In the study area, the top of the
formation ranges from approximately 10 feet above NGVD to a depth of -425 feet NGVD. Several
units unconformably overly the Avon Park Formation, including the Ocala Limestone, the
Hawthorn Group (undifferentiated) and undifferentiated sands and clays.

Gamma-ray log response for the Avon Park Formation is somewhat different from that of
the overlying Ocala Limestone. In general, Avon Park lithologies give rise to a more variable signal
with a slightly higher background count rate. This relative variability is primarily due to variations
in dolomite or organic content. In many cases, high gamma-ray activity at the top of the Avon Park
Formation is due to thin (<2 inches) layers of organic material.

Ocala Limestone

The Upper Eocene Ocala Limestone, first named by Dall and Harris (1892), consists of
white to light-gray to light-orange limestone with a diverse fossil assemblage. More specifically,
the lithology of this formation ranges from a variably chalky wackestone or packstone in the upper
parts to a biogenic packstone to grainstone in the central and lower parts of the unit. Accessory
constituents include organic, clay, dolomite and chert. Porosity is variable within this unit and is
generally moldic and intergranular with occasional macrofossil molds. This formation contains
characteristic fossils such as the foraminifers Lepidocyclina spp., Nummulites (Operculinoides) and
echinoids such as Eupatagus antillarum. Other fossils observed in the unit include mollusks,
bryozoans and corals.

The Ocala Limestone is typically bound by unconformities. Depths to the top of the
formation range from land surface (W-892, for example; well-head elevation = +91 feet NGVD) to
-285 feet NGVD (Plates 8 and 9). Subcrop extent of the Ocala Limestone includes the entire study
area except for southeast Levy and southwest Marion Counties. Analysis of well cuttings and cores
selected for this study indicates that the Ocala Limestone obtains a maximum thickness of 230 feet
(W-14873). These maximum depths and thicknesses occur in regions on the flanks of the Ocala
Platform, which trends south-southeast across the study area.

Gamma-ray logs for the Ocala Limestone consistently exhibit low gamma-ray activity (e.g.,
background-level count rates) and relatively fewer peaks than the overlying units. In some southern
areas, (e.g., W-16609 and W-14669, Plate 8), the Ocala Limestone gamma-ray signature is "quiet"
when compared to the underlying Avon Park Formation and the overlying Suwannee Limestone. In
cases where the Ocala Limestone is dolomitized, the gamma-ray logs may exhibit a slightly higher
and more sporadic signal. Many peaks in the gamma-ray logs correlate with the presence of
organic.









Lower Oligocene Series


Suwannee Limestone

The Lower Oligocene Suwannee Limestone was first identified by Cooke and Mansfield,
(1936). This unit ranges from a light-gray to yellowish-gray packstone to grainstone. These
carbonates are variably moldic with trace amounts of sand and clay within the upper parts. Trace
amounts of chert and organic occur throughout the unit. Fossils in the unit include mollusks,
echinoids (primarily Rhyncholampus gouldii), abundant miliolids and other benthic foraminifers
including Dictyoconus cookei.

This formation unconformably overlies the Ocala Limestone and is unconformably overlain
either by Hawthorn Group units or UDSC sediments. In several areas within the southern part of
the study area, the Suwannee Limestone is less than 20 feet below land surface. The maximum
observed elevation for this unit is +132 feet NGVD (W-14917). This well, located in southern
Citrus County (Plate 4) also marks the approximate northern limit of the Suwannee Limestone in
the study area. Cross sections in this study indicate that this unit is present within southern Citrus,
central Hernando and western and central Pasco Counties. W-14889 in northwest Polk County also
encounters this unit. Although not observed in Sumter County wells, the Suwannee Limestone is
reported to occur as exposed remnant boulders in Sumter County (Campbell, 1989). Elevation of
the Suwannee Limestone ranges from -80 feet NGVD to +132 feet NGVD. The unit thickens to the
south and west, ranging up to 255 feet thick (W-13923, Plate 8).

The Suwannee Limestone is characterized by gamma-ray activity that has an overall higher
count rate than the underlying Ocala Limestone. In addition, there exists much more variability in
its signature relative to the Ocala Limestone. This variability in the gamma-ray signature correlates
with dolomite, clays and organic within the formation. Compared to gamma-ray activity in
overlying Hawthorn Group sediments, the Suwannee Limestone signal is lower and less irregular.

Lower Oligocene to Pliocene Series

Hawthorn Group

Hawthorn Group sediments range in age from Lower Oligocene (Brewster-Wingard and
others, 1997) to Lower Pliocene (Scott, 1988; Covington, 1993) and generally consist of phosphatic
siliciclastics (sands, silts and clays) and carbonates. The Hawthorn Group in the study area consists
of the Arcadia Formation and the Peace River Formation. The Tampa Member of the Arcadia
Formation is also observed in wells in the study area. Hawthorn Group sediments lie
unconformably above the Suwannee Limestone, Ocala Limestone or the Avon Park Formation in
this region.

In the study area, the top of the Hawthorn Group ranges from approximately sea level to
+200 feet NGVD, and ranges in thickness up to 145 feet. Wells used in this study generally
encounter undifferentiated Hawthorn Group siliciclastics within two areas: the eastern edge of the
study area (Plates 2, 5 and 6) and a prominent upland in the region, the Brooksville Ridge, which
trends north-northwest through the center of the study area. Presence of Hawthorn Group
sediments in many wells along the Brooksville Ridge indicates that this upland is underlain by an
erosional remnant of the Hawthorn Group; two examples are W-6903 (Plate 2) and W-15933 (Plate
6).








Arcadia Formation (Tampa Member)


In the study area, all observed occurrences of the Arcadia Formation are part of the Tampa
Member. The Upper Oligocene (Brewster-Wingard and others, 1997) to Lower Miocene Tampa
Member of the Arcadia Formation is white to yellowish gray in color, and ranges from a
wackestone to packstone with varying quartz sand and clay (Scott, 1988). Minor phosphate,
dolomite and chert are also observed. Porosity of this unit is generally intergranular and moldic.

The top of the Tampa Member ranges from zero to +85 feet NGVD, and ranges in
thickness up to 80 feet. The Tampa Member occurs beneath sediments of the UDSC and the
Hawthorn Group (undifferentiated), and is underlain by the Suwannee Limestone. Plates 8 and 9
illustrate the northern limits of this unit, which pinches out in southern Hernando County beneath
the Brooksville Ridge.

Tampa Member gamma-ray activity is variable. It is difficult to distinguish the Tampa
Member from adjacent units in the section when the Tampa Member is thin (e.g., < 15 feet thick).
Gamma-ray activity for thicker occurrences of the Tampa Member, however, can usually be
distinguished from the underlying Suwannee Limestone the Tampa Member has relatively higher,
more variable count rates and more numerous gamma-ray peaks. Relative to the Hawthorn Group
(undifferentiated), the Tampa Member gamma-ray response is generally lower and contains fewer
peaks.

Peace River Formation

The Middle Miocene to Lower Pliocene (Scott, 1988; Covington, 1 93) Peace River
Formation is comprised of yellowish gray to olive gray, interbedded sands, clays and carbonates
with the siliciclastic component being dominant (Scott, 1988). Variable amounts of phosphate
sand and gravel, as well as minor carbonate beds, are interspersed throughout the unit. This
formation was only encountered in one well (W-14389, Plate 8) located in the southeast part of the
study area. The Peace River Formation is 25 feet thick in this well, which lies along the northern
subcrop extent of the unit. Although not well represented in W-14389, the gamma-ray activity in
the Peace River Formation is usually higher and contains one to three strong peaks. These
characteristics readily allow distinction from most underlying units in the region, however, the log
response may be difficult to distinguish from overlying undifferentiated sediments (see
Undifferentiated Sands and Clays).

