Spaceport news

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Title:
Spaceport news
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
Kennedy Space Center
Publisher:
External Relations, NASA at KSC
Place of Publication:
Kennedy Space Center, FL
Publication Date:

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Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Brevard -- Cape Canaveral -- John F. Kennedy Space Center
Coordinates:
28.524058 x -80.650849 ( Place of Publication )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00099284:00141


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John F. Kennedy Space Center Americas gateway to the universe Spaceport News www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/news/snews/spnews_toc.html July 11, 2008 Vol. 48, No. 14 Shop offers New utility facility focuses on future By Kate Frakes Spaceport News The facility is a multi-use, exible building that has the ability to transform with future changing requirements. Jason Ritter, Civil and Architectural section lead for Kennedys Center Operations Facilities Division Kennedy Space Center Director Bill Parsons, left, helps cut the ribbon at a ceremony July 1 marking the ofcial opening of Utility Shop K6-1246. NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis A ribbon cutting cere mony July 1 marked Alliance Ground Systems architectural section lead for largely contributed to the This facility houses used for six USA Ground some trailers and other & Associates designed the Ritter said the facil trailers and sheds to a more The facility is a multithe ability to transform with future changing require NASA The Astrovan has a built-in cooling system that connects to the astronauts bulky suits, so they do not get overheated during the trip to the launch pad. T and excitement in those who watch it wind its way toward the launch them to meet their fully fueled ride their crew quarters to the launch Rare view inside Astrovan shows ride rich in tradition Spaceport News See ASTROVAN Page 8

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Page 2 SPACEPORT NEWS July 11, 2008 Lightning warnings give workers heads up on danger Spaceport News More information on lightning safety is available at www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov For information on lightning safety training call William Roeder at 853-8410 or e-mail him at william.roeder@patrick.af.mil More online T world for the most lightning or goes to the Democratic derstorms occurring almost be aware of and understand other weather tragedies com aware of the lightning hazard and the lightning safety before a thunderstorm six miles of the location lightning soon will become lightning is imminent or occurring within six miles of should seek shelter immedi The alerts are issued for locations include the shuttle I stay in the building until when this deadly danger is Security Boat Storage Facility a gift from Santa The facility is between the Although it may come as a the biggest wear and tear to the the boats from weather and wild In addition to sheltering NASA security boats from Flori security boats were stored in the The new facility has been in rity Boat Storage Facility truly Spaceport News The unit wishes to express its sincerest thanks to Pat Klotz for making this long overdue facility a reality. Bill Rickelman, captain, Space Gateway Support Marine Enforcement Unit NASA/Jim Grossman The new Security Boat Storage Facility will protect boats from weather, wildlife and extend the life of each boat about another ve years.

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SPACEPORT NEWS Page 3 July 11, 2008 whale beached itself on the line when a worker from the the beach working with en mates headed for the shore Beached melon-headed whale gets lucky break By Mary Ann Chevalier Spaceport News mal was in stable condition and an excellent candidate information about melonheaded whales because they is a great chance to learn the water for more than four intentions was calm and and the stranded whale was gently loaded for the ride A veterinarian, left, and Sea World representatives cool the skin of a melon-headed whale found stranded south of Launch Pad 39A at NASAs Kennedy Space Center. The whale was transported to a whale rescue center in Panama City, Fla., for rehabilitation and release. NASA/Kim Shiett The rescue was com cent actually are able to be melon-headed whale under went medical treatment and are high he soon will be This is a great chance to learn more about the species, then return him to the wild. Megan Stolen, Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute biologist Workers from Kennedy Space Center, a veterinarian and representatives from the Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute carry a melon-headed whale on a sling to a waiting truck. NASA/Kim Shiett

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Scene Around Kennedy Space Center Page 5 SPACEPORT NEWS Page 4 SPACEPORT NEWS July 11, 2008 July 11, 2008 Send photos of yourself and/or your co-workers in action for possible publication. Photos should include a short caption describing whats going on, with names and job titles, from left to right. KSC-Spaceport-News@mail.nasa.gov Spaceport News wants your photos Inside the Space Station Processing Facility STS-126 crew members check data on equipment that will y on their mission. NASA/Kim Shiett Platform C is moved out of the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center to allow refurbishment of the facility for the Constellation Programs Ares 1-X vehicle. The platform will be demolished. NASA/Amanda Diller A worker attaches an overhead crane to the aft skirt for the Ares 1-X rocket in the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The segment is being lifted into a machine shop work stand for drilling modications. NASA/Jim Grossman Workers ensure space shuttle Discoverys robotic arm is placed correctly for installation in the payload bay in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. Scheduled to launch on the STS-119 mission, Discovery will carry the S6 truss segment to complete the 361-foot-long backbone of the International Space Station. Five Florida high school seniors were presented NASA awards at the 53rd State Science & Engineering Fair of Florida. The recipi ents were judged and selected by NASA-KSC judges on projects in various categories that were related to NASAs mission.

