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Mines and quarries greater than 10 acres in size in the Suwannee River Water Management District ( FGS: Open File Map Se...
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00099165/00001
 Material Information
Title: Mines and quarries greater than 10 acres in size in the Suwannee River Water Management District ( FGS: Open File Map Series 1 )
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: Florida Geological Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1992
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
The author dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law and all related or neighboring legal rights he or she had in the work, to the extent allowable by law.
System ID: UF00099165:00001

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OPEN FILE MAP SERIES NO.


Mines and quarries greater than


10 acres in size in the


\ Suwannee River Water


S Management DistrictV
Sby

Milena Macesich, Nettie Martinez, Mark Groszos,
Frank Rupert, P.O. No.149, and Ron White

Florida Geological Survey
Walter Schmidt, State Geologist and Chief

Division of Resource Management
Department of Natural Resources
Tallahassee, Florida
Published in cooperation with the
Suwannee River Water Management District
1992
This map illustrates the locations of historic, present, and potential
future mineral mines and quarries greater than ten acres in size in the Suwannee
River Water Management District (SRWMD). Such open pit mines serve as important
windows into the local geology, as well as defining areas of known economic
mineral deposits. Many abandoned mines are water-filled, and the larger pits may
form significant surface-water features. Some mines, such as abandoned limestone
pits, penetrate the regional aquifer systems.
Mine data were derived from several sources, including U.S. Geological
Survey (USGS) topographic quadrangle maps, Mark Hurd airphotos, recent Florida
Department of Transportation airphotos, and from publications and data on file
at the Florida Geological Survey and the Department of Natural Resources, Bureau
of Mine Reclamation. A list of data sources used follows this text.
Because of the ever-changing nature of the mineral industry in Florida,
current mine status is continually in flux. Mineral companies commonly sell
properties among themselves, shut down some locations, and start up others,
according to market demand. In addition, many old and abandoned mines, for which
there are no location records, may be overgrown, water-filled, or refilled as
landfills. This may render them indistinguishable on either topographic
quadrangle maps or airphotos. Therefore, the reader should bear in mind that
mines may exist which were not identified in this study.
Mines were digitized onto individual county basemap files using the computer
aided drafting program AUTOCAD. Mine size was estimated by comparing potential
mine sites on the topographic maps to a polygon of known 10 acre size. Mine
areas close to, and possibly smaller than the 10-acre size limit were included.
In general, the total area disturbed by mining is mapped. Some mapped areas may
include total land area owned by the mining company and available for
exploitation.

Mineral Commodities

The major mineral commodities mined or proposed to be mined in the SRWMD
include dolomite, heavy minerals, limestone, peat, phosphate, and sand. While
some of these minerals are utilized locally, most are shipped out of the
respective counties for processing and use. The following is a summary of each
commodity mined in the District.

Dolomite

Dolomites belonging to the Oligocene age Suwannee Limestone and the Eocene
age Avon Park Formation as well as dolomitized Ocala Limestone have been mined
in the SRWMD. Three active mines currently produce roadbase and aggregate grade
dolomite in northwestern Taylor County, near the Jefferson-Taylor County line.
Dolomitized Ocala Limestone and Avon Park Formation have been mined at various
times in the past in both Dixie and Levy Counties. One active mine produces
roadbase dolomite from the Avon Park Formation in southern Levy County, at Gulf
Hammock.

Heavy Minerals

Most of Florida's heavy mineral production occurs from mines in the
extensive sands of the Trail Ridge, just east of the SRWMD in Clay County. E.I.
duPont de Nemours and Company has proposed plans to mine heavy minerals along the
western flank of the Trail Ridge, just inside the SRWMD in northeastern Bradford
County. Details on the status of this proposal and the anticipated mining date
are currently unknown.

Limestone

Limestone comprises a significant potential mineral commodity in several
counties of the SRWMD. It is typically mined in areas where the high purity
Eocene age Ocala Limestone or Oligocene age Suwannee Limestone occur at shallow
depth. These areas generally lie over the crest and flanks of the structurally-
high Ocala Platform, in the west-central portion of the District. Roadbase and
construction lime was mined historically in Alachua, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist,
Lafayette, Levy, Suwannee, and Taylor Counties. Active mines are in operation
in western Alachua County, southern Columbia County, Suwannee County, and Levy
County. The limerock produced from these pits is used primarily as roadbase and
in asphalt mix. AL

Peat

Two mines in the SRWMD, both in Madison County, have commercially mined
peat. Of these, only one is currently active. The peat is utilized for
horticultural purposes.


Phosphate

Pebble phosphate occurs as a granular component of the Miocene Hawthorn
Group sediments in the SRWMD. The largest producer is Occidental Chemical
Corporation, which operates the large Swift Creek and Suwannee River mines in
Hamilton County.
Numerous hard rock phosphate pits were mined in the past in portions of
Alachua, Columbia, Levy, Gilchrist, and Suwannee Counties. Hard rock phosphate
occurs as a replacement of limestone, and is generally developed in localized A
deposits on the top of the Ocala Limestone, often in paleokarst features.
Historic mining often occurred as scattered operations in small pits. Many such
pits are difficult to recognize today. Hard rock mines larger than ten acres
were situated primarily in Alachua and Gilchrist Counties. Data on these larger
pits was derived from Epenshade and Spencer (1965), and mines are indicated as
circles on the mine maps. No hard rock phosphate mines in the District are
currently in operation.
Sand
*
Numerous sand pits occur in all counties within the SRWMD. By far, the vast
majority of these pits supply local fill, and most are smaller than 10 acres in
size. The exceptions typically include large borrow pits whose fill was used in
highway and overpass construction, or construction company sand pits, such as the
inactive Craggo Company pit in east-central Alachua County.
While mines labeled "borrow pit" on the topographic maps are probably sand
or gravel pits, the actual commodity extracted is not known, and they are
designated separately on the map legend. Several mines were labeled as "gravel
pit" on the USGS topographic maps. The actual material mined is uncertain, but
portions of the topographically high ridges in the northern highlands do contain
quartz pebble-bearing fluvial and marine sediments.


3E 4E 5E 6E 7E 8E 9E 10OE 1


_ACHULJA COUNTY
LIMESTONE MINE
1 WILLISTON SHELL ROCK CO., (INACTIVE)
2 LIMEROCK IND., (INACTIVE)
3 UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
4 LIMESTONE PROD. INC., (INACTIVE)
(5) HOUDAILLE IND. (INACTIVE)
(6) NEWBERRY CORP., (INACTIVE)
(7) WILLISTON SHELL ROCK CO., (INACTIVE)
(8) HOUDAILLE IND., (INACTIVE)
(9) LIMESTONE PROD. INC., (INACTIVE)
(10) LIMESTONE PROD. INC., (INACTIVE)
(11) ALACHUA CORP., (INACTIVE)
12) LIMEROCK IND., (INACTIVE)
13) DIXIE LIME AND STONE CO., (INACTIVE)
(14) LIMEROCK IND. INC., (ACTIVE)
(15) DICKERSON FLA. INC., (INACTIVE)
(16) LIMESTONE PROD. INC., (ACTIVE)
(17) FLORIDA ROCK IND., (INACTIVE)
(18) S.M. WALL CO., (ACTIVE)
SAND PIT
(19) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(20) CRAGGO CONSTRUCTION CO., (INACTIVE)
(21) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(22) D&M JOHNSTON (ACTIVE)
(23) ALACHUA COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS (ACTI\
(24) ALACHUA COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS (ACTI\
(25) OSTEEN BROTHERS (ACTIVE)
GRAVEL PIT
(26) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(27) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(28) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(29) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
HARD ROCK PHOSPHATE MINE
(30 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
31 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
32 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
33 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
34 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
35 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
36 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
37 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
38) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE
(39) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(40) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(41) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(42) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(43) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(44) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(45) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)


Data Sources ii I UIlNRI-NUVIlN ',UIVII/-iIT i IIlMMI-IlVL)
aa Sources (19) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
TDAVL/-D r'lI IKITV


'4'












N


( I F) -LUOIUR KULOC IIN., SUVWAMINELL 4UMAKT R IINL, I IVL)
(12) SOUTHERN DOLOMITE AND HICAL CO. (INACTIVE)
(13) SUWANNEE CO. ROAD DEPT. (ACTIVE'












OPEN FILE MAP SERIES NO.


Mines and quarries greater than


10 acres in size in the


\ Suwannee River Water


S Management DistrictV
Sby

Milena Macesich, Nettie Martinez, Mark Groszos,
Frank Rupert, P.O. No.149, and Ron White

Florida Geological Survey
Walter Schmidt, State Geologist and Chief

Division of Resource Management
Department of Natural Resources
Tallahassee, Florida
Published in cooperation with the
Suwannee River Water Management District
1992
This map illustrates the locations of historic, present, and potential
future mineral mines and quarries greater than ten acres in size in the Suwannee
River Water Management District (SRWMD). Such open pit mines serve as important
windows into the local geology, as well as defining areas of known economic
mineral deposits. Many abandoned mines are water-filled, and the larger pits may
form significant surface-water features. Some mines, such as abandoned limestone
pits, penetrate the regional aquifer systems.
Mine data were derived from several sources, including U.S. Geological
Survey (USGS) topographic quadrangle maps, Mark Hurd airphotos, recent Florida
Department of Transportation airphotos, and from publications and data on file
at the Florida Geological Survey and the Department of Natural Resources, Bureau
of Mine Reclamation. A list of data sources used follows this text.
Because of the ever-changing nature of the mineral industry in Florida,
current mine status is continually in flux. Mineral companies commonly sell
properties among themselves, shut down some locations, and start up others,
according to market demand. In addition, many old and abandoned mines, for which
there are no location records, may be overgrown, water-filled, or refilled as
landfills. This may render them indistinguishable on either topographic
quadrangle maps or airphotos. Therefore, the reader should bear in mind that
mines may exist which were not identified in this study.
Mines were digitized onto individual county basemap files using the computer
aided drafting program AUTOCAD. Mine size was estimated by comparing potential
mine sites on the topographic maps to a polygon of known 10 acre size. Mine
areas close to, and possibly smaller than the 10-acre size limit were included.
In general, the total area disturbed by mining is mapped. Some mapped areas may
include total land area owned by the mining company and available for
exploitation.

Mineral Commodities

The major mineral commodities mined or proposed to be mined in the SRWMD
include dolomite, heavy minerals, limestone, peat, phosphate, and sand. While
some of these minerals are utilized locally, most are shipped out of the
respective counties for processing and use. The following is a summary of each
commodity mined in the District.

Dolomite

Dolomites belonging to the Oligocene age Suwannee Limestone and the Eocene
age Avon Park Formation as well as dolomitized Ocala Limestone have been mined
in the SRWMD. Three active mines currently produce roadbase and aggregate grade
dolomite in northwestern Taylor County, near the Jefferson-Taylor County line.
Dolomitized Ocala Limestone and Avon Park Formation have been mined at various
times in the past in both Dixie and Levy Counties. One active mine produces
roadbase dolomite from the Avon Park Formation in southern Levy County, at Gulf
Hammock.

Heavy Minerals

Most of Florida's heavy mineral production occurs from mines in the
extensive sands of the Trail Ridge, just east of the SRWMD in Clay County. E.I.
duPont de Nemours and Company has proposed plans to mine heavy minerals along the
western flank of the Trail Ridge, just inside the SRWMD in northeastern Bradford
County. Details on the status of this proposal and the anticipated mining date
are currently unknown.

Limestone

Limestone comprises a significant potential mineral commodity in several
counties of the SRWMD. It is typically mined in areas where the high purity
Eocene age Ocala Limestone or Oligocene age Suwannee Limestone occur at shallow
depth. These areas generally lie over the crest and flanks of the structurally-
high Ocala Platform, in the west-central portion of the District. Roadbase and
construction lime was mined historically in Alachua, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist,
Lafayette, Levy, Suwannee, and Taylor Counties. Active mines are in operation
in western Alachua County, southern Columbia County, Suwannee County, and Levy
County. The limerock produced from these pits is used primarily as roadbase and
in asphalt mix. AL

Peat

Two mines in the SRWMD, both in Madison County, have commercially mined
peat. Of these, only one is currently active. The peat is utilized for
horticultural purposes.


Phosphate

Pebble phosphate occurs as a granular component of the Miocene Hawthorn
Group sediments in the SRWMD. The largest producer is Occidental Chemical
Corporation, which operates the large Swift Creek and Suwannee River mines in
Hamilton County.
Numerous hard rock phosphate pits were mined in the past in portions of
Alachua, Columbia, Levy, Gilchrist, and Suwannee Counties. Hard rock