Post-Hawthorn Group

Undifferentiated Sands and Clays (USDC)

Post-Hawthorn Group sediments occur throughout the study area and range in thickness up
to 125 feet (Plate 2). These undifferentiated sediments are primarily comprised of varying
proportions of sand and clay. Unlike sediments further south in SWFWMD coastal counties, only
one well (ROMP TR 17-3 [W-14675], Plate 7) contains shell fragments in this post-Hawthorn
Group unit. The thickest sections of UDSC are found in cross sections B-B', C-C' and I-I' (Plates
2, 3 and 9) where borehole samples reveal probable infilling of karst features. These features,
which are probably sinkholes, are included in the cross sections to represent karst that is
characteristic of the northern part of the study area. Variable amounts of chert, organic and re-
worked phosphate may occur in UDSC sediments.









Gamma-ray activity is variable in Post-Hawthorn Group sediments. Moderate to strong
peaks are observed in some logs, reflecting concentrations of clay, organic, heavy minerals or re-
worked phosphorite. Sediments without these components have very low gamma-ray responses
(W-16609, Plate 8). This variability limits the use of gamma-ray logs to help delineate UDSC
sediments from underlying units.

HYDROSTRATIGRAPHY

Up to three aquifer systems comprise the hydrostratigraphic framework of the study area
(Figure 2). Nomenclature used herein to describe these aquifer systems is based on
recommendations of the Southeastern Geological Society (1986). The uppermost aquifer is
usually the surficial aquifer system (SAS), however, it may be absent, leaving the Floridan
aquifer system (FAS) exposed, or just below overlying unconsolidated, permeable surficial
deposits. In the latter examples, the FAS is considered "unconfined." The intermediate aquifer
system/intermediate confining unit (IAS/ICU), is discontinuous in the study area and functions
more as a confining unit than an aquifer system in the region. Along the axis of the Brooksville
Ridge, permeable zones locally exist within the IAS/ICU. The IAS/ICU lies between the SAS
and the FAS.

The FAS occurs throughout the state and is often an artesian aquifer system. Artesian
conditions may vary within parts of the study area according to seasonal rainfall. Flowing
artesian conditions exist year-round along parts of coastal Pasco and Hernando Counties (Healy,
1974). Within the study area, the FAS is confined, semi-confined or unconfined, depending on
the permeability of overlying deposits. Aquifer systems and geologic formations typically
correlate with lithostratigraphic boundaries (Figure 2). The relation between lithostratigraphic
and hydrostratigraphic units in the study area is evident in Plates 1 through 10.

Surficial Aquifer System (SAS)

The SAS correlates with Pliocene-Holocene unconsolidated siliciclastics referred to
herein as undifferentiated sand and clay (UDSC) deposits (Plates 1 through 10). Surficial
deposits may be missing, having been eroded away and exposing limestone at the surface (e.g.,
unconfined FAS). In contrast, these same deposits may exceed 100 feet thick where they infill
karst features (including paleosinks represented by W-15075 and W-10829; Plates 2, 3 and 9).
Depending on the composition of infilling sediments, the karst features may provide hydraulic
connection between the SAS and the FAS. Moreover, discontinuous and variably sandy clay
beds near the base of the SAS provide varying degrees of hydraulic separation from subjacent
aquifer systems. As such, it is difficult to characterize large areas as either the SAS or
unconfined FAS.

Delineation of the SAS is based not only on lithologic interpretation but also on water-
level data. For example, ROMP 90 (W-15647) demonstrates a classic example of confinement
between the SAS and the FAS. Water levels measured during drilling rose three feet when the
basal clays of the SAS were fully penetrated and artesian conditions of the FAS took over.

Water levels in paired monitor wells provide valuable information regarding the presence
of a SAS in the absence of an IAS/ICU. FAS water levels in ROMP 93 (W-14336, Plate 7), for
example, are at least five feet lower than SAS water levels (US Geological Survey, 1990)
indicating a well-defined hydraulic separation between the two aquifer systems. Hydrologic data









from ROMP LP-6, located approximately two miles north of cross section D-D' (Figure 1)
indicates that FAS water levels are typically more than one foot above the surficial water table.
Twelve feet of clay and clayey sand provide sufficient confinement between the FAS and SAS at
LP-6.

As noted above, effectiveness of the hydraulic separation between the SAS and the
subjacent FAS varies locally. Water levels in the paired wells LI KD and LI KS (northeast of
W-5054 in G-G'; Figure 1), are nearly indistinguishable, thus indicating poor to no confinement
between the FAS and "water table" levels in surficial sediments (US Geological Survey, 1998).
In local contrast, water levels from the monitor-well pair LI1MM and LI MS (southeast of W-
5054; Figure 1) confirm existence of an SAS because "water-table" elevations may be higher or
lower than the FAS potentiometric surface due to seasonal fluctuations (US Geological Survey,
1998).

Depending on hydraulic conditions and the leakance of the basal SAS clays, the SAS
may recharge the FAS and vice versa. Paired monitor wells with inconsistent trends in water
levels suggest that there may be some degree of confinement of the FAS, either as low
permeability horizons in the base of the SAS or in the uppermost carbonates of the FAS (e.g.,
mudstones/micrites or densely recrystallized zones). The different water levels may also
represent a delayed seasonal recharge response between the SAS and the FAS, which would also
indicate semi-confinement.

In summary, the extent of the SAS in this region is discontinuous due to site-specific
hydrologic and lithologic conditions. In many cases, some degree of hydraulic connection
between the SAS and the FAS exists. In moderate to poorly confined areas, (i.e., a "leaky" or
discontinuous SAS) changes in the FAS potentiometric surface due to pumping may lower water-
table elevations and therefore may affect lake and swamp water levels.

Intermediate Aquifer System/Intermediate Confining Unit (IAS/ICU)

The IAS/ICU includes all permeable or water-bearing units and all confining beds
located beneath the SAS and above the FAS (Duerr and Enos, 1991). Sediments within the
IAS/ICU in this region comprise erosional remnants of the Hawthorn Group, which at one time
probably blanketed the region (Scott, 1988). These remnants function primarily as laterally
discontinuous confining units. Where present, confining beds of the IAS/ICU generally promote
artesian conditions within the FAS. Localized permeable zones exist within the IAS/ICU,
especially along the axis of upland regions. One example located within the Brooksville Ridge,
W-15933, contains relatively permeable sediments within the IAS/ICU. As shown in cross
section C-C' (Plate 3), however, this is a geographically isolated occurrence.

The IAS/ICU sediments represented in the cross sections are comprised of interbedded
siliciclastics of the Peace River Formation (W-14389, Plate 8), and the undifferentiated
Hawthorn Group (W-15682, Plate 1; W-6903 and W-8883, Plate 2; W-12794, Plate 5; W-16304,
Plate 6). In some areas (W-15933, Plate 6), the Tampa Member contains relatively higher
amounts of clay and has a relatively lower permeability than the underlying Suwannee
Limestone. Where these characteristics exist, the Tampa Member is not hydraulically well-
connected to the FAS and is considered part of the IAS/ICU. Within the study area, the top of
the ICU ranges from almost 200 feet above NGVD (W-15933, Plate 6) in Pasco County to just
below NGVD (Plate 2, W-6903) in Marion County. Thickness of the ICU ranges from less than
10 feet (W-50088, Plate 3 and W-15650, Plate 7) to more than 140 feet (W-15933, Plate 6).









Floridan Aquifer System (FAS)


The FAS underlies all of Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina.
The FAS is divided into the "Upper" and "Lower Floridan Aquifer," generally separated by
unnamed middle confining units (Miller, 1986, 1997). The upper FAS (i.e., "Upper Floridan
Aquifer") supplies the region with potable water and varies from unconfined to confined,
depending on the thickness and composition of the overlying sediments. The thickness of the
upper FAS in the study area ranges from 600 feet to over 1400 feet (Wolansky and Garbode,
1981). The top of the FAS is typically considered the uppermost occurrence of vertically
persistent permeable carbonates below the siliciclastics of the IAS/ICU or SAS. The highest
elevation of the FAS based on wells presented in this report is 133 feet above NGVD. The lower
extent of the upper FAS occurs within the lower Avon Park Formation, where vertically and
laterally persistent evaporite minerals (gypsum and anhydrite) are present in the carbonate rocks
(Ryder, 1985). These evaporites, which occur either as beds, vug fillings, or as intergranular
minerals within the carbonate matrix, result in a significant decrease in permeability. Referred to
as the "middle confining unit" of the FAS, these evaporites are of regional extent (Hickey, 1990).
Wells included in this study generally do not extend into the middle confining unit or the lower
FAS (i.e., "Lower Floridan Aquifer"). The top of the middle confining unit, however, may be
represented by the gypsum observed in W-16611 and W-15649 (Plates 4, 6, 9 and 10) near the
base of the Avon Park Formation.

In the study area, the upper FAS (Plates 1 through 10) typically consists of the Avon
Park Formation, Ocala Limestone and Suwannee Limestone. Hydrogeologic data, however,
suggest that in Pasco County (Plate 8) the Tampa Member is hydraulically connected to the FAS.
For example, water levels measured at W-16609 (Plates 8 and 9) changed very little while coring
through the Tampa Member into the Suwannee Limestone (DeWitt, 1990). Immediately south of
the study area, in Hillsborough and Manatee Counties, the Tampa Member comprises the upper
part of the FAS (Green and others, 1995).

Carbonates of the FAS occur at or near the surface in the north part of the study area and
dip gently to the south-southeast. Confinement of the FAS in the northern region varies from
confined to semi-confined (see Surficial Aquifer System section) to unconfined. Sediments
overlying the FAS in the north part of the study area are primarily UDSC. Hydrologic data from
wells in this region document the unconfined nature of the FAS. For example, water levels in
FAS and shallow monitor wells at site ROMP LP-4 (W-16311, Plate 4) exhibit nearly identical
elevations, suggesting that an unconfined FAS is present. Along the Brooksville Ridge and the
eastern part of the study area, undifferentiated Hawthorn Group deposits comprise the IAS/ICU
and provide increased confinement of the FAS. Karst features, such as sinkholes (and
paleosinks) breach areas where clay deposits may otherwise have provided confinement of the
underlying limestones (e.g., Plates 2, 3 and 9; Trommer, 1987).

In summary, the present study area is a region containing major stratigraphic changes
due to erosion (including numerous karst features), non-deposition and re-worked sediments. As
a result, determination of whether a particular well or area can be characterized as "unconfined
FAS" or "SAS overlying FAS" is difficult. Aquifer system delineation can become more
complicated when one takes into account the regional aspect of the definition of aquifer system,
which states, in part, "... permeable and less permeable material that acts as a water-yielding
hydraulic unit of regional extent" (Bates and Jackson, 1987). In the study area, the SAS and the
IAS/ICU are not laterally continuous. For the purpose of this investigation we have delineated









aquifer systems on the basis of local hydrogeologic characteristics and correlation with
lithostratigraphy. This may be a topic worthy of further study or discussion as the hydrogeologic-
unit definitions in Florida are refined and perhaps redefined.



References

Arthur, J.D., O'Sullivan, M., Clayton, J., and Werner, C., (in review), Lithostratigraphic and
hydrostratigraphic cross sections through Charlotte, De Soto, Hardee, Highlands and
Polk Counties, Florida: Florida Geological Survey Open File Report, 23 p.

Arthur, J.D., Werner, C., Thompson, D., and Green, R., (in review), Lithostratigraphic and
hydrostratigraphic cross sections through Charlotte, Manatee and Sarasota Counties,
Florida: Florida Geological Survey Open File Report, 24 p.

Bates, R.L., and Jackson, J.A., 1987, Glossary of Geology: American Geological Institute,
Alexandria, Virginia, 788 p.

Braunstein, J., Huddleston, P., and Biel, R. (eds.), 1988, Gulf Coast Region: Correlation of
stratigraphic units in North America (COSUNA) project, Tulsa, American Association of
Petroleum Geologists.

Brewster-Wingard, G.L., Scott, T.M., Edwards, L.E., Weedman, S.D., and Simmons, K.R., 1997,
Reinterpretation of the peninsular Florida Oligocene: A multidisciplinary view:
Sedimentary Geology, volume 108, p. 207-228.

Campbell, K.M., 1989, Geology of Sumter County: Florida Geological Survey Report of
Investigation No. 98, 28 p.

Cooke, C.W., and Mansfield, W.C., 1936, Suwannee Limestone of Florida: Geological Society
of America Proceedings, p. 71-72.

Covington, J.M., 1993, Neogene nannofossils of Florida in Zullo, V.A. and others, (eds.), The
Neogene of Florida and adjacent regions: Florida Geological Survey Special Publication
37,112 p.

Dall, W.H., and Harris, G.D., 1892, Correlation papers-Neocene: U. S. Geological Survey
Bulletin 84, 349 p.

Duerr, A.D., and Enos, G.M., 1991, Hydrogeology of the intermediate aquifer system and upper
Floridan aquifer, Hardee and De Soto Counties, Florida: US Geological Survey Water
Resources Investigations Report 90-4104,46 p.

DeWitt, D.J., 1990, ROMP TR16-2 Van Buren Road Monitor Wellsite, Pasco County, Executive
Summary: Southwest Florida Water Management District, unpublished report.

GeoSys, Inc., 1992, The Well Log Data System, version 3.0: Dr. Robert Lindquist, 1215 N.E.
17h Ave., Gainesville, Fl, 32609.










References (continued)


Gomberg, D.N., 1975, Regional Observation and Monitor-Well Program'(ROMP): Purpose and
Plan: Southwest Florida Water Management District, 37 p.

Green, R., Arthur, J.D., and DeWitt, D., 1995, Lithostratigraphic and hydrostratigraphic cross
sections through Hillsborough and Pinellas Counties, Florida: Florida Geological Survey
Open File Report 61, 27 p.

Healy, H.G., 1974, Potentiometric surface and areas of artesian flow of the Floridan aquifer
system, May, 1974: Florida Geological Survey Map Series Number 73.

Hickey, J.J., 1990, Assessment of the Flow of Variable Salinity Groundwater in the Middle
Confining Unit of the Floridan Aquifer System, West Central Florida: United States
Geological Survey Water Resource Investigation 89-4142.

Miller, J.A., 1986, Hydrogeologic Framework of the Floridan Aquifer System in Florida and in
Parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina: United States Geological Survey Profes-
sional Paper 1403-B, 91 p.

Miller, J.A., 1997, Hydrogeology of Florida, in Randazzo, A.F., and Jones, D.S., eds., The
Geology of Florida, Gainesville, Florida: University Press of Florida p. 69-88.

Missimer, T.M., McNeill, D.F., Ginsberg, R.N., Muller, P.A., Covington, J.M., and Scott, T.M.,
1994, Cenozoic record of global sea-level events in the Hawthorn Group and the
Tamiami Formation of the Florida Platform [abs]: Geological Society of America
Abstracts with Programs, volume 26, number 7, p. A-151.

Ryder, P.D., 1985, Hydrology of the Floridan Aquifer System in West-Central Florida: United
States Geological Survey Professional Paper 1403-F, 63 p.

Scott, T.M., 1988, The Lithostratigraphy of the Hawthorn Group (Miocene) of Florida: Florida
Geological Survey Bulletin 59, 148 p.

Scott, T.M., Wingard, G.L., Weedman, S.D., and Edwards, L.E., 1994, Reinterpretation of the
peninsular Florida Oligocene A multidisciplinary view [abs]: Geological Society of
America Abstracts with Programs, volume 26, number 7, p. A-151.

Southeastern Geological Society Ad Hoc Committee on Florida Hydrogeologic Unit Definition,
1986, Hydrogeological Units of Florida: Florida Geological Survey Special Publication
28, 8 p.

Trommer, J.T., 1987, Potential for Pollution of the Upper Floridan Aquifer from Five Sinkholes
and an Internally Drained Basin in West-Central Florida: United States Geological
Survey Water Resource Investigation 87-4013, 103 p.
-4
United States Geological Survey, 1990, Water Resources Data Florida, Water Year 1990,
Volume 3B. Southwest Florida Ground Water: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data
Report FL-90-3B, 241 p.























References (continued)


United States Geological Survey, 1993, Water Resources Data Florida, Water Year 1993,
Volume IB. Northeast Florida Ground Water: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data
Report FL-93-1B, 296 p.

United States Geological Survey, 1998, Water Resources Data Florida, Water Year 1998,
Volume 3B. Southwest Florida Ground Water: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data
Report FL-98-3B, 323 p.

White, W.A., 1970, The geomorphology of the Florida peninsula: Florida Geological Survey
Bulletin 41, 92 p.

Wingard, G.L., Sugarman, P.J., Edwards, L.E., McCarten, L. and Feigenson, M.D., 1993,
Biostratigraphy and chronostratigraphy of the area between Sarasota and Lake
Okeechobee, southern Florida An integrated approach: Geological Society of America
Abstracts with Programs, volume 25, number 4, p. 78.

Wingard, G.L., Weedman, S.D., Scott, T.M., Edwards, L.E., and Green, R.C., 1994, Preliminary
analysis of integrated stratigraphic data from the South Venice Corehole, Sarasota
County, Florida: US Geological Survey Open File Report 95-3, 129 p.

Wolanski, R.M., and Garbode, J.M., 1981, Generalized Thickness of the Floridan Aquifer,
Southwest Florida Water Management District: United States Geological Survey Open
File Report 80-1288, scale 1:500,000.
















Plate 1. Cross section A A'

Levy and Marion Counties


R18E R19E


RI9E R20E


R2OEIR21E


R21E R22E


ROMP 134 W-1936 W-892 MR-25
W-15188 W-50094


0


HAWTHORN GROUP.
UNDIFF.

NO SPL




L.O

M.D.O
M.D.O
M.D.O




AVON PARK
FORMATION












[ T.D. 2173' BLS ]


50


to1


GAA (CPS)
G*MMA (CPS)


c.o.1 UDSC




mc OCALA
."s.l LIMESTONE




.Rc.I
M.R.I.C





M..CRI

M.R.I
M.R.I
M.R / AVON PARK
MR FORMATION
M.R

M. I

M.C ,Ch


150 -



100 -



50 -



0



- 50 -



-100



- 150-



-200



-250-



- 300 -



-350-



-400-



-450 -



-500



-550-


M
M







D.LM
M




M,D
M.D
M
U


I.p
c.I UDSC
C.S.I.H
c.S.I
L,M.C.I
M
M.R
M.R
M.R OCALA
M.R
M.R LIMESTONE
M.R
M.R
M.R
M.R
M.R
U.R
MR


NO SPL
o0
AVON PARK
FORMATION


0 100 200

GAMMA (CPS)




M.R UDS
M.R
M.R
MR -_- - -
M.R
M.R
M.R
M.R OCALA
R.R LIMESTONE
M,R

M.R.D


[ T.D. 400' BLS ]


- 40




20




0




- 20




- 40





L-60
- 60




-- s80




- -100


CI.






.p..Py


M
""\
: -


AVON PARK
FORMATION


COMMENTS


PHOSPHATE GRAVEL
PHOSPHATE SAND
ORGANIC
SPAR
IRON STAIN N
QUARTZ
ANHYDRITE
CHERT


1O S


T SILT
C CLAY
Sh SHELL
D DOLOSTONE
L LIMESTONE
H HEAVY MINERALS
SPL NO SAMPLE
G GYPSUM
Py PYRITE


CLAY CHERT SHELL BED GYPSUM

SEE TEXT FOR DISCUSSION OF UNCONFINED
FLORIDAN AQUIFER SYSTEM


-240


HORIZONTAL SCALE

MILES
0 0.5 1 2 3 4 5


00.51 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
KILOMETERS


[VERTICAL EXAGGERATION IS APPROXIMATELY
157.6 TIMES HORIZONTAL SCALE


- 850 -260


--260


WEST


RI6EIR17E


6r




40




20


RI7E R18E


0-- 0

- 25 10


FEET METERS

200 60


W-2010


R22EIR23E


ROMP 131
W-15682


EAST
A


W-8415


EXPLANATION


HATCHING PATTERNS

LIMESTONE

SURFCt


GRAVEL FINE MEDIUM COARSE

LOSTONE INTERMEDIATE
/ OLOSOAQUIFER SYSTEM/
CONFINING UNIT


FLORIDAN
SAND FINE MEDIUM COARSE AOUIFERM
SYSTEM
/---INTERBEDDEO LIMESTONE AND DOLOSTONE--




SILT FINE MEDIUM COARSE


200-- 60



150-
40


100-

20
50 -



0 0 -

25 10


FEET METERS

200 60


[ T.D. 1185' BLS ]


50


0o


-100-



-150


-200 -60


-250 -



-300


-750 -



-800



-850


-400



-450 -



-500 -



-550



-600


--180


-650 -200


-700-



-750



-800-


~~';'~~'''''''~~'
LFIISLtlCn
,~f . . '.I 11 I1


.. .


~i~:~i~i~i














RI6EIR17E

WEST

B 93 TEN MILE

CREEK











ROMP 124
W-14519


Plate 2. Cross section B B'

Levy and Marion Counties
R17EIR18E R18EIR19E RI1EIR20E


R20EIR21E


W-15075 W-6903 ROMP 119

W-15643


PROBABLE
SINKHOLE FILL


0 25 50

c AMMA (CPS)


UDSC


HORIZONTAL SCALE

MILES
0 0.5 1 2 3 4 5

iI I I I ,I I I I I I I
00.51 2 3 4 4 6 7 8

KILOMETERS

VERTICAL EXAGGERATION IS APPROXIMATELY
125.7 TIMES HORIZONTAL SCALE


0 25 50

GAM (CP
cus (cPs)


C/

c



c
c
c
c
C


cC.O.p




M.D
L


UDSC




/


NO SPL


AVON PARK
FORMATION


S .H

CHc UDSC


S OCALA
LIMESTONE


M.R.Py HAWTHORN GROUP
M.R UNDIFF.
M
M.Py

Py

SAVON PARK
FORMATION


C.Ch
- UDSC






LIMESTONE
M.C.S,.O

M.R.S.O.O
R.M.S
M.R.S.D
S D
NO SPt
u~o _
0




D AVON PARK
L.o.O FORMATION
DS.Ch
M.D.O.Ch
M.O.Ch.O
M.SD.Ch
D.Ch
O.M.DCh
.DO.S.O

M.D
M.D.Ch.C.O
M.D.Ch.S
U.D
M.O.C.Py
M.O.O.C.h


C.H
C.H
C.H
HAWTHORN
Mch
GROUP
UNDIFF.

u



M





R
R


NO SPL


20




- 20


~~ g







i~;~ j









UMNCS


GRAVEL


HATCHING PATTERNS

LIMESTONE C




FINE MEDIUM COARSE


COMMENTS


SAUIFER
SYSTEM


INTERMEDIATE
DOLOSTONE OR AD Nr
CONFINING UNIT


SAND FINE MEDIUM COARSE FLODFA
SYSTEM
-- INTERBEDDED LIMESTONE AND DOLOSTONE----




SILT FINE MEDIUM COARSE


CLAY CHERT SHELL BED GYPSUM

SSEE TEXT FOR DISCUSSION OF UNCONFINEO
FLORIDAN AQUIFER SYSTEM


M MICRITE T
S SAND C
P PHOSPHATE RAVEL Sh
p PHOSPHATE SAND D
O ORGANIC L
R SPAR H
I IRON STAIN NO SPL
0 OUARTZ C
A ANIMORITE Py
Ch CHERT


SILT
CLAY
SHELL
OOLOSTONE
UMESTONE
HEAVY MINERALS
NO SAMPLE
GYPSUM
PYRITE


- 20


150 -



100-



50-

o-

0



- O-


- CET

FEET METERS


NO SPL


NO SPL



NO 5PL

NO SPL

NO SPL

NO SPL



NO SPL



NO SPL


R21EIR22E

(0


SEASORO
COAMSTUNE
RR
EAST

B'


150 -


I(X


100 -


- 150-


-200- 60


W-8883


- 250 -



-300 -



- 350 -


FEET METERS


- -80




-100


150 -


-400 -120


0 --


- -180


ISO -


- 200 -+- -


- 250 -


-650 1- -200


-700 -



-750



-800 -


-850 + -260


--280




-300


-O000 J


-500 -



-550



-600 -


- 650 -
-200


- 700





-750

-800


- 850 -260


-900-



- 950



-1000-


- -280




-300


L.


EXPLANATION


S . ..... .











Plate 3. Cross section C C'

Citrus and Sumter Counties


R19I R20E


R20EIR21E


R21E R22E


R22ER23E EAST

C'


WEST

C


















TR 21-3
W-14885


U:DSC -:':-- : --:-

GAMMA LOG
(NO SCALE
AVAILABLE)


NO SPL OCALA
.^ - LIMESTONE ' .''.

:.R
M.R.0
I-:-








M.R
UUDC
" o . s O











u AVON PARK
M.R.O.o FORMATION

M.R
O.L

M
M



0
U
M.O
Ch.O.CG
O


150 -



100 -



50 -



0







-100-



-150



-200


--25
-250 -



-300
- 3-



-350
s



-400-


--45




-500 -



-550-



-600 -


P.,
I.C
C
C.I
C.,

C.,

U.R.Py
M.R
M.R
M.R
M.R
M.R
M.R.Py
M.R
M:R.I.Ch
M.R.I
M.R.y

M.R.O.I.0
M.R.O.0
R
R
R.O
R.O
C


25 50 75
I I I
(GAMMA CPS)




MC ---- -
M.C





MC









AVON PARK
FORMATION


PROBABLE

SINKHOLE FILL


C


/C.
C.H i


c
C
C.H






M


EXPLANATION


[jjjjjjLL.ISURFICIAL
SAIFER
'SYS STEM
GRAVEL FINE MEDIUM COARSE YS

O ~sTONF FLORIDAN
D/LOSTONE AQUIFER
S/ SYSTEM



SAND FINE MEDIUM COARSE


---- INTERBEDOOED LIMESTONE AND DOLOSTONE----




FINE MEDIUM COARSE


CLAY CHERT SHELL BED GYPSUM


COMMENTS


M MICRITE
S SAND
P PHOSPHATE GRAVEL
p PHOSPHATE SAND
0 ORGANIC
R SPAR


I IRON STAIN
0 QUARTZ
A ANHYDRITE
Ch CHERT


T SILT
C CLAY
Sh SHELL
D DOLOSTONE
L LIMESTONE
H HEAVY MINERAL


NO SPL
G
Py
J


UDSC
























I

'--21



















S


NO SAMPLE
GYPSUM
PYRITE
MICA


HORIZONTAL SCALE
MILES
0 0.5 1 2 3 4 5
i I I I II I II I I j I

00.5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
KILOMETERS

VERTICAL EXAGGERATION IS APPROXIMATELY]
119.1 TIMES HORIZONTAL SCALE


0 50 100 150 200
I I I I I
GAMMA (CPS)
C.1.0



M.R UDSC

M:.R
M.R 0 OC
:.o 0 LIMESTONE A
M.O.D

:.o









AVON PARK
FORMATION


NO SPL

NO SPL

T.C





0
C.O.py




Ch
O.R.Ch
R.Ch
R.Ch.O


O.R
M.R.0
R.G
R.Q
R
R


R17E IRIE


200-







100-

75-
50-

25-
0-


- 25 -
0-

-25


60


50

40


30

20

10


0

- 10


R18EIRI9E


s


W-720 ROMP 113 W-10829 ROMP 112
W-50088 w-1if17


FEET METERS

200 60


200-

175-

150-

125-

100-

75 -

50-

25-

0-

- 25-


30

20

10

0 -

- 10


W-10622


HATCHING PATTERNS

LIMESTONE


FEET METERS

200 -- 60


0




20







-so

Ls


- 50

-80





-100




K -120




--140




- -160




- -180


150-



10 -


0


40




20




0




- 20




- 40


- 50-



-100



-150


- 650 -200


-200 +- -60


SILT


H.C
CJ
H.I
C.p
O.Py
C.I
C.I
C.P.J
C.PAJ
C.p.J
-oJ
C.J
C.Py.J



U.RM
M.R.Sh
M.R

M.R
M.R
M.O.Py
M.O.Py
M.O
M.R.I.Sh
M
M.O.Sh
M.R.Sh
R.M
R.M
R.ISh



0.0

NO SPl

M.O.I.O
I.O.Py
1.0
M.I
U.1
MJ.O
M.O.Ch
M.I
M.O.Ch.I
M.Ch.0.I
.OQ.Ch.l
Ch.O.O.Sh.1
M.Ch.O.l.Sh
U.Ch.OJ.Sh
O.Ch.LPy

Ch.O.LO
0.Ch.1
0.1
0.1
O.Ch
O.I.Ch.O


-700



-750



-800


-250



-300



-350


--220




- -240


-- 0




-100




- -120




-140


---------
~~~:%~%'-:



~'C:~:~'.~'.~-'.-:
:::~'--',-
-.-.-. .-.-..




I


I


1 z






















- ^


- -220




- -240


- 750 -



-800-


YV 1V 001#


-550


-650



- 700


.


''''


.... ...


; : 8; : :; .-



, . , .


..................




















R20E R2E


CITRUS CO. I SUMMER CO.


R21E I R22E
TSALA WITHALCOOCHEE
TSALA RIVER
APOPKA RER
LAKE I JUNIPER
CREEK
S SWAMP


ROMP 109
W-14917 ROMP 110 ROMP LP-4
W-16611 W-16311


ROMP 111
W-16022


80


250 -


HAWTHORN GROUP









UDSC

o M
M.C
.c
S.o OCALA
LIMESTONE




M -
S M.I.T.C,D

M.D
M.L
SMJ.T.R AVON PARK
M .,T.I FORMATION

m M.
M.R


EXPLANATION

HATCHING PATTERNS

LIMESTONE


AQUIFERR
SYSTEM
GRAVEL FINE MEDIUM COARSE

DOLOSTONE INTERMEDIATE
,f__ _-_L_--_T_-_--_\ \\ AQUIFER SYSTEM/
CONFINING UNIT

FLORIDAN
SAND FINE MEDIUM COARSE AQUIFER
SYSTEM
,-- INTFRBEDEFD LIMESTONE An D OOSTOINF-


SILT


FINE MEDIUM COARSE


CLAY CHERT SHELL BED


GYPSUM


SSEE TEXT FOR DISCUSSION OF UNCONFINED
FLORIDAN AQUIFER SYSTEM


co~


M MICRITE
S SAND
P PHOSPHATE GR
p PHOSPHATE SA
0 ORGANIC
R SPAR
I IRON STAIN
0 QUARTZ
A ANHYORITE
Ch CHERT


HORIZONTAL SCALE

MILES
0 0.5 1 2 3
l I I ,I I I I ,

00.5 1 2 3 4 5
KILOMETERS


150 -


I.S.L

M.C.I.Ch


SUWANNEE UDSC
LIMESTONE
C.i.O.Ch

OCALA
LIMESTONE


M.D
M.D
M.D

M.D.R.I






AVON PARK
FORMATION










MOMENTS


T SILT
C CLAY
AVEL Sh SHELL
ND D DOLOSTONE
L LIMESTONE
H HEAVY MINERALS
NO SPL NO SAMPLE
G GYPSUM
Py PYRITE


0 50 100
I 0 50 100
GAMMA (CPS) I I I
GAMMA (CPS)
o UDSC


.M
0
0


0

AVON PARK
FORMATION











0

O.M

0
0
O.G.M

M
,. Ch,0.
O.R.G
8:G.P,
G
G.O.R


0 100 200100 -
II I
GAMMA (CPS)
S, UDSC
C.l eso


-150


-200 -- -60


AVON PARK
FORMATION


-400 -- -120


- 450 -



-500 -



-550 -



-600



-650



- 700



-750



-800


4 5


6 7 8


VERTICAL EXAGGERATION IS APPROXIMATELY
107.4 TIMES HORIZONTAL SCALE


WEST


300-

250 -

200 -

150-

100-

50 -

0-

- 50-


100

80

60

40


20

0


- 20


R17E RISE 8


ID &


Plate 4. Cross section D D'

Citrus and Sumter Counties


RISE I RI9E

491


FEET METERS

1 00
300


R19E I R20E


ROMP 108 C
W-15685


250 -


200 60


150 -


40


20

FEET METERS
3 100
300


-200 -- -60


200 -L


-250 -



-300 -



- 350 -


--100


-400 -120


-450 -



-500 -



-550 -



-600 -


--180


- 650 -200


- 700 -



-750



-00-


--220




- -240


S i M.R

M.R
M.R."D OCALA
M.R LIMESTONE
M.R.D



S i M.R.C.O
R
S ,M.C.R.O


I
I


;1:


LI LIMONITE











Plate 5. Cross section E E'

Hernando, Sumter, and Lake Counties


WEST

E


R17EIR18E R18EJR19E R19EIR20E


f^


MUNDEN


275
80
250

225 -- 70

200- 60

175
50
150-

125-- 40

100-- 30

75 -
20
50-
5-- 10

0 -- 0

0 10

FEET METERS

150


HORIZONTAL SCALE
MILES
0 0.5 1 2 3 4 5


00.51 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

KILOMETERS
VERTICAL EXAGGERATION IS APPROXIMATELY]
134.8 TIMES HORIZONTAL SCALE


R20EIR2IE R21EIR22E R22EIR23E R23EIR24E







is UTTLE ATLANTIC @
SEABOARD 8 WITHLACOOCHEE COASTUNE
...-.....-- ICOASTUNE 8 RIVER RR I


W-4205 W-15942 ROMP 102
SW-50096


| 0 25 50 75


o s GAMMA (CPS)


W-12794


COMMENTS


40




20




0




20




- 40





-60




S- 80




- -100




- -120




- -140




- -160


MICRITE T SILT
SAND C CLAY
PHOSPHATE GRAVEL Sh SHELL
PHOSPHATE SAN D 0 OLOSTONE
ORGANIC L LIMESTONE
SPAR H HEAVY MINERALS
IRON STAIN NO SPL NO SAMPLE
QUARTZ G GYPSUM
ANHYDRITE y PYRITE
CHERT


* CONTACT IS DASHED BASED ON INSPECTION OF DRILLER'S LOG


CLAY CHERT SHELLED GYPSUM
CLAY CHERT SHELL BED GYPSUM


-80O


TR 19-3 ROMP 105
W-14873 W-15681


275 -
80
250-

225 70

200- 60

175-



125-- 40

100-- 30

75-
20
50-
10
25-

0-- 0

- 10

FEET METERS

150


L-r SULRFICAL

. ,SYSTEM
GRAVEL FINE MEDIUM COARSE T

DZLO N nI INTERMEDIATE
OLOSTONEAUIFER SYSTEM/
CONFINING UNIT


FLORIDAN
SAND FINE MEDIUM COARSE AQUIFER
SYSTEM
_iMT enrffcrn i lUreCmr sn M aTcmir


100 -



50 -



0



-50-



-100-



-150 -



- 200 -



-250-



-300 -



-350 -



-400-



-450 -



-500 -



-550 -


40




20




0




-- 20




- 40


100 -



50 -



0-



- 50



- 100 -



-150


-180
-600 -



-650-- -200


-200 -t -so


-700



-750



-8-


-250 -



-300



-350-


- -220




- -240


-400 -20


-450



-500



-550-



-600-


-6 -[ -200


--220




- -240











Plate 6. Cross section F F'

Hernando, Pasco, Sumter, and Lake Counties


RI7EIRIBE


RI8EIRI9E


R19EIR20E


BROOKSVILLE AIRPORT


HUNTER'S LAKE


R21E R22E
@


100
300

250 -

200-- 60

150-
40


20
So
0 0




FEET METERS


00 oo


250 -



200 6 O


UDSC
0 50 100
0 25 50 1 I
G AMMA (CPS) O.I
GAMMA (CPS) : | ..H


M.R.D
M.R.D.Py
M.R.0
M.R.O


AVON PARK
FORMATION


AVON PARK
FORMATION


AVON PARK
FORMATION


EXPLANATION

HATCHING PATTERNS

LIMESTONE
SURGICAL
SSTE

GRAVEL FINE MEDIUM COARSE
INTERMEDIATE
OLOSTONEAUIFER SYSTEM/
t LOONFINING UNIT


SFLORIDAN
SAND FINE MEDIUM COARSE AQUIFER

-- INTERBEDDED LIMESTONE AND DOLOSTONE-- -SY




SILT FINE MEDIUM COARSE


COMMENTS


R22EIR23E


R23E Ra4E


EAST

F'


ROMP 101
V-14880


100 150 200

GAMMA (CPS) UDSC


AVON PARK
FORMATION


NO SCALE AVAILABLE


HORIZONTAL SCALE
MILES
0 0.5 1 2 3 4 5

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 78


M MICRITE T SILT KILOMETERS
S SAND C CLAY VERTICAL EXAGGERATION IS APPROXIMATELY
P PHOSPHATE GRAVEL Sh SHELL 162.5 TIMES HORIZONTAL SCALE
p PHOSPHATE SAND D OOLOSTONE
O ORGANIC L LIMESTONE
R SPAR H HEAVY MINERALS
I IRON STAIN NO SPL NO SAMPLE
0 OUARTZ C GYPSUM
A ANHYDRITE Py PYRITE
Ch CHERT

.OVERLAPPING LOGS FOR THIS
INTERVAL OMITTED


CLAY CHERT SHELL BED GYPSUM
SEE TEXT FOR DISCUSSION OF UNCONFINED
FLORIDAN AOUIFER SYSTEM


WEST


ROMP 97 V-707 V-6556 W-15933 ROMP 99
W-14673 V-16304


TR 18-2
W-15649


300-

250-

200- so

ISO-
40

100-
20
50 0
o- 0
- 50
20

FEET METERS
100



00
250


- 200 60


200-L


- -100


-160


- 350


-500


-550 -


- 200 -6


00 -120
-- 400-


- 450 -



-500 -



- 550 -














- 750 -


-240











WEST

G R