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Scene Around Kennedy Space Center Page 5 SPACEPORT NEWS Page 4 SPACEPORT NEWS July 11, 2008 July 11, 2008 Send photos of yourself and/or your co-workers in action for possible publication. Photos should include a short caption describing whats going on, with names and job titles, from left to right. KSC-Spaceport-News@mail.nasa.gov Spaceport News wants your photos The leading edge of the wing on space shuttle Endeavours heat shield with a reinforced carbon-carbon panel and one insulator assembly removed. Endeavour is the scheduled launch vehicle for the STS-126 mission and will deliver a multi-purpose logistics module to the International Space Station. NASA/Jim Grossman Workers ensure space shuttle Discoverys robotic arm is placed correctly for installation in the payload bay in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. Scheduled to launch on the STS-119 mission, Discovery will carry the S6 truss segment to complete the 361-foot-long backbone of the International Space Station. NASA/Jim Grossman Five Florida high school seniors were presented NASA awards at the 53rd State Science & Engineering Fair of Florida. The recipi ents were judged and selected by NASA-KSC judges on projects in various categories that were related to NASAs mission. Reader-submitted photo Reader-submitted photo Jack Rebstock hugs Kim Cleary and gives her roses as she crosses the nish line after last years YMCA Family Chal lenge Triathlon. Cleary was one of three Kennedy workers in the triathlon who survived cancer. A special triathlon has been added to this years festivities for cancer survivors and their caregivers, July 25 and 26 at the Titusville YMCA Family Center. For more information, call 321-268-2209 or 321-501-2384 or send an e-mail to jkramer2@c.rr.com.

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Page 6 SPACEPORT NEWS July 11, 2008 Nautical heroes set sight on SRB retrievals they think of as the title of hero can reach mechanical tech and welder the many heroes within these as nautical heroes; the crews cally designed for the task of Global Positioning Systems with bow and stern water the boosters during launch Spaceport News of the Freedom Star and nent crew which consists of a who aid the crew in the deli erated Plug into the booster The nautical heroes Launch directors in control of behind-the-scene intangibles F By Steven Siceloff Spaceport News front man of a band of highly trained cialize in one of the most demanding He bids the astronauts farewell on the shuttle runway when the mis to greet the astronauts when they as launch director is to conduct the ing and rechecking shuttle systems launch director whose NASA career stressed the demands of recognizing Sieck said he saw so many during countdown was when an un A radar now scans the sky That means he has to coordinate the of communication between the or orbiters here feel like they lost a Courtesy of United Space Alliance The SRB retrieval team arrives at a oating solid rocket booster in the Atlantic Ocean during a recent shuttle mission. The booster was towed back to Hangar AF at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

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Page 7 SPACEPORT NEWS July 11, 2008 VAB rose from the marsh 45 years ago Remembering Our Heritage By Kay Grinter Reference Librarian NASA le NASA le NASA le NASA le Construction of the Vehicle Assembly Building begins, as seen from the Turn Basin. Driving test piles during the early construction phase of the Vehicle Assembly Building. The steel piling construction phase of the Vehicle Assembly Building. Construction of the Vehicle Assembly Building required 4,225 steel piles. onstruction began on the most recognizable landmark Designed for the storage and the largest building in the world by Following the initial site NASA alum Bob Barnini trans The only thing that made the

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John F. Kennedy Space Center Managing editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Candrea Thomas Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Ochoa-Gonzales Copy editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rebecca Sprague Editorial support provided by InDyne, Inc. Writers Group. NASA at KSC is on the Internet at www.nasa.gov/kennedy USGPO: 733-049/600142 Spaceport News Spaceport News is an ofcial publication of the Kennedy Space Center and is published on alternate Fridays by External Relations in the interest of KSC civil service and contractor employees. Contributions are welcome and should be submitted three weeks before publication to the Media Services Branch, IDI-011. E-mail submissions can be sent to KSC-Spaceport-News@mail.nasa.gov Page 8 SPACEPORT NEWS July 11, 2008 Send photos of yourself and/or your co-workers in action for possible publication. Photos should include a short caption, with names and job titles, from left to right. Send them to KSC-Spaceport-News@mail.nasa.gov Spaceport News wants your photos Leslie Raab, janitor with Yang Enterprises Chris Bond, electrical engineer with NASA Gene Hajdaj, aerospace technologist with NASA Wayne Bower, lead tech with InDyne Video Shops NASA Employees of the Month: July NASA Employees of the Month for July include, from left: John R. Lorch, Engineering Directorate; Sylvia Vega, Procurement Ofce; Robert P. Mueller, Applied Technology; Jackie LeClaire, Constellation Ofce; and Stephen Paglialonga, Information Technology & Communications Services. Not pictured: Jon Devereaux, Engineering Directorate; Gregrory Gaddis, Launch Vehicle Processing Directorate; Kirk Ketterer, Safety & Mission Assurance Directorate; John Adkisson, Center Operations; Jose Nunez, ISS & Spacecraft Processing Directorate; and James Sudermann, Launch Services Program. Sandra Gantt, senior drafter with InDyne From ASTROVAN Page 1 rooted in its tradition rather than its tor units used to circulate cool air came that the rookie astronauts motorcade escorted by security to in constant communication with the astronauts will make its way to the