Spaceport news

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Spaceport news
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Kennedy Space Center
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External Relations, NASA at KSC
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United States -- Florida -- Brevard -- Cape Canaveral -- John F. Kennedy Space Center
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John F. Kennedy Space Center Americas gateway to the universe Spaceport News www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/news/snews/spnews_toc.html Jan. 22, 2010 Vol. 50, No. 2 Inside this issue . MIT students visit Heritage: ISS enters decade of research Page 7 Page 6 Page 6 Tornado season here Tranquility, cupola ready for place aboard ISS By Linda Herridge Spaceport News Sea turtle rescue Page 2 N ASAs Tranquility node soon will join the U.S. Destiny, Harmony and Unity modules on the International next month aboard space shuttle Endeavour on the STS-130 mission, NASAs last major piece of hard as they were tested and processed at Kennedys International Space Sta The European-built Tranquil ity was contracted to the European by prime contractor Thales Alenia node, which arrived at Kennedy in May 2009, was transferred to on Nov. 20, 2009. Kennedys International Space Directorate worked with the Ital and check out Tranquility and the cupola. Joe Delai, said the module contains about 1,068 pounds of crew and medical supplies, in crew trans platforms, for delivery to the space station. Tranquility contains miles of about 8,000 pounds more than a Delai said. Theres space for ad ditional racks, an exercise machine Deputy Director Bill Dowdell noted there was a problem with a to replace it. There were a lot of wires to Tranquility is very different the most complex module since the U.S. lab Destiny was prepared for used to connect Tranquility to the the stations prime contractor, will create a second set of hoses from Tranquility. had been used in the past for pro for the space station and had to be Delai said NASA, ESA and one team to build and check out the node. It is sad to see our European built a wonderful module that will said. will lead the six-member crew on STS-130. Terry Virts will serve Behnken, Kathryn Hire, Nicholas crew members will perform three spacewalks and use the shuttle and station robotic arms to attach Tranquility to the Unity node on the station. The cupola will be relocated Earth. The cupola will allow a nearEarth and space, and will be used as a control room for robotics and liv NASA/Jack Pfaller A technician dressed in clean room gear, typically called a bunny suit, stands by Tranquility, in the Space Station Processing Facility.

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Page 2 SPACEPORT NEWS Jan. 22, 2010 L the shore. A sudden, severe cold front unable to eat or swim. National Seashore for the National By the end of the next day, a fullway. On the north end of the space Merritt Island National Wildlife pools and on tarps spread across the work quickly to examine newly indoors. By Jan. 16, more than 2,000 ity -an incredibly rare occurrence for those who monitor the wildlife here. You want to keep track of which turtle is which, and where explained Environmental Projects Health Applications at Kennedy. Thats where Karrie Minch, a Several facilities are permitted for sea turtle rehabilitation, and Minch up temporary homes for far more hand. of aquariums, marine rehab centers taken in turtles. Theyve created extra pools with warm water. Thats really what a lot of these turtles need -a chance to warm up. Most dont need extra care or rehab for The animals in need are mostly stay in the ocean. turtles have been plucked from the water by wildlife workers, vol stopped by the rescue facility into their boat. The pair had traveled to help with the rescue effort. in 30 minutes and had to come in who helped move and measure the here and saw what this entails, the tarp. But it feels wonderful to be able to help them. Theyve been so As of presstime, most of the turtles had been returned to the ref Workers rescue thousands of sea turtles from cold By Anna Heiney Spaceport News WORD ON THE STREET The cold snap that lingered in Brevard County earlier this month forced spaceport workers to focus on saving sea turtles. What did you do to brave the record chill ? Page 8 Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission workers move a green sea turtle into a storage facility at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge on Kennedy. The turtle was one of more than a thousand stunned by a sudden and severe drop in temperature earlier this month. Most of the turtles were rescued from the Mosquito Lagoon, with others coming from the Indian River and Cocoa Beach. NASA/Amanda Diller A few of the rescued green sea turtles warm up on tarps and cardboard inside a storage facility at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge on Kennedy. NASA/Amanda Diller