R16EI R17E


Plate 7. Cross section G G'

Pasco, Sumter, and Polk Counties


R17E RISE


CREWS
BEE TREE LAKE
POND ,


R23E R24E


GREEN SWAMP


TR 17-3
W-14675







NO SCALE AVAILAB
FOR LOG


W-14046 ROMP 93 W-5863 ROMP
W-14336 W-15



0 100 200
G A PC


LE


Sh

C.I.Sh

M.S
U
M


U.R

U. _





MR.D



M.R
M
M.M
M
NO SPL

M


M.D

NO SP
M.D
M.D
U
0


UDSC

CHI
C.M.R
M.R
MR
M
M.R
SSUWANNEE
LIMESTONE
M
M




M
M






M OCALA
M LIMESTONE
M



M ,
M















M.R.O
M
M, R
M.s
M.R






M.R.Py


AVON PARK
FORMATION


150


100



50 -


0-


- 50 -


-100 -


- 150 -
o








-200


-250-


-300 -


-350-


-400 -
~










- 450
o








-500 -


-550-


-600-


C UDSC

M.R
M.R

M" SUWANNEE
M.R.C.I LIMESTONE


MU.R

1.


- 40




- 20




- 0



- 20




- 40




- -60




- -10




- -100



- -120




- -140


c UDSC

M
SUWANNEE
M.R LIMESTONE
M.R.S

M




LIMESTONE

M.R


M.R
M.R
MR
M,R

M.R.Py
M.C
M

NO SPL
Ch
M
M
M
U AVON PARK
MD FORMATION
M.O
M
M.D
M.D


* NOTE:
THIN (LESS THAN 10') BED OF
POSSIBLE TAMPA MEMBER
OF HAWTHORN GROUP
PRESENT IN THIS WELL


L- 20

FEET METERS


ROMP 88
W-15650


UDSC











in










1 1 1


0 40 80
| I I
GAMMA (CPS)
C.I.Ch
M.C.S.Ch
M.Ch
U
M.C
M.p.C.Py.R


M.D
M.D
M.Ch.l
NO SPL

M.R

U.R


M.R.T.O



M.D

M


* DENOTES SHIFT BACK TO BASELINE.


LIMESTONE



GRAVEL FINE MEDIUM COARSE

OOLOSTONE



SAND FINE MEDIUM COARSE

-- INTERBEDDED LIMESTONE AND DOLOSTONE---



SILT FINE MEDIUM COARSE


-650 -200


HORIZONTAL SCALE


COMMENTS


SURFICIAL
AQUIFER
SYSTEM


SFLORIDAN
LAQUIFER
SYSTEM
".IC


M MICRITE
S SAND
P PHOSPHATE GRAVEL
p PHOSPHATE SAND
0 ORGANIC
R SPAR
I IRON STAIN N
O QUARTZ
A ANHYDRITE
Ch CHERT


T SILT
C CLAY


Sh

L0
L
H
1O SPL
G
Py


SHELL
DOLOSTONE
LIMESTONE
HEAVY MINERALS
NO SAMPLE
GYPSUM
PYRITE


0 0.5 1 2 3 4 5

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

KILOMETERS



VERTICAL EXAGGERATION IS -
165.0 TIMES HORIZONTAL SCALE


CLAY CHERT SHELL BED


250 -r 0


RISE I RISE


- 60

- 40

- 20

0


R19E R20E


90 ROMP 89
647 W-5054


0 400
0 50 100 U
SI I GAMMA (CP)
GAMMA (CPS)
UDSC


OCALA
M.O LIMESTONE
WO SPL
M.C.I
M.S.p.R.Ch
M.
M,
M.R


M.R
O.Ch


MM
Mi. AVON PARK
M.R FORMATION
M.O.R.O
M.R.D
L
D
M.0.R.O
NO SPL
M

M.0.O
L

L.O
S
S
C.T
S

L.O.Py
S.P?
S.O

O.C.T
O.C.T



0
0
Q


R20E IR21E


SEABOARD
COASTLINE
" RR


BROOKSVILLE RIDGE

@


R2E I R22E


@


R22E R23E


M.R LIMESTONE








0
0





AVON PARK
FORMATION
NO SPL


EXPLANATION


HATCHING PATTERNS


20

FEET METERS





100


- 20


- 20



--40


50


0


- 50so


-100 -


-150-


- 650 -L -20


-200 4-- 60


- 350 -


GYPSUM


u F~


1


:1


'-~-~~C
::


... ........ .

.............
-:.: -:I:-: : -:






N'"




. . . .
. . .










l ' l l














Plate 8. Cross section H -

Pasco and Polk Counties


W-13923 W-14669 W-662 W-14889
ROMP 85 ROMP 87


PEACE RIVER
FORMATION

UDSCP 'y 2
C. GA""MA (CPS)


sO OPoUDSC

AMPA MBR. OF
M.R ARCADIA FM.
U.R

M.R
U.R
U SUWANNEE
M.R LIMESTONE
M.R

M.R












R,O
M R
M



M.R
M.R



















R.O





RM
R.M













O H



I I
SOCALARTI E
U LIMESTONE



































187.7 TI
0


MR.D
R.0

R
0

0 HLO


0 1



0 1
A

0 VERTICAL EXA
187.7 TI
0


0
0
0
0
Ch
0


150ISO -



100 -
so -





0-
















-200



-250 -



-300MO



-350-







-450 -
0
























-500-
~


















- 550



-600 -


SCALE NOT AVAILABLE


C
C.L UDSC

M.C.S



M:C
STAMPA MBR. OF
LUC ARCADIA FM.


M.R SUWANNEE
u: s | LIMESTONE

NO SPL
M.R.C

M.R /

OCALA

LIMESTONE



M t

M.RPy.S

spL AVON PAR
FORMAT(


SCALE NOT AVAILABLE
H UDS



LsCh SUWANNEE
LIMESTONE
tU.S
UCh

M.R.Ch
M.R
U


.R OCALA

M LIMESTONE


- - - --R.U.C


R.M.Ch

M.S.Ch.O
m Sh 0
:s5 SUWANNEE
M.R LIMESTONE
M.R
M

M OCALA





M
u.D. LIMESTONE



M.D.O r.


M.O.Ch
M
M.D.T

M.D


AVON PARK
FORMATION


EXPLANATION


HATCHING PATTERNS

LIMESTONE
SURFICIAL
.. AQUIFER
RAVE FINE 1SYSTEU
RAVEL FINE MEDIUM COARSE
D OLOSTONNE INTERMEDIATE
-p M AQUIFER SYSTEM/
SC /ONFINING UNIT


FLORIOAN
SAND FINE MEDIUM COARSE AQUIFER
SYSTEM
SINTERBEDDED LIMESTONE AND DOLOSTONE ST




SILT FINE MEDIUM COARSE


COMMENTS


MICRITE T
SAND C
PHOSPHATE GRAVEL Sh
PHOSPHATE SAND D
ORGANIC L
SPAR H
IRON STAIN NO SPL
QUARTZ G
ANHYORITE Py
CHERT


M.C.I.R
L.I



M.C.R.I



M.Ch.



M.R.T.O




M,R.T.0.C
M.D.O
M.D.O.T

M T



M.R.Sh

M.,
M.R
U

M.R.O
M.R
M.R
M.R.O

-,L.0 C.0
L.O.R.C.O

RAO


-850 -260


WEST


150 -
40

100 - 30


20
50
SO -



0 0

-10
- 50


FEET METERS


TR 16-2A
W-16609


150 -


100 -- 30


W-14389
ROMP 76


ORIZONTAL SCALE
MILES
2 3 4 5
I I I I
111 1 I II
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
2345676
KILOMETERS

GGERATION IS APPROXIMATELY
TIMES HORIZONTAL SCALE


- 50-


FEET METERS


CLAY CHERT SHELL BED GYPSUM


- 20




- 40




--60




- -80




- -100




- -120




- -140




- -160




- -180


c
NO SPL
C 1
NO DI


0 -+-


U.S


NO SPL





M.Ch
M





M. R


- 200 6


- 650 -200


- 250


-700 -



- 750 -



-800-


- -240


-350


-400 -120


SILT
CLAY
SHELL
DOLOSTONE
LIMESTONE
HEAVY MINERALS
NO SAMPLE
GYPSUM
PYRMTE


-450



-500



-550


-600-




-650



-700-



- 750



-800


__ _~~ ___ ~___~


I


:;r


rlR'd


. .


m . , .


---- -- -
xi: ..ri- ...
I l l ll:~:


i~i~i~i~ii~



r















I




r


- 850 -- -260


..
~tt~-~


RK
ON












Levy, Citrus,


Pasco and HI


717ST1BS1 T185IT19S T19SIT20S


50

40

30

20

10

0

- 10

METERS






60
40


175-

150-

125-

10-

75 -

50 -

25 -

0 -

- 25 -

FEET

200



150-



100 -



50 -


0



- 50



-100



-150 -



-200 -



-250



-300-



-350



-400-


7


PROBABLE
SINKHOLE F





:9.HC












CV NGS


ILL



C /:


c
c


c
c
c
c
c
C D


C.D.p
C.D.p I

U

L.D
L


UDSC


OCALA
LIMESTONE


/


/


W-720


UDSC


AVON PARK
FORMATION


AVON PARK
FORMATION


NO SPL









R


EXPLANATION

HATCHING PATTERNS
UMESTONE


AOUIFER
SYSTEM
GRAVEL FINE MEDIUM COARSE

LOSTONE____ INTERMEDIATE
AQUIFER SYSTEM/
CONFINING UNIT


FLORIDAN
SAND FINE MEDIUM COARSE AAo iFER

NITERB'EDDED LIMESTONE" AND 0DLOS'TONE* ,SST


NO SPL

NO SPL



NO SPL

