Group Title: Caribbean today (Miami, Fla.)
Title: Caribbean today
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00099285/00009
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean today
Uniform Title: Caribbean today (Miami, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 38 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Caribbean Pub. Services
Place of Publication: Miami Fl
Miami Fl
Publication Date: September 2006
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Economic conditions -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1989.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 3, published in 1999; title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00099285
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 40985415

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O SEPTEMBER 2006


cItff @ciTh
Oi. O\I^~LJ


e r y


o u r w o r I d


PRESORTED
STANDARD
j,,, U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
MIAMI, FL
PERMIT NO. 7315

Tel: (305) 238-2868
1-800-605-7516
caribtoday@earthlink.net
ct ads@bellsouth.net


I T E M LTIAW RD-INNNG EW MA AZIE


Many people who are not
affected by migraine
headaches, a legitimate health
condition, continue to believe
commonly-held myths about
migraine, page 13.


Next month, Bicentennial
Park will be the venue for the
Miami Carnival 2006 Parade &
Festival, the closing of a
series of fetes and special
events that showcase colorful
Caribbean celebration,
page 16.


New s .................... 2
View point ................ 9
Education/Youth ..........11


INSIDE
Health ................... 13 Business ................ 17 Region .................. 21
Food .................... 15 Sport .................... 19 Politics .................. 22
Arts/Entertainment ....... 16 Tourism/Travel ........... 20 FYI ...................... 23


W e


c 0 V









-usw^caribbeantodj..c..


CARIBBEAN TODAY


n e WS


September 2006


Lack of funds ground around-the-world solo flight by young Jamaican.. .for now


GORDON WILLIAMS
Jamaican-born pilot
Barrington Irving's plan to
fly solo around the world
has been grounded for a while
longer due to lack of funding
to support the venture.
According to the 22-year-
old Irving, who lives in South
Florida and wanted to become
the youngest ever to complete
the journey, the Sept. 1 take-off
could not get the green light
because he had not secured the
$1 million needed. Fundraising


for the project has so far netted
about $700,000.
"Basically we still have to
meet the fundraising goal,"
Irving told Caribbean Today
last month.
He said the new departure
date for "Experience Aviation
World Tour", an east-to-west
route which is expected to take
30 days with more than 90
hours flying time beginning in
Florida, is being re-scheduled
for sometime next spring. Any
take-off before that would not
be wise, Irving explained, due


to the expected change of
weather patterns, especially on
his return, which could result
in his Columbia 400 aircraft
flying into dangerous winter
conditions.
"There was no possibility
of going (anytime soon) after
Sept. 1," he said. "That would
be winter time, if I was sup-
posed to leave say in October.
Anytime later than September
the window closes."

AVIATION BOOST
Irving originally con-


~Centrinoc 1k


ceived the idea to fly solo
around the world to convince
young people especially
minorities that aviation is a
great career and that any goal
can be accomplished if gen-
uine commitment is applied to
the task. He holds
public seminars
and lectures at
schools to pro-
mote those ideals.
However, he said
companies, the
main targets of
his fundraising
efforts, have been
asking for more
in return for their
contribution.
"Corporations,
the dollars we are
asking for, they
want to see more
than me just talk-
ing to kids," he
said.
So, the man
who prides him-
self on his
Caribbean roots, Irving inspects
emphasizing that
his "values, character and
principles are built on my
Jamaican background," has
embarked on an additional
project. He plans to open a
learning center at his base, the
Opa-Locka Airport in Florida,


to teach middle and high
school students about careers
in aviation.

MOTIVATION
In the meantime, Irving
said he has been able to han-



^^^ ^,


^^- H *"


dle the disappointment of
postponing his dream, prefer-
ring to look at the positives he
has accomplished so far.
"I've still made great
progress from where I was six
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4)


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BRIDGETOWN, Barbados,
CMC An Internet scam pur-
porting to come from the
United States Internal Revenue
Service (IRS) has resurfaced,
the U.S. embassy in Barbados
and the eastern Caribbean
reported late last month.
According to the embassy,
the scam resurfaced earlier in
August when a number of
persons received "notifica-
tion" purportedly from the
IRS claiming they were enti-
tled to a refund and all that
was needed was for the recipi-
ent to give their credit card
number and the money would
be credited to their account.
"It is not the practice of the
IRS to request this type of
information via e-mail. The IRS
warns that care should always
be taken when disclosing per-
sonal information," the
embassy warned in a statement.
Jim Dupree, a spokesman
for the IRS in Baltimore, said
the scam was very serious
since "people see something
(purporting to be) coming
from a government agency as
more serious and needs more
attention."
The embassy said the
frauds send an e-mail to indi-
viduals posing as an IRS rep-


resentative informing them
that, if they are awaiting a
refund, they can check the
progress of the refund by
clicking on a link contained
in the email.

LINK
This link directs individu-
als to a website that requests
personal information including
Social Security Numbers (SSN)
and credit card information
and the website may also
attempt to infect systems with
malicious code. According to
the embassy, the IRS has
investigated 12 phishing scams
from 11 countries since
November last year. Last
month the IRS received exam-
ples of nearly 1,300 fake email
correspondence from con-
cerned taxpayers.
Taxpayers have been
urged to be suspicious of
emails that urge them to
act quickly or their accounts
will be suspended or closed,
emails that are generic and
don't address them by name
or any e-mails requesting
personal information such as
account numbers, SSN credit
card numbers or pass words.
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September 2006


CARIBBEAN TODAY

n e WS


Jamaica's P.M. among most powerful women in the world


KINGSTON, Jamaica, CMC -
Jamaica's Prime Minister
Portia Simpson Miller has
been included in the United
States-based Forbes Magazine
list of the 100 most powerful
women in the world.
Simpson Miller is the only
person from the Caribbean
included on the list. She was
ranked at number 89.
According to Forbes
Magazine, German
Chancellor Angela Merkel
has overtaken U.S. Secretary
of State Dr. Condoleezza Rice
as the world's most powerful
woman. Merkel was not
included in the Forbes top
100 index in 2005.
Chilean President

Accountant jailed

in N.Y. for swindling

Bermuda gov't
HAMILTON, Bermuda, CMC
- A 35-year-old Bermudian
accountant, who stole almost $2
million in the bi--,-l ever fraud
against the Bermuda govern-
ment, has been jailed for four
years and seven months in New
York City, the Royal Gazette
newspaper has reported.
Harrison Isaac, Jr. looted
a Bank of New York account
set up by the Bermuda gov-
ernment to pay vendors in
United States dollars under
post-9/11 financial regulations.
Isaac was employed in
the Accountant General's
Department, where he was
given sole responsibility for the
online account in question. He
exploited a loophole in safety
checks to siphon off $1,899,888
through Internet transfers over
an eight-month period from
May 2003.
The offenses were deemed
to have taken place in New
York, and addressing the U.S.
District Court in Manhattan
that dealt with Isaac last
month, Bermuda's Attorney
General Larry Mussenden said
he had let the island down.
Isaac was caught by police
while at Bermuda International
Airport in April 2004. He had
an outbound ticket to Atlanta,
Georgia and was found with
five access cards for the
Bank of New York account
in the names of staff from
the Accountant General's
Department as well as hand-
written notes saying: "Sell
everything", "liquidate", and
"reset password".
He was arrested and in
Nov. 2004 extradited to the
U.S. where he remained in cus-
tody up until last month's hear-
ing. Isaac pleaded guilty to 15
fraud-related charges during a
previous court session.
0


Michelle Bachelet is listed at
number 17, while Liberian
President Ellen Johnson-
Sirleaf took 51st position
and South Korean Prime
Minister Han Myung-sook
made it onto the list at 68.
Other leading women
politicians include the Chinese
Vice-Premier Wu Yi, known


in China as the "Iron Lady",
who dropped one place to
number three.
Simpson Miller, who was
appointed prime minister ear-
lier this year, has been leading
in a recent poll published in
the Jamaica Observer newspa-
per. The poll states that more
Jamaicans believe that


Simpson Miller and the ruling
People's National Party (PNP)
would do a better job of run-
ning the country than the
Opposition Jamaica Labour
Party( JLP) led by Bruce
Golding.
0


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CARIBBEAN TODAY

n e WS


September 2006


Caribbean workers return to U.S. jobs after Hurricane Katrina


GORDON WILLIAMS
Many Jamaican work-
ers who fled the
United States after
Hurricane Katrina's extensive
damage to their workplaces
are back on the job, according
to at least one employer.
The management of Beau
Rivage Biloxi said that it has
retained a full quota of rough-
ly 200 Jamaican workers,
although not all of those were
on the job last August when
Katrina lashed the Mississippi
resort, forcing it to close.
"We have about the same
number, but not all of them
were here previously," Beau
Rivage Biloxi's Director of
Human Resources Rogena
Barnes told Caribbean Today
late last month when the
resort officially reopened.
"Not all of them came back."
According to Barnes,
some of the workers had since
taken jobs with other resorts
in the U.S. and were unable to
break their contracts to return
to Beau Rivage Biloxi. She


KINGSTON, Jamaica, CMC -
National Security Minister Dr.
Peter Phillips and United
States Ambassador to Jamaica
Brenda LaGrange Johnson
have signed a $529,300 agree-
ment to assist Jamaica in
securing its borders against
drug trafficking.
"Illegal drugs are often
exported to the United States;
they often poison and distort
our own local environment, so
the governments of Jamaica
and the United States have a
mutual interest in ensuring
that we reduce the impact of


said "roughly a third" of the
original 200 had returned.
"They had opportunities
to work for other companies
while we were rebuilding,"
Barnes explained. "They just
couldn't leave until their time
had had expired."

SCARED, ANGRY
Last August most of those
guest workers, who were
employed mainly in house-
keeping and maintenance jobs,
wanted to do anything but stay
in Biloxi. Traumatized by the
fury of Katrina, the worst nat-
ural disaster in the history of
the U.S., which had forced
them to evacuate their lodg-
ings and live on bare necessi-
ties for days at a shelter with-
out proper sanitary conven-
iences, many vowed never to
return to work in the U.S.
"We were scared," Serene
Samuels told Caribbean Today
on the day she left for Jamaica
last year.
Some workers were also
angry at what they called the
unfair treatment they received


illegal drugs
through our
own territori-
al space and
prevent its
export to
other coun-
tries, includ-
ing the Phillips
United
States," Phillips said at the
recent signing ceremony.
He said that the funds
would provide a further boost
in the fight against drug traf-
ficking in Jamaica.
0


in terms of compensation
prior to their departure.
Workers showed Caribbean
Today checks valued as low as
44 cents. The workers argued
that although Beau Rivage
Biloxi secured transportation
for them to the shelters and
generally treated them well,
they did not believe the resort
should have deducted certain
expenses after the tragedy.
"What happened, (the
Jamaicans) believed that they
(Beau Rivage Biloxi) should-
n't take any rent from their
pay because we were there
not working more than a week
(during the hurricane)," said
Delroy Coke, a floor care
worker at the time.
The issue was raised by
the workers with Jamaica's


Ministry of Labour when
they returned home to the
Caribbean island. Caribbean
Today's efforts to contact the
relevant government authori-
ties in Jamaica and the U.S.
were unsuccessful late last
month.
Beau Rivage Biloxi, mean-
while, chose not to address the
issue of the workers' compen-
sation.
"We are not allowed to
discuss compensation," Barnes
said late last month. "That is
one particular thing we don't
discuss with the public."
However, Barnes said
Beau Rivage Biloxi was happy
that Jamaican workers decid-
ed to return to the job and the
resort was pleased with their
performances.


Katrina, a Category Five
hurricane, swept through the
southern U.S., including the
states of Florida, Louisiana,
Alabama and Mississippi.
Some 350 Jamaican employ-
ees, primarily in Mississippi
and Lousiana, were out of
jobs after the hurricane, which
killed roughly 1,700 people,
231 in Mississippi. Louisiana
was the hardest hit, with near-
ly 1,500 deaths in that state
attributed to the hurricane.

Gordon Williams is Caribbean
Today's managing editor.
0


Lack of funds ground around-the-world solo

flight by young Jamaican.. .for now

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2) Gordon Williams is 2006 you may e-mail him at
or three months ago," he Caribbean Today's managing editor@caribbeantoday.com.
explained. "(The postpone- editor. Beginning Nov. 1,
ment) is discourag-
ing, but at the
same time it moti-
vates me."
Irving is
encouraged by the
progress because,
he admitted, when
he first conceived
the idea for the
solo flight he didn't
really believe he
could pull it off.
In addition, the
amount raised so
far has also exceed-
ed his expectations.
Now there is no '
turning back.
"It will be
done," he said.
But, Irving
added, a wise
approach is neces-
sary. By the time
he eventually
makes the journey
he will have turned
23, yet flying
before the weather
clears next spring
would go against
one of the same
principles he has
taught the children
he visits... ..
"It's just
not the safest or
smartest (thing
to do)," he
explained about
tackling unfavor-
able winter condi-
tions in a small i
plane, especially in .
places like Alaska.
"You'd just be ask-
ing for trouble." Irving


Jamaica, U.S. sign border

security agreement




CARIBBEAN TODAY


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September 2006




CARIBBEAN TODAY


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CARIBBEAN TODAY


ne u Ws

-~ Elections in Guyana

Jagdeo leads ruling PPP/C

back to power in Guyana


GEORGETOWN, Guyana -
The incumbent People's
Progressive Party Civic
(PPP/C) government, led by
Bharrat Jagdeo, has formed
Guyana's ninth government
since the developing country
gained political Independence
from Britain 40 years ago.
The victory in the Aug. 28
elections secured another five-
year term for the PPP/C.
Jagdeo's party won 36 of 65
parliamentary seats and 183,887
or 54.6 percent of the 338,839
valid votes cast in regional and
general elections to beat its
main rival the People's National
Congress Reform One Guyana
(PNCR-1G) in both polls.
The PNCR-1G won 22
seats with 114,608 votes, while
the newly formed Alliance for
Change won five seats after
securing 28,366 votes.
Absent from Parliament
will be the Rise Organise and
Rebuild (ROAR) Movement;
The United Force (TUF) headed


by Manzoor Nadir, Tourism,
Industry and Commerce Minister
in the last PPP/C government; and
the Guyana Action Party (GAP),
which held a combined five seats

Parliament.
In the last
Parliament,
the PPP/C got
34 seats; the
PNC/R 27;
GAP/WPA
two; ROAR Jagdeo
one; and TUF
one.

'WALK WITH ME'
The 42-year-old Jagdeo
was sworn in as Guyana's sixth
executive president at a cere-
mony at State House in the
capital less than a week after
the elections and immediately
called on citizens of the multi-
racial republic to "walk
with me" in developing
the Caribbean community
(CARICOM) state.


"I am fully aware on the
responsibilities that now fall on
my shoulders very human
shoulders," Jagdeo said. "These
are responsibilities that I cannot
carry out alone. I need you to
walk with me, as I walk with you
along the road of development."
Last month's elections
turned out to be a largely
peaceful exercise. The PPP/C
had also won the violent and
bloody 1992, 1997 and 2001
polls comfortably.
The principal election con-
testants complained of low voter
turnout for the 2006 polls. In
1997 voter turnout was 86.4 per-
cent and climbed in 2001 to 89.4
percent.
Jagdeo, a Russian-trained
economist, will have to grapple
with an ailing economy, as well as
dealing delicately with bridging
the bitter racial divide between
the two main ethnic groups here.
0


Voters in Guyana wait in line outside a polling station for a chance to make their choices.


Voting process satisfies

CARICOM observer mission


GEORGETOWN, Guyana -
The Caribbean community
(CARICOM) electoral
observer mission which moni-
tored the recent regional and
general elections in Guyana
has expressed "general satis-
faction" with the conduct of
the poll.
In a statement released
days after the Aug. 28 polls,
the team said while some peo-
ple encountered problems
locating their polling stations
at locations with multiple sta-
tions, the Guyana Elections
Commission (GECOM) did


its best to facilitate electors
when these problems arose.
"The CARICOM
Electoral Observer Mission
is pleased with the way in
which the process of voting
was conducted and expresses
its general satisfaction with
the logistical arrangements
for the conducting of the
poll," the team, which was
led by Hensley Robinson, a
former chief electoral officer
in Barbados said.
"The CARICOM
Electoral Observer Mission
acknowledges, with satisfac-


tion, the efforts of all involved
in the multiple aspects of the
electoral process. The
Observer Mission is especially
encouraged by the participa-
tion of Guyana's youth", the
13-member team said in its
statement issued through the
CARICOM Secretariat.
The Organization of
American States (OAS) also
said it was pleased with the
conduct of the polls. It said it
was also pleased that the elec-
tions had passed off peacefully.
0


GEORGETOWN, Guyana -
The Guyana Private Sector
Commission (PSC) says
the maturity displayed by
Guyanese voters on Aug. 28
disappointed the chorus of
local and foreign 'naysayers'
who were forecasting
unprecedented violence
at the polls.
PCS Executive Major
General Norman McLean
said the 2006 model has so
far produced peaceful general
and regional elections and
should be used as a guide for
future polls. McLean did not
believe that armed Joint
Services ranks who patrolled
the country "can take credit
for the peace-
ful poll," but
said it was a "Guyanese n(
collaborative that they can
effort.
He said views and op
the education
program pur- coming to bl(
sued by the We have to gi
Guyana
Elections credit for disi
Commission
(GECOM), maturity..."
political par-
ties and non-governmental
organizations (NGOs) must
take the credit for the "digni-
fied and efficient manner" in
which electoral workers and
voters conducted themselves
on polling day.
"Guyanese now under-
stand that they can express
their views and opinions with-
out coming to blows about it.
We have to give the public
credit for displaying maturity,"
McLean said.
Some 492,000 voters were
expected to vote, but accord-
ing to preliminary figures,
voter turnout was disappoint-


ex
ini
ows
ive
plal


ingly low.

HAPPY
PSC Chairman Yesu
Persaud, speaking about the
absence of bloody violence
which characterized all polls
here since 1992, said "we are
all today happy," that the
anticipated violence never
occurred.
Persaud admitted that
local businessmen, especially
in the volatile urban centers,
including the capital, were
expecting "all hell and fire"
on election day, but it turned
out to be "the most peaceful
poll in a number of years," in
the former British colony.
Meanwhile,
the United
understand States embassy
press their in Georgetown
joined the cho-
ons without rus of praise
showered on
About it. Guyanese vot-
the public ers "for exercis-
ing their demo-
ying cratic franchise
in a calm,
responsible
manner". An
embassy media statement said
"the 23 U.S. Embassy person-
nel who participated within
the OAS Observer Mission
reported that the election day
process went smoothly except
for a few instances of disor-
ganization that were not suffi-
cient to affect the outcome.
"The Embassy applauds
the tireless efforts of dedicated
GECOM staff, polling station
officials, party agents, and vot-
ers in carrying out the General
and Regional Eu n I i, Liii the
statement added.
0


Stories compiled from CMC sources. Photographs
from other wire services, including AR


LWW-crbbatoa.co


Peace at the polls,


organizers hailed


A voter casts her ballot.


September 2006









-usw^caribbeantodj..c..


CARIBBEAN TODAY


n e WS


September 2006


Cyclist completes 4,000 miles in 40 days to raise awareness,


resources to improve lives of Haiti's children


MIAMI Haiti Kids
Foundation Chairman Jesse
Johnson cycled into Toussaint
L'ouverture Elementary School
in Miami's Little Haiti neighbor-
hood last month, ending his
4,000-mile in 40 days cross coun-
try "Bike for Haiti Kids" trip.
There, he was greeted by
more than 500 school children
as well as Haitian American
community leaders and sup-
porters.
Johnson departed Seattle
on July 14 to raise awareness
of the needs of Haitian chil-
dren with the goal of raising
$1 million along the way.
"The Bike for Haiti Kids


has been challenging on many
levels, but in the end a success
because we have informed
and engaged thousands of
people across the country on
the issues facing the children
of Haiti," said Johnson.
Councilman Jacques
Despinosse presented
Johnson with a city proclama-
tion. The school's principal
Dr. Lilane Delbor welcomed
Johnson to Miami and the
school and joined the students
in cheering his efforts.

INSPIRATION
Haiti Kids Foundation is a
nonprofit organization dedi-


cated to improving the lives
and futures of Haitian chil-
dren by providing safe living
environments and life sustain-
ing care. The foundation
plans to direct all funds raised
from the Bike For Haiti Kids
project to supporting and
extending the work of quality
orphanages in and near Port-
a-Prince. Long-term plans
include developing new
orphanages and programs to
strengthen living environ-
ments for all Haitian children.
"My hope all along was
that people will be inspired by
this ride to learn more about
the children of Haiti, and get


involved in mak-
ing life changing
improvements in
their lives," said
Johnson. "Even if
people contribute
only a few dol-
lars, that money
will make a dif-
ference to a child
in need."
To find out
more about the
Haiti Kids
Foundation, visit
www.haitikids-
foundation. org
0


Jesse JlnnSOn is greetie Dy me students ati e ioussalni
L'ouverture Elementary School in Miami.


Caribbean Today's publisher gets lifetime achievement award


Peter Webley, publisher of
the South Florida month-
ly newspaper, Caribbean
Today, has been selected as a
recipient of the Caribbean
Peer Awards Life Time
Achievement Award for 2006.
Webley was among four
awardees, all Caribbean nation-
als, who were honored for their
sterling contribution to the
growth and ongoing develop-
ment of Caribbean media in the
area of sales, marketing and
advertising. The other awardees
include: Ken Gordon, of
Trinidad and Tobago; and
Lester Spaulding and Neville
Blythe, both well-known
Jamaican media personnel.
The honorees were selected
from a list of 10 Caribbean
nationals by the Peer Awards
Foundation of AKM
Communications.

PIONEER
DL, rsId as one of the
pioneers of Caribbean news
publishing in South Florida,
Webley launched the
Caribbean monthly newspaper
in Dec. 1989. As the
Caribbean diaspora began to
grow in the early 1980s in this


region, Webley told JIS News
that he saw a need for greater
and better news coverage of
the Caribbean region and of
the nationals here in Florida.
With a distribution of
almost 40,000, circulation of
Caribbean Today has grown
outside the region to include
United States cities Atlanta
and Chk.iti, plus communities
in Connecticut, New Jersey
and New York, as well as some
Caribbean islands.
The paper is free to the
public and covers news, fea-
tures, entertainment and sports
especially related to the
Caribbean community.

WEBSITE
Earlier, this year, the
Caribbean Today developed a
website to include on-line
readers.
"Readers of Caribbean
Today would also note a
refreshingly positive portrayal
of minorities," Webley said.
A recent audit conducted
by the City of Miami Metro
Communications Department,
indicated that among 72 publi-
cations Caribbean Today
ranked sixth overall, and first


vveuley
among the black population in
the South Florida region.
A recipient of several
awards over the years, Webley
was into the Miami Hall of
Fame inducted in May last year
for his outstanding contribution
in the area of journalism.
Other outstanding awards
for business development and
community contribution
include the United Coalition of
Minority Business Enterprises
2003, the Minority Enterprise
Development (MED Week)
Award 2003, and the Broward
Black Elected Officials'
Business Leader Award 2006.
He has also received other
awards from several schools in


the South Florida community,
where he continues to work
with students on educational
projects.
Webley is also a founding
member of the Florida-based
Jamaica USA Chamber of
Commerce (JAUSACC) and
the Kendal South Dade chap-
ter of the Kiwanis Club.
According to Webley,
Caribbean Today is now a
thriving news magazine that
has contributed greatly to rais-
ing the positive profile of
South Florida's Caribbean
community.
"Perhaps our most
poignant achievement is that by
providing the community with a
positive reflection of its many
faces, the paper has helped the
community to understand the
diverse cultures that embrace
this community," he added.
The Peer Awards
Foundation was incepted in
1998 by AKM Communications
to recognize Jamaican media
personnel in the areas of mar-
keting, advertising and sales.
This year, the program was
developed to include the
Caribbean media community.
0


U.S. gaming company in Antigua closes shop


ST. JOHN'S, Antigua, CMC -
The United States-based gam-
ing company BETonSPORTS
(BOS) plans to cease opera-
tions in Antigua and Barbuda.
The company said that it
would also close its operations
in Costa Rica. The decision fol-
lows the issuance of a tempo-
rary restraining order from a
U.S. District Court preventing it
from continuing its operations.
The order required BOS
to close its U.S. facing Internet
gaming websites and post a
notice promising to pay clients
outstanding money. In a state-
ment issued last month, the
company said after "thorough-


ly reviewing possible alterna-
tive business plans" it could
"no longer considers the U.S.
facing operations of the com-
pany, which are based in Costa
Rica and Antigua, to be
viable" in light of the tempo-
rary restraining order.
It said it would not accept
any wagers from U.S.-based
customers and that it would
also end its operations in
Antigua and Costa Rica "as
soon as pr., Ik.blh .

JOBS LOST
As a result of the decision,
800 employees in Antigua and
Costa Rica were scheduled to


lose their jobs.
The company has prom-
ised to pay "any liabilities to
staff and creditors in an order-
ly manner and repay balances
due to U.S. customers in an
orderly manner". But it
warned that payment would
depend upon its ability to per-
suade banks and cash proces-
sors to release its funds.
On July 17, the U.S.
unsealed a 22-count indict-
ment against BOS executives
accusing them of running an
illegal Internet gambling
operation. Prosecutors have
indicated they will seek a
$4.5 billion penalty against


the company.


ELUSIVE
Many Americans use the
Internet to place bets on sport-
ing events and the industry has
been largely considered out-
side the reach of U.S. legisla-
tors and prosecutors who do
not have jurisdiction over off-
shore operations.
U.S. prosecutors insist that
offshore Internet casinos vio-
late the Federal Wire Act of
1961, but legal experts say the
position is untested.
0


Street Address:
9020 SW 152nd Street, Miami, FL 33157
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6010
Miami, FL 33116-6010.
Telephone: (305) 238-2868
(305) 253-6029 Fax: (305) 252-7843
1-800-605-7516
E-mail: caribtoday@earthlink.net
Send ads to: ct ads@bellsouth.net
Vol. 17, Number 10 SEPT. 2006

PETER A WEBLEY
Publisher
GORDON WILLIAMS
Managing Editor
DAMIAN P. GREGORY
Deputy Managing Editor
SABRINA FENNELL
Graphic Artist

DOROTHY CHIN
Account Executive
SUNDAY SELLERS
Account Executive

AMANDA ECHEVERRI
Accounting Manager
Caribbean Media Source
Media Representatives
TOM JONAS
353 St. Nicolas Street, Suite 200
Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2Y 2P1
Tel: (514) 931-0422 Fax: (514) 931-0455
E-mail: tom@cmsworldmedia.com
Jamaica Bureau
MARIE GREGORY
(876) 925-5640
P.O. Box 127, Constant Spring
Kingston 8, Jamaica

Opinions expressed by editors and
writers are not necessarily those of the
publisher.
Caribbean Today, an independent
news magazine, is published every month
by Caribbean Publishing Services, Inc.
Subscription rates are: US$20 per year
(Bulk); 1st Class $35 per year.
Caribbean Today is not responsible
for unsolicited manuscripts or photos. To
guarantee return, please include a self-
addressed stamped envelope.
Articles appearing in Caribbean
Today may not be reproduced without
written permission of the editor.





CARIBBEAN TODAY


SV I U WP O I N T


Reggae makes 'Splash


wwcarT beaTn- to'day. .cs *I


High maintenance


GORDON WILLIAMS
L ast month, reggae, the
music which blossomed
throughout the world
after springing from its
Caribbean roots in Jamaica, wit-
nessed two important milestones
- one good, the other sad.
Most satisfying was that,
for the first time in nearly a
decade the musical festival
"Reggae Sunsplash" returned
with a tour that ran from its
birthplace throughout the
United States.
On a sour note, reggae
lost one of its greatest ambas-
sadors, Joseph Hill, leader of
the group "Culture", who died
while on tour of Europe.
No one needs to be con-
vinced of reggae's popularity
today. The steady, intoxicating
beat heavy on drum and bass
- that first generated attention
more than four decades ago,
has survived admirably in the
topsy turvy world of popular
music. It has made a huge
impact, and fans everywhere
have lapped it up. It has helped
to put the Caribbean squarely
on the world music map.
It is no surprise, for exam-
ple, that the late Bob Marley's
CDs still sell briskly a quarter
of a century after the music's
rebel icon passed away.

CHANGES
Today the music has wit-
nessed startling changes or
influences. It has altered other
musical genres as well. Along
the way, dancehall the dee-
jay-flavored spin-off made
popular by the likes of U-Roy,
Shaggy, Beenie Man, and even
one of Bob's children Damion
"Jr. Gong" Marley has
forced its way into main-
stream thought as well. Yet,
sometimes, the message, so
important to the early r< oi, '
reggae promoters, including
Marley, Peter Tosh, Bunny
Wailer, Culture and Burning
Spear, has taken a bit of a
back seat to more likeable
lyrics and beats. Still the
music's core thrives.
Now Sunsplash, which
drooped into dormancy espe-
cially following the death of
one of its founders, is on the
mend. The start of the U.S.
tour in Florida has given every
indication that the music is still
satisfying to many, even with
the limited dancehall influ-
ence. In West Palm Beach,
Tampa and Cocoa Beach, the
crowds warmed to mellow
sounds of Third World, Maxi
Priest, Toots and the Maytals
and headliners UB40.
A group like Culture
would have fit right in on a
slate like that as well. Or
would it?
The response of the audi-
ence on the early part of the
U.S. Sunsplash tour said the


bouncy mixture of reggae fla-
vored with R&B and rock was
just as tasty as anything
Marley could have conjured
up. They danced in the aisles
for Maxi Priest and rushed to
the front of the stage to greet
him when he climbed off-stage
as part of his performance.

GOOD RECEPTION
Despite the less-than-
capacity audiences at the
Florida sites, the fans present
all embraced his hits as if they
were rolling up today's charts.
The same reception was show-
ered on Toots, Third World
and UB40. If the reggae pitch-
er had been emptied in the
U.S. due to the absence of
Sunsplash, the tour was serving
up a refill with added flavor.
But those audiences were
predominantly white. While
young black Americans long
a target of Bob Marley in his
heyday have grabbed hold of
dancehall's appeal, especially
when tied to hip hop, the
early Sunsplash returns in the
U.S. tuI_'-,', that the mellow
roots reggae is still struggling
to get their attention.
Yet that does not mean
that the Sunsplash tour does-
n't offer quality entertain-
ment. When Third World,
Priest, Toots and UB40
appear on any show a myriad
of hit tunes are bound to be
unleashed. It's nice, clean
entertainment.
The promoters must be
pleased. The question is:
should they be? Has the real
force behind reggae, the
protest edge that helped to
launch its worldwide appeal,
eluded the music after the
departure of Marley and
Tosh? Bunny Wailer once
said: reggae is the music that
carries the message, it tells of
history, the truth and the
rights. Sweet love songs with
catchy drum and bass are all
right great, even. But maybe
the music is heading a tad bit
wide of its original target. Has
reggae lost its sting?
Now the death of Hill
leaves even a bigger void. The
group Culture, whose origin
coincided with the launch of
roots reggae with such telling
songs as "Two Sevens Clash",
will carry on, at least for a
while without its influential
lead singer. But the music's
old guard is disappearing.
But let's not get ahead of
ourselves just yet. It's time to
celebrate Sunsplash's return.
It's reggae's original shining
symbol, a great celebration
still creating waves.

Gordon Williams is Caribbean
Today's managing editor.
Beginning Nov. 1, 2006
you may e-mail him at edi-
tor@caribbeantoday.com
0


t's a fact, some women are
high maintenance and cost
an arm and a leg, plus tax,
just to squire, wine and dine
them.
Apparently there is some
myth that it's a man's world and
that women really have it hard.
That may be true yes, that
some women do have it hard,
but so do the mass of men.
Women come into this
world and everything is hand-
ed to them. They expect to be
wined, dined and if they feel
like, bedded, wooed. We all
know what wooing is, it means
to court a woman, to wit,
spend a coil of money on her,
feeding her, buying her food
that she can eat and flowers
that she can't eat.
It takes money to woo.
But women are conditioned
that men are supposed to pay
for everything, and no amount
of argument will ever con-
vince them otherwise. It can
prove to be very expensive.
Let's take a man and a
woman who are involved
somehow, both earning the
same amount of money, or she
even more. She gets pregnant.
The man is expected to pay


for all proce-
dures, all
doctor visits,
all medicine,
hospital fee,
pre and post
natal. Come
delivery time
he better
pray that it's TONY
a natural ROBINSON
birth too, and
not a C-sec-
tion, or it'll take a few C notes
to pay.
This caught a good friend
of mine who, as the saying
goes, only 'tief' a piece had a
one night stand with a co-
worker who wasn't even his
real woman either. She got
pregnant, had some complica-
tions and had a C-section plus
other surgical stuff at a private
hospital which cost the earth.
To this day that man rued that
night when he stole forbidden
fruit. The female produce
market can be a very expen-
sive place.
The lady had a good job,
plenty money, but society dic-
tates that the man must spend
on her. Be careful when you
offer to spend your life with a


woman, all she hears is the
word 'spend'.
After the child is born,
there is this thing called child
maintenance, which the man
better fork over every month
or he's hauled before the
courts and shamed like dog.
All school fees and such must
be paid by him.
"Who made these laws
anyway, a woman?" was the cry
of many men who I spoke to.

EXPECTATIONS
It's not that they want to
shirk their responsibilities
either, as children are expen-
sive and many women can't
manage, but in many cases the
woman has a big job with
loads of cash, but just expects
that the man must pay for
everything. It doesn't matter
that he's out of work, lost his
job through redundancy or
fallen on hard times.
Many women are so
locked into this maintenance
syndrome, that their hearts
turn to stone. No wonder you
have the term, high mainte-
nance women.
"As you look pon some
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 10)


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* r-r


September 2006





CARIBBEAN TODAY


-usw^caribbeantodj..c..


VIE W P 0 I n T


The fun of reality


Hey Tony,
I found your article in
Caribbean Today of July 2006
('Woman on top') to be so
interesting and hilarious. You
are perfectly correct in your
facts about the role that
women play. Most men would
not buy your arguments, but
that's sad for them if they


Barbados or vice versa
requires the completion
of more forms than
applying for a major
bank loan" President
of the Caribbean
Broadcasting Union
(CB U), Vic Femandes
commenting last month on the
way nationals are still being
treated as aliens when they go to
other countries in the region.

* To say that my objective
stability has gotten consider-
ably better would not be a lie.
To affirm that my recupera-


can't face reality.
You are not bashing any-
one, you just call a
"spade a spade", you
just don't sugar coat
anything, you are my
kind of a guy. I love you
for that. I am a returning
resident from the USA and
it's so wonderful to be home
irrespective of the negatives
hi wings that have been por-
I rayed about my blessed para-
dise.

One love brother,
Jean Grant
q(gmgrant@yahoo. com)


Beautifully written

I sat in the doctor's office on
July 26, I started reading
Caribbean Today, and on the
second page (of the supple-
ment) was an article written
by Tony Robinson. I read the
article. I must tell you that for


tion will not



incorrect" -
Cuba's
President
Fidel Castro
delivering a
message to the Cuban people
last month to be optimistic
about his health, but to be pre-
pared for any bad news.

* "Once they point guns at
you, you have to take them
out" Guyana's President


a long time I have not read
anything as beautifully written
as this article.
I got so obsessed that I
started turning the pages of all


Bharrat
Jagdeo last
month call-
ing on the
security
forces to use
whatever
means neces-
sary to take
back control
of the crime situation in the
country.

* "Whatever numero uno says
goes. I am saying we must
correct that" Trinidad and
Tobago's former President Sir


the papers looking for more.
I found another one entitled
"Woman on top". I certainly
enjoyed the writings. Today I
went out looking for papers.


Ellis Clarke
saying
S recently that
Stood much
-tpower has
been placed
/ in the hands
of every
j-.- prime minis-
ter since the
oil rich republic attained
Independence in 1962.

Compiled from CMC and
other sources.
0


The articles are excellent.

Always DElSam
(delsamcook@bellsouth.net)
0


High maintenance


(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9)
girl so, yu know say dem is
high maintenance, me can't
afford dat league," say some
men as they look on wistfully
and longingly at some beauti-
ful women.
Some women appear to
be out of the leagues of many
men, leading some guys to
resort to all sorts of schemes
just to get and hold them,
including stealing. She expects
to have money lavished on her
all the time. Don't bother to
show up at Miss Uptown's
house in an old bruk down car
with no money in your pocket
and expect to take her out.
And even if you manage to
reach somewhere and wish to
make a commitment it's going
to cost you, as is diamond ring
dem want. Remember the old
saying, "Diamonds are a girls
best friend."
There's this T.V. commer-
cial for engagement rings that
says, 'If you really love her, is
six months salary enough to
prove it?' Women don't have
that pressure. Mortgage your
life, for a little love.

PAY PER VIEW
If perchance your eye
catches a woman and you wish


to take her out, be assured
that it's you, the man, who
spends. You find transport to
pick her up, take her to the
movies, you pay as she walks
in and heads straight for the
cafeteria like nuh food nuh
deh at her yard. Come inter-
mission, she wants more, so
you pay again, and after the
movie if you decide to go else-
where, you pay again, cover
charge, drinks, more food, the
man pays.
The irony is that some of
these ladies could buy and sell
the man, as they have high
powered, high paying jobs, but
it is the unwritten law of their
nature that man must mind
them. Invite a woman to din-
ner and it's the man who is
expected to pay. All she has to
do is say yes and sit and wait
for him. And when she orders,
it's the top of the line food
too. No curry goat or ackee
and salt fish, but food she
can't even pronounce. No
Pepsi or Coke, but foreign
wine, and of course, after the
main course, the most expen-
sive desert to finish off the
guy. So much so that in some
restaurants there are separate
menus for men and women.
Guess which menu has the
prices on it? The one for the
man of course. She can blithe-
ly order anything she wants
with no regard for the price.
Meanwhile his brain is
going, ka-ching, ka-ching, like
a cash register, as she orders.
Very rarely does a woman say
to a man, 'hey let's go out
later, my treat, I will pay for
EVERYTHING'. It's so rare,
that when it happens, it's a big
deal. Women cry for equality,
but when it comes to paying,
no way. That's why some men
don't have many women any
more. It's just too expensive.

STRATEGY
It's the norm for women
to expect this from men. They


sometimes hit hard and hit
quickly, for as they meet the
man, the sob story starts.
"Listen, I know I just met you,
and normally I don't do this
sort of thing, but I'm a little
short this month, and the rent
is due, so... ka-ching, ka-ching,
ka-ching."
Either that or it's, "The
car is in the shop and I can't
even get it out as I'm a little
short this month."
Are there no tall women
anymore, is everyone a little
short?
Pity the man who starts
to pay the rent or buy gro-
ceries just to get the woman,
for it's precedent, and law is
precedent, and it's the law
that men pay.
Even if you get married
and divorced, it costs the man,
as the dreaded alimony is
another lifetime of living hell.
Why can't she pay him alimo-
ny, after all her salary is more
than his? It should be spelt
allthemoney. That's why some
men simply disappear, it's
cheaper than getting divorced.
Life is stacked against men in
that department. From the day
they are born they are expect-
ed to pay for women. Young
boys, saving up lunch money,
walking home to save bus fare,
starving, just to have money to
take out girls. Why couldn't it
be that it happens half and
half, instead of the woman just
sitting back and waiting to be
maintained? As for those spe-
cial days like Valentine's and
such, the man's pocket better
be deep. That's why men are
so stressed out, die before
women and leave them behind
to spend the insurance money.
High maintenance women
drive so many men to their
graves, from which they keep
on paying. Ka-ching, ka-ching.

seidol@hotmail.com
0


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I


September 2006








Spebr C D U CAo T In TAP o Dn tv Yi mmCa bean


CXC reports big growth in CAPE entries in the Caribbean


BRIDGETOWN, Barbados,
CMC The Barbados-based
Caribbean Examination
Council (CXC) said that candi-
date entries and unit entries
for the Caribbean Advanced
Proficiency Examination
(CAPE), had shown a signifi-
cant increase for 2006 over last
year.
It said that unit entries
increased by 36 percent, from
43,993 in 2005 to 69,018 entries
this year, while candidate entries


also increased by approximately
r% pL ri. n from 13,651 in 2005
to 19,019 this year.
Communication studies
became the first CAPE subject
to surpass the 10,000 candidates
mark, with 10,218 entries this
year. Other units with large
entries were Caribbean studies
(7,259), pure mathematics unit
one (4,413), management of
business unit one (3,878) and
sociology unit one (3,670).
In 16 of the 43 units exam-


ined, more than 90 percent of
the candidates achieved Grades
I to V, while in 14 of the units
more than 80 percent achieved
Grades I to V. Only in two units
did less than 60 percent of the
candidates obtained acceptable
grades. These were Computer
science unit two (54 percent)
and law unit two (50 percent),
CXC said.
It said there were improved
performance in French unit,
communication studies, history,


biology, accounting, pure math-
ematics and electrical and elec-
tronic technology.
CXC said that candidates
who completed seven CAPE
units this year are eligible for
the CXC associate degrees.
"The degrees will be based
on performance in both the


2005 and 2006 sittings.
Candidates must have com-
pleted seven units including
Caribbean studies and commu-
nication studies and must have
achieved Grades I to V in each
unit", it added.
0


Caribbean youth still careless about HIV/AIDS Douglas


MARVIN HOKSTAM

TORONTO, Canada, CMC -
St. Kitts and Nevis Prime
Minister Dr. Denzil Douglas
says greater efforts would be
needed to get young people of
the Caribbean to adopt pre-
ventive measures against the
deadly HIV/AIDS virus.
"Our goal is to devise a
new strategic framework (for
the Pan Caribbean Partnership
Against HIV/AIDS, PAN-
CAP), one with continuing
efforts at prevention," said
Douglas, the CARICOM
spokesman on H1V/AIDS and
PANCAP chairman.
"Because even though we
see a decrease in prevalence,
there are still 70 percent of our


ROSEAU, Dominica, CMC -
The Dominica government
says it will introduce alternative
sentencing for young offenders
as it seeks to deal with a grow-
ing prison population.
Attorney General
Ian Douglas said that the
Community Services Order
pilot project would allow law
enforcement authorities to
give an alternative to a jail
term for minor crimes.
He explained that the
project could be implemented
by October and would help
reduce the over crowding situ-
ation at the lone prison.
There are more than 310
prisoners at the Stock Farm
prison, just on the outskirts of
the capital.


young people not taking meas-
ures to protect lth mL h LS and
that are putting l i 1N L, s a
risk of being infected with the
disease. We need to repackage
the promotional aspect of our
efforts."
Douglas
was attending
the 16th
International
AIDS
Conference
here and held
discussions
with former Clinton
United States
President Bill Clinton. He said
the meeting with Clinton was
to request assistance from the
Clinton Foundation in devis-
ing and executing the new
strategic framework.


Superintendent of Prisons
Algernon Charter earlier this
year expressed concern over
the growing number of young
people in prison.
Charter has also welcomed
the introduction of the pilot
program, saying it would also
reduce government's spending
on the prison.
"I think it's a good move
for us and it is something that
we always wanted. It is going
to cost the government much
more to maintain an inmate as
opposed to making them do
community service," he said.
Douglas said the pilot
program would help in the
rehabilitation of prisoners.
0


"I have extended an invi-
tation to Mr. Clinton to attend
our next 'Champions for
Change' gathering," said the
prime minister.
Clinton has said that the
Caribbean is making progress
in the fight against HIV and
AIDS.
The first Champions for
Change gathering was held in
St. Kitts in November 2004
and it is being hailed as a
"landmark event" that
brought together a wide cross-
section of Caribbean parlia-
mentarians, cultural and
sporting icons and representa-
tives of non-governmental
organizations in an effort to
stimulate debate on the dis-
ease in the Caribbean. The
next gathering is scheduled for
Barbados and according to
Douglas the aim is to get
Caribbean media on board.
*


1,-




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Dominica introducing alternative

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CARIBBEAN TODAY


11 6 n t T 91


I www .caibeatoa.com I


TORONTO, Canada, CMC -
Three international founda-
tions have come together
to pump $1 million into a
Caribbean-wide media cam-
paign on HIV/AIDS.
The Ford Foundation and
the Elton John Foundation
announced last month that
they would be joining with
the Kaiser Family Foundation
to support the operations of
the Caribbean Broadcasters
Media Partnership on
HIV/AIDS, the region's
first media-led initiative
on HIV/AIDS.
"We know that the media
is our most powerful tool to
get out information and
change attitudes. I am delight-
ed that my foundation, in con-
junction with our partners
Kaiser and Ford, will work
directly with Caribbean
broadcasters to help educate
their audiences, promote tol-
erance, and change the public

Dispelling


myths fr
Many people who are not
affected migraine headaches,
a legitimate health condition,
continue to believe common-
ly-held myths about migraine.
According to the National
Headache Foundation (NHF)
in the United States, some of
the more common myths are
as follows:

Myth: Caffeine cannot help
relieve a migraine.

Fact: For certain migraine suf-
ferers, caffeine is a migraine
inhibitor, for others it is a trig-
ger. Keeping a headache
diary can help determine
whether caffeine helps or
hurts your migraine. Caffeine
is found naturally and as an
additive in coffee, tea, choco-
late, cola, certain soft drinks,
and some pain relieving and
acute migraine medications.

Myth: Migraines are not
trigged by stress.

Fact: Stress is a commonly rec-
ognized trigger of migraines.
Stress can be physical or emo-
tional. It can be good or bad.
It is an unavoidable part of
modern life.
Events causing emotional
stress can trigger a migraine
headache. Migraine sufferers
are thought to have highly
sensitized brains. In times of
emotional stress, certain
chemicals are released that
provoke the vascular changes
that can cause a migraine
headache. Factors related to


dialogue about this epidemic,"
Sir Elton John, founder of the
Elton John Foundation said.
Also speaking at the
International AIDS Conference
in Toronto, where the


Sir Elton John


announcement was made, Ford
Foundation executive Dr. Jacob
Gayle said: "Media is a central
part of Caribbean communica-
tion and culture. It is well

migraine


'om fact
stress include anxiety, worry,
shock, depression, excitement,
and mental fatigue.


Headaches can make life uncomfortable.

After a stressful period
there may be a letdown
which can, in itself, trigger
a migraine headache.

Myth: Regular exercise may
not help reduce migraine
frequency.

Fact: For those who suffer
from chronic, recurring
migraines, exercise can either
provoke an attack or lessen
the frequency and severity of
these headaches. If exercise or
physical strain induce a
headache, it is important to
see a healthcare provider.
Maintaining a regular exercise
program can reduce the
number of headaches and
contribute to overall good
health.
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 14)


placed to bring HIV/AIDS
concern and awareness into the
households, hearts and actions
of our families and communi-
ties."

LEVERAGE
Dr. Allyson Leacock,
head of the seven member
broadcasters steering commit-
tee and general manager of
the Caribbean Broadcasting
Corporation, said the collabo-
rative effort was a way to
leverage communication
power to raise awareness,
fight stigma and intolerance
and support people already
suffering with the disease.
She said the 30 television
and radio stations operating in
22 regional countries who
were involved in the partner-
ship were committed to
reserving a minimum of 30
seconds per hour 12 minutes
per day for HIV/AIDS
messages across all program
genres, including news, public
affairs and entertainment.
The strategy involved a pan-
Caribbean public service cam-
paign; original HIV-themed
entertainment, such as soap
operas; program workshops
for writers, producers and
on-air talent; journalist train-
ings and briefings and comple-
mentary information sources.
The partnership was
launched in May.
0


Haitian seniors get

medical help in Miami


M iami-Dade County
Mayor Carlos Alvarez,
in partnership with
the Miami-Dade County
Department of Health's
Consortium for a Healthier
Miami-Dade and the Alliance
for Aging, recently hosted the
"Haitian Wellness Expo for


tion to seniors regarding the
existence of free or low-cost
health, safety and fitness
resources. Our goal is to fos-
ter healthy lifestyles and
reduce the risk of disease," said
Mayor Alvarez. "The initia-
tive's ultimate goal is to elimi-
nate all barriers to healthcare.


Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Alvarez, left, presents a key
to the county to Dr. Ronv Francois. secretary of health. Florida


Department of Health.
SL In 1rr' at the Haitian
Emmanuel Baptist Church in
Miami.
More than 250 seniors
attended the expo to learn
about improving their health
and quality of life. They also
participated in tai chi classes,
and blood pressure, glucose
and cholesterol screenings.
"The initiative's events
provide much needed informa-


thus improving
the health of
the community
overall."
The "Mayor's
Initiative on
Aging: To Life!"
is the result of a
public and private
partnership of
organizations
dedicated to the
wellbeing of
Miami-Dade
County residents
55 and over.
During 2006, a
series of promo-
tional, education-
al and fitness
activities will be


held exclusively
to engage Miami-
Dade's senior residents. This
public awareness campaign will
have a minimum of 12 main
monthly events designed to
encourage positive aging.
For more information
about the mayor's initiative,
call 305-375-3333 or visit
www. mayorsinitiativeonag-
ing. com
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September 2006





CARIBBEAN TODAY


lwww -arib e g -dy~om1


HEALTH BRIEFS


* Cubans setting up regional
eye facility
Cuba is assisting in the establish-
ment of a state-of-the-art regional
eye care facility to be based in St.
Lucia, Prime Minister Dr. Kenny
Anthony has confirmed.
The prime minister said last
month that plans were "proceeding
apace" for the establishment of the
ultra-modern ophthalmology center
which would provide expert servic-
es to patients from neighboring
islands through Cuba's Miracle eye
care project "Plan Milag".
* HIV/AIDS battle may be
lost
Marcus Day, head of the Caribbean
Drug Research Institute (CDRI),
says the war against the HIV/AIDS
virus will be lost if the authorities
fail to adopt critical measures to
help young people protect them-
selves against the pandemic.


"We have to depend less on
promoting the theory of absti-
nence, and that young people
should stay away from sex," said
Day, who has called for condoms
to be made available in schools
and health centers on demand.
* Cuba upgrades nursing
program for St. Lucians
The Cuban government has
agreed to upgrade its scholarship
nursing program to allow St.
Lucians studying in that country
to obtain higher qualifications, St.
Lucia's administration announced.
The government also revealed
it would be recruiting another 100
students to help fill the island's
original quota of scholarships
offered by Havana.
Compiled from CMC and other
sources.
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Caribbean countries seeking to introduce

smoking laws for Cricket World Cup 2007


BRIDGETOWN, Barbados,
CMC Some Caribbean coun-
tries have signaled their inten-
tion to introduce legislation
banning smoking in public
places in time for next year's
Cricket World Cup.
This was the word coming
out of the recently concluded
meeting of the Caribbean com-
munity (CARICOM) Cricket
World Cup Health Sector
Subcommittee, which was held
in Barbados late last month.
Chairman of the
Subcommittee, Barbados's
Minister of Health Dr. Jerome
Walcott, said both Barbados
and St. Lucia were moving in
the direction of banning smok-
ing in public places, while
Grenada's Minister of Health,
Senator Ann David Antoine,
said her country also intended
to introduce similar legislation.

FINAL STAGES
Walcott said Barbados's


legislation was in its final
stages and should be laid in
the Parliament in October.
"Anti-smoking legislation
is before Chief Parliamentary
Counsel Shirley Belle for fine
tuning. The legislation has
been much talked about for
some time and we have had
discussions with the various
stakeholders," Walcott told
members of the press at the
end of the meeting.
He said the International
Cricket Council had stipulated
that there would be no smok-
ing at stadiums except in desig-
nated areas, but those regula-
tions would be superseded by a
country's legislation in cases
where that legislation existed.
In the case of Grenada,
Antoine said while they
planned to introduce the legis-
lation, it was not at a stage
where it could be taken to
Parliament for discussion.
"Grenada is one of the


countries that has responded
to the request to address the
issue of smoking in public
places. We are very concerned
about the public health issue
at it relates to smoking in pub-
lic. There is also the issue of
safety," she said.
Victor Roach, president of
the Caribbean Chapter of the
International Committee for
the Prevention of Alcohol and
Drug Dependency, told the
Caribbean Media Corporation
his organization would contin-
ue its lobbying to ensure that
regional countries introduced
legislation prohibiting public
smoking. With regards to the
CWC 2007, he said the previ-
ous tournament in South
Africa was smoke-free and
there was no reason why this
should not be the case in the
Caribbean next year.
0


Dispelling migraine myths from fact


(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13)

Myth: Dietary supplements
cannot be helpful in migraine
treatment.

Fact: Those suffering from
frequent migraines may have
a low magnesium level.
Magnesium has a relaxant
effect on smooth muscle, such
as in blood vessels. Daily sup-
plementation of 500 mg to 750
mg increases the body's mag-
nesium level. Riboflavin
(Vitamin B2) assists nerve
cells in the production of ATP,
an energy producing sub-
stance, which is essential for
many chemical reactions to
occur in the body. High doses
of riboflavin (400 mg. is rec-
ommended) may reverse
cells' "energy crisis" during
migraine attacks.

Myth: Migraines are not trig-
gered by a lack of sleep.


Fact: Migraine can be trig-
gered by lack of sleep. Go to
sleep at the same time every
night and wake up the same
time each morning, including
on weekends. This maintains
the body's natural circadian
rhythm.

Myth: Migraines cannot be
trigged by exposure to smoke,
odors or perfume.

Fact: Certain fumes and
vapors can initiate a migraine
headache. Perfumes are also
often a culprit. Being in pub-
lic places which are smoke-
filled or poorly ventilated can
result in the onset of a
migraine.

Myth: Migraines do not run in
families

Fact: Migraines can be heredi-
tary. If one parent has
migraine, the child has a 50
percent chance of having


them. If both parents have
them, there is a 75 percent
chance the child will develop
migraine and if even a distant
relative has migraines, there is
a 20 percent chance the child
will also experience them.
ISuti,, migraine is an
often misunderstood disease,
it is important to dispel myths
that may contribute to the
confusion," said National
Headache Foundation
Executive Director Suzanne
E. Simons. "It is our hope
that this effort will further the
understanding that migraine is
neuro-biologic disease."
For more information on
headache causes and treat-
ments, visit www.headaches.org
or call 1-888-NHF-5552
(Monday to Friday 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. CST).

- National Headache
Foundation
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CARIBBEAN TODAY


FOOD


~-,. .
- Jo,, C, -


I ww.caibeatoa.comI


'Sweet Hands' stir tasty tradition into a Caribbean


TITLE: SWEET HANDS:
ISLAND COOKING FROM
TRINIDAD & TOBAGO
AUTHOR: RAMINGANESHRAM
REVIEWED BY: DAWN A.
DAVIS
Food reflects culture.
And, when a culture is
as diverse as the
Caribbean's, the cuisine is
bound to be as varied, and
exotic.
Sweet Hands is more than
just a cookbook. Not only
does the author showcase the
enticing ethnic cuisine of the
twin island republic, she clev-
erly intertwines the history
and folklore that surrounds
a particular dish.
Born in New York to
a Trinidadian father and
Iranian mother, Ramin
Ganeshram goes back to her
roots through the culinary
arts of the Caribbean island
known for carnival and "dou-
ble a tasty breakfast treat
or late-night snack of spicy
chickpeas served between two
pieces of fried dough.

JUST TWO HANDS
If you ever crave "Trini"
food, but don't know where to
find it, well this book is for
you. Its simple directions, with


accompanying pictures and
fascinating stories on the ori-
gin and tradition behind the
recipe, ensure a successful
meal. No complicated equip-
ment needed, just your two
hands, some provisions, flour,
fish, meat, etc.
Adding to the book's allure
is how cleverly Ganeshram
weaves her own family stories
between the pages, giving each
recipe a personal touch. We
learn of her father, Krisnaram,
who watched the women in his
Trinidadian household cook in
"coal pots" under the house
that sat high on stilts. He
watched them bake the breads
he so loved, yet his hands just
weren't "set for it", until years
later when he migrated to New
York. He became a prophetic
baker.

MELTING POT
Trinidad is a melting pot
of Indian, African, Chinese
and other cultures. Africans
are descendants of the West
African slaves brought to the
New World, while the large
Indian population is a result
of the indentured servants
brought to the island by the
British after the abolition of
slavery. They brought with
them their foods and religions.


The mixture created a blend
of tastes unique to Trinidad.
In fact, no household is com-
plete without Indian curry,
West African callaloo (a root
food used for its leaves) and
fried rice.
From street foods
(cooked and served roadside)
to soups, vegetables, and
black cake, the reader can
pick and choose from well-
organized sections. There is
even a glossary that defines
the unique Caribbean foods.
Ever heard of "Buss Up
Shut"? Check page 116 for
detailed preparation tech-
niques. Trinidad's famous corn
soup, a staple during carnival
time, is not left out; neither is
roti, a favorite among many
Caribbean people.
Vegetarians too will feel
quite at home with this cook-
book. With recipes like dal
puri, a tasty bread filled with
spicy cooked lentils, and
breadfruit oil-down, stewed
breadfruit with spices like hot
pepper, scallions, and thyme
cooked in coconut milk, the
non-carnivore can prepare
delicious and nutritious meals.

WORTH ITS SALT
Throughout the book,
Ganeshram highlights many


old traditions, some that
are sadly "heading dan-
gerously close to cultural
subjugation to computers
and tL k \ NI IIN One
such tradition is "Dancing
the Cocoa", where vil-
lagers walk through cocoa
beans spread out on level
ground in order to poli,, '
them before being roasted
and ground to make cocoa
sticks. The payoff is a nice
steaming cup of "cocoa
tea", a Caribbean favorite.
Speaking of traditions, no
Caribbean cookbook would
be worth its salt without a
mention of rum punch, ginger
beer, and sorrel. Well,
Ganeshram does these bever-
age recipes justice and even
adds some appetite-whetting
drinks such as mango wine,
soursop punch and sugar cane
wine. Of course, the Trinidadian
aromatic bitters that gives most
drinks (worldwide) their
oomph, Angostura Bitters,
takes pride of place with a little
history. Manufactured under a
veil of secrecy since 1824, "the
bitter ingredients arrive by ship
to Port of Spain and are stored
in a special warehouse that is
guarded at all times. There are
never any markings on any bag,
box, or label to give even a hint


Z4 ,/M
as to the contents of those
precious containers," cites
Ganeshram.
Sweet Hands is filled with
much more interesting histori-
cal tidbits. So, what will you get
from this book? Hopefully
,\\ i hands", the highest
complement a cook can
receive, and a little Lign,.pp '
(extra) or "brawta" as they say
in Jamaica.

PUBLISHER: Hippocrene
Books, Inc.

Dawn A. Davis is a freelance
writer for Caribbean Today.
0


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'One Love' voted


'Top Foreign Song'


KINGSTON, Jamaica, CMC -
"One Love", the popular reg-
gae song by the late Jamaican
singer Bob Marley, has been
voted the "Top Foreign Song"
by a foreign-based magazine.
According to the Conde
Nast Traveler magazine, more
than 12,000 readers chose
the song by the legendary
Marley as the top tune. The
September edition of the
magazine carries an article
entitled "Around the World
in 50 songs" in which it
allowed readers to pick the
top 50 tunes.
Journalist Jim Farber,
who wrote the article, said
"One Love" was selected as
top song for its powerful evo-
cation of Jamaica's hopes for
peace.
"Bob Marley's sumptuous
melody and caring vocal stand
as testaments to the island's
finest resources and aspira-
tions," he said.
"One Love", which was
designated the Song of the
Millennium by the British
Broadcasting Corporation
(BBC) in 2000, has been used
by the Jamaica Tourist Board


in its advertising campaign for
many years.
"The popularity of an
identity that reggae and Bob
Marley generate made it
easy to select 'One Love' as


Marley


Jamaica's advertising theme. It
brings instant recognition as
consumers around the world
connect. So it's a perfect fit,"
said Donny Dawson, Jamaica's
interim director of tourism.
0


DAWN A. DAVIS
Come Oct. 8 Miami's
Bicentennial Park on
Biscayne Boulevard
will once again be the venue
for the Miami Carnival 2006
Parade & Festival.
Celebrating its 22nd
anniversary, the climactic
event brings to a close a two-
week long series of fetes and
special events that showcases
colorful mas bands, gyrating
bodies, and the latest in soca.
Historically plagued with
logistical problems and lack
of a venue they could call
"home", organizers seem to
have found some stability, at
least for the time being, at
their new location in
Bicentennial Park. With ade-
quate space for vendors, revel-
ers, and enough "road" to
showcase the bands as they
enter the park, this year's car-
nival should be smooth sailing.

ORGASMIC
Miami Carnival season
actually kicked off in July with
a free fete with music by
Miami and Orlando DJs,
steelband music, partying, and
costume displays at Haulover
Beach in Miami.
Revelers will get a pre-


view of the orgas-
mic parade that
draws thousands
with a Mini
Carnival Costume
Parade at Bayside
Hut, Key
Biscayne on Sept.
23. Billed as a
"Warm-Up and -
Taste of Miami -
Carnival" mas
bands and steel
bands, the Miami Miami Carniv'
Pan Symphony,
the Tamboo
Bamboo Steel Orchestra,
Miami DJs and a host of ven-
dors with arts and crafts and
Caribbean food will come
together in this appetite whet-
ting event.
To gear up for the ulti-
mate party, here is a rundown
of other fetes that will build
up to the road march:

STEELBAND PANORAMA
JAMBOREE & J'OUVERT
PARADE
Friday, Oct. 6
Hialeah Park, 2201 E. 4th
Avenue, Hialeah

INTERNATIONAL
CARIBBEAN MUSIC
FESTIVAL
Saturday, Oct. 7,
Bicentennial Park


J'OUVERT & BREAKFAST
Saturday, Oct. 7

MIAMI CARNIVAL 2006
PARADE & FESTIVAL -
CARICOM CONSULAR
VILLAGE MACHEL
MONTANO & XTATIK
Sunday, Oct. 8

The parade starts at noon at
N.E. 36th Street and N.E.
Second Avenue. It proceeds
south on N.E. Second Avenue,
east on N.E. 19th Street, south
on N.E. Fourth Avenue and
into Bicentennial Park.
Festivities in the park
continue until 11 p.m.

Dawn A. Davis is a freelance
writer for Caribbean Today.


Culture's lead singer

dies while on Euro tour


Internationally acclaimed
veteran artiste Joseph Hill,
the lead singer of the reg-
gae group "Culture", died last
month in Berlin, Germany
while in the middle of a
European tour.
Hill, who was born in the
central parish of St. Catherine,
Jamaica in 1949, began his
career in music at the leg-
endary Studio One. He found-
ed the reggae group in 1976
and recorded songs written
in response to the State of
Emergency declared by the
Jamaican government in
that year.


Hill
was the lead
voice behind
hits such as
"Two Sevens
Clash", a ref-
erence to the
numerologi-
Hill cal coinci-
dence of July
7, 1977; "Natty Never Get
Weary" and "Stop the Fussing
and Fighting".
Hill, who last performed
at Reggae Sunsplash in
Jamaica last month, had over
22 albums to his credit.
0


Bounty Killer arrested in Jamaica


KINGSTON, Jamaica, CMC-
Internationally acclaimed
dancehall artiste Rodney
"Bounty Killer" Pryce was
arrested by the police last
month following a show in the
eastern parish of St. Thomas.
Bounty Killer was taken
into custody by the police after
he reportedly used expletives
and blasted police officers who
had earlier taken action against
some artistes on the "Saddle to
the E.,,I show who had also
used expletives.
However, his arrest did not
go down well with some resi-


dents from the
community of
Grants Pen in
the parish who
blocked the
road to protest
against his
arrest.
Police Bounty Killer
granted bail to
the singer. He appeared in court
late last month to answer to
charges of using abusive and
indecent language and pleaded
not guilty. He is slated to return
to court on Oct. 4
0


Play mas with Miami Carnival


September 2006


momm- I ............... ........ ........ "Il""Ill""Ill!"",""","
I n RTS / e nT 6 R T n i n m e nT


I - - N -





CARIBBEAN TODAY


KINGSTON, Jamaica, CMC -
Jamaica's economy grew by
nearly three percent
during the period April to
June this year, according to
Director General of the


Hughes
Planning Institute of Jamaica
(PIOJ) Dr. Wesley Hughes.
He said the 2.8 percent
growth was as a result of the
strong recovery in agriculture
and tourism.


The tourism sector grew
by 19.5 percent, with tourists
spending some J$447 million
($6.7 million) over the three-
month period, while the agri-
cultural sector recovered from
a severe drought to record a
17 percent growth.
Hughes said the strong
performance of the agriculture
sector was due to more favor-
able weather conditions,
which saw domestic crop pro-
duction growing by 24.2 per-
cent, while export crop pro-
duction increased by 15.8 per-
cent.
The mining sector also
had a significant turnaround,
with a 1.4 percent increase
after two consecutive quarters
of decline.
Hughes said the increased
demand for alumina in China,
which is experiencing a boom
in its productive sectors,
improved mining technolo-
gies, and a more stable indus-
trial environment, resulted in
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 18)


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Sn es s


TODD N. ROSENBERG
& MICHAEL ROSENBERG

Because of various con-
cerns such as privacy,
confidentiality, avoid-
ance of probate and protecting
beneficiaries from the claims of
potential creditors, many for-
eigners decide that leaving their
foreign assets in an
intervivos revoca- 7 "
appropriate plan-
ning strategy when
United States per- -- -
son beneficiaries 2003 1
are involved.
Many tax prac-
titioners would --
agree with this 2003
overall conclusion,
but one should
always note that ___"
each situation
should be considered separately
and additional planning will
most likely be necessary upon
the passing of the grantor.
Upon the passing of the
grantor, and if the trust remains
foreign (for example, due to
the fact that the trust continues
to be governed by the laws of a
foreign jurisdiction), said trust


LWW-crbbatoa.co


will become an irrevocable for-
eign non-grantor trust, and in
this situation, various U.S.
income tax consequences will
arise.
In the case of a foreign non-
grantor trust, foreign source
income and foreign source capi-
tal gains are generally not sub-
ject to U.S. income tax. Special




0. 20031 Ii'/ll 2 '" 201i.':4
.. .. -


-EZ Q_' 2003 It" I -*




source rules apply to foreign
persons so that even gain, for
instance, from the sale of shares
in a U.S. corporation, can consti-
tute foreign source capital gain.
Capital gains are taxable to
such a trust if said gains result
from the disposition of a U.S.
real property interest (USRPI)
or if such gains are effectively


connected with a U.S. trade or
business (ECI).
MODIFICATIONS
A U.S. person beneficiary
of such a trust must include in
his or her gross income the
amount of the trust's income
which is required to be distrib-
uted, or is otherwise properly
paid or credited to the benefici-
ary during the taxable year, to
the extent of the trust's distrib-
utable net income (DNI).
Simply put, DNI is the foreign
trust's taxable income with spe-
cial modifications.
Thus, the maximum
amount of the trust's current
income that may be taxable to
any U.S. person beneficiary will
be the amount of the trust's
DNI allocated to said benefici-
ary.
In the case of a foreign
non-grantor trust, foreign
source income and any net cap-
ital gains are included in DNI
pursuant to rules that modify
the starting taxable income
base. If such income or net
capital gain is distributed in the
tax year earned (or within 65
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 18)


Jamaica's economy

grows by nearly 3%


A tax tip to ponder for beneficiaries,

foreign estates in the United States


GUYANA BATS FOR DIGICEL


Guyana's President Bharrat Jagdeo, left, receives a cricket bat signed by members
of the Digicel-sponsored West Indies cricket team from Colm Delves, chief execu-
tive officer of Digicel Group last month. Delves was informed by the Guyana gov-
ernment that Digicel will receive a license to offer Guyana technology and mobile
telecommunications services. The new license will also expand the company into
South America.


CARIBBEAN TODAY


TfTIVAA t' OFcWf

Caribbean culture has influenced the world
in many Ways over the years, from the erotic
beauty of the islands and people, to the
pulsating rhythms of their music ;
reggae, soca, salsa and merengue.
Now, Caribbean food is beginning to
play a new and vibrant role in how the
world Views this region, from jerk .
pork to curry chicken, fried plan- I
tains, fried yuca, cracked conch to
flying fish, from mango
chutney to guava jelly.
Caribbean beers, rum and liquors
are seen all oVer the world. Come with
Caribbean Today as we take you from the tip
of the yucatan to the jungles of Guyana, as we explore the tastes of the Caribbean.
We will tell you where you can find those hard-to-get products and foods.

CALL NOW TO ADVERTISE!
1-800-605-7516 305-238-2868
Fax 305-252-7843
e-mail: sates@caribbeantoday.com
Articles for Editorial Consideration: October 19th, 2006
ADVERTISING DEADLINE: OCTOBER 27TH, 2006


September 2006





CARIBBEAN TODAY


-usw^caribbeantodj..c..


BUS


I n ESS


T&T using soccer hype to attract European investments


PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad,
CMC Trinidad and Tobago is
seeking to capitalize on the
interest generated by the Soca


TUI rU


Warriors' participation in the
2006 World Cup soccer finals in
Germany to drive European
investment in its non-energy
sectors.
Trade and Industry Minister
Ken Valley said the twin-island
republic is sending a mission to


CONTINUEU
a 7.7 percc
ite produce

STRUGG
Manu
struction 1
to Nlrun--Il
tion had d
than 19 pe
responding
activity in
sector.
Hught


CONTINUEU
days there,
ter" of suc
ordinary in
etc.) will fl
U.S. perso
If such
tal gain is i
rently, thus
a current I
trust's leve
quences w
trust later
person ben
accumulate
The so
tion throw


European capitals since investors
there have been expressing a lot
of interest about investment
opportunities in Trinidad and
Tobago in the aftermath of the
tournament.
The minister said the mission
will play a main part in the gov-
r ni .L I's economic diversifica-
tion thrust by focusing mainly on
laying the groundwork for these
European nations to invest in the
country's non-energy sector.
The mission is to be made
up of government officials as well
as public and private sector rep-
resentatives from organizations in
the energy and non-energy sec-
tors of the economy Additionally
Valley said efforts are being
made to ascertain if former
national football captain Dwight
Yorke will be willing to be part of
the mission. He said FIFA Vice-
President Jack Warner will also
be welcomed to join the mission
if he chose to do so.


However, when contacted
last month Warner said no one
had invited him to be part of
the mission.


Warner


Valley said the Sept. 4-22
tour include Ireland, Germany,
Spain, France and England. The
minister said other investment
missions will be sent to the Far
East and Latin America.
0


Jamaica's economy grows by 3%
ED FROM PAGE 17) tive macroeconomic perform- million) less than recorded in
ent increase in baux- ance should be seen within the the corresponding period of
;tion in Jamaica. context of low inflation rate of 2005 and that is moving in the
2.8 percent, stability in the right direction," he explained.
;LE foreign currency exchange He predicted that "the
facturing and con- rate and increased revenue economy will remain positive
however, continued intake, which was J$1 billion for the future quarter" owing
as cement produc- ($15.1 million) more than pro- to "the continued growth in
declined by more jected. tourism and agriculture and a
-rcent, causing a cor- "The fiscal deficit has per- return to expansion in con-
g 3.5 percent drop in formed better than projected struction sector, should be the
the construction at J$2.5 billion ($30.3 million) main domestic drivers."
less than programmed and 4
es said that the posi- J$4.5 billion ($60.6

A tax tip to ponder for beneficiaries,
JED FROM PAGE 17) beyond the scope of this article, bution from a foreign non-
after), the "charac- but any U.S. person beneficiary grantor trust. In fact, the result
h distributions (e.g., of a foreign non-grantor trust may be the receipt of income or
come, capital gain, that is accumulating or is think- gains U.S. tax-free.
ow through to the ing about accumulating income Consider the following situa-
n beneficiaries, or net capital gains should seek tion: A foreign non-grantor trust
4 income or net capi- immediate counsel. holds the deceased grantor's for-
not distributed cur- On the other hand, if a eign vacation house which has a
s potentially avoiding U.S. person beneficiary basis of $500,000. The trust holds
J.S. income tax at the receives a distribution from a the property for a few years
1, adverse conse- foreign estate that generates when the trustee decides to sell
ill arise when the foreign source income and net the asset in order to produce liq-
distributes to a U.S. capital gains, there is a viable uidity so that a monetary distri-
ieficiary any such argument that the U.S. person bution can be made to the U.S.
ed amounts. beneficiary will be in a better person beneficiary.
)-called "accumula- position from a U.S. income tax Presume a $1,000,000 gain
back rules" are point of view than if said bene- on the sale of the property and
ficiary received the same distri- the trustee makes a $1,500,000


James P. GS, PA4
Immigraon Law Offices
Professionals and specialty workers
Managers for U.S, Subsidiaries
Nannys & Home Care Workers i
Family Petitions
Importers/Exporters & Investors
Artists, Athletes & Entertainers
Businessmen, Scientists, Educators
Labor Certification & Residence: Employees & Families
Waivers and petitions at U.S. consulates abroad
Criminal Immigration Matters
Deportation: Asylum, Cancellation of Removal
Citizenship 305.444.7775
jgagel@jgagel.com www.visas-anwmerica.co
150 Alhambra Circle, Suite 1270 Coral Gables, FL 33134,


NEW YORK, CMC -
International rating agency,
Standard & Poor's, has main-
tained healthy financial ratings
for Trinidad and Tobago.
While warning that a signifi-
cant increase in g, ,\ L rImIL 111 s
already "high level" of fiscal
spending could lead to a reversal,
the agency last month affirmed
its 'A-' long-term foreign and
'A+' long-term local currency
sovereign credit ratings for the
oil-rich Caribbean country.
Additionally, the agency
maintained the country's 'A-2'
short-term foreign and 'A-I'
short-term local currency
sovereign credit rating.
Roberto Sifon Arevalo, the
agency's credit analyst, said the
ratings reflected continuing sur-
pluses in the republic's fiscal
and external accounts which
stood at 30 percent of gross
domestic product in 2005, and
it is estimated to reach a high
33 percent of GDP in 2006.
"This performance along
with Trinidad and Tobago's
political and macroeconomic
stability, high energy prices,
and increased output-boost pol-
icy flexibility underpin strong
economic growth prospects
over the medium term,"
Arevalo said.

SLOW GO
The credit analyst said the


foreign estates
distribution to the U.S. person
beneficiary. Although such gain
is not considered taxable income
to the trust for U.S. income tax
purposes, the realized capital
gain will be included in the
trust's DNI and if distributed in
the same year realized (or with-
in 65 days thereafter), the U.S.
person beneficiary will be sub-
ject to tax on the $1,000,000 gain
(which gain will maintain its
character as capital gain).

LOSING GAINS
If the distribution is not
made in the year the capital
gain is realized, but is made in a
subsequent year, the distribu-
tion will lose its capital gain
treatment and will also be sub-
ject to the adverse accumula-
tion throwback rules.
If instead, it was a foreign
estate and not a foreign trust
which sold the vacation house, a
viable argument exists that the
entire distribution to the U.S.
person beneficiary could be U.S.
income tax free. Foreign
estates are generally subject to
U.S. income tax in the same
manner as nonresident alien
individuals. Nonresident alien
individuals are generally not
subject to U.S. income taxation
on foreign source income or
capital gains (unless said gain is


expansionary fiscal stance was
accompanied with slow devel-
opment and tax reductions in
the more labor-intensive non-
energy sector, increases the
non-energy deficit (overall
deficit minus energy revenue)
to 16 percent of GDP in 2005
from eight percent of GDP
in 2004.
"This performance high-
lights the country's heavy
exposure to changes in energy
prices, a risk that is compound-
ed by large increases in govern-
ment expenditure. However,
general government and public
sector debt continue to decline
on both a gross and a net
basis," he said.
Net general government
debt was 2.8 percent of GDP
in 2005, and the government is
expected to reach a net creditor
position of 1.0 percent of GDP
in 2006, far better than the 'A'
median's 30 percent net debtor
position, he said.
Arevalo said the stable
outlook balanced the expecta-
tion that external and fiscal
trends would remain positive
and that the growing Heritage
and Stabilisation Fund (HSF)
would provide an increasingly
important buffer for the
open,






ECI or from the disposition of a
USRPI).
Unlike a foreign non-
grantor trust, the computation
of a foreign estate's DNI does
not include foreign source
income or realized capital
gains. In this respect and in
comparison to the example
above, the $1,000,000 gain
should not be included in the
foreign estate's DNI.
Therefore, the distribution
should not be taxable to the
U.S. person beneficiary as the
maximum amount of the distri-
bution that would be taxable to
said U.S. person beneficiary
would be the amount of the
estate's DNI, which in this case
would be zero.
If you or a loved-one are a
U.S. person taxpayer and are
the beneficiary of a foreign
non-grantor trust or a foreign
estate, U.S. tax counsel should
be considered to guide you or
your loved-one through the
complex U.S. tax rules.

Michael Rosenberg is a share-
holder and Todd Rosenberg is
an associate with the Coral
Gables law firm of Packman,
Neuwahl & Rosenberg and can
be reached at 305-665-3311.
0


T&T keeps healthy rating


from Standard & Poor's


September 2006






CARIBBEAN TODAY


SPORT


r6ww -arbbentda.com


Jamaican soccer player on comeback trail in U.S.


GORDON WILLIAMS

Just months after his most
successful season as a pro-
fessional soccer player,
Jamaican international Fabian
Dawkins was forced to the
sidelines following a knee
injury which threatened his
promising career. Now he is
on the road back.
Just days before Dawkins
faced South Florida's Miami
EC. on Aug. 25 he was given
the green light by doctors to
play the entire game for his
club the Atlanta Silverbacks,
which competes with Miami
EC. and 10 other teams in
America's United Soccer
Leagues (USL). Prior to that
game, doctor's orders restrict-
ed him to the bench and limit-
ed appearances as a substitute.
"I just got cleared from
the doctor (Aug. 23) to play a
full match," a happy Dawkins
told Caribbean Today prior to
his departure for Miami for a
game at Tropical Park on
Aug. 27 which featured other
Caribbean players such as
Jamaican Sean Fraser and
Haiti's Stephan Guillaume,
plus teammate Machel
Millwood, who is also
Jamaican.

BATTLE
Dawkins believes his
full recovery could not have
come soon enough. The
Silverbacks are locked in a
battle to secure a USL playoff
berth. Consecutive losses to
Miami late last month proved
to be major setbacks for the
Atlanta, Georgia-based club,
which dropped from the sixth
and final playoff spot to sev-
enth following the second
straight loss a 7-1 thrashing -
to Miami.
However, the forward/
midfielder who last represent-
ed Jamaica versus the United
States in a friendly interna-
tional in April, is looking for-
ward to recapturing the form
that resulted in 15 goals and
four assists in 26 games and a
spot on the USL All-League
First Team last season. He is
also focused on playing at a
higher level in the future. The
USL is the second-tier profes-
sional competition in the U.S.
"Right now I'm coming
off injury. My immediate
plan is to get 100 percent fit,"
Dawkins explained. "From
there, I'd love to move on to a
higher standard somewhere in
Europe. My main goal is to
play (for Jamaica) in the 2010
World Cup."
Dawkins injured himself
on May 16, 2006 while training
with the Silverbacks. An MRI
showed medial and lateral
meniscus tear in his right knee.
He had surgery to repair the
damage on May 23. He


returned to the team in June
and by late July described
himself as being "70 to 75 per-
cent" fit. However, through
the end of last month he had
still to make any starts for


the team.
"I'm still working in,"
Dawkins told Caribbean
Today recently.
"It (knee) is feeling
alright," he added. "No pain."

GOING HOME
After the USL season,
which could end early this
month for the Silverbacks if
the club fails to make the
playoffs, the former national
youth player may return to
Jamaica to turn out for his
club Village United, where he
enjoyed tremendous success
last season. The all-round


competition of Jamaica's
National Premier League is
about the same as the USL,
Dawkins said, with a few dif-
ferences.
"Here (in the U.S.)
coaches are more adamant
to stick to the game plan," he
said. "In Jamaica they tend
to stray from the game plan
more."
He also has his eyes on
becoming a permanent mem-
ber of Jamaica's Reggae Boyz
senior national team, which
recently rehired Carl Brown
as technical director on an
interim basis. Despite only
recently recovering from the
injury, Dawkins was named in
Jamaica's squad to train for
two friendly matches against
Canada this month. He is hop-
ing other chances will pop up,
especially since he may be
able to showcase his talents
in Jamaica's NPL.
In the meantime,
Dawkins is hoping that
his performance for the
Silverbacks will help other
Caribbean players, particular-
ly those from his native coun-
try, to secure professional
contracts in the U.S.
i,,,d on what I've done
here my coach is always inter-
ested in Jamaica," Dawkins
said. "He's always asking if I
know players I think will blend


in (with the Silverbacks)."
Dawkins has no problem
with that, as long as the coach
does not forget that his star
striker is definitely on his way


back to full force.

Gordon Williams is Caribbean
Today's managing editor.
0


Jamaica's Asafa Powell acknowledges the crowd's applause after equaling his
own world record in the 100 meters last month in Zurich, Switzerland. Powell
ran 9.77 seconds in the event, the third time he has clocked that time. American
Justin Gatlin has also run that time, but his records are under scrutiny after he
tested positive for banned substances.


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RECORD REPEAT


CARIBBEAN SAMBA CELEBRATION


Photograph from Miami hC.


Former soccer superstar Romario, left, celebrates with Caribbean teammate Sean
Fraser, center, and fellow Brazilian Diego Walsh after their club scored one of seven
goals against the Atlanta Silverbacks in a United Soccer Leagues game in Miami,
Florida late last month. Romario scored three times in the game, while Fraser, a
Jamaican, scored twice and assisted on two of the Brazilian World Cup winner's goals.


September 2006


I





CARIBBEAN TODAY


- u s ..atdy Q


KINGSTON, St.
Vincent CMC The
St. Vincent and the
Grenadines govern-
ment has signed a con-
tract to begin further
development of an
airstrip on the
Grenadine island
of Canouan.
A $15 million loan
from Scotiatrust and
Merchant Bank of
Trinidad and Tobago
was awarded to
Canouan Construction
Associates, CCA Ltd.
to redevelop the airport
and its facilities.
The facelift would
see an additional
2,300 feet added to


the 7,000 meters
airstrip along with improve-
ments to the airport's termi-
nal building and fire fighting
facilities.

TRANSFORMATION
Prime Minister Dr. Ralph
Gonsalves said the expansion
would transform the airport
into the country's first jetport


Canouan offers an impressive 18-hole golf course.


and would result in the contin-
ued growth of passenger
arrivals to the country. The
prime minister noted that the
requirement to expand the
airport arose due to the
restructuring policy of U.S.-
based carrier American Eagle,
which operates a shuttle serv-
ice to the island.


The Building Code Compliance
Office ensures uniform code
compliance County-wide
Miami-Dade County's Building Code Compliance Office (BCCO), created by the
County Commission in 1991, is a regulatory department that provides oversight
on building code issues throughout Miami-Dade County, administers the
issuance of local contractor/tradesman licenses and approves construction
products that are used to build structures in the County.
BCCO's mission of uniform code compliance throughout Miami-Dade County is
achieved through its work in three department sections: Code Compliance,
Contractor Licensing/Enforcement and Product Control.


Code Compliance:
* BCCO Code Compliance
Specialists author revisions and
amendments to the statewide
Florida Building Code.
* BCCO Code Compliance
Specialists ensure uniform
application of building code
County-wide and provide technical
assistance to municipal building
officials by completing routine field
visits
* BCCO Code Compliance
Specialists disseminate new code
provisions by conducting monthly
building officials meetings and
industry trade organizations and
teaching continuing education
courses for code certified
personnel
Contractor
Licensing/Enforcement:
* BCCO Code Compliance
Investigators conduct monthly
Contractor Commercial Vehicle
Checkpoints and construction site
sweeps in a proactive effort to
curtail the number of unlicensed
contractors as well as conduct
Reverse Contractor Stings to
curtail unlicensed contractors
* BCCO Code Compliance
Investigators investigate
unlicensed contractor complaints.


Investigators work closely with
Miami-Dade Police and the State
Attorney's Office in the attempt to
gain financial restitution for the
homeowners, as well as provide
information that could lead to the
unlicensed contractor's arrest.
* BCCO Contractor Licensing
process contractor exam
applications and issue licenses
and certificates of competency for
building and trade categories
Product Control:
* The Product Control Section
oversees the Product Approval
process for building envelope
materials to ensure that they meet
the County's rigorous standards
* The Product Control Section
monitors the products submitted to
state to obtain the optional state
product approvals
* The Product Control Section
researches new methods of
standards to enhance the
performance requirements in the
High Velocity Hurricane Zone.
* The Product Control Section
oversees a Quality Assurance
program to ensure that products
approved with a Notice of
Acceptance are maintaining the
standards of production.


For more information on BCCO, visit the department's website at
www.miamidade.gov/buildingcode or call 3-1-1.

MLAM


He said with the airline
increasing its fleet to accom-
modate larger volumes of pas-
sengers from Miami to the
Grenadine Island, the exten-
sion would enable the carrier
to use larger aircraft on its
Canouan route.
According to Gonsalves,
the new runway at Canouan
would create opportunities
for other commercial aircraft
to exploit the Grenadines
market.


I


ITOU R ISM


Airport plans set to transform Canouan


TALLER TASTE


The "Red Stripe Ambassador", right, presents a bottle of the new, bigger version of
the famous Red Stripe Beer to Jamaica's Ambassador to Washington Gordon
Shirley, on Jamaican Independence Day last month in Washington, D.C. Red Stripe
is well known worldwide and travelers often visit Jamaica, where the beer is
brewed, to sample the taste. It has become a popular brew with tourists. The new
size is 24 ounces, but the familiar "stubby" shape of the bottle remains the same
as the 12-ounce version.




Call for Bids or Proposals
For a listing of available Broward Community College (BCC)
open procurement solicitations visit:
www.broward.edu/purchasing/bids
or contact
954-201-7455
BCC strongly encourages participation by minority and women-
owned business enterprises (MWBE firms)


"There are lots of
Vincentians who would use
the Canouan airport rather
than to go through Barbados
and St. Lucia to connect to
their international carriers,"
Gonsalves said.
Nestled between
Mustique
and the
Tobago
Keys,
Canouan
has become
one of the .
economic .
boons of
the
Grenadines
attracting Gonsalves
the atten-
tion of foreign investors to
it shores.
The island is home to
the now world renowned
Raffles resort and the popu-
lar Trump international Jim
Fazio-designed 18-hole golf
course.
St. Vincent and the
Grenadines, a multi-island
state, has five functional air-
ports, and plans are in the
pipeline to construct an inter-
national airport by 2011.
0


Couples to expand

resorts in Jamaica

Couples Resorts has
announced plans for
expansion with the
addition of a fifth resort to its
brand.
The new resort will be sit-
uated near the multi-billion
dollar Harmony Cove luxury
tourism project in the parish
of Trelawny, Jamaica. The
370-room resort is estimated
to be a $57 million investment
and will be built on 38-acres
of land owned by Lee Issa,
Couples Resorts' chairman.
The construction is esti-
mated to be completed in 2008.
"Couples has been in
expansion mode for the past
few years," Glenn Lawrence,
Couples chief executive offi-
cer, said in a press release
issued late last month.
"We have created a highly
successful resort model, which
has allowed us to grow expo-
nentially. We started with a
single resort, Couples Ocho
Rios, over 28 years ago and
now offer 900 rooms spread
amongst four resorts..."
Couples Resorts, head-
quartered in Montego Bay,
Jamaica, currently owns and
operates four properties in
Jamaica.



Cheaper getaways

to Jamaica this fall
The Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB) has
made a listing of resorts in the
Caribbean island which are offering
vacation packages as the summer
draws to a close. Among them are
the following:

* Half Moon's "Homecoming
Package" for parents who want to
spend quality time with their chil-
dren before the school year gets on
its way. Runs through Oct. 31. Check
www.halfmoon.com
* Coyaba Beach Club is offering
the fifth night free on any booking
until Nov. 16. Visit www.coyabaja-
maica.com

* Jamaica Inn is offering a "Pay
for Four Nights Stay for Five" special
until Dec. 14, with blackout dates
from Nov. 21-29. Check
www.jamaicainn.com

* Sandals Resorts is offering discounts
of up to 50 percent off published rack
rates at www.sandals.com

* Sunset Beach Resort & Spa -
During September, October and
November, all children ages 12 and
under stay free. Visit www.sunset-
beachjamaica.com/
There are many more equally
attractive packages. Visit the JTB's
website at www.visitjamaica.com
0


September 2006


............ ........
T R n V 6 t





CARIBBEAN TODAY


T&T minister defends decision

to hire police officers from U.K.


PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad,
CMC Trinidad and Tobago
Minister of National Security
Martin Joseph has defended
government's decision to
recruit United Kingdom cops
to fight crime in the country.
His latest defense came
after the Chamber of Commerce
issued a statement saying gov-
ernment should have followed
Guyana's example to use the
crime fighting skills of former
New York Police Commissioner
Bernard Kareck.
However, in a letter to
Chamber President Ian Welsh,
Joseph pointed out that Kareck
is currently under two federal
investigations for financial
impropriety. He further stated


Barbad

thumbs i
BRIDGETOWN, Barbados,
CMC Barbadian public ser-
vants have voted to accept a
$20 million payout from gov-
ernment to offset the increased
cost of living over the last year.
However, Walter Maloney,
president of the National Union
of Public Workers, said they do
not want the money as a one-
off payment as had been pro-
posed by government, but
instead want it to be treated as
a retroactive pay increase for
the last year of a three-year
agreement which ended in May.
"We are saying that the
two percent should be added
to the basic pay of public ser-
vants and that it be retroac-


that his ministry has not been
secretive about its crime
fighting tactics and reminded
Welsh that it was just recently
that his ministry met with the
chamber to discuss how it is
fighting crime.

UNDER PRESSURE
Joseph has recently come
under attack for recruiting 27
Scotland Yard officers to help
fight crime in the country.
Each officer is being paid a
million Trinidad and Tobago
dollars (TT $1 = U.S. 16
cents) a year, a figure which in
some instances is eight times
higher than what senior local
cops are being paid a year.
That is the equivalent of the


os' public work(

up to govt's inflal
tive. So we have not dismissed
the $20 million that the gov-
ernment is offering, but we
have said that $20 million
must not be a one-off pay-
ment," Maloney said.
The Daily Nation newspa-
per quoted Maloney as saying
that once the money was
added to salaries as a retroac-
tive payment it would be
reflected in the pensions and
gratuities of the public offi-
cers. Government put the
offer on the table since there
was an agreement with trade
unions that public workers
would be given additional
funds once the inflation rate
climbed over five percent dur-


U.K. salaries of
the officers
who have been
on the job in
the Caribbean
since April.
Cabinet
granted
approval for Joseph
the Scotland
Yard detectives to be appoint-
ed to the anti-crime unit
because of the unprecedented
upsurge in crime in the country,
Joseph said. Joseph also said
the ministry is open to more
discussions with the chamber
pertaining to how to keep the
country and citizens safe.




ers give

lion offer
ing the final year of a three-
year wages agreement.
According to Central
Bank Governor Dr. Marion
Williams the inflation rate
reached seven percent up to
the end of June this year.
"We applaud the govern-
ment for accepting that there
was a move in the inflationary
rate and so the offer of $20
million," Maloney said.
The umbrella trade union
body, the Congress of Trade
Unions and Staff Associations,
previously said it was not in
agreement with the one-off
payment.
0


CARIBBEAN BAR ASSOCIATION
Cordially Invites ou to Join Us at our
Tenth Annual
SCHOLARSHIP AND AWARDS BANQUE
Saturday, September 30, 2006


This Year's Banquet will feature
,f ff^ /-/ // / //- f-

Cocktail reception: 6:30 p.m.
Dinner: 7:30 p.m.
"* Cost: $I00 per person

Honorees: Dr. Karl Wright-Florida Memorial University
1 .0B Winsome "Lady C" Charlton
0- Ocho Rios Miami Inc. a s

Location: Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino.


Sir George Alleyne receives

Suriname's highest national award


PARAMARIBO, Suriname,
CMC Sir George Alleyne,
former director of the Pan-
American Health Organization,
has been decorated with
Suriname's highest national
award.
In a brief ceremony at
the Presidential Palace in
Paramaribo last month, the
distinction as "Bearer of the
Grant Sash in the Honorary
Order of the Palm" was con-
ferred to Sir George by
President Ronald Venetiaan.
In his remarks the head


of state noted the illustrious
career and regional and
worldwide achievements of


the former PAHO director,
who is currently chairman of
the Caribbean Commission on
Health Development and
United Nations special advi-
sor on HIV/AIDS.

DEDICATION
Venetiaan said the
Barbadian national has dedicat-
ed a great part of his career to
medicine and health care and
uplifting the standard of public
health for the benefit of his
people and the overall process
of Caribbean development.
He said one of Sir
George's major philosophies -
"the wealth of the Caribbean
is the health of the Caribbean"
- became the cornerstone of
the Caribbean community
(CARICOM) policy on health
and development.
The president said as
director of PAHO, Sir Alleyne
has dedicated a great part of
his life to the health of the
Caribbean people and was a
tireless advocate of economic
growth and development of
the Pan-American population.
0


Caleb Center
5400 NW 22 Ave. 1st Floor
(M-F 8 AM to 4:30 PM)

South Dade Government Center
10710 SW 211 St. 1st Floor
(M-F 8 AM to 4:30 PM)


LeJeune Office
3575 S. LeJeune Rd.
(M-F 8 AM to 5 PM)

Douglas
3071 SW 38 Ave. 1st Floor
(M-F 8 AM to 5 PM)


Get 7E




Join the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department
(WASD), and the Adopt-A-Tree Program

Saturday, September 23rd
9 am to 12 noon
Florida Memorial University
15800 NW 42 Ave, Miami Gardens

For the chance to receive a new high-efficiency
showerhead ABSOLUTELY FREE in
exchange for your previous model!

If you can't make it to the launch event on
Saturday, don't worry -~~ You can still get
your FREE high-efficiency Showerhead!

Simply visit any of the following four WASD
"Exchange Locations":


MIAMl

Or visit us online at www.miamidade.govlwasdl or
call 786-552-8955 for more information on how the
Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department
can help save YOU water and money


September 2006


-2P4 r





CARIBBEAN TODAY


- u scrbes..


ROSEAU, Dominica, CMC -
An executive member of the
Dominia Labour Party (DLP)
has severed links with ruling
party and is discussing his
political future with a recently
formed political party.
Kenrick Ambo, who held
the position of assistant secre-
tary with the DLP, said he is
leaving the party because of
his disappointment with the
treatment he received since
unsuccessfully contesting the
May 2005 general elections on
the party's ticket. In that elec-


tion he was beaten in the
Salisbury constituency by
United Workers Party Leader
Earl Williams.
"I am severing ties with
the Dominica Labour Party
and resigning as the assistant
general secretary of the
party," Ambo announced on
state radio late last month.
Ambo says his decision is
based on two fundamental
reasons: "One, the party's lack
of respect for the people of
Salisbury, Morne Rachette
and Coulibistrie. Two, for the


P 0 1 I T I C S


Robertson in charge of PNP

campaign for upcoming polls


KINGSTON, Jamaica, CMC -
The governing People's
National
(PNP) eased
into election
mode last
month when
it announced
the appoint-
ment of politi-
cal talisman
Dr. Paul
Robertson as Robertson
the party's
campaign director for polls
widely expected within
months.


Robertson, one the party's
most seasoned strategists,
assumed the post he has held
in previous campaigns, includ-
ing the 2002 elections which
saw the party getting a fourth
consecutive term in power.
He developed a reputa-
tion as a brilliant campaigner
in 1986 when as general secre-
tary of the party, he helped to
lead the PNP to the local gov-
ernment elections then the
general elections in 1989.
Colin Campbell, PNP
general secretary, confirmed
Robertson's appointment and


told local media that a formal
announcement about the cam-
paign hierarchy would be
made in due course.
Robertson, Member of
Parliament for South East St.
Catherine, has already
announced his intention to
quit representational politics.
He was campaign manager for
Dr. Peter Phillips, who lost
against Portia Simpson Miller
in internal elections to choose
a new party leader earlier this
year. Simpson Miller is
Jamaica's prime minister.
0


/


GEORGETOWN, Guyana -
Re-elected President Bharrat
Jagdeo has said there would
be changes to his new Cabinet
following the Aug. 28 regional
and general elections.
When asked whether there
would be any change in the
composition of his new Cabinet
Jagdeo replied: "There will be
changes to my Cabinet."
Speaking at a news con-
ference here before the results
of the elections were officially


announced, Jagdeo said that
he was "very very confident
about the parliamentary
majority" his ruling People's
Progressive Party Civic
(PPP/C) would enjoy in the
new National Assembly.
Prior to the elections
Jagdeo said that his party was
seeking a 51 percent majority
in the 65-seat legislature,
adding that any thing above
that figure would be "a bonus".
0


RM. hails national unity

at T&T's Independence


PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad,
CMC As Trinidadians celebrat-
ed the country's 44th anniversary
of political Independence late
last month, Prime Minister
Patrick Manning commended
nationals for their spirit of
national unity
In his Independence mes-
sage Manning said citizens have
transformed "our highly-multi-
ethnic nation into one society,
breaking down the barriers of
race, class, gender and other
prejudices inimical to our col-
lective peace and progress. He,
however, lamented that the
country has "not been able to
escape the difficulties of organ-
ised crime."
According to Manning, 44
years ago Aug. 31 Trinidad
and Tobago took the "impor-
tant and necessary dLL. i< 1n' to
part with colonialism and
Independence provided the
opportunity for greater control
over the country's affairs.
"Since the achievement of
our Independence, our nation
has made remarkable progress
in our human development, the
living standards of our citizens,
our economy, and our relations
with the nations and peoples of


the world," he
said, adding
that these
outcomes are
not inadver-
tent.
Manning
said the twin-
island republic Manning
continues to
pursue national development on
the foundations of an open and
liberal democracy, the suprema-
cy of the constitution, the rule of
law, and equality of justice.

ONE SOCIETY
"Through the nurturing of
goodwill, understanding and
genuine appreciation of all
among our citizens, we have
transformed our highly-multi-
ethnic nation into one society,
breaking down the barriers of
race, class, gender and other
prejudices inimical to our col-
lective peace and progress."
He added that out of the
difficult economic circum-
stances of the past, Trinidad
and Tobago has evolved into a
strong, stable, progressive and
promising economy.
0


party's lack of respect and
appreciation for the level of
sacrifice that I have made and
my family have made on
behalf of the party."
Ambo, a police officer
who resigned his job to enter
politics, says he is not satisfied
with the management of the
state, and several attempts to
reach the prime minister to
discuss matters pertaining to
his constituency have been
rejected.
0


Former Dominica parliamentarian dies


ROSEAU, Dominica, CMC -
Pat Stevens, a former legislator
and member of the Dominica
Freedom Party (DFP), died
last month after a prolonged
battle with cancer of the blad-
der, relatives said. He was 71
years old.
Stevens, who once repre-
sented the Marigot constituen-
cy, north of here, died at the
Princess Margaret Hospital.
He began his political


career at the age of 26 where
he unsuccessfully contested the
Eastern District constituency
in the 1961 general elections
on a ticket of the Dominica
Labour Party (DLP). But he
entered Parliament in 1973
when he contested a by-elec-
tion following the decision of
his father, W.S Stevens, to
retire from active politics.
In the 1975 general elec-
tions, Stevens contested the


Marigot constituency as an
independent candidate and
won and later joined the DFP
in 1978. He represented the
constituency until his retire-
ment from active politics in
1990.
Prime Minister Roosevelt
Skerrit, in his condolence
message, described Stevens as
a "great son of the soil."
0


Guyana polls could be turning point in

country's history ~ Carter Center


GEORGETOWN, Guyana,
CMC The Carter Center,
which observed the Aug. 28
elections in Guyana, says the
peaceful polls could be a turning
point in the country's history.
"The character and
resilience of the Guyanese
people has been borne out by
these elections (and) if the
current spirit is maintained,
and Guyana's political leaders
make wise and far-sighted
choices, acknowledge deeply-
held concerns, this could be a
turning point in Guyana's his-
tory," head of the Carter


Center team, Sir John
Compton, said last month.
Sir John, a former St.
Lucia prime minister, said the
orderliness of the elections
speaks of "the maturing of
Guyana's political culture and
the deep yearning for peace
and progress which is shared
by all Guyanese."

PRAISE
He praised the Guyana
Elections Commission
(GECOM), political parties
which contested the polls and
the wider Guyanese public for


"the most
peaceful and
orderly elec-
toral process
in recent his-
tory." He said
notwithstand-
ing the politi-
cal maturity Compton
displayed,
"the frustration and fear that
exists across society must be
acknowledged and mitigated
through actions of political
leaders over the coming days
and beyond.
0


Executive member severs ties

with Dominica's ruling party


September 2006


Christie puts party on

election alert in Bermuda
NASSAU, Bahamas, CMC to guarantee that the people
Prime Minister Perry Christie, of this country are fully
who turned 63 last month, has aware of the integrity of our
called on his colleagues in the purpose.
Progressive Liberal Party "Our focus is
(PLP) to prepare for the next to ensure that
general elections. this country
The PLP won 29 of the continues to
40 seats in Parliament in the be a stable
2002 elections to take power democracy,
from the Freedom National continues to
Movement. move forward
Christie told supporters and upward,
that the PLP is the party of Christie and that we
choice and he is looking for- do so and not
ward to winning a second term allow people who are out to
in the next poll, due 2007. stop us to distract us from the
"One by one, step by step, work we have to do," Christie
community by community, said.
island by island. And we
will be relentless in our efforts

Jagdeo promises

Cabinet shake-up






CARIBBEAN TODAY


JAMAICAN JERK FEST
The tasty spice and flavor of
cooking done with Jamaican
jerk seasoning will again be
available this month at the
Markham Park in Sunrise,
Florida.


passport applications can call
1-877-487-2778. Customer
service representatives are
available from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Monday through Friday,
excluding Federal holidays.
Automated information is


A plate of tasty Jamaican jerk chicken.


The fifth annual
"Jamaican Jerk It %i aIl I will
be held on Sept. 24, featuring
cooking and domino contests,
live entertainment, a new art
of food and wine pairing com-
petition, plus a fun zone for
children.
Activities begin at 9 a.m.
For more information,
call 305-891-1242; or visit
info@jerkfestival. com.

PARENTS NIGHT OUT
The Art and Culture Center
of Hollywood, Florida will
hold a I'arL ni, Night Out"
event on Oct. 13.
I'arL in Night Out" is a
chance for parents to have an
evening out on the town alone
while their children ages four
to 12 create art, participate in
creative movement activities,
play games, eat pizza and
watch movies at the center,
1650 Harrison Street.
During this event, parents
will drop their children off at
6 p.m. and pick them up at
10 p.m.
The theme is "What Do
You Want to be When You
Grow Up?" Kids should dress
up as someone in their chosen
profession. Each event costs
$15 per child for center mem-
bers or $20 per child for non-
members.
For more information
and reservations, call 954-921-
3274.

PASSPORTS
The National Passport
Information Center (NPIC),
the United States Department
of State's single, centralized
public contact center for U.S.
passport information, is offer-
ing a toll free service and has
expanded its service availabili-
ty/options.
Persons with questions or
need status checks on pending


available 24 hours a day, seven
days a week.
For e-mail access, visit:
npic@state.gov Website of
passport and other interna-
tional travel information is
available at travel.state.gov

'GREEN CARD' FILING
The United States
Citizenship and Immigration
Services (USCIS) has
announced that aliens must
mail applications to renew or
replace permanent resident
cards, commonly known as
"Green Cards", directly to the
Los Angeles Lockbox.
The Lockbox is a process-
ing facility used by USCIS to
accelerate the collection of
applications and petitions.
The announced change allows
the agency to improve the
processing of
Form 1-90
(Application to
Replace
Permanent
Resident Card)
by electronically
capturing data
and images and
by performing
fee receipting
and depositing m
from one central
location, rather
than at the local
district office,
service center, or
application sup-
port center
(ASC).
Aliens filing
a Form 1-90,
regardless of
their state of res- y^
idence, must
mail those appli-
cations with an
application fee Sea Cargo *
of $185 and a
biometrics fee I
$70 to one of the M ff


rFYI

following addresses:
For U.S. Postal Service
(USPS) deliveries:
U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration Services, P.O.
Box 54870 Los Angeles, CA
90054-0870;
Or for non-USPS deliver-
ies (e.g. private couriers):
U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration Services,
Attention: 1-90, 16420 Valley
View Ave., La Mirada, CA
90638
Applicants should not
include initial evidence and
supporting documentation
when submitting the Form I-
90 to the Los Angeles
Lockbox.
Applicants will receive a
notice for a biometrics pro-
cessing appointment at an
ASC and will submit their ini-
tial evidence during that
appointment.
Applicants will receive
their biometrics appointment
in the mail.

CRISIS HOTLINE
Multi-lingual counselors
are available to respond per-
sons suffering from stress or
needing help with housing,
food, child care, caring for
teens or other similar prob-
lems.
Call 211 from a regular
telephone or 954-537-0211
from a cellular.
The free service is being
offered as part of Broward
County's helplines.

NEW JTB DIRECTOR
A Jamaican national, who
held a senior position in The
Bahamas tourist industry, has
been appointed as new head
of the Jamaican Tourist Board
(JTB).
Basil Smith, a veteran in
the tourist industry, has been
selected to replace Paul


LW-S^^ caribbeantoday


Pennicook as the director of
the organization.
Smith, who was a deputy
director of the JTB from 1995-
1997, currently works in The
Bahamas as the senior direc-
tor of communications in The
Bahamas Ministry of Tourism.
He has also served as the
executive vice president of
The Bahamas Hotel
Association.
In a press release issued
last month, the JTB said
Smith will aid in the expan-
sion of its global reach and
develop strong partnerships
with the private sector.
Earlier this year
Pennicook opted not to renew
his three year contract with
the JTB and on June 1 he
joined the national airline Air
Jamaica as senior vice-presi-
dent of sales and marketing.

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR
CARIBBEAN NATIONALS
The Caribbean Hotel
Foundation (CHF) has award-
ed a record
number of
scholarships
to
Caribbean
nationals to
pursue stud-
ies in
tourism
related
fields. Sanguinetti
It said
that the scholarships to 39
Caribbean nationals reaffirm
the program as the LargL I
scholarship program in the
Caribbean hospitality industry
and one of the top programs
in the industry worldwide".
"The scholarships granted
are a testimony of tomorrow's
trends and practices in our
industry. From summer
schools in profitability and
food service management to


certifications in eco-tourism,
almost all of the applicants'
educational interests are
somehow related to the sus-
tainable development of the
tourism product and the
preservation of Caribbean's
identity, especially through
cuisine," said Gill Titcombe,
coordinator of the CHE
Alec Sanguinetti, director
general and chief executive
officer of the Caribbean Hotel
Association (CHA), praised
the regional private sector
including the Florida-based
Caribbean Cruise Association
(FCCA) and other cruise lin-
ers for their contribution
towards the program.
"Thanks to contributions
of our industry partners and
the hard work of our coordi-
nator, the Caribbean Hotel
Foundation has become the
bi-_-L.,I and most versatile
scholarship program in the
tourism and hospitality indus-
try, with awards to promising
students and industry profes-
sionals at all levels,"
Sanguinetti said.

LOW COST TO FLY TO
BERMUDA
Low-cost Canadian air-
line, WestJet, plans to start
flights to Bermuda as well as
several Caribbean destina-
tions, the Royal Gazette
newspaper has reported.
WestJet, which already
flies to numerous locations
within Canada and the United
States, has received approval
from the Canadian govern-
ment to provide services to
10 regional locations including
Bermuda, the Cayman Islands,
Jamaica and The Bahamas.
0


September 2006




CARIBBEAN TODAY


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