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SPACEPORT NEWS Page 3 Jan. 22, 2010 B stepped foot on the moon, NASA wanted to learn more about Earths closest celestial body. So, it sent probes and rovers to check out the conditions. The space before humans travel there. closer to the Martian surface. Lake Nona Middle/High School in Orange County: Team Mulrennan Middle School in Hillsborough County: Team study human factors with its experi Golden Gate High School in Collier County: sion operations with its experiment ments to send to the Mars Desert in March. is operated by The Mars Society. Each facility can simulate the envi encountered on the planet. closely examined the entries and who participated. It is obvious that teachers and students worked very with these innovative Mars experi before they are shipped to the facility. sults obtained from the experiments will have an opportunity to interact They also will take a virtual tour of Kennedy. School said, Perhaps most impor peers and mentors, and became Mars Experiment Design Competition focuses on teamwork NASA supports Educate to Innovate campaign Throughout the year, Kennedy will have more than 100 students and faculty from diverse fields seeking internship opportunities in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, as well as accounting and business. The External Relations Education Programs and University Research Division and the Human Resources Of fice need your expertise as mentors/colleagues for high school, undergraduate and graduate students, as well as postdoctoral scholars for the summer of 2010 through the spring of 2011. The experience will be rewarding for you, is essential to the success of the intern, and will help inspire Americas next generation or explorers. Mentor/Colleague and Projects Solicitation Forms will be available this month from your directorate administrative officer. For more information contact Benita Desuza at Benita.W.Desuza@nasa.gov or 321-867-3671 To learn more about education programs at Kennedy, visit www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/ home/index.html Inspire next generation, become a mentor/colleague N ASA has launched an initiative to use its missions to boost summer underrepresented students across the nation. NASAs Summer of Innovation supports President Obamas Educate excellence in science, and mathematics, or STEM, education. into NASAs Summer of and Informal Education lead. We already have that educate Americas next unique place to further the work with thousands of middle school teachers and 2010. increase the number of future scientists, mathematicians participation of low-income, minority students. This is an incredible opportunity for our administration to come nations critical science, of Innovation, NASA is with federal, state, and local partners, universities and teachers to expand the opportunity for more of states, and partnerships with NASA will use its substantial Kennedys scientists and NASAs Summer of Innovation will increase the scope and scale of the STEM education Winterton, assistant administrator for education at NASA Headquarters. NASA content and products at the state level coupled and events open to students and teachers nationwide. The national event, in partnership with other departments and the availability of to competitively select district partnerships in up to seven states to pilot Awards will have a period of performance of 36 months. required to develop ways to keep students and teachers year and to track student participants performance NASA will use national network includes industry, museums, science centers, and state and local research and public outreach efforts for NASAs aeronautics and space projects. applications will be selected NASA has determined that submitters for this opportunity must be Space only one proposal per state will be accepted.

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Page 4 SPACEPORT NEWS Jan. 22, 2010 Page 5 SPACEPORT NEWS Jan. 22, 2010 Scenes Around Kennedy Space Center Preparations are under way at Launch Complex 37 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to lift the core stage of a Delta IV rocket into its launcher. This view from the mobile service tower shows the proximity of the Atlantic Ocean to the launch pad. The rocket is slated to launch GOES-P, the latest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite developed by NASA for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, on March 1. Space shuttle Discoverys STS-131 mission specialists, from left, Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger, Clay Anderson and Rick Mastracchio, participate in training activities during the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, in Orbiter Processing Facility-3. CEIT gave crew members the opportunity to operate the tools contained in the tools stowage assembly that will fly on their mission to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for March 18. External Tank-135 approaches the wide gaping door of the Vehicle Assembly Building on Jan. 5. The tank arrived Dec. 26 aboard the Pegasus barge, towed by a solid rocket booster retrieval ship from NASAs Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans. ET-135 will be used to launch space shuttle Discovery on the STS-131 mission to the International Space Station, targeted for March 18. A sign points space shuttle Endeavour to Launch Pad 39A during rollout Jan. 6. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 4:13 a.m. EST, and the 3.4-mile trip took about six hours. Endeavours STS-130 mission is targeted for launch at 4:39 a.m. Feb. 7. The walls are propped up for the new Propellants North Facility in the Launch Complex 39 area. Once complete, the building will qualify for the U.S. Green Building Councils Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum designation, the highest designation a LEED facility can achieve and the first for the center. NASA/Jack Pfaller NASA/Amanda Diller NASA/Kim Shiflett NASA/Jack Pfaller A Boeing spacecraft fueling technician from Kennedy takes a sample of the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which is protectively covered at the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. NASA/Jack Pfaller Nick Wilson, a graduate student at the University of Maryland and a former Kennedy summer intern, received a NASA Gold Dollar award for saving three children from a strong rip current in the ocean. His research is in the area of developing an active vibration isolation system for electronic racks at the launch pads. For NASA Valarie Franklin shows off her Certificate of Retirement during her retirement coffee Dec. 11. Franklin has worked for the federal government for the past 33 years, including more than 18 years at Kennedy. For NASA NASA/Jim Grossmann

