Spaceport news

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November 16, 2007 John F. Kennedy Space Center Americas gateway to the universe Spaceport News http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/news/snews/spnews_toc.html Vol. 47, No. 24 Discovery home after historic mission sets up future space station growth NASA TV to cover November space station spacewalks, work and briengs F OLLOWING the wake of space shuttle Discovery's delivery of the Harmony connect ing module to the International Space Station, the station crew will conduct two more spacewalks and robotically move two components this month to prepare for delivery of a European laboratory. All of the spacewalks and major robot ics work will be broadcast live on NASA Television. At 4:30 a.m. Nov. 20, NASA TV will broadcast live coverage as Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Daniel Tani con duct a 6.5-hour spacewalk to hook for the relocated mating adapter and Harmony module. A press con ference will follow the spacewalk on NASA TV, originating from NASA's Johnson Space Center with questions from participating NASA sites. At 4:30 a.m. Nov. 24, NASA TV will broadcast live coverage as 6.5-hour spacewalk to complete the hookup of the mating adapter and Harmony module to the sta tion. This will leave them ready for the docking of space shuttle Atlantis and delivery of Columbus on mission STS-122. T HE space shuttle Discovery (right) and its crew landed at NASAs Kennedy Space Center at 1:01 p.m. Nov. 7 after completing a 15-day journey of more than 6.2 million miles in space. Discoverys STS-120 mis sion added a key component to the International Space Station and featured an unprecedented space walk to repair a damaged solar array. This mission demonstrates the value of having humans in space and our ingenuity in solving problems, said Bill Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for space operations at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The teams on the ground worked around the clock, along with the crews in space, to develop level of preparedness gave us the edge necessary to make this a suc cessful mission. Discoverys crew of Com mander Pam Melroy, Pilot George Zamka and Mission Specialists Scott Parazynski, Doug Wheelock, Stephanie Wilson, Dan Tani and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli delivered the Node 2 module, known as Harmony. Harmony will provide attachment points for European and Japanese laboratories to be added later this year and early in 2008. Tani remained behind on the 16 crew. He is scheduled to return home aboard space shuttle Atlantis on a mission targeted to launch Dec. 6. Tani replaced Clayton months on the station, arriving in June aboard Atlantis. Anderson returned with the STS-120 crew. With Discovery and its crew safely home, the stage is set for the Before Atlantis STS-122 mis sion delivers the European Space Agencys Columbus laboratory module to the station, Harmony must be relocated to its permanent location at the front of the com three spacewalks and robotically move two components to complete that task, allowing Atlantis to dock and Columbus to attach to Harmony. (See NASA TV below for more information.) Right, Commander Pamela Melroy, Pilot George Zamka and Mission Specialists Scott Parazynski, Stephanie Wilson and Doug Wheelock after landing on Runway 33 of the Shuttle Landing Facility.

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November 16, 2007 Page 2 SPACEPORT NEWS SpaceX breaks ground on launch complex S tion Technologies, or SpaceX, broke ground on Nov. 2 at build new launch facili ties at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The U.S. Air Force Space Command's 45th Space Wing granted a license to SpaceX to operate on 40, which was previ ously used for Titan 4 launches. SpaceX will be able to launch both the Falcon 9 and Falcon 9-heavy from the site. The com pany is planning to debut the Falcon 9 in late 2008. As part of NASAs Commercial Orbital Transportation Services, or COTS, competition, SpaceX will launch a Falcon 9 with a cargo-carrying payload on a series of three demonstration missions from Cape Canaveral to the International Space Station, culmi nating with the delivery of supplies to the orbiting laboratory. SpaceX says it intends to demonstrate its launch, maneuvering, berthing and return abilities by 2009 a year before NASA has scheduled the end of space shuttle operations. ous launches, including two interplanetary missions: the Mars Observer on Sept. 25, 1992, and the Saturn-bound Cassini-Huygens, which rode into space on Oct. 15, 1997, atop a Titan IVB launcher. Putting spades to work at ground-breaking ceremonies for SpaceXs new Falcon 9 rocket launch facilities at Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral are (from left) Thad Altman, Florida representative; Jeff Kottkamp, Florida lieutenant governor; Elon Musk, founder and chief execu tive ofcer of Space Exploration Technologies; U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Susan Helms, commander of the 45th Space Wing; Lynda Weatherman, Brevard County Economic Development Commis sion chief executive ofcer and president; Steve Koehler, president of Space Florida; Janet Petro, deputy director of NASA's Kennedy Space Center; Patricia Grace Smith, Federal Aviation Adminis tration associate administrator for commercial space transportation; and Steve Cain, Kennedy COTS project manager. T HE NASA Engineering and Safety Center, known as NESC, recently honored United NASA honors USA employee for technical excellence Space Alliance employee Delmar Foster during ceremonies at a lead ership meeting at NASA's Langley At NASAs Langley Research Center in Virginia, Ken Cameron (left), NESC deputy director for safety, and Ralph Roe, NESC director, present an NESC Engineering Excellence Award to Delmar Foster (center) of NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Research Center in Virginia. The ceremony recognized individuals for their contributions to critical technical assessments over the past year. Foster received an NESC En and outstanding proactive support in establishing the processes and techniques for SAS software utili zation within the Data Mining and Trending Working Group." Award honors individual accom plishments of NESC job-related tasks of such magnitude and merit as to deserve special recognition. This is the fourth year the NESC has recognized employees and NASA partners for outstanding contributions to NESC-sponsored activities and to encourage critical problems. The Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Fire Department arrived nine minutes later and promptly were no injuries and no damage to surrounding property. Demolition contractors using steel cutting torches were section ing an aging structure in prepara tion for removal when adjacent materials ignited. The work was according to standard operating procedures. This kind of thing is not un heard of during large-scale demoli tion. Thats why we have proce dures in place. Everyone acted pro fessionally and by the book, and fortunately no one was hurt, said Norman Bobczynski, SpaceXs launch site director. Musk was informed of the situa tion and stated that SpaceX will and will make any changes deemed necessary.

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SPACEPORT NEWS Page 3 November 16, 2007 Atlantis rolls to Launch Pad 39A 24th shuttle mission to the space station to add Columbus Laboratory In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the Columbus Laboratory is positioned on a stand where it is being displayed to the media at a special showing. At left, an artists rendering of the inside of the Columbus Lab as it is intended for use after its installation on the International Space Station. S PACE shuttle Atlantis rolled out to Launch Pad 39A on Nov. 10 and preparations for the STS-122 mission are moving forward. out of the Vehicle Assembly Build ing was 4:43 a.m. The 3.4-mile journey to the launch pad took about a little more than 7 hours. The primary payload on Atlantis is the Columbus Labora tory (see below for more about Columbus). Launch to the Interna tional Space Station is targeted for Dec. 6. The addition of this mod ule to the space station was made possible with the installation of the Harmony Node 2 module on mis sion STS-120 in October. B UILT by the European Space Agency, or ESA, Columbus ing crew members and scientists around the world the ability to conduct a variety of life, physical and materials science ments. Columbus is ESA's largest single contribution to the space station. ESA has developed a range of payload racks, all tailored on micro-organisms, cells and tissue cultures, and even small plants and small insects. The Material Science Laboratory Electromagnetic Levita tor is a facility for melting and solidifying conductive metals, alloys or semi-conductors. The Fluid Science Laboratory will on Earth, such as better ways to clean up oil spills and even improve manufacture of optical lenses. Outside its pressurized hull, Columbus has four mounting points for dered view of the Earth, science packages can investigate anything from tivity 250 miles below on the Earth. Columbus was transferred to Launch Pad 39A on Nov. 8 in preparation for its journey to the station. Space Shuttle Atlantis, secured atop a mobile launch platform, nears the top of the ve percent grade to the top of the hardstand on its nal approach to Launch Pad 39A. The rotating service structure, adjoined to the xed service structure at left, has been rolled back in preparation for the shuttles arrival. After a 7-hour trip, the shuttle was hard down on the pad at 11:51 a.m.

