Spaceport news

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Title:
Spaceport news
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Serial
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English
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Kennedy Space Center
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External Relations, NASA at KSC
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Kennedy Space Center, FL
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serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Brevard -- Cape Canaveral -- John F. Kennedy Space Center
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28.524058 x -80.650849 ( Place of Publication )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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July 27, 2012 Vol. 52, No. 15 Spaceport NewsJohn F. Kennedy Space Center Americas gateway to the universe All Hands Cabana: Next 50 years will be better By Frank Ochoa-Gonzales Spaceport News While change is constant, the mission for Kennedy Space Center remains the Director Bob Cabana to workers during an All Hands on July 13 at the Training Auditorium. made tremendous progress, and one thing hasnt changed -we are a premier launch complex, Cabana said. We must continue to change, better. Nobody does what we do. Cabana said certain challenges nedys future: human space exploration tion When you consider a year ago Atlantis landed and the Space Shuttle been able to accomplish since then . it is phenomenal, Cabana said. Cabana said Kennedy workers spacecraft processing, launching, sustaining efforts has led the way to the building of a 21st century launch complex of the future, enabling added to our nations space program through acquisition and management ing, and next-generation technology we continue to show our expertise in these areas. NASA/Chris Chamberland At an All-Hands meeting July 13, Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana and other Kennedy leaders gave an update of center activities to workers. Center Operations Deputy Direc tor Nancy Bray shared Kennedys concept of the Central Campus, phases currently are being designed. Phase 1 includes a 200,000-squarebreak ground in Spring 2014), and Central Campus Phase 2 also is a 200,000-square-foot facility that will be integrated to the east side of Phase in support of consolidation facilities. Its groundbreaking is scheduled for Spring 2017, when the demolition of Headquarters and the Central Instru Jennifer Kunz briefed Kennedy workers on the status of the Ground See ALL HANDS Page 3 Cella Energy signs fuel source deal with Kennedy By Steven Siceloff Spaceport News Anew approach to an estab lished fuel will be the focus and possible production with the help of NASA's Kennedy Space Cella Energy's American subsid iary is partnering with Kennedy to make its micro-bead technology practical enough to be used as a fuel in most kinds of machinery, cars, portable electronics and perhaps The company, based in Brit ain, has formulated a way to store hydrogen safely in tiny pellets that allows the fuel to be burned in an engine. Kennedy, which handles regularly as part of its rocket work, is being enlisted to help the company hurdles. If the work pays off, engines all gen, which burns clean, producing no greenhouse gases. See ENERGY Page 2 Sally Ride Forrest McCartney Educational outreach ISU rockets launch Inside this issue... Page 2 Page 3 Page 5 Page 6

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Page 2 SPACEPORT NEWS July 27, 2012 In Memoriam Ride inspired, took giant leap for women By Bob Granath Spaceport News Sally Ride is best known as the From ENERGY Page 1 athlete who was nationally

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Page 3 July 27, 2012 SPACEPORT NEWS In Memoriam McCartney hailed for timely leadership By Bob Granath Spaceport News U known, and no From ALL HANDS Page 1 He was always out in the iness poll was taken and it

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Page 4 SPACEPORT NEWS July 27, 2012 Astronaut panel shares experiences with ISU participants By Linda Herridge Spaceport News International Space University (ISU) par ticipants Tejal Thakore from India, Christian Luthen from Germany, Kazuyuki Okada from Japan, and many others from around the world heard about the discussion July 11 at the Kennedy Space Center Visi tor Complex in Florida. The panel of current and former U.S. and interna tional astronauts discussed the space shuttle, live on the International Space Station, and their hopes for commer exploration into deep space. ence, Okada said. I like the diversity of the students and I feel very fortunate that people from so many differ ent countries. Luthen, a medical doc would like to work more in human space life sciences. Thakore, an aerospace to work as a Galileo space craft controller in Munich, Germany. This has been a fantastic and exceptional experience, Thakore said. at Moffett Field in Califor nia, is director of the ISU countries, with the majority from China, Canada and the U.S. level and are dedicated to interdisciplinary and inter cultural cooperation in space activities, Martin said. The than 100 fulland part-time faculty and invited industry world. discussion were Kennedy Director and former astro naut Bob Cabana, who also served as moderator. Panel ists were Ken Bowersox, astronaut with the Japan Techsystems and former and Jim Voss, director of discussion at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex on July 11. Participating in the discussion from left are Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana; Winston Scott, dean of the College of Aeronautics at Florida Institute of Technology; former NASA astronaut Kent Rominger, vice president of Alliant Techsystems and former NASA astronaut; Nicole Stott, NASA astronaut currently on detail at Kennedy Space Center; Jim Voss, director of advanced programs at Sierra Nevada Corp. and former NASA astronaut; Garrett Reisman, senior engineer with SpaceX and former NASA astronaut; Ken Bowersox, former NASA astronaut; and Chiaki Mukai, a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut. For more about ISU, click on the photo. Cabana opened the discus what they think it takes to be an astronaut. Voss said, I think you have to do the very best you On a question about the commercialization of as the systems that takes are safe, mechanically, they will learn how to deal with cial world is to make the transportation as simple as possible so people can enjoy space. headed in the future. Bowersox said, The more people we put into space, the traits would be needed to several responses. cies and we have to have in a pristine environment, Cabana said. For exploration on deep space missions, you want people with expeditionary It will be a team effort and have all the skills. Cabana closed the discus forever. has some awfully unique Cabana said. I truly believe will be the people of planet Mukai said, Keep your dream alive and then pursue your dream. International Space University facts The International Space University, or ISU, is in its 25th year of the annual Space Studies Program, an intense nine-week program. It was founded in 1987 and headquartered in Strasbourg, France. ISU is the worlds leading international space education institution, supported by the worlds leading space agencies and aerospace organizations. Each year it is held in a different host location. This years program is hosted by the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Fla., and NASAs Kennedy Space Center. For more information, visit: www.isunet.edu/

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July 27, 2012 SPACEPORT NEWS Page 5 Summer library program helps students 'Dream Big' and interesting." strations using a miniature every child the opportunity to participate by "guessing" amateur scientists. grader at Windermere El ementary School in Orange his predictions did not al vacuum chamber got big bigger." are imperative to human constructed using toothpicks sizes. crumpling into a misshapen heap. "Our poor little astro see. "He's dead." "We'll all see this on Face adults. space. illustrating that astronauts require special tools to help Gold instructed Kathe to standing on the turntable. By Kay Grinter Spaceport News W shaving cream and marshmal Florida Libraries 2012 Sum changing their composition permanently. preschool and elementary school-aged students and and teens. Space Center are traveling throughout Central Florida this summer also visiting the public libraries in Suntree/ South Mainland. veteran aerospace education mal Education Outreach children and 12 parents in attendance. strations illustrating several delighted the audience as it ence room. Weight added to the rocket caused it to light as possible. atmospheric drag impacts a rocket. Elementary School in Cocoa satellite as he spun on a turn table. He moved hand-held instruction to demonstrate that engineers can control Kathe's natural response to Gold to dub her the "giggly astronaut." so easy." Gold explained that est thing to a microgravity environment available to them during training. Kathe described her experience attempting to do a simple especially "challenging." tivity called "Impact Crater invited to create craters in the craters they dug in the up the debris surrounding in a spacesuit. As Gold and Smith packed up the demonstra

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Page 6 SPACEPORT NEWS July 27, 2012 ISU students reach beyond expertise to launch rockets By Steven Siceloff Spaceport News A the International Space Univer sity's rocket launch competition at don't think I've taken a science class in seven years." Six teams designed and built large lo missions to the moon and dozens taking part in an engineering course France. is a chance to expand." ISU holds its summer session in a Kennedy co-hosting the event along available. experience." vanced technology can be sprinkled Galactic. "We have an airborne unicorn!" happy and excited just to get the chance to launch. the envelope too much because you deadlines. rocket in just three hours because they had to order the parts the next Some real rocket scientists took at Kennedy. "It gets people so enthused about launching rockets in small scale to making it a bigger scale to send all about."

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Page 7 July 27, 2012 SPACEPORT NEWS Remembering Our Heritage Apollo 15 mission provided lessons for future exploration By Bob Granath Spaceport News D took Americas lunar landing program to the next level. With more science and ing site. lunar orbit. said addressing Kennedy employees during a rounded by the Hadley-Apennine Mountains While the geology training took place in exotic dures and practice using the geology tools. Since to possible ventures to Mars or a return to the moon. astronauts could take control to avoid hazards on developing a prototype lander to demonstrate Kennedys Morpheus test site manager. scape has been built so engineers can test the navigation data and test the Morpheus vehicles lunar rover. years old.

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Page 8 SPACEPORT NEWS July 27, 2012 Historian: Kennedy heading in right direction By Steven Siceloff Spaceport News K ennedy Space Center's Logsdon. "It's basically the same deci noted that the Air Force already had place. are looking into capabilities else In celebration of Kennedy Space Center's 50th anniversary, enjoy this vintage photo . FROM THE VAULT said. "I think Mr. Cabana is leading not a sure thing. Is there going to be a thriving space launch business that yes." "Commercial success is going to around the moon. It's a combination make this place." the mandate to send astronauts to humanity exploring the cosmos. continued to be about demonstrat ing U.S leadership vis--vis the States or Soviet Union." thesis about Kennedy's decision to set the nation on a course to land sassinated. Logsdon said that once Kennedy president and then his successor to its evolution depends on the national John F. Kennedy Space Center Spaceport News