NO SPL

NO SPL

NO SPL


NO SPL






M.D
SD1SP.
M.D


FINE MEDIUM COARSE


MICRITE T
SAND C
PHOSPHATE GRAVEL Sh
PHOSPATE SAND 0


ORGANIC
SPAR
IRON STAIN
QUARTZ
CANHDRITE
CHERT


* OVERLAPPING LOGS
FOR THIS INTERVAL
OMITTn.


L
H
NO SPI
G
Py


SILT
CLAY
SHELL
DOLOSTONE
LIMESTONE
HEAVY MINERALS
NO SAMPLE
CYPSUM
PYRITE


* SEE TEXT FOR DICUSSON OF UNCONIN0rE
FLOROIAN AUIFER SYSTEM


CLAY CHERT SHELL BED GYPSUM


200-- 60


T13S T14S


NORTH
I


T14S T15S


W-15075


T15S T16S


T16SJT17S


ROMP 131
W-15682


25 50 75

GAMMA (CPS)
HAWTHORN GROUP


-550



-600


--100




- -120


- -160

--180

-180


- 650 -200


- -220


-700 -



-750



-800


-850 --260


-900 -


- -280









action I I'

Hernando Counties



T20S IT21S


T22S jT23S


WACHEE RIVER


TR 19-3
W- 14873


0 10 20 30
I I I I I I
AMUA (cPs)


UDSC


OCALA
LIMESTONE


AVON PARK
FORMATION


AVON PARK
FORMATION


NO sPL
0

0
0
M.D.O
M.0
M.D.O


HORIZONTAL SCALE

MILES
0 0.5 1 2 3 4 5
I I i l I I I I I I I
00.51 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
KILOMETERS


VERTICAL EXAGGERATION IS APPROXIMATELY
107.6 TIMES HORIZONTAL. SCALE


T23S T24S


T24SJT25S


T25S T26S


SOUTH

I


POND


TR 18-2
W-15649


POND


TR 17-3
W-14675


0 25 50


NO SCALE AVAILABLE UDSC
UDSC


SUWANNEE
LIMESTONE


AVON PARK
FORMATION


TR 16-2A
W-16609


0 251
GAMMA
GAMMA


T2IS I122S


0
LIME


AVON
FOR


ROMP 108 C
W-15685


20D>- 60

175-
50
150-
125-- 40

100- 30

75-
20
50-
10
25-

0 0

25 -
-- 10

FEET METERS

200 60



150
40

100
S 500

(CPS) 20
2-
50



0 0

TAMPA MEMBER
OF THE so
CAOIA FORMATION 20

100 -
NANNEE
STONE 4
-150



-200 60



-250
so
- 0
-00- 200

-100
ICALA
STONE -


-400 -120




SPARK 14
MATION

-500

-160

550


-180
600 -



-650 -200



-700 -
-220


-750

-240
-800 -



50 -260



-2-900
-280


u
M.'


M.l.T.C.D









Marion,


Plate 10. Cross sec
Sumter, Hernando,


60


40
30
20
10
0


D
0
u.D.O.
O.S.OI
M.D.O.1
U.D.Ch
M.5.0.0
0
D.Ch
O.M.Co
D.0
t.D.O.S

M.0O
U.D.Ch
U.D
Uj.a.I


T17STr185 Ti1BSTI9S TISslT2OS



g8
SPRmNESS
OUTLET
RIVER


Ti3S T14S TI4SITISS TI5ST16S TIGSIrT75

NORTH
J


QUARRY

QWRRY






W-892 ROMP 119
W-15643


'O
L
UDSC




.,R LIMESTONE u.s
..RR


M.R us
Rr.R



M..R.S
M.RMR.1O.S
R .R.S.0

0
AVON PARK u'-
FORMATION 0


I I
caus (cPS)


0 100 200
I (CPS)
UaM (CPs)


UDSC

o LOCALA
LIMESTONE
'5


,D









.o



.0
PL
O.Ch
N.0k


AVON PARK
FORMATION


UDSC


' OCALA
LIMESTONE

u.O.O


D
a




AVON PARK
No NS. FORMATION
NO SPL
T.C

C..,Py
o

Ch
O.O.Ch
R.CO
.0Ch.0
0.R
8:9
O.R
R.Gy
.0
R

0
R
O.Ch


150-

100-

50

0

- 50

- 00

-150

-200

-250 -

-300 -

-350 -
- 3,5

-400 -

-450 -

-500-

-550

-600-

- 650

-700-

- 750 -

-800-


ROMP 112
W-16617


" L- 10
FEET METERS
200 so


40


HORIZONTA SCALE
W-ES
0 0.5 1 2 3 4 5
I I' I I II--
I I I I I I I I
00.5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
KLLOMETERS

VERTICAL EXCGERATION S APPROXIMATELY
107 6 TIMES 0I,'ZONTAL SCALE


-160


- -220


I


I


cix









Plate 10. Cross section J J'

Sumter, Hernando, and Pasco Counties


TI9SIT20S


7205 T215


SOUTH
J'


PRINCESS
LAKE
OUTLET
RVER JUMPER
I CREEK


W-662


loo 200

GMUMA (CPS)

UDSC


OCALA
LIMESTONE


AVON PARK
FORMATION


HORIZONTAL SCALE
MILES

0 0.5 1 2 3 4 5

00.,5 1 2 3 4 5 7 8
KILOMETERS


,VETICAL EXAGCERATION IS APPROXIMATELY 7
107.6 TIMES HORIZONTAL SCALE
IZVE.RTIaL Ex.AGGEF TKN IS APPROXIMATELY


ROMP 110
W-16611 W-15942 ROMP 99
W-16304


0 50 100

GAuA (CPS)


M.C.T
MR
M.C



0















o

0.u
0


0














o.R.G
C.O.R






cG.
.0o
G.0
G.0


GRAVEL






SAND






SILT


100 2cP

CMM (CPS)


OCALA
LIMESTONE


AVON PARK
FORMATION


SPL


OCALA
LIMESTONE


AVON PARK
FORMATION


EXPLANATION

HATCHING PATTERNS COMMENT
LIMESTONE
L |uM MICqRITE T SIL
SiCiAL SiSURfAN
,',,, I I I l I I || AQUIFER C N CLAY
e SYSTEM P PHOSPHTE RAVEL S SHEU
FINE MEDIUM COARSE p PHOSPHATE AVL S SHE
P PHOSPHATE SANO D DOLO
SNTEDLMEOATE 0 ORGANICS L LES
UIFER SYSTEM/LMES
SCONFING UNIT R SPAR H HEAVY
IRON STAIN NO SPL NOS

FINE MEDIUM COARSE A FLoRIN 0 QUARTZ GCyPS
SYSTEM A ANHYDRITE p PYRIT


-INTERBEDOEO LIMESTONE AND DOLOSTONE----



FNE MEDIUM COARSE


CHERT


TAMPA MEMBER
OF THE
ARCADIA FORMATION


SCALE NOT AVAILABLE


OCALA
LIMESTONE


\?


STONE
TONE
r MINERALS
AMPLE
Uu
E


CLAY CHERT SHELL BED GYPSUM


200-- 60

so
o 50
15
40

1- 30

75
20
50
10
25

0 0

- 25 -

FEET METERS

200 60



150
40

100

20
50



0 0



50
20


100

-40
-150



200
-200 -s



S-250
80


-300

-100



-250-
-120
-400



450
-140


-500

-160

-550


-180
-600



-6 -200


700
-220

750


-240
-800


T21SIT22S


722S JT23S


T23S(T24S


T24ST25S


T255 T26S


O ~--


i


G",


M4-- -





















ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors would like to express their appreciation to the Geohydrologic Data
Section, of the Resource Data Department, Southwest Florida Water Management District for their
lithologic and geophysical data collection, field and office support, and insights, thoughts and comments,
regarding the development of this series of cross sections and reports.

Southwest Florida Water Management District

David L. Moore, Deputy Executive Director
Water Resource Management and Development


Greg W. Jones, P.G., Director
Resource Data Department LOGIC


S. Greg McQuown, Manager
Geohydrologic Data Section


*Geohydrologic Data Section
James M. Clayton, P.G.
Michael T. Gates, P.G.
Donald L. Thompson, P.G.
Richard A. Lee, P.G.


The authors also gratefully acknowledge those staff of the Florida Geological Survey who participated in
this project. Lance Johnson, Paula Poison and John Marquez are thanked for their contributions in
computer aided design drafting and editing of the cross sections. Ken Campbell, Rick Green and Dr. Tom
Scott are thanked for their contributions and discussions regarding the stratigraphy of the study area. We
also thank the following staff who provided review of this report: James Balsillie, Paulette Bond, Rick
Green, Jackie Lloyd, Frank Rupert, Dr. Tom Scott, and Deborah Mekeel.

























927 F5 "5387
11/86/81 34768 -