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Page 4 November 16, 2007 SPACEPORT NEWS World Space Expo commemorates humanitys rst 50 years in space, looks to future explorations to the moon and beyond By Steven Siceloff Staff Writer T HUNDERING space shuttles gave way to the Thunderbirds and roaring rockets made room for a soaring Super Hornet, Eagle and Raptor during the four days of the World Force's elite aerial demonstration team known as the Thunderbirds staged a full air show from the same runway at NASA's Kennedy Space Center used by space shut tles returning from orbit. "I never thought I would get the opportunity to do it. It's just really neat to do it," said Lt. Col. Kevin "Hollywood" Robbins, commander of the Thunderbirds. The squadron was joined at the Shuttle Landing Facility by the the American inventory, including the Air Force F-22 Raptor and the Navy's F/A-18 Super Hornet. "It's a once-in-a-lifetime for who pilots the F-22 Raptor. A pair of F-15 Eagles, the Army's precision parachute team known as the Golden Knights and a World War II-era P-51 Mustang also took part in a weekend of air shows over the space center in Florida. The 920th Rescue Wing, based at nearby Patrick Air Force Base and on-call during all space shuttle launches and landings, showed its capabilities with helicopters pull ing an astronaut from the waters of the Banana River in a simulated recovery. The two helicopters then joined up with an HC-130 trans port aircraft for an aerial refueling demonstration. It made for an impressive roster of performers for crowds number ing about 7,000 each day on Nov. 3 and 4 at the NASA Causeway that links Kennedy and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Top, crowds along the NASA Cause way watch the HC-130 transport aircraft in an aerial refueling demon stration. Middle, the U.S. Air Force 920th Rescue Wing demonstrates its capability. This unit was responsible for Mercury and Gemini capsule recovery. Left, a member of the U.S. Army Golden Knights demonstrates his precision skydiving and landing. Anniversary event honors Mercury astronauts By Linda Herridge Staff Writer T HOUGH the air was crisp and the skies threatened rain, noth ing could dampen the spirits of the crowd that gathered at the Kennedy et Garden Nov. 2 to honor the 45th anniversary of the Mercury Program Mercury astronauts John Glenn and Scott Carpenter arrived for the VIP event in gleaming classic Cor vettes. Glenn and his wife, Annie, were escorted by former Apollo as tronaut Al Worden, while Carpenter was escorted by shuttle astronaut and chairman of the Astronaut Schol arship Foundation John McBride and Mercury astronaut nurse Dee OHara. Preceding them, also in classic Corvettes, were U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Susan Helms of the 45th Space Wing, Center Director Bill Parsons and NASA Associate Administrator Chris Scolese. Rob Reider, who was narrator for the Aerial Salute to 50 Years in Space, welcomed each Reider said as a U.S. Navy F-18 Hornet streaked across the sky overhead in salute. KSC Inc., welcomed everyone to the celebration. Were so proud to have these two Ameri can heroes here with us tonight, LeBlanc said. Parsons discussed the center's vital part in the future of the space program. On behalf of the nearly 15,000 men and women who work here at Kennedy, I welcome you to World for NASA. Were celebrating the upcoming 50th anniversary of NASA and are honoring our Mer nedy will play a key role in returning humans to the moon and beyond. In a cavalcade of veteran Apollo and Mercury astronauts, John Glenn rides in the back of a Corvette driven by Al Worden. Glenn piloted the Mercury-Atlas 6 Friendship 7 spacecraft on the rst U.S. manned orbital mission. Worden was command module pilot for Apollo 15.

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World Space Expo commemorates humanitys rst 50 years in space, looks to future explorations to the moon and beyond Page 5 November 16, 2007 SPACEPORT NEWS Roaring Raptor stuns, dazzles in rare performance at Kennedy By Steven Siceloff Staff Writer D ARTING through tight loops, snapping into rolls and roar ing through starts and stops, the F-22 Raptor But the man at the controls says markably tame to pilot. U.S. Air Force Maj. Paul Moga, off the Raptor at NASA's Ken nedy Space Center in Florida dur Nov. 14. Although Moga used the jet's twin engines to rip through the air on passes reaching Mach 0.94, the maneuvers that took him sharply skyward or showed off a tight circle turn were the ones no other performer was able to match. It was a rare sight for air show audiences anywhere in the world because the Raptor was too new for aerial demonstrations until this year. being the F-15C, when I'm do ing some of the things I do in this demo in the Raptor, sometimes I actually can't believe that I'm doing it," Moga said. "I can't believe that the aircraft ecute them safe. I mean, I'm totally under complete control throughout the whole demo." The Raptor's engines are strong enough to make the plane cruise at supersonic speeds, but the key onstrations is a set of robust ramps down. It's a technology that NASA helped develop with the X-31 air craft. For Moga, incorporating that technology safely into the demon lenges of choreographing the show. "Really, what I'm trying to dis play at an air show is primarily the power and maneuverability of the aircraft," Moga said. "Those two alone truly set it apart from anything that is in the world right now." During a particularly stunning maneuver that is a standard for aircraft straight up, but let the jet stall and start sliding backward while its nose fell forward. He let ing up the engines again and steer ing straight out of the fall with no problem. It was enough to make other shake their heads. "Even though there's a couple times where it looks like I'm out of control and falling like a leaf to the Earth, I am in complete control of the aircraft and that alone speaks to how capable this airframe is," he said. A P-51 Mustang tries to keep pace with a U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor during the World Space Expo aerial salute at NASAs Kennedy Space Center. Maj. Paul Moga U.S. Army Golden Knights precision skydiving team members presented Glenn and Carpenter with commemorative Both Mercury astronauts com ences, challenges with the Atlas rockets and their hopes for the fu ture of NASAs space program. Anniversary event honors Mercury astronauts By Linda Herridge Staff Writer T HOUGH the air was crisp and the skies threatened rain, noth ing could dampen the spirits of the crowd that gathered at the Kennedy et Garden Nov. 2 to honor the 45th anniversary of the Mercury Program Mercury astronauts John Glenn and Scott Carpenter arrived for the VIP event in gleaming classic Cor vettes. Glenn and his wife, Annie, were escorted by former Apollo as tronaut Al Worden, while Carpenter was escorted by shuttle astronaut and chairman of the Astronaut Schol arship Foundation John McBride and Mercury astronaut nurse Dee OHara. Preceding them, also in classic Corvettes, were U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Susan Helms of the 45th Space Wing, Center Director Bill Parsons and NASA Associate Administrator Chris Scolese. Rob Reider, who was narrator for the Aerial Salute to 50 Years in Space, welcomed each Reider said as a U.S. Navy F-18 Hornet streaked across the sky overhead in salute. KSC Inc., welcomed everyone to the celebration. Were so proud to have these two Ameri can heroes here with us tonight, LeBlanc said. Parsons discussed the center's vital part in the future of the space program. On behalf of the nearly 15,000 men and women who work here at Kennedy, I welcome you to World for NASA. Were celebrating the upcoming 50th anniversary of NASA and are honoring our Mer nedy will play a key role in returning humans to the moon and beyond. In a cavalcade of veteran Apollo and Mercury astronauts, John Glenn rides in the back of a Corvette driven by Al Worden. Glenn piloted the Mercury-Atlas 6 Friendship 7 spacecraft on the rst U.S. manned orbital mission. Worden was command module pilot for Apollo 15. Glenn said training was rather and desert training was interesting. anonymity. Glenn and Carpenter would like to see the space program re turn humans to the moon and take them to Mars. Glenn would not want to cut back on science on the International Space Station living and working on the sta tion. We are doing what we should do, Carpenter said. To beyond is inevitable. Just wait you aint seen nothing yet. Left, the U.S. Air Force Thun derbirds y in formation. The squadron includes two women: Maj. Nicole Malachowski ies No. 3 jet as the right wing pilot in the diamond formation and Maj. Samantha Weeks ies the No. 6 jet as the opposing solo pilot.

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Page 6 November 16, 2007 SPACEPORT NEWS By Linda Herridge Staff Writer A NDY Bradley, an aero space technologist in Ken nedy Space Centers En gineering Directorate, enjoys men toring Pink Team students for the FIRST competition, also known as For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology Robotics. Bradley and several Kennedy workers, including Bill Benson and Jon Bauschlicher of the Launch Services Program, are gearing up to once again mentor Brevard County high school students and prepare them for the annual team event. FIRST includes 130,000 stu dents, 10,700 robots, 37,000 men tors and 27,000 event volunteers each year. from the leadership and guidance, Bradley said workers at Kennedy ways. Working here, engineers go through the development cycle weeks, Bradley said. What we do for FIRST is very similar. We incredibly short deadline, and we solution. He said mentors provide direction and hands-on skills to help students design a robot for the annual competition held in the spring in Atlanta. There are eight FIRST teams in Brevard County schools, with Ken nedy mentors supporting Rock ledge/Cocoa Beach/Viera High Schools Pink Team and Cocoa High Schools Bionic Tigers. Benson, an aerospace technolo gist, and Bauschlicher, a guidance, navigation and controls analyst, are returning for their respectively, to men tor the Bionic Tigers team. It makes engi neers and the things we do real for the kids who, before this thought that engineer ing was either beyond their reach or some thing they were not interested in doing, Bauschlicher said. Benson said men toring establishes rela tionships between cur rent NASA employees and future engineers and scientists. It also provided him an oppor tunity to enhance his leadership and engi neering skills by work ing with a small team to develop new hardware in a short period of time, thus making him a more effective NASA employee. FIRST is a great program, but it takes mentors to make it hap pen, Center Director Bill Parsons said. Kennedy civil servants and contractors who contribute to this program are helping to develop the nical work force. Higher Education Programs Specialist Dr. Lesley Garner said there are FIRST mentors at all of NASA's centers. Garner is Ken nedys mentor coordinator in the Relations Directorate. She is look ing for more workers to get in volved in the FIRST program, pos the county. Brevard Schools Superinten dent Dr. Richard DiPatri would like to see a FIRST team in each high school by the end of the 20092010 school year. For now, we encourage stu dents where a school does not have its own team to join a team from a neighboring school. DiPatri said the program is an effectively inspire and encourage students to pursue careers in engi neering, science, auto mechanics, technology and other careers im portant to the country. It provides a wonderful op portunity for students of all ability levels to engage in a team process with sportsmanship and friendly competition as hallmarks of the program, DiPatri said. For more information about FIRST, visit To become a FIRST mentor, contact Garner at 321-867-3623 or Lesley. C.Garner@nasa.gov FIRST robotics teams seek Kennedy mentors The Pink Team. The Bionic Tigers. Panel provides updates on Ares I-X test ight progress By Linda Herridge Staff Writer A PANEL discussion featuring updates on work for the Ares Kennedy Space Center Engineer ing Academy at the Training Audi torium. Presenting to a full house of NASA and contractor personnel were panel members Jon Cowart, NASA Ground Systems Integrated Product team lead; Steve Sullivan, Kennedy Ares I-X chief engineer, and Shaun Green, Kennedy Ares I-X deputy chief engineer. Sullivans overview of the Ares I-X test vehicle included updates on hardware manufacturing and delivery to Kennedy. We are less than one year from the start of hardware delivery to Kennedy and were 18 months from launch of vehicle elements and components will be fabricated and assembled at multiple sites and then transported to Kennedy for integration and launch. (See PANEL, Page 8) Right, Jon Cowart, team lead

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November 16, 2007 Page 7 Remembering Our Heritage SPACEPORT NEWS NASA employees of the month: November Kevin Zari of International Space Station/Payload Processing; Rebecca Witt of Information Technology and Communications Services; Ralph Gelpi of the Launch Integration Ofce; and Nancy W. Hoffman and Gerald M. Stahl with Engineering Development. By Kay Grinter Reference Librarian T HE launch activity of the United States steadily in creased until 1966, when it peaked at 77 commercial, military and NASA launches, a record that still stands. There were a respect able 61 launches in 1967. The Eastern Test Range was especially busy in early Novem ber 1967. Three different rock ets were launched successfully between Nov. 5 and 9, a span of launch from the Western Range on Nov. 10 put the NASA family in the right frame of mind for the Thanksgiving season. First up, on Nov. 5, was the Hughes-built Applications Tech 12 on Cape Canaveral. Launched aboard an Atlas-Agena D, its nine improve spacecraft technology, develop long-life control systems, advance spacecraft communica tions and improve long-range weather predictions. ATS-3 was the last spacecraft to be launched from On Nov. 7 two days later, Sur veyor-6 was boosted into orbit by a General Dynamics-built Atlas-Cen taur from Pad 36B on Cape Canav eral. Among Surveyors objectives was the development of the tech nology for a lunar soft-landing to support the Apollo Program. Once Surveyor-6 was on the moon, its liftoff from the lunar surface. The third launch on Nov. 9 of the Saturn V vehicle. Apollo 4 launched from Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center. George Meyer was a pad safety supervisor for Pan American, the Range support contractor. Now a youthful 85 and retired, he was on station for all three of these launches. I was assigned to the impact convoy command near the pads for the ATS and Surveyor launches, he recalled. One of our responsibilities was to inspect the pad and give the all clear follow room for the Saturn V test. Louis Ullian was chief engineer for Range Safety for the U.S. Air Force Eastern Test Range and was on console in the Range Control Center, known as the RCC, for all three launches. Retired after 38 years of service, he recalled: We worked some pretty long hours then, and there were cots available in the RCC. After the Surveyor-6 launch, I fell asleep outside on the centers steps. The Range Com mander found me and sent me back 40 years ago: November brings busy week to Eastern Range drove home. The fourth launch during this busy week was of a McDonnell Douglas-built Thrust Augmented Improved Delta from Space Air Force Base, Calif., on Nov.10. ESSA-4, the fourth RCA-built Environmental Science Services Administration meteorological satellite in the series, was designed to provide both global and local cloud-cover pictures daily. How do jubilant employees cel ebrate a winning streak? Like the rest of the American work force, of course, with well-deserved time off spent with family and friends, giv ing thanks and eating turkey. Explorer program event looking for past employees A area will mark the 50th anniversary of the launch of Americas The event will include a banquet sponsored by the NASA Alumni League, the Redstone Missile Pioneers, the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Museum in Cape Canaveral and NASAs Kennedy Space Center. Event coordinator Norman Perry is seeking reunion participants listic Missile Agency, Jet Propulsion Lab, U.S. Air Force or support ing contractors on Jan. 31, 1958. For more information about the event, contact Perry at 321-4800688. Missile Row, Cape Canaveral

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Page 8 November 16, 2007 John F. Kennedy Space Center Managing editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amber Philman Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anita Barrett Copy editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Corey Schubert Editorial support provided by InDyne, Inc. Writers Group. NASA at KSC is located on the Internet at http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy USGPO: 733-049/600142 Spaceport News Spaceport News is an ofcial publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by External Relations in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees. Contributions are welcome and should be submitted two weeks before publication to the Media Services Branch, IDI-011. E-mail submissions can be sent to Anita.Barrett@jbosc.ksc.nasa.gov. SPACEPORT NEWS Staff Writer I TS hard enough for one per son to go more than two years without suffering an injury that keeps them away from work, let alone more than 250 people avoiding this problem. On Oct. 10, the Wyle Laborato ries work force accrued one million hours without lost-time injuries," which are incidents that require time to be missed from work. This is particularly impressive because the workers are responsible for sensitive laboratories, propellants and life support services, as well as the systems engineering, operation, maintenance and use of chemical and personal protective equipment. Wyle is part of the Space Gateway Support Joint Base Op erations Support Contract team. Wyle workers handle potentially Wyle employees walk the talk for safety hazardous cryogenics, hypergolic, high-pressure gases and special commodities, and manufacture liquid air used by government and contractor personnel. The company manages more than 35 miles of high-pressure gaseous nitrogen and helium pipe lines at Kennedy that support many defects in space shuttle and rocket systems and components. This admirable streak is one of the longest records on the space port. The entire JBOSC team con gratulates the Wyle employees and George Hauer for his leadership as a JBOSC team partner, said Sam Gutierrez, Space Gateway Support public affairs and government rela tions manager. From Oct. 29 to 31, the teams safe practices were recognized with various luncheons and speak er events. According to Gutierrez, Wyle management was generous in encouraging employees to spend this time to build camaraderie. SGS and the Wyle Safety and their employees work in areas and with tools and equipment that are safe and healthy. Company leaders and employ ees say they are also dedicated to the Voluntary Protection Program, which recognizes and promotes effective safety and health manage ment. Through their commitment, employees have certain rights which include protection from discrimination for their health and safety duties, and access to results of inspections and accident inves tigations. Employees with Wyle Laboratories enjoy a luncheon in recogni tion of their outstanding safety and health record for the past two years. Management hosted the events to encourage camaraderie among the more than 250 employ ees at Kennedy. instrumentation sensors that will take thermal, structural, trajectory, aerodynamics and shock measure Sullivan said the vehicle will be autonomous and use the current shuttle range safety system and ground telemetry during launch. Cowart discussed progress on ground support equipment and facilities including Launch Pad ics module access and lightning protection system. He said work is under way to provide design, analysis and the equipment neces sary for access to the solid rocket booster igniters, avionics module and upper stage. We will have a Vehicle As sembly Building high bay, launch The integration product team will also provide design, analysis and equipment needed for impor tant elements including mobile launch platform vehicle stabiliza tion and the sound suppression water system. Shirish Patel, the Payload Rack Checkout System manager in the ground systems division of the International Space Station and Spacecraft Processing Directorate, attended the panel discussion. He said he has attended several of the Kennedy Engineering Academy events because they are very in formative and he appreciates the It is great to hear about past projects and how they were suc cessfully accomplished, Patel said. Its also important to gain knowledge on future vehicle de sign, capabilities, planned tests and schedules. The centers Engineering Directorate created the Kennedy Engineering Academy to bring engineering resources together to cellence. directorates management sup encourages engineers to learn con tinuously, inquire constantly and share openly within and beyond the engineering community. PANEL . Continued from Page 6 NASA showcases inatable habitat for Antarctica N ASA, the National Science Foundation and ILC Dover recently un Moonwalker Road in Frederica, Del. The habitat, being developed under NASAs Innovative Partnership Program, will be a component of the McMurdo Station in Antarctica from January 2008 through February 2009. and data collected from the habitats sensors, designers will evaluate the moon or Mars.