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Title: Caribbean maritime
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00099408/00010
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Title: Caribbean maritime
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Land & Marine Publications Ltd.
Place of Publication: Colchester Essex, England
Publication Date: May-September 2010
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Volume ID: VID00010
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
        Front Matter 3
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
Full Text
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PROGRESS TOWARDS
DEDIC DATED
CRUtSE PIER


EXPANSION,
DEVELOPMENT
CONTI NUE


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Tel. +1 809 564 4440, Fax +1 809 372 7968. wwwwartsila.com/do
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CONTENTS i


2 Editorial
The good news outweighs the bad
3 Message from the CSA President
In support of scholarship, exchange of knowledge
34 Newsbriefs
42 Newsmakers
Petrelluzzi receives French Government's
Maritime Merite medal
44 Information Technology
Online backup and server hosting
46 The Human Factor
Is your manager doing a number on your business?
47 A Matter of Law
US International Port Security Programme
a collaborative approach


8 Port-au-Prince
Port of Port-au-Prince devastated in earthquake
10 Jamaica
Battered by global recession Jamaica moves forward
with port development plans
15 Kingston Wharves Ltd
Kingston Wharves Ltd. home to Heegh Autoliners'
new transshipment hub
16 Bridgetown
Progress towards construction of dedicated cruise pier
19 George Noon
CSA's eighth President George Noon laid to rest
19 Caribbean Maritime Institute
CMI awarded ISO international standards certification
20 Ponce
Visible sign of economic development in Puerto Rico
21 MIT
'Our tiny but meaningful contribution'
25 Port of Spain
Increase in containers in 2009, additional yard space
this year
26 St. Maarten
St. Maarten: Expansion, development continue
30 Miami
Up to challenges presented by expanded Panama Canal
32 Panama Canal Expansion: update
Work continues apace, on schedule contractors take
advantage of dry season
34 San Juan
More cargo ships but less cargo; decline in cruise business
37 The Environment
Taking oily water treatment to the next level
41 Grantley Stephenson
New vice president comes with a lot of experience
43 Port of Fort-de-France
Pointe des Grives Terminal brings improvement, progress


Except for that appearing in the Editorial column, the views and opinions
expressed by writers featured in this publication are presented purely for
information and discussion and do not necessarily reflect the views and
opinions of the Caribbean Shipping Association.
-The Editor.


CARIBBEAN MARITIME MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010 1






EDITORIAL


CARIBBEAN

MARITIME
No. 10 I MAY SEPTEMBER 2010
The officiaournal of the Caribbean
Shipping Association

Scaribbean shipping association

MISSION STATEMENT
"To promote and foster the
highest quality service to the
maritime industry through training
development; working with
all agencies, groups and other
associations for the benefit and
development of its members and
the peoples of the Caribbean
region."

GENERAL COUNCIL 2009-2010
President: Carlos Urriola-Tam
Vice President: Grantley Stephenson
Immediate Past President: Fernando Rivera
Group A Chairman: Michael Bernard
Group A Representative: Rhett Chee Ping
Group A Representative: Roger Hinds
Group A Representative: Glyne St. Hill
Group B Chairman: David Jean-Marie
Group B Representative: Linda Profijt-del Prado
Group C Chairman: Cyril Seyjagat
Group C Representative: David Ross
General Manager: Clive Forbes
Director Information and Public Relations:
Michael S.L. Jarrett
Caribbean Shipping Association
4 Fourth Avenue, Newport West,
PO Box 1050, Kingston C.S.O, Jamaica
Tel: +876 923-3491
Fax: +876 757-1592
Email: csa@cwjamaica.com
www.caribbeanshipping.org
EDITOR
Mike Jarrett
Email: csa-pr@mikejarrett.net
PUBLISHER:

MARINE
Land & Marine Publications Ltd
1 Kings Court, Newcomen Way
Severalls Business Park, Colchester
Essex, CO4 9RA, UK
Tel: +44 (0)1206 752902
Fax: +44 (0)1206 842958
Email: publishing@landmarine.com
www.landmarine.com


THE GOOD NEWS


OUTWEIGHS THE BAD

This issue has a special focus on ports and terminals. However, the
achievement of the Caribbean Maritime Institute in completing all the
tasks and organisation required for an international standard certification
is to be noted and celebrated. As documented in this issue of Caribbean
Maritime, the Jamaican-based officer training academy was notified of its
ISO 9001:2008 certification in February. As, the CSA President notes in his
message here, the Association supports scholarship; and, "training develop-
ment" is at the heart of the mission of the Caribbean Shipping Association.
In this context we celebrate the achievement, recognising it as the founda-
tion on which future development can be built.
While there was still an uncomfortable level of bad news as final performance
figures for 2009 were revealed (most of it related to the lingering effects of the
global recession), there was positive news to celebrate. Last year, for example, the
Port of Port of Spain chalked up a six per cent gain in container throughput. And, St.
Maarten completed its new cruise pier (North) with expectations to complete expan-
sion of phase 2 of its cruise village project by next year.

COMMITMENT
The Jamaica government put forward a commitment that the new and exciting Fal-
mouth cruise port project, costing USD233 million will be completed in December of
this year to receive its first ships. And if David Harding reaps fruit from his efforts so
far (and still continuing), Barbados Port Inc. could present to its people that country's
first dedicated cruise pier within the next 36 months.
The ghosts of the recession still haunt. Most of the ports reviewed in this issue
have some bad news to report. Most of it is related to declining trade levels and
consequently less domestic and transshipment cargo. Interestingly however the good
news of growth, development, achievement, expansion, new construction, major
capital investment, new technology and even corporate good will (see page 21)
outweighs the bad news.
Other positive developments documented in this issue: Ponce got its two ship-
to-shore cranes making it today a far more effective facility and giving Puerto Rico
expanded port capability. And Wartsila weighed in with new technology to protect
the environment (see page 37) with its Senitec M-series.
These are positive indicators from which we draw encouragement as we present
this 10th issue of Caribbean Maritime.
Sadly, Caribbean Maritime notes the passing of the CSA's eighth President,
George Noon. The CSA through this medium, records its gratitude for his service to
the shipping industry of his native Saint Lucia and the Caribbean.
And, as this issue went to press, we heard of the passing of another CSA stalwart,
A.C. 'Pat' Lawlor, who died in the UK. We extend condolences to his family and the
shipping community of Trinidad and Tobago.




MIKE JARRETT, EDITOR


2 CARIBBEAN MARITIME MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010






PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE






In support of scholarship,



exchange of knowledge


This is the tenth issue
of Caribbean Maritime.
It means that this maga-
zine has now completed
three years of service. We
hope that, somewhere,
it has encouraged or
stimulated thought lead-
ing to positive action.
It also means that there
is information to share.
The reports and thoughts
published over three
years carry readers to the
far corners of the region
and report on progress
and development in the
shipping sector in ports as
separated as Jacksonville
in the north and Paramar-
ibo in the south.
This tenth issue is
expected to be the first to be
included in the Digital Library
of the Caribbean, run by the


diversity in the sources from
which they access current
and historical information
about the shipping industry.
The Caribbean Shipping
Association is happy that its
official journal is to be made
available to a wider audience
and to thereby expand the
pool of knowledge about the
Caribbean region.
Responsibility
Training and scholarship are
pillars of the CSA's work.
The work of Caribbean
Maritime, is to empower
the current players in the
industry which moves billions
of tonnes of cargo annually
across the region. It also has
a responsibility to encour-
age the exchange of ideas
and the flow of knowledge
about the business of ship-


The work of Caribbean

Maritime, is to empower

the current players in the

industry which moves

billions of tonnes of cargo

annually across the region


Digital Library Center at the
University of Florida. This
means that future decision-
makers will now have greater


ping. It is knowledge about
the industry and the needs
and demands of world trade
which drives future develop-


ment and which is the foun-
dation of today's decision-
making and problem-solving.
And, that is why 'training
development' is at the heart
of the mission of the Carib-
bean Shipping Association.
Focus
The focus of this issue of
Caribbean Maritime is on
ports and terminals. They
are the very link between
individual nations and those
producers whom they supply
or from whom they pur-
chase. Whether public or
private, ports and terminals


facilitate world trade, local
and national development.
They are a critical link in the
supply chain. It is for this
reason that their interests
and needs have been made
the mandate of one of the
four groups that comprise
the CSA.
I hope you find this issue
of Caribbean Maritime
useful.


Carlos Urriola
President, Caribbean
Shipping Association


CARIBBEAN MARITIME I MAY SEPTEMBER 2010 3





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buildings had collapsed or were
by Mike Jarrett








7X






PORT-AU-PRINCE


Shortly before 1700hrs., on Janu-
ary 12, as Haitians turned their
attention to the activities for the
evening, the ground shook, vio-
lently ... very violently.
It shook for just over half a minute
but, so violently, that it brought down
some of the largest strongest buildings
in the capital city of Port-au-Prince and
laid waste hundreds of thousands of
residential facilities.
By the time one of the most vio-
lent earthquakes in the history of the
Western Hemisphere took its first pause,
there were hundreds of thousands
of Haitians dead and or buried under
rubble. About a million persons roamed
the streets in shock and awe, looking for
lost loved ones and wondering where
they would find shelter from the ele-
ments that night and for the weeks and
months to come.

Toppled
The port facilities in Port-au-Prince
were destroyed. Container yard sur-
faces had huge cracks and chasms.
Cranes and equipment were toppled
or listing. For days, the people of Haiti
could not receive vitally needed relief


supplies through the port of Port-au-
Prince. Homeless hungry people lived a
nightmarish existence under the blazing
Haitian sun during the days and became
food for stinging insects at night.
One of the first responses to this
tragedy came from the Caribbean Ship-
ping Association. CSA President Carlos
Urriola immediately sent a message of
solidarity and support to the Haitian
people and particularly the Haitian ship-
ping community, which subsequently
reported that 30 port workers had died
in the tragedy. When the CSA Gen-
eral Council met in Kingston later that
month, the Association started discus-
sions on longer term plans to assist
the re-development of one of its older
member-countries.


vised' pier. Since that first trip and for
nine consecutive weeks, rather than
return to Miami, the Seaboard Sun
made twice weekly sailings between
Haiti and Kingston, Jamaica, connecting


After emergency repairs by Haiti's port

authority and the US military, the old

south pier at Port-au-Prince became

the only facility for landing aid


The newer, larger north pier was
devastated. After emergency repairs by
Haiti's port authority and the US mili-
tary, the old south pier at Port-au-Prince
became the only facility for landing aid.
Supplies were brought into Port-au-
Prince from that pier on trucks travel-
ling on a hurriedly repaired, single lane,
gravel road. The road could accommo-
date only one truck at a time. So trucks
had to wait in queue until one made
the round trip for emergency supplies
before proceeding. The offloading of
the early cargoes of relief supplies was
therefore very slow.
Haitian shipping was totally disrupted
and would remain so for about a week.
Seaboard Marine was one of the
first shipping lines to return to regular
sailings. While limited port facilities were
highly congested with relief supplies
from several countries, on January 27
the my Seaboard Sun arrived in Lafiteau,
less than 10 miles from Port-au-Prince.
The ro-ro vessel carried a variety of
cargo to the quickly repaired 'impro-


with Seaboard's regular twice weekly
Miami service. In this arrangement, the
short transit time from Kingston to Haiti
allowed the Seaboard Sun to complete
more trips to Haiti than if the ship was
returning to Miami.

Supplies
By the end of March, the Seaboard Sun
had carried over 1,200 teu into Haiti. Of
this number, over 500 containers filled
with humanitarian supplies originated
in Miami.
Meanwhile, as this issue of Caribbean
Maritime went to press, Haitian export-
ers had started to benefit from the
shipping services to Miami. According to
Seaboard Marine, apparel factories that
survived the earthquake were getting
back into production, putting Haitians
back to work. But even as Caribbean
Maritime went to press, Haiti was still a
country in a dire state of emergency and
threatened by disease and flooding from
its annual 'rain season' which was just
about to begin. m


CARIBBEAN MARITIME I MAY SEPTEMBER 2010 9






IJAMAICA


BATTERED BY GLOBAL


RECESSION JAMAICA


MOVES FORWARD WITH


PORT DEVELOPMENT PLANS


KCT workers break productivity record


amaica's ports have
experienced a signifi-
cant fall in vessel calls and
cargo volumes, a direct
effect result of the global
recession.
Jamaica had a total of
3,397 vessel calls in 2009
and a throughput volume
of 25 million metric tonnes.
This represents a 5.3% and
17.5% decline in vessel calls
and throughput volume
respectively, as compared
with 2008.
The decline in vessel calls
at Jamaica's ports reflects a
decrease of 268 (or 23.7%) at
the ports outside of Kingston,


which was partly offset by
an increase of 78 ship calls or
3.2% at the Port of Kingston.
The severity of the decline
in ship calls at the other ports is
in large measure attributed to
the general reduction in export
activities at the bauxite/alumina
terminals and a softening in
world aluminium markets.

VOLUMES
The volume of cargo handled
at Jamaica's 'outports' (that
is, ports outside of the Port
of Kingston) decreased in
2009 by 5,179,043 tonnes
or 37.1%. This reflected a
massive reduction in imports


(38%) and exports (36.7%).
With the exception of
Jamalco's (Jamaica-Alcoa)
Rocky Point port, there was a
significant decline in alu-
mina exports from all ports
through which bauxite or
alumina is shipped.
Alumina exports at Port
Esquivel and Port Kaiser
declined by 80.7% and
83.3% respectively, while
alumina exports from Rocky
Point increased by 24.3%.
Concurrently, bauxite exports
from Port Rhodes recorded a
28.3% decline.

THE PORT OF KINGSTON
Last year (2009) the Port
of Kingston (that is, the
Kingston Container Termi-
nal and the private opera-
tor, Kingston Wharves Ltd.
combined) experienced a
10 per cent decline against
the previous year. Container
traffic decreased by 187,909
teu, which accounted for an
8.1% drop in transhipment
volumes and a 16.4% decline
in domestic volumes, that is,
cargo of national origin or
arriving for local use).
At the Kingston Container
Terminal (KCT), container


volumes handled by the
major shipping lines fell from
1,442,744 teu in 2008 to
1,323,899. Given the circum-
stances this performance could
have been worse. The KCT has
been able to keep its major
customers. Indeed, it has seen
significantly less fallout than
other container ports.

WORKERS SET RECORD
AT KCT
The drive to improve produc-
tivity and overall efficiency is
showing results.
In February 2009 King-
ston Container Terminal
Ltd, a subsidiary of the Port
Authority of Jamaica, took
over the management of
the KCT. The contractual
management arrangement
that the Port Authority of
Jamaica had for seven years
with APM Terminals Jamaica
Ltd., a subsidiary of the
A.P. Miller Group, ended
on January 31 2009. This
decision was implemented
against the background of
the exploration of options
regarding privatisation of the
operations at the KCT. One
year later, in the first week
of February 2010, workers at


10 CARIBBEAN MARITIME MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010










KCT established a productiv-
ity record. They accomplished
a sustained production of 42
container moves an hour while
working the Zim Antwerp,
the first of the new generation
of mega container vessels to
call at the KCT.

CAPACITY
The Zim Antwerp has a
capacity of 10,062 containers.
It is expected that more vessels
of this size and bigger will be
calling more regularly at ports
like Kingston over the next
two years and more so when
the Panama Canal Expansion
programme is completed.

CRUISE ARRIVALS DECLINE
Cruise ship calls to Jamaica
also declined last year. There
was a 17% reduction in
vessel calls in 2009 relative
to 2008, as a result of record
levels of bookings cancelled.


Consequently cruise visitors to
Jamaica were less, the num-
bers falling from 1,080,508 in
2008 to 922,397 in 2009.
Ocho Rios continued to be
the preferred Jamaican port
of call for cruise ships. Over
69% of the total number of
cruise passengers to Jamaica
in 2009 landed in Ocho Rios.
The Port of Montego Bay
accounted for 30.7% of the
total visits.
The Port Authority of
Jamaica (PAJ), under its
Cruise Jamaica brand, con-
tinued to market the coun-


try's cruise sector and last
year Jamaica, for the fourth
consecutive year, was voted
the World's Leading Cruise
Destination at the World
Travel Awards.

NEW PORT DEVELOPMENT
In 2009 work was started on
the development of a new
cruise pier and facilities that
will host the new Genesis
Class generation of mega ves-


sels recently introduced into
the industry by Royal Carib-
bean Cruises International.
The new Falmouth cruise
ship terminal will include a sea
side development (with pier,
customs, immigration and
related facilities) as well as a
land side development (which
will include shops restaurants,
art and craft and in bond
stores). The landside develop-
ment being undertaken by
Royal Caribbean will incorpo-
rate the Georgian architecture
design theme for which the
town of Falmouth is famous.


The pier being developed
at Falmouth will be able to
accommodate two cruise
ships at a time. The PAJ
expects that the sea side
development will be com-
pleted by November of 2010.
According to the PAJ,
plans are also being devised
for the upgrading of cruise
facilities at both Ocho Rios and
Montego Bay cruise ports.

STRATEGIES
To cope with the downturn,
Jamaica's port authority imple-
mented strategies to: reorgan-
ise the operations to increase
efficiency and reduce expenses;
close the gap created by the
fallout in revenues and slow
down in collections; and,
revised the 2009/10 Budget
to account for the changes.
Cost reduction strategies that
were implemented included
reorganisation of operations
at the business centres, result-
ing in savings in operational
expenses and improvement
in productivity ratios. Staff
rationalisation resulted in a
number of positions being
made redundant. Cross-
training of staff created more
multi-skilled workers and the
PAJ had discussions with the
workers unions to get sup-
port for a variety of measures
to contain the wage bill. m


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JAMAICA, FOR THE FOURTH

CONSECUTIVE YEAR, WAS

VOTED THE "WORLD'S LEADING

CRUISE DESTINATION" AT THE

WORLD TRAVEL AWARDS






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pile planking, ecologically river banks, dred-
ging and maintenance of watercourses, Our
proven expertise and know-how allow us to
provide any kind of project-related support
municipalities and water boards might need,

Contact
Ballasr Nedar
P.O. Box 1505
3430 8M Neuwegern
The Netherttnds
Phone: 131 (0) 30285 3727
Fax: +31 (0)302854841
E-mail: mfo.infraibolosit-nedom.nt
ntrernet: www.bo losr-nedom.ni


ron expanmion urrat ay, Mi. M a- en


Mnnume inrjge










,*1.


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d
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ri, is
i r"'
s o
b.":n"'~i r4.2
~"i,, "
r+ 1.1






KINGSTON WHARVES LTD


Kingston Wharves Limited



home to Hoegh Autoliners'



new transshipment hub


For the first time in the
history of the Jamaican
shipping industry, there
will be a vehicle carrier
service direct from Europe
to Kingston.
Kingston Wharves Limited
will now manage and facili-
tate terminal operations for
Hoegh Autoliners' recently
opened Transshipment Hub
in Kingston, Jamaica.
"With the advanced
technology, infrastructure and
state-of-the-art equipment
that we possess, our facility
will be providing critical sup-
port to the hub's operations",
outlined Grantley Stephenson,
Chairman and CEO Kingston
Wharves Limited.
This dynamic initiative
by Hoegh Autoliners, the


primary global provider of
'roll on/roll off' (ro-ro) vehicle
transportation services, will
improve the transit time for
the East Asia-US trade. Previ-
ously, the hub was located in
San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Opening
To commemorate the official
opening of the new Carib-
bean Transshipment Hub,
Hoegh Autoliners in col-
laboration with International
Shipping Limited and King-
ston Wharves Limited hosted
automotive dealers, industry
leaders and other stakehold-
ers at a reception onboard
the Hdegh Caribia, in
Kingston on its maiden port
call. The crew of the Hdegh
Caribia led tours of the new


140-metre long feeder vessel
capable of transporting
1,940 motor vehicle units, in
addition to 53 Mafi Trailers.


pated that these figures will
increase. Kingston Wharves
Limited expects that the
increased business to be gen-


Initially, it is expected that the
transhipment of approximately
15,000 to 20,000 cars and large
motor vehicles including trucks,
buses and earth-moving equipment
will be facilitated by Kingston


Wharves Limited...
Mr. Stephenson as he
recapped the journey that led
to this new hub stated,
"...several years ago Kingston
Wharves requested all the
shipping agents representing
car carriers to collaborate with
us in an effort to establish
a vehicle transhipment hub
here in Kingston. International
Shipping saw the opportunity
grabbed it with both hands
and pursued it vigorously and
here we are this afternoon
launching this service."

Transhipment
Initially, it is expected that
the transhipment of approxi-
mately 15,000 to 20,000
cars and large motor vehicles
including trucks, buses and
earth-moving equipment will
be facilitated by Kingston
Wharves Limited yearly. As
global economies recover
in the long term it is antici-


erated by this new venture
will have a positive impact on
Jamaica's economy, as it is a
net foreign exchange earner.
In addition, an increase of
activity is anticipated for other
entities and sub-sectors includ-
ing marine pilots, tugs, steve-
dores and shipping agents.
New era
"We at Hoegh Autoliners
see this as a start of a new
era for us in the Caribbean
and we are very enthusiastic
about starting on this new
set up here in Jamaica,"
said Mr. Tore Listad, Owners
Representative, South
America Hoegh Autoliners.
"The new hub will continue
to offer first class service for
on-carriage to Suriname,
Guyana, Trinidad, French
Guiana, Bahamas, Grand
Cayman, and a full scope of
other destinations." r


CARIBBEAN MARITIME I MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010 15






















0. -..1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..0 0. .


















toS air/sea 0. t sfeB as P th ' 0
f lg e acco-Sn to Ric is to 0'e not.0 bet at th 00.' failt '0.

plan,* cruis-" that is ach00ved,".the atte1rpartof'2012.0

could die br '00 a dei "fo Puerto Ric to Bar in is no meeyasprt



* S -. .00 0 0' .00.0 -^^^^^^^H^^^H^^^n^^^^^^^VII~flin^
mor tha t oyas m beeisSoBr ds' 00'. is sisades-ogsina
and .00 return 000e with not '0ly for Barbados0but'for0the0Bridgetown'port,.est
.'0 1 '. 0iB 0'0' '00 0 '0''00 0'0 .00.0
unogtal exeine thi rein .00e 00. '0'1 as '0 dee wae Dai 00.0gChira
of0 '0i su-denhe Car habu to hadl cargo and of Babao 0.'t Inc.
ibben iland loal blk ugarforexpot t
'0.ado '0'' Inoro 00hi 0.io is stl the Euop and th Unte Stts ca 0'lag oprto0 r
rae 0000'sratn wa nu be one reio f00 cruis The 0.0.op en i0 be .0. Hadn said
Charm n avd arin vi- hi pssngrs" ade M. ie t sch ttacios s he It oud 0's m a00h
ualises~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ as a "pol fredy Hadna.uhrt0nsi- nadara rkadtent- gtst h rdeo nPr
crusepasege evirn- pig n hi prt f hewold ual onertht s ariso'mgh0b0sifed
men -seon t nneinth Pan fr helog-ooed Caes t cpialseonBaba e av t0ceae acli
tie tha 0'e moecndcv
to th tax drvr andth
taisriean0e eal







0000ope adadsov- t 0's U$0 0 milio on in landbase atrctos At crat tha seso laea
nir00 shp and0. an exane co pltin ar now~ co in the sam tieBrao'0rtrltstohwtecus
passenge temia 0'r worl 00' 0'. '0wigbor .0 I 0nc is puhn im rvm n shi pa0' ge see us, 0 t'0
class shoping Exresin ofitrssi '0.00 tax ope00 on 0.' th chairmansa.'
He wat to 0 0'mstf what is0 tage a0 0 joit-enur hadcrf tr0'' at Peia 0'ol atrieps
the Brigeow Port, corc ar als bein exa ine an Vilae '0 00'r .0'anc segrw e hycm f
eroeu inom to abu a 00'sio i00 00i rear 00.0. 0'o 0.e 0't' gaes sosisinBraos0ohv
this0 conr's mai sepr 00 0' d 0' '.0 en f a. 0'.t deeop et hede in that exeiec tha wil be0

and~~~~ ~~~ craeahm -otn him nHrigi h re.nw s"rvrs ufretbe hnte






/!... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................._i






0tme 900,00 0. tonnes of0 00.'iie '0' sml veses a o-jitvnurswthot




......0..' ..

alongside ~ 00 per .6 6erst16 mers0vrteyer0stawt

two. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ We66 wnBabdst craethogthfrm- in'soito recai nin ars adpriuarytegot










'10-010100* 0'0'0'0 00 '
be one of them" sd 0. 'n of 00 0e i s as pt of in





Th'or0hara of th conr' shp0ae in.' 26o 006, brigin 0g "S 0'' ha 0eno h
repre t 0 '00 It is t 00 0'r of enty o 1tr0 00 e l '


0'1 w 120,0 0 00 0 a s atso c 0 the 0' b the
ge0s 000nl fro Euop an '00'. fo man Brts-ae acomdt 00 la 0. nu 0e '0'tucio 0' a dediate
the Unit Kigd m flin cruise shi lie oprtn of veses inluin m g -sie cruis pir oneta a aco' -






gsted'tha th ineto wa in inentoa shipin. One.. it reae to cris touism *S ilo n h eod
to deeo atrcin 0' th exesow ihto.lce Brao0otIc'ae at aotU$0mlin
0'r th 0. '0'l enorg
thos cris pasnest
remain asln -ty iios





"We wantoo ge0hoewo0oo


long0ta viios 00.'wil
makehoteiershapp," h
0'uipped.
The iminn 0ecev
opmet atthe ridgtow
0''t isapoec0htha0Lt
bee onte0 adssnc0h





0''geow Port. Pasne
.............................................................................................0........
0'IBEA MAITM I.AY-0ETEBE21


















oIl


fTI!


Qmj 0 Im qI=






GEORGE NOON i


CSA's eighth President George Noon laid to rest


A n affable charac-
ter, well loved by
his peers, George Noon
brought to the CSA the
sunshine and warm spirit
of his native St. Lucia.
As the eighth President
of the Caribbean Shipping
Association, George Noon led
the Association into the final
decade of the 20th century, a
time when the new computer-
driven technologies had just
started to change the methods
and practices of shipping.
George Noon, a soft-spo-
ken man, kept the Associa-
tion on a path of growth. He
understood the Caribbean
and knew that the Associa-


tion's success rested heavily
on its multi-lateral and multi-
cultural characteristics. His
style of Presidency reflected
this as he worked consistently
for unanimity and consensus
among all members.

Contribution
George Noon died on
Saturday, February 27, 2010
after serving the Caribbean
and the St. Lucia shipping
community for nearly all his
professional life. Through his
leadership of the Caribbean
Shipping Association, he
made a significant contribu-
tion to growth and devel-
opment of the Caribbean


regional as a whole.
"He gave his time, energy,
experience and goodwill to
the CSA and to its member-
ship region-wide and for this
the Association's history will
always remember him," said
CSA President Carlos Urriola.
The President of the Ship-
ping Association of St. Lucia,
Wayne Monrose expressed
regrets on behalf of the
Shipping Association of St.
Lucia. Describing Mr. Noon
as "a stalwart", he noted that
as a member of the Shipping
Group of the St. Lucia Employ-
ers' Federation, George Noon
led the local shipping associa-
tion for over 20 years.


"He will forever remain an
icon among the various ship-
ping boards and other ship-
ping interests in St. Lucia and
the Caribbean," Mr. Monrose
said. m


CMI awarded ISO international



standards certification


On Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 23, 2010, at
exactly 1430hrs. local
time, the faculty of the
Caribbean Maritime
Institute (CMI) received
the news that they had
been anxiously awaiting.
Lloyd's Register Quality
Assurance Inc, announced
that it had conferred on
the Institute (CMI), the cov-
eted International Stand-
ards Organization (ISO)
9001:2008 certification.
The news and excitement
raced through the Kingston
based maritime training
college like wild fire. All the
work and sacrifice; standards
setting and slavish attention
to detail and methodology


had paid off. The CMI had
gained the international rec-
ognition for the quality of its
programmes it deserved. Its
ISO certification proved that
CMI had quality standards
that were trustworthy and
sound.

EXCITEMENT
Executive Director Fritz Pin-
nock's voice on the tel-
ephone as he discussed the
good news betrayed excite-
ment as well as a sense of
accomplishment. He and his
team of dedicated profes-
sionals had worked long, tire-
less hours to bring the CMI
to this point and the award-
ing of this internationally
recognised quality standard


was validation of the curricu-
lum and the initiatives that
had been implemented over
the years.
The ISO certification is
the international stamp of
approval and recognition of
excellence in delivery and
administration of the CMI's
programmes in the Stand-


ards of Training, Certification
and Watch Keeping (STCW)
95, International Maritime
Organization (IMO) courses
and its other academic
offerings.


The CMI is now the only
IMO approved maritime edu-
cation and training institution
in Jamaica.

CERTIFICATION
According to its Execu-
tive Director, the CMI is
pursuing further local and
international certification


and accreditation so as to
become the premier mari-
time, logistic and engineering
centre of excellence for train-
ing, research and consultancy
in the Region. m


CARIBBEAN MARITIME I MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010 19


The news and excitement raced

through the Kingston based maritime

training college like wild fire







I


Cl


oaliMl


I]


*I


I1N


re


N-jr






MIT


'Our tiny but



meaningful




contribution'


MIT sets example for corporate social responsibility


Corporate social responsibility
is in the DNA of Manzanillo
International Terminal (MIT). Since
the company was founded, even
during its construction phase, it has
been taking initiatives that reflect a
sincere and abiding concern for its
people and the community.
MIT started operations in April 1995.
The company started operations in the
midst of its own construction because
shipping agents demanded immediate
service. The company's founders were
as concerned about human resources as
they were to complete the first phase of
development. So, even as they pushed
ahead with the construction phase, they
supported the small business of the
needy, hard-working women who sold
food to the truckers and contractors.
In that corporate initiative in the early


days for an appropriate way of supplying
food to its employees, these small food
businesses became firmly established and
were soon providing a steady monthly
earning and self sustained growth. Later,
a food court was included in the devel-
opment plan of the terminal. Today these
small restaurateurs are still providing daily
meals but now they are feeding more
than 700 employees, truckers and ship-
ping agents personnel.
SUPPORT
During 1996, MIT moved by philan-
thropy, started a project to assist
with food to poor people and drug
addicts. At the same time, the com-
pany accepted responsibility to support
community initiatives in vital areas such
as sport and education. The company
also assisted a regional non-government


organisation (NGO) to properly organise
rural community groups in farming and
animal breeding.
ASSISTANCE
The Corporate Social Responsibil-
ity programme, which evolved by the
year 2000, was based on the previous
activities and included five community
projects. The major one was Educational
Improvement, which included school
assistance programmes such as:
1. Infrastructure Development
2. Junior Achievement
3. Learning
4. Knowing and Having Fun
5. Company-Student Support Program
6. Professional Practice
7. Recreational Programmes
8. Technology and Tools, etc

CARIBBEAN MARITIME I MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010 21



















/


/


4C






MIT


MIT's corporate social responsibility pro-
gramme has a robust sports sponsorship
component. This includes: participation
in Rotarian Children's Football League;
support to the female football team
(Navy Bay) and the male football team
(Arabe Unido); as well as support for the
Portobelo's Triathlon.

INITIATIVES
In 2005, on MIT's Tenth Anniversary, the
company reported important achieve-
ments in its corporate social responsi-
bility initiatives, including the building
and outfitting of: 10 classrooms with
visual aids; a school soup kitchen; five
orientation centres for children; and, 11
classrooms in public schools.
For its own employees, the company
fulfilled the most important project, its
staff credit union.


the Panamanian national government,
which will be of direct benefit to Colon
City. Highlights of this initiative include
the construction of Juan A. Nunez
Health Center for $1.5 million; the
infrastructure improvement and painting
of Mateo Iturralde Library; the Atlan-
tico Nursing Home; Children's Baseball
Stadium; the Panama Al Brown sport
coliseum; the Everardo Nunez Gym; and,
the Camino del Sol artistic mural.
MIT invested $1.2 million between
2006 and 2009, continuing the follow-
ing programs:

* Educational Improvement: Annual
delivery of 2,000 bags with school
items; high school and university profes-
sional practice; part of the construction
of Santa Maria de Belen School; and,
two classrooms in the Rio Gatun school.


MIT ACTIVELY PARTICIPATED IN COMMUNITY

MATTERS THROUGH GOVERNMENTAL

INSTITUTIONS, LOCAL AND NATIONWIDE


MIT actively participated in com-
munity matters through governmental
institutions, local and nationwide. In
2010, MIT invested more than $2 mil-
lion dollars in joint programmes with


* Support to sports: (in addition to
existing programmes) cycling; swim-
ming competence surrounding Colon,
with local and international participants;
boxing in different categories; and, a


yearly marathon with employees and
their families participating as well as the
general public.

Community Aid: Annual sponsor-
ship to Casa Esperanza (children in high
social risk); Buen Samaritano (disabled
and needy children are attended in
this centre); Casa Hogar S.O.S. (abused
children receive high school education);
Operaci6n Sonrisa (children with facial
deformities are facilitated with surgery),
ANCON (Preservation of the nature),
among others.

EMBRACES
And even as MIT embraces its commu-
nity, locally and nationally, it has special
care and concern for its own staff. The
company therefore promotes activities
and special benefits for its employees
including birthday presents, school
items and scholarships for their children.
Father's Day and Mother's Day are both
recognized at MIT and at the end of every
year the company celebrates with a huge
family party.
MIT's corporate character is distin-
guishable by its comprehensive, far reach-
ing, socially uplifting links and community
development and support projects. The
size, cost and complexity of the corporate
social responsibility programme demands
an organisation to ensure sustainability. In
this regard there is a Community Affairs
Management office at MIT, with two
persons working full time, three support
personnel and a group of 20 volunteers,
identified with the rubric, "Our tiny but
meaningful Contribution". m


CARIBBEAN MARITIME I MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010 23





- _.

































ii"i" 9

























































* Vg ~
w UrII~~b


~- I


I--















































































Year Passengers Percentage
2006 1,421,645
2007 1,421,906 0.0%
2008 1,345,812 -5.4%
7009 1 715 146 -9.7%

























jRiiUII I


Year Teu Percentage
2006 80,277
2007 81,061 +1%
2008 77,557 -4%






never miss another issue


www. landmarine. corm/cm







PORT OF MIAMI






UP TO CHALLENGES PRESENTED




BY EXPANDED PANAMA CANAL


Port of Miami is currently
pushing through with
some of its "most aggres-
sive upgrades" since the
port was established over a
century ago. Over a billion
dollars will be spent on new
infrastructure over the next
five years and, according to
Port Director Bill Johnson, it
is all timed to coincide with
the completion in 2014 of
the Panama Canal Expan-
sion Programme.
... we are up for the chal-
lenge of the new global trade
reality and we are positioning
ourselves to compete over the
course of the next decade," he
said, in a recent report.
The Port of Miami sees
its fortunes in the context of
an expanded Panama Canal.
And, like the Panama Canal,


by Rick Eyerdam in the previ-
ous issue of Caribbean Mar-
itime. This will make it one
of only three U.S. seaports
on the eastern seaboard that
can accommodate the world's
largest ships. Second, the
long-planned Port of Miami
Tunnel project is to be imple-
mented. This will make truck
movement between the Port
of Miami and the MacArthur
Causeway Bridge (1-395), far
more efficient and thus the
Port will be able to up truck
movements to twice current
capacity. The third move is the
building of an intermodal and
distribution network in coop-
eration with strategic partners
like the Florida East Coast
Railroad. Combined with other
significant investments in
terminal yards, gantry cranes,


AMERICA'S TRADE WITH EAST ASIA

IS EXPECTED TO SHIFT FROM PACIFIC

PORTS TO ATLANTIC PORTS


I e POTOe IMIANA E


Teu
1,009500
1,054462
976,514....
884.945
82807,069
807,069


I 9. POR OF* 9IM TP1 MPR ONRE


China
Hong Kong
Germany
Honduras
Guatemala
Italy ............
Dominican Republic
Netherlands
Jamaica
France
Colombia
Belgium
Panama
Venezuela .........
Haiti


Ie POR OF MIAM O 5 EXPRONRE


China
.C hina, ....................................
Hong Kong
Honduras
Dominican Republic
Guatemala
Jamaica....
Germany
Panama
Venezuela
Grand Cayman
Bahamas
ta. ....................................
Trinidad & Tobago
Colombia
Costa Rica


I T M TP RDI C


its operators are moving
feverishly to upgrade, expand
and re-position services. An
expanded Panama Canal means
change all around. America's
trade with East Asia is expected
to shift from Pacific ports to
Atlantic ports. And, being the
closest USA port to the Panama
Canal, Miami expects to be the
first call for fully laden post-
Panamax vessels.
Anticipating this shift, the
Port of Miami is making three
significant moves. First is the
dredging of the harbour to
a 50-foot depth, as reported


gate complexes and roadway
systems, the Port will be ready
for the increased business
brought about by the Panama
Canal expansion
Miami has been preparing
over time for the next gen-
eration of cruise ships and has
already completed two ultra-
modern cruise terminals. Pas-
senger Terminals D and E are
among the most modern cruise
facilities in the world. On the
drawing board is the world's
largest multi-terminal facility,
potentially serving several cruise
vessels simultaneously. w


China
Hong Kong
Honduras
Germany
Guatemala
Dominican Republic
Jamaica
Italy
Panama
Venezuela
Colombia
Netherlands
Grand Cayman
Costa Rica
France
Bahamas
Trinidad & Tobago
Spain
Belgium
Haiti
Korea
Barbados
Chile
Japan
Taiwan


30 CARIBBEAN MARITIME MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010


% change
-3.1%
4.5%
.4% ......
-9%
-26%
-2.6%


Tonnes
.... 2;774"
342,761
335.178
333,267.
230,394
181,456
130,740
92,809
84,287
82,551
63,423
62.554S
53,431
49,532
47,952


%
/o
27.7 "o
10.29%
10.06%
6.92%
5.45%
3.93%
2.79%
2.53%
2.48%0

1.6%
1.49%
1.446%


Tonnes
...443,598
351,896
350,777
315,710
233,957
222,650
186,548
57,264
94,325

76,437
6873,23
68,579


%
12.67%
10.05%
10.02%
9.02%
8.54%
6.68%
6.36%
5.33%
4.49%.
2.69%
2.24%o
2.21%
2.18%
2.09%
1.96%


Tonnes
1,366,371
694,658
684,043
557,828
529,265
446,450
318,244
258,956
239,979
206,796
136,654
130,884
115,109
111,264
101,621
92,924
84,810
84,040
80,208
76,748
74,365
54,367
51,314
50,538
33.890




































I.OT FMIM 1:SMMR.


Year
TEU
Cargo ships docked
Cruise ships docked
Danccnnrce


WEakslp & Twcc W hmb h(
Flebd BaV 5111ies




MIAMI 13051- 06
US Genicra Agent Se@Freg AgaFieEs USA. Inc.
Wb Site stfirlighlagelinO1i


* Pamtl, D-cpcl d ha nvi b
- Ace-bae orseCkinrarDoft!


4E*M* Nw-
fif < e.in i


* Dry muitbrimlzd EnbAmar
11 l ls. %MaE fy A Ri h g It54Dck


JAcKSOMVL PORTEVILADES ARUBA BARBADOS BONAIRE CURACAO
Gt1NDCAYTMAN iREADA SUYANA HATI JAAICA MA RITA
PAMA ST.UICLA SC.lICEfM SUJAMIE TUIIIIAD VEEZUEIA


2004
1,009,500
2,153
719
SAGO KCRA


2005
1,054,462
2,147
734
z cncA 701


2006
976,514
1,937
757
Z 721 A O


"*tk **


'Service come-s

firSt Wit u .l





PANAMA CANAL EXPANSION


WORK CONTINUES APACE, ON


SCHEDULE CONTRACTORS TAKE


ADVANTAGE OF DRY SEASON


The contract for the design and
I construction of the third set of
locks, the main project of the Panama
Canal Expansion Programme, passed
the 200-day mark in March, shortly
before this issue of Caribbean Mari-
time went into production.
The consortium, Grupo Unidos por


el Canal (GUPC), took advantage of the
Panamanian dry season (first quarter of
the year) to mobilise heavy equipment
and to begin the material removal on
both the Pacific and Atlantic sides of the
Canal. As a result, the work continued
apace and within the schedules estab-
lished for the completion of the works in


1,883 days from the issuance of the order
to proceed on August 25, 2009.
EXCAVATION
The first two dry excavation contracts
of the Pacific Access Channel, which
will connect the third set of locks in
the Pacific to the Gaillard Cut, were







PkANAA CANAL EXANSO
0''O -i0.'0 66 0. 0 .

























































00! 0 -0* .
co petdi the first qure of 2010. Exaso Prora me 00 t inole th 00% ofthe w ork in th 0cfc a



Constucto0 Uran an h eia- cosruto 0.0 a. 3. km lon impe ri .C issue th ore o rcedt a








Mec. The reore 57 completionon
Febuar 280 1 0. Thi 00ore pecet

ag inlue the toa clarn of 19



that '0 '0r usda.ipoa 0ie. mershg,0na ewd rs the fi0s qure of 200, thec0 0'ac
On Janar 22 201 th Paam of abu 5 milio cui metres of fil. to bea the 00y exaato of 0.8
Canal Auhrt A P i ssue th ore milo cui mere of maeral It is '
to prce fo th fort an*atdyepce httefrto h qim n
exaato cotrc of 0.e Paii Aces '0nhie th drdgn work at '0e fo h rdigo 1. ilo ui

Chanel PAC4).Thisis he ecod m st etracesto he analconinu atfull metrs f m teral aong13. kmwil














NE~W OIL
DISCOVERY
IN G1ULF OF
MEXICO^i~






S hell anno~w~unced in ^
Marc1 fth a si gnfian Inew 8 11 ts
oil discoveryintheeastenH
GuHlf fMexlBHico, addin



to di^scoveries in heare

from 2009.The oil i
loatdatBthBe Appoatto
prospct, in 2,20 metre

(7,217 fet) of ater in^^


WIN7D TOPPLES^^
CRNE KILLS J^TE^^^^

PORT WORKERS



T he Bahiamil~as prtcm ui tyiw h adtagd lt o h


BBiBl

PLIPDECO
APPOINTS
PRESIDENT

E rnest Ashley Taylor
was appointed
President of PLIPIDECO
effective March 1, 2010.
Mr. Taylor joined PLIP-
DECO in July 2008 as
Vice President Port
Operations coming from
Digicel and, before that,
the Port Authority of
Jamaica where he was
Assistant Vice President
Operations. PLIPIDECO's
two core activities are:
(a) Industrial real estate
management and (b)
Port management and
operations, including
cargo handling serv-
ices. PLIPIDECO is the
owner and landlord of
the 860-hectare Point
Lisas Industrial Estate,
located on the west
coast of central Trinidad.
The Estate houses more
than 95 tenants: a mix
of world-class metha-
nol, ammonia and urea
plants, three steel plants
and a power plant. Port
Point Lisas, the second
major port in Trinidad
and Tobago, consists of
six general cargo and
container berths. The
facility handles a variety
of cargo including con-
tainerised, break bulk,
lumber, paper, consuma-
bles dry bulk and steel.





































StSh e U S2-m illio S n rdv lop ment
cuse temia in Famot will be S cS m-
plte by yea en.Tepoeticue


Bt~~~iTATh Cana Authrit reore that Canal transits increased^^^^^^^^^^^^
MORE SH^^^^~^BIPS to 3,590 transi^^^Mfy^^^^^B^^Bfts ^from 3520 yearearler. ransts f spe
H I "*v^~~esel and lage shp requrin inrese by 8.1 perceIBiil CR~ifl~gf ff M' n tlff
TRANSI CANAL^^& ^ INv to 2,2 trnst fromA 1,74 Trnst by dr bul A^^^^w^uxiliijdjUIBfJii ships and^^
^^_ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ akr inrasd Trnst of cotane ships, reI^^^^^^*^^BBHiBBfll^^^fB~m~frigerated
^Bn~i~cargo ships and car carriersi decreased. CanalaWaters


AAPA ELECTS CHAIRMAN

T he board of directors of the American Association of Port Authorities
(AAPA) elected A. J. Pete Reixach Jr. chairman at its spring conference
meeting on March 22, 2010. He will be formally installed in September
at the Annual Convention in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He is currently the
executive port director and CEO of Port Freeport (TX), a post he has held
for the past 24 years. All through that time he has been involved in AAPA
affairs, as a member of the board of directors, executive committee,
US legislative policy committee, and as a member and chairman of the
resolution committee. He is a past chairman of the Gulf Ports Associa-
tion of the Americas, and of the Gulf Seaports Marine Terminal Conference.









San Juan more cargo ships but less

cargo; decline in cruise business


MAITM AFAR

r SanLui Ai an Se Ports


t of San Juan recorded a
ry in cargo ship calls in
SThere were 3,123 cargo
s in the fiscal year as
with 2,225 in 2007-2008.
e 2,304 vessel calls in



spite the increase in cargo
o Rico's main port expe-
ntinuing decline in cargo
the last three fiscal years.
Ilion wharf tons in 2006-


2007, cargo moving through San Juan
declined to 9.4 million wharf tons in
2007-2008. Cargo moving across the
port declined further, down to 8.3 mil-
lion tons last year.
Cruise ship calls decline to 470 last
year, down from 581 the previous year
and 563 in 2006-2007.
Last year a total of 1.236 million pas-
sengers arrived in San Juan. This was a
decline of more than 17 per cent from
the 1.497 million the year before and
less than the 1.375 million passengers
who arrived in 2006-2007. m


POTO A UNFICLYAS 20-0 070 080



WH RAE(O S ,0,4 ,9,1 ,7,2







....... SHIP, CALLS 2,304li~ 2,22Sii 3,123ii~"


The Por
recove
2008-2009.
vessel visit
compared
There wer
2006-2007.
Increase
However, de
ships, Puert
rienced a co
landed over
From 9.6 mi


iiiiiiiiiiii









































SHIP OWNERS CAN SAVE MONEY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

WHEN SOLVING THE SLUDGE AND BILGE WATER ISSUE


Environmental issues are a growing
concern for companies involved in shipping
as well as for governments and global
organisations. Legislative actions already
in operation or coming in the near future
also focus on keeping the seas clean. One
concern for shipping companies, not only
in the Caribbean region, is how to deal
with the sludge and bilge issue. The ideal
solution would be to have a fully automatic
oily water treatment system to remove
practically all waste oil from the bilge water.


W ater is crucial to
most organisms on
our planet. Clean water,
especially, is something
that not only our environ-
ment depends on, but it
is crucial for the national
economies in the Carib-
bean region. The sea is in
many ways the biggest
economic asset in the Car-
ibbean. Beaches are less
attractive if polluted. Fish
are killed by oil and other
waste. Coral reefs, a major
dive attraction but part


of a fragile ecosystem,
are easily destroyed but
take a long, long time to
recover even if that were
possible.
CLEAR WATER,
CLEAR CONSCIENCE
The Caribbean Sea and its
island ports are visited by a
large number and variety of
vessel types, ranging from
huge cruise ships to gigantic
container vessels and tankers
passing through the Panama
Canal.


CARIBBEAN MARITIME I MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010 37






THE ENVIRONMENT



"A ship owner of today
wants to cut unnecessary
costs and at the same time
run an environmentally sus-
tainable business. The good
news is that we are now
able to help the owners with


this regarding the handling
of sludge and bilge," says
Marc Tarbox, Sales Manager,
Wartsila Caribbean, Inc. in
Puerto Rico.

TREATMENT
IMO requires that vessels
over 400 GWT have an oily
water treatment system
installed within three years
and that the oil content in
the discharged water is less
than 15 ppm (parts per mil-
lion). Shipping companies
also experience increasing
costs for disposal and
handling of sludge and
bilge water. Therefore
owners of these ships are
likely to be interested in
the Wartsila Senitec M-series
of oily water treatment
systems.
Shipping makes it possible
to move large quantities of
load with a minor impact on
infrastructure. As one of the
important actions for keep-
ing the seas clean, spills
of fuel oil on board should
end up in the sludge tank.
Simple separators do not
work efficiently enough
when it comes to surpassing


38 CARIBBEAN MARITIME I MAY


stringent regulation require-
ments.
"Achieving high reli-
ability and low effluent oil
discharges in the treatment
of bilge and sludge is highly
complicated," says Lars


Olsson, Manager, Service
Solution, Wartsila Sweden.
This is due to the complex
composition of oil, chemi-


cals, solids, rust, and other
fouling substances in the
bilge water. This composition
also varies over time, which
makes techniques like coa-
lescing and filtration unsuit-
able. Furthermore, emulsions
in the oil are not handled by
such technologies.

CONSTANT ATTENTION
Many separators of today
require constant attention.
This is both a cost and a
safety issue, as valuable engi-
neer time is removed from
other important tasks.
What makes the Wart-
sila Senitec M-series units
unique is the ease of use,
the completeness of the
design and, above all, the
fact that they surpass exist-


ing IMO regulation require-
ments with a wide safety
margin. Currently, the IMO
regulations have a limit of a
maximum of 15 ppm of oil in
the discharged water. "The
Senitec units are guaranteed
to produce a maximum of 5
ppm, and in all actual cases
the measurements are below
1 ppm," says Lars Olsson.
The M-Series is also certified
by IMO and US Coast Guard
and has been awarded type
approval for max 5 ppm oil in
effluent by Bureau Veritas.
The system can also be
extended with Wartsila's
BilgeGuardTM bilge discharge
monitor, which constantly
oversees and monitors the oil
content in all discharges over-
board. Should the oil content


"ACHIEVING HIGH RELIABILITY

AND LOW EFFLUENT OIL

DISCHARGES IN THE TREATMENT

OF BILGE AND SLUDGE IS HIGHLY

COMPLICATED"










rise above the set limit, the
flow will be re-routed back to
the sludge tank. The system
logs discharge quantity and
oil content as well as the time
and position of the vessel. All
data is stored in memory for
later retrieval.

HOW IT WORKS
The technology behind
Wartsila Senitec M-series is a
combination of optimised tra-
ditional methods, and innova-
tive new solutions. It consists
of a four-stage, emulsion-
breaking separator, where
each stage handles one key
component of the sludge and
bilge mix. It can handle input
flows with an oil content of


bilge water. Dispersed solids
(colloids) suspended in the
bilge water are stabilised by
negative electric charges on
their surfaces, causing them
to repel each other. Since this
prevents these charged par-
ticles from colliding to form
larger masses, called flocs,
they do not settle. Once the
suspended particles are floc-
culated into larger particles,
they can be removed from
the liquid by flotation.

DISSOLVED AIR FLOTATION
AND SLUDGE SKIMMING
Dissolved air flotation is used
to promote the separation
and subsequent removal of
the solids to the solids tank.


THE REDUCTION OF

BOTH SLUDGE AND BILGE

VOLUMES AMOUNT TO

SIGNIFICANT REDUCTIONS

IN DISCHARGE FEES


SolidPac unit. The SolidPac
add-on is a filtration system,
where the water content in
dry solids can be reduced
by as much as 95 percent,
lowering costs for disposal
ashore and simplifying the
solid waste handling process.

A WIN-WIN SITUATION
FOR ALL INVOLVED
The return on a Wartsila
Senitec investment is easy to
calculate for vessels visit-
ing ports where sludge and
bilge discharges are subject
to charges. The reduction
of both sludge and bilge
volumes amount to signifi-
cant reductions in discharge
fees. In the actual case study
shown in Table 2, a ro-ro
vessel with a DWT of 9 000


THE ENVIRONMENT


tons saved as much as 40%
for sludge disposal, and 92%
for bilge water disposal.

SAVINGS
"The total net savings were
sufficient to enable a very
short payback time based on
the reduction in discharge fees
alone. The need for less manual
labour, as well as the increased
safety margin towards IMO
regulations and the increased
safety in knowing that no
accidental spills will happen
due to the fail-safes built into
the system can be considered a
bonus," states Marc Tarbox.
The real winner, however,
is the environment. The oil
content in the discharged
water is significantly less than
with traditional systems. m


between 0% and 100%,
making it the most versatile
separator on the market, the
company claims.

DISSOLVED AIR FLOTATION
AND OIL SKIMMING
By a combination of dissolved
air and a unique dual oil zone
interface stage, the oil floats
to the surface, where it is
skimmed off and pumped to
the waste oil (sludge) tank.

EMULSION BREAKING
The processes of coagula-
tion and flocculation are
employed to separate the
suspended solids from, and
break the emulsions in, the


The open design of the
system makes it easy to have
full control and to maintain
and run the unit with a mini-
mum of effort.

ACTIVATED
CARBON FILTRATION
The fourth stage consists of
a traditional active carbon
filter. This filter is only for
final cleansing of the water
before discharge. Field
studies show that the water
contains less than 1 ppm
after the filter.
The solids in the solids
tank can be processed and
dewatered further through
the use of a Wartsila Senitec


* ff-port container terminal
. A mlrg transportation fleet
* Supermadcers for greater effcency
* A235 mere pir whch allows two
ships to be disharged sirmutaneusly



Jh Fenandes Ltd.
41::tissalisi:M


CARIBBEAN MARITIME I MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010 39


















YOUR CARGO IS SAFE WITH US Traymore N.V.


/E






GRANTLEY STEPHENSON i


New CSA vice president comes



with a lot of experience


n October last, when the CSA mem-
bership voted for a new President
for the year 2009 to 2010, they also
elected Grantley Stephenson from
Jamaica as Vice President to under-
study Carlos Urriola for the period.
Grantley Stephenson has been a
member of the CSA's General Coun-
cil for many years, most recently as
Group B chairman. In that role he has
had to take the lead on issues spe-
cific to the ports and terminals group
of the regional body. However, in his
new capacity as Vice President, he will
experience the CSA from a different
perspective. He will be working more
closely with the President than any other
elected member of the General Council
and in that regard will be party to all of
the executive decisions taken in imple-
menting CSA policy.

CEO
Back in Kingston, Mr. Stephenson runs
Kingston Wharves Ltd. (KWL) one of
two entities that comprise the port of
Kingston. (The other is the Kingston
Container Terminal.) He has been its


opment. He had overall responsibility for
Sales, Finance, Equipment Management
and Traffic, in Kingston and Montego
Bay; and, for the establishment of an
efficient and profitable bonded ware-
house in Montego Bay.

AGENCY
Prior to that, between 1988 and 1999,
he was Managing Director of Jamaica
Freight & Shipping Co. Ltd. which then
represented six major shipping lines.
He was also responsible for the agency
at Port Esquivel and for maintaining
good relations with the various Alcan
offices locally and overseas, and with
the owners and charterers of the vessels
using that port
In his long career in shipping, Mr.
Stephenson has seen it all. He had
responsibility for operating the m/v
Morant Bay on behalf of the Govern-
ment for over ten years. And it was
he who ultimately negotiated the sale
of m/v Morant Bay He established a
P&l Representative Company and was
responsible for establishing Coastal
Shipping and for operations of the


In his long career in shipping, Mr. Stephenson

has seen it all. He had responsibility for

operating the m/v Morant Bayon behalf of the

Government for over ten years

Chairman and CEO since July 2004 and m/v Jamaica Provider He represented
has therefore been in the forefront of the Jamaica Government's interest in
moves designed to reorganise and repo- Port Services Ltd., from 1975-1987 and
sition the company. came up through the ranks at Jamaica
Previously, as CEO at Seaboard Merchant Marine, from Management
Freight and Shipping Jamaica Ltd., Mr. Trainee to Acting General Manager.
Stephenson established Seaboard's He has negotiated Time Charters
representative office in Kingston and and Contracts of Affreightment for bulk
carried responsibility for Business Devel- vessels and has participated in negotia-


tions for purchase of vessels. He has
been responsible for ship operations and
established crew training for Ratings and
arranged for Training of Officers. He has
led negotiations with Government for
enactment of legislation to facilitate the
operations of the National Shipping Line
and has had to keep step with Jamaica
government policy through direct con-
tact with its various ministries.

PRESIDENT
Mr. Stephenson was elected President
of the Shipping Association of Jamaica
in 1998 and served in this capacity until
2002. His service to his national associa-
tion goes beyond that however. He has
been a member of its Managing Com-
mittee since 1990.
Still serving as Honorary Consul
General of the Kingdom of Norway in
Jamaica, Mr. Stephenson was in 2007
awarded a National Honour by the
Government of Jamaica the Order of
Distinction, in the Rank of Commander.
He comes to the CSA's leadership
with credentials but also with a lot of
experience. m

CARIBBEAN MARITIME I MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010 41






NEWSMAKER


Petrelluzzi receives


French Government's


Maritime Merite medal


G rard Petrelluzzi, long-standing
member of the Caribbean
Shipping Association and former
member of the CSA's General Coun-
cil has been honoured by the French
Government with the Maritime
Merite medal.
Mr. Petrelluzzi received the decoration
on January 29, 2010 at Pointe a Pitre.
The notification, translated literally,
stated: "Gerard Petrelluzzi was hon-
oured by receiving the medal of the high
distinction of the Maritime Merite as
Chevalier de I'Ordre National du Merite
Maritime, a high distinction in the
French Maritime industry."
Born on February 2, 1951 at Pointe
a Pitre, Gerard has been in shipping for
almost all his professional life.
After gaining a bachelor degree he
entered law school and after two years

AS A MEMBER OF THE
CARIBBEAN SHIPPING
ASSOCIATION, GERARD
WAS CHAIRMAN OF
GROUP A IN 1992
AND 1993
received a DEUG (Diplome Universitaire
d'Etudes Generales) diploma from the
Institut Vizioz in 1969. He later left
Guadeloupe for Miami where he worked
as a trainee at the well-known shipping
company Chester Blackburn and Roder.
Gerard subsequently returned to Guad-
eloupe and was employed at Monnot
Agency, a shipping agency representing

42 CARIBBEAN MARITIME MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010


KNSM, Harrison Line, Suriname Line,
and others. Monnot Agency decided
to sell its shipping activities to Agence
Petrelluzzi.
Agence Petrelluzzi was established in
Pointe a Pitre by Captain Leopoldo Pet-
relluzzi. Capt. Petrelluzzi had arrived in
Guadeloupe with a three-mast sail ship,
the Leopoldo in 1896. He put down
roots there and started the company,
which was passed from father to son.
PRESIDENT
Gerard entered Agence Petrelluzzi
almost 100 years later, in 1980, where
he worked in Operations, in Sales, Steve-
doring and in the Cruise Department.
In that same year, 1980, he became
a Member of the Board of the Guad-
eloupe Tourism Office, where he is still
a member. In 1986, he became the first
president of the Guadeloupe Shipping
Association to welcome a CSA confer-
ence to that country. That was the 16th
Annual General Meeting in October
1986. Gerard remained as President of
the Guadeloupe Shipping Association
until 1994, and is nowadays Honourable
member of UMEP (L'Union Maritime et
Portuaire) Guadeloupe. He is also active
in the Chamber of Commerce of Guad-
eloupe where he has been a member
since 1986.
In 1994, the old Agence Petrelluzzi
was sold to Delmas group and Gerard
founded, with Delmas group as co-
founder, SGCM. He is he still working
there as Sales Manager.
Gerard is known as a strong defender
of the cruise industry, promoting
Guadeloupe in several associations such


as UMEP, the CSA, Seatrade and the
Florida-Caribbean Cruise Association.
He succeeded in bringing Regency
Cruises to Marie Galante island for the
first time, with the Regent Sun. This was
on October 16, 1989. Subsequently,
he developed cruising at Les Saintes,
Deshaies, where no cruise ship had
called before, with the Club Med 2.
As a Member of the Caribbean Ship-
ping Association, Gerard was Chairman
of Group A in 1992 and 1993. He has
also been a member of the CSA's Silver
Club since 2004.
MEDAL
The Maritime Merite medal is not the
first national recognition for Gerard.
He had previously received the medal
of Tourism from the French Minister of
Tourism in 1992. In 2006, he received
the Maritime Merite, from the French
Minister of Transport and now, four
years later, he has received the medal
for that distinction.
He is married and has three children. m




me. w*ow

























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.....................................................................................*..................
CAIBEA MARITIM I 0.Y SE0.EMB000'10





































Avi dl MinnI fir mni1oL than 25 \.ears has
pr, idod direct, tixed-day ~uilin beween
ihe I niCte SItI., C(ribh(' an RaIin. C'Inr al
ani~ Sulth Animerrii.
(,enenvcn schedules co ned With
ItnrIIahed cusLomnwr service and an
expa~iding fleet of ship- inu lded by a
company of dehcated proflsinals. hal
become our tra~mark.

We Of 1r
* Reliable rice frm MiaminloriA to
the Caribbean
* Intrccntinn within the Carihcan
* L worldwide parts via Miami


The leader in ocean

Stransportation

in the Caribbean


L1I
SErstCc,






E^THE HUMAN FACTOR


Is your manager doing a


number on your business?


M ost employees seem
to think that the
most stressful part of
their job is their immedi-
ate manager or supervi-
sor. The numbers suggest
that workplaces are filled
with too many unhappy
working relationships.
Does this mean there is a
deficiency in leadership?
According to Barry Pos-
ner's Leadership Challenge,
there are three important
things about leaders. Firstly,
competent leaders are per-
ceived as having four charac-
teristics in common: a high
level of integrity they keep
their word and tell the truth;
they are decisive they make
sound and timely decisions
that are logical; they are per-
ceived as being competent
- strong in some particular
aspect of the business; and,
as visionary they link the
present with the future and
see the opportunities.


Secondly, they are humble
and persistent.
Thirdly, two out of three
persons in leadership posi-
tions will fail; they will be
demoted, fired or sidelined.
The most common reason
for their failure will be their
inability to build and maintain
a team. Their inability to build


a team will be a function of
certain dysfunctional disposi-
tions; and interpersonal ten-
dencies which are not usually
seen in a job interview. These
tendencies usually show up
when people are under stress
or they let down their guard. I'll
discuss here some of the major
dysfunctional dispositions.

Arrogance she is right
and everyone else is wrong
Arrogance can be described
as excessive pride, self-blind-
ing brilliance or inflated worth.
One of the most difficult bal-
ancing acts in the leadership
walk is between confidence
and too much confidence.
If you are going to succeed
as a leader you need to have
confidence in your abilities.
On the other hand, all it takes
to fail as a leader is to have too
much confidence.
Watch out for arrogance.
It can be highly visible but it
can also be subtle. In either


case it leads to the downfall
of careers and companies.

Volatility his mood
swings are sudden and
unpredictable
It is often said that volatile
leaders vibrate with energy
that can be contagious for
the organisation. When they


are up, they are positive
and energised. They com-
mand attention and respect,
motivating and inspiring their
team in ways that others
can't. On the flip side, their
negative bad-tempered phase
is excused either as a natural
reaction to the job's frustra-
tion; or as a price that has to
be paid for the expenditure of
all that energy.
A volatile leader often
seems unpredictable. Though
these leaders throw off great
energy, they ironically can
also drain it away as people
attempt to adjust to their
moods.

Over cautious the
next decision you make
may be your first
Balancing between new
regulatory requirements and
demands from boards in the
current business environment
can make leaders highly
vulnerable to becoming


overcautious, overanalysing
important decisions in the
face of increased anxiety and
significant stress.
Fear of making the wrong
decision causes procrastina-
tion. Instead of making a
choice the manager delves
deeper into the data. Soon
the problem spirals out of


By Fritz Pinnock
control, the opportunity for
solution is missed, and the
very failure that the effort
was aimed at avoiding is
brought on by indecision.
Today, CEOs who are
overly cautious frequently
fail. There's too much data to
analyse.

Habitual distrust the
focus is on the negatives
Distrust gives rise to the crea-
tion of a 'hit list' of enemies.
It will cause one to seek
information on the activities
of adversaries. It prevents
formation of partnerships that
can help to accomplish more.
Given the litigious work-
place and regulatory require-
ments, it would be unusual
if one is not wary of what
is right and wrong. There
is a difference, however,
between healthy skepticism;
and, virulent distrust. The
former involves being realis-
tic, responding appropriately
to circumstance and envi-
ronment; the latter involves
being inappropriately and
egregiously suspicious.
The leader who is consist-
ently distrustful sends a mes-
sage that people had better
watch their backs rather than
their work. Failure comes
because people don't take
risk under that steely gaze.
They don't believe in them-


46 CARIBBEAN MARITIME MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010


A volatile leader often seems unpredictable.

Though these leaders throw off great energy,

they ironically can also drain it away...






A MATTER OF LAW


selves because the distrustful
leader seems not to believe
in them.

Aloofness disengaged
and disconnected
Smart and dispassionate, the
aloof CEO generally succeeds
by analytical rather than
people skills. In the old-fash-
ioned sense of the term, this
is a leader who can rise above
the fray to make cool-headed,
fiercely rational decisions.
Being aloof has its advan-
tages. CEOs of this bent
usually don't get caught up
in politics or messy people
problems. They're all busi-
ness, which means they are
rarely accused of playing
favourites. People often feel
confident in aloof leaders
because such leaders seem to
know their business and are
dedicated to doing it well.
However, when aloof
leaders are under stress, they
often become withdrawn.
This is where things go off
course. When they isolate
themselves during crises or
retreat from people who are
desperately in need of their
guidance, they are highly
likely to fail.
Some leaders will admit
to being aloof but argue that
it is 'just part of my per-
sonality'. They are unaware
that this trait cuts them off
from the kind of emotional
relationships with others that
could inspire commitment.
They also miss out on the rich
resources of ideas in their
team and thus become overly
reliant on a narrow range of
information. It is important
to note that this de-railer is
often mistaken for arrogance
but the two are different. A
person can be aloof without
being arrogant. m


US International Port


Security Programme


A collaborative approach


The United States of
America has charged
its Coast Guard with the
administration of a vital
plank of its anti-terrorism
response and its quest
for 'homeland secu-
rity'. Under its Maritime
Transportation Security
Act, 2002 ('MTSA'), one of
several pieces of legisla-
tion fathered by the tragic
events of September 11,
2001, the United Sates
Congress has given the
United States Coast Guard
('USCG'), inter alia, the
responsibility of policing
not only the ports of the
United States, but also the
ports of the world!


The USCG's
International Port
Security Programme
The USCG has adopted a
comprehensive approach to
shouldering the responsibility
outlined above. Its Interna-
tional Port Security Pro-
gramme ('USCG IPSP') while
obviously and unapologeti-
cally a result of the United
Sates' response to the threat
of terrorism and the need
to secure its borders and,
therefore, the security of the
'homeland', is at the same
time a genuinely collabora-
tive framework in which to
engage foreign states in a
joint global effort. To be sure,


anti-terrorism is not the 'be
all and end all' of the USCG
IPSP, but it is a focus.
The Programme enjoins
the support and collabora-
tion of US trading partners
by encouraging best prac-
tices in maritime vessel and
facilities security, structured
exchanges and recipro-
cal country visits which are
intended to build relation-
ships, transfer technology
and promote best practices.
Finding common ground at
the policy level while adopt-
ing standard best practices
at the operational level,


By Milton Samuda

cooperative countries its best
practices; and, learns from
those countries' innovative
measures utilized to over-


The result of the exchange of
realities and the collaboration
between countries is an enriched
and enhanced capacity to fight
terrorism and maintain safety


underpins the collaborative
approach that the Coast
Guard takes in the implemen-
tation of its IPSP and in the
discharge of its responsibili-
ties under the MTSA.

Framework
The USCG has made its per-
sonnel available in a consulta-
tive capacity as part of its col-
laborative approach. Within
the framework of country
visits and other policy efforts,
the USCG raises issues and
areas of concern; shares with


come particular or unique
challenges. When the USCG
raises concerns, this may be
of a general international
nature, such as enjoining
support for certain interna-
tional interventions, or may
be specific to the country
and ports being addressed,
such as the ability to achieve
and maintain certain secu-
rity levels. The result of the
exchange of realities and
the collaboration between
countries is an enriched and
enhanced capacity to fight


CARIBBEAN MARITIME IMAY SEPTEMBER 2010 47







A MATTER OF LAW



terrorism and maintain the
safety of vessels and facilities
for the benefit of interna-
tional maritime trade.
Caribbean countries and
ports have embraced that
collaborative approach. The
USCG has visited several terri-
tories including The Bahamas,
Costa Rica, Curacao, the
Dominican Republic, Jamaica,
Panama, and Trinidad and
Tobago. These bi-lateral
discussions have enhanced
practices and built capacity.

Port Security
Advisories
In encouraging best prac-
tices, a key component of
the USCG's strategy is to
constantly review and assess
the anti-terrorism measures
employed and deployed by
foreign ports, especially ports
at which vessels have called
prior to arriving in the USA.
This is a part of the statutory
mandate given to the USCG.
This review and assessment
is not an academic exer-
cise. It is a real and ongoing
programme with practical
consequences the chief of
which can be the refusal of
entry to a vessel seeking to


enter a port of the United
States. Whether arising from
specific knowledge (e.g. due
to a country visit) or from
a lack of knowledge (e.g.
because of an inability to
verify information), the result
of the USCG's determination
that a country has failed to
maintain satisfactory anti-ter-
rorism measures at its ports,
is usually the imposition of
additional measures against
any vessel visiting such ports.
On January 16, 2009, the
USCG issued Port Security
Advisory (1-09) which, inter
alia, announced that "The
Coast Guard has determined
that Venezuela is the most
recent country not maintain-
ing effective anti-terrorism
measures in its ports." The
Advisory went on to establish
actions to be taken by vessels
that "arrive in the United
States on or after January 23,
2009 after visiting ports in
Venezuela as one of their last
five ports of call".

Result
That same Advisory cited
Cuba among a number of
other countries. The result
was that vessels qualified


as above, were mandated
to employ the additional
measures prescribed in the
Advisory "as a condition of
entry into US ports". Meas-
ures required will apply to
the vessel both prior to its
arrival in the Unites States as
well while it is docked in the
US port.

Advisory
On January 25, 2010, the
USCG issued a Port Security
Advisory for Haiti. The Advi-
sory specifically stated, "Due
to the devastation caused
by the recent earthquake
the US government has
concerns regarding Haiti's
current ability to execute,
maintain and audit the port
facility requirements of the
International Ship and Port
Facility Security (ISPS) Code".
As a result, measures were
recommended for vessels
calling at Haitian ports. The
Advisory ended by stating
that "Implementing the
above recommended secu-
rity measures will generally
expedite vessel entry into
the US." One can readily see
the difference in tone and
consequence of this Advisory


when compared with that of
January 16, 2009 concerning
Venezuela. The Haitian situa-
tion was, after all, the direct
result of an act of nature.

Collaboration
Caribbean countries and
ports should continue
their collaboration with the
USCG so as to enhance safe
maritime traffic and trade
between US ports and the
ports of the Caribbean. It is
true that the anti-terrorism
response has implications for
port fees, the cost of voyages,
delays of vessels and can even
result in vessels refusing to call
at certain ports. Additionally,
the law must be concerned
with the potential impact
on bi-lateral arrangements,
contractual obligations and
some treaty requirements.
However, the greater good
is the safe transport of cargo
and persons by sea.
Isn't that what has always
been at the heart of the
intent of international mari-
time law? m

Milton Samuda is managing
partner of the Jamaican-based
law firm Samuda & Johnson.


48 CARIBBEAN MARITIME MAY- SEPTEMBER 2010




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