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Page 6 SPACEPORT NEWS Jan. 22, 2010 F normal winter severe weather weather season likely will start ear lier and could be more severe due to Ocean. more severe thunderstorms. that tornadoes will occur and the tornado to strike, it is much better to be prepared. Tornado safety is an easy, two-step process. Step 1, Have a Plan: Identify the safest room and ensure everyone there. The safest rooms typically are on the lowest floor with inside walls between you and the outside wall. Small rooms away from windows with solid construction, such as restrooms and closets, offer the best debris, and motorcycle and sports helmets can protect your head. People in mobile homes or other proper shelter elsewhere. A common myth is to open windows to let the not explode from decompression any loose outside materials and close protective shutters if there is Step 2, Keep Informed: Obtain formerly known as NOAA Weather NOAA radios even provide dont cover 2 percent of the country, so its important to test the reception of new radios. backup severe weather alerts. Some station Web sites send free text phones. You can even set different loud alarm. Some of these services specific locations so that you are you. The National Weather Service is Cold weather raises tornado threat; text alerts available By William P. Roeder 45th Weather Squadron You can view the 45th Weather Squadrons daily, 24-hour and weekly planning forecasts at: www.patrick.af.mil More info online Eight aerospace engineering students from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology peer into a Michelin tire used on a space shuttle flight during a recent tour of Kennedys Logistics Facility. NASA/ Troy Cryder E dents from the Massachusetts Institute of . and not just to enjoy the weather now that it has warmed up a bit. In fact, they prepped for months their three-week visit to the Sunshine State. Kwami Williams, Jillian introduced to the operation operations. erational Internship Experi the students to spend time requirements today. They also will understand how the relationship between the classroom, but critical for the successful practice ture . to what we can do. Its the best preparation we sphere of Kennedy could lead to summer employ ment and eventually new hires by NASA and Ken nedy aerospace contractors, future work force needs. fers NASA the opportunity to make a unique experi ence available to students summer, when the center Sponsored in part by Kennedys Education Of discussion with then-NASA to MIT in mid-November 2002. In January 2003, 12 ral visit. Since then, more than 50 students have been students receive introduc well as contractor opera space shuttle, International Space Station, payload and expendable launch vehicle Then, the students a more intimate familiar ates. Students will have the opportunity to interview Every day we see a different aspect of Kennedy blown away from every Williams said. what they learned will be required from all students at the end of their visit, Jan. 29. In the future, Ken nedy and the Massachusetts hope to expand this pro United States.

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Page 7 SPACEPORT NEWS Jan. 22, 2010 Remembering Our Heritage NASA celebrates decade of research, looks ahead By Rebecca Sprague Spaceport News N 10th year of human presence aboard one accomplishments in history -the International Space Station. Kennedy reaches be launch operations, to health, environment, and ultimately our quality of life. We have some awe board the station that were station in November 2009 aboard space shuttle Atlantis on the STS-129 mission. direct effect on plant cells that cause stems and roots to Also developed in the that uses real-time Portable can determine how plants react in space, particularly peratures. The camera captures scientist in the Surface Sys tissue preservation aboard the station. The Kennedy and stain those samples. included in station payloads and used with a variety of tives, such as soybeans and formaldehyde. In 2008, Kennedys En aboard the space station that Station crews switched out adorned roofs and trees -suited to spacecraft since blue peak, we help maintain circadian rhythm and thereby spectrum, for example a have even looked at options critical experiments to the station. The team developed or one double locker, and other compatible experiment accommodations. In Sep tember 2008, the platform of the stations U.S. operat the platform could enable research and education mis retires. tory concepts success is very dependent on the suc SpaceX and Orbital Science Shannon Skinn, Kennedys Once those vehicles show their abilities, we expect the become a key facility for As the capabilities of new launch vehicles mature, bial virulence, or infectious disease, research to come as the U. S. Department of the next 10 years we expect will result in new vaccines, medicines and numerous commercial applications that are currently unanticipated, life on Earth and NASAs efforts to further our explora Expedition 22 Commander Jeffrey Williams conducts a daily status check of a plant experiment in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. Williams is holding a Kennedy Fixation Tube, or KFT, which revolutionized biological tissue preservation in space by providing hazardous chemical fixation in a triple contained device. To celebrate the 10th anniversary of people continuously liv ing aboard the International Space Station, NASA designed a special 2010 calendar with unique images and highlights of historic space exploration milestones aboard the orbiting laboratory. You can download a copy for free at: www.nasa.gov/station Download 2010 ISS calendar NASA

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Page 8SPACEPORT NEWSJan. 22, 2010 John F. Kennedy Space CenterManaging editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Candrea Thomas Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Ochoa-Gonzales Copy editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rebecca SpragueEditorial support provided by Abacus Technology Corp. Writers Group.NASA at KSC is on the Internet at www.nasa.gov/kennedy USGPO: 733-049/600142Spaceport News three weeks KSC-Spaceport-News@mail.nasa.gov The cold snap that lingered in Brevard County forced spaceport workers to focus on saving sea turtles. What did you do to brave the record chill?I couldnt ride my Harley . although my husband and I tried. I really didnt like the cold very much. I did cover up my plants. But I like the cold weather. It actually was quite refreshing.Maggie Forbes, with NASAWORD STREETON THE Christine Vanaman, with Innovative Health ApplicationsIve just been down here from New Jersey for only two years. My blood hasnt thinned out yet.Kevin Bivona, with ASRC Aerospace Corp.I put on everything I could underneath. Im from Puerto Rico and Ive never experienced this cold before.Emmanuel Navedo, with ASRC Aerospace Corp.I had to wake up an hour earlier to defrost my car. I hate cold weather . thats why I moved to Florida.Casey Booth, with NASA Exchange Looking up and ahead . Targeted for Feb. 7 Launch/KSC: Endeavour, STS-130; 4:39 a.m. EST No earlier than Feb. 9 Launch/CCAFS: Atlas V, SDO; 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. EST No earlier than March 1 Launch/CCAFS: Delta IV, GOES-P; Window 6:19 to 7:19 p.m. EST March 3 Launch/CCAFS: Falcon 9, Window 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST Targeted for March 18 Launch/KSC: Discovery, STS-131; 1:34 p.m. EDT Targeted for April 19 Launch/CCAFS: Atlas V, OTV; TBD Targeted for May 13 Launch/CCAFS: Delta IV, GPS IIF-1; 3:19 to 3:37 a.m. EDT Targeted for May 14 Launch/KSC: Atlantis, STS-132; 2:28 p.m. EDT Targeted for July 29 Launch/KSC: Endeavour, STS-134; 7:51 a.m. EDT Targeted for Sept. 16 Launch/KSC: Discovery, STS-133; 11:57 a.m. EDT No earlier than Nov. 22 Launch/VAFB: Taurus, Glory; TBD Targeted for December Launch/CCAFS: Delta IV, GPS IIF-2; TBD Aug. 5, 2011 Launch/CCAFS: Atlas V, Juno; TBD Aug. 15, 2011 Launch/Reagan Test Site: Atlas V, NuSTAR; TBD Sept. 8, 2011 Launch/CCAFS: Delta II Heavy, GRAIL; TBD To Be Determined Launch/VAFB: Delta II, Aquarius / SAC-D Satellite; TBD To Be Determined Launch/VAFS: Delta II, NPP; TBD No Earlier Than October 2011 Launch/CCAFS: Atlas V, Mars Science Laboratory; TBD NASA Employees of the Month: January NASAEmployees of the month for January are, from left: William Shockley, Procurement Office; Paul Jagdmann, Launch Services Program; Edsel Sanchez, Constellation Project Office; Robert Kline, Center Operations; Pamela Zeitler, Employee of the Quarter, Constellation Space Transportation Planning Office; Isolda Galiana-Liang, Information Technology and Communications Services; and Amy Simpson, Launch Vehicle Processing Directorate. Not pictured are, Peter Johnson, Engineering Directorate; James Broughton, Engineering Directorate; and Christopher Torres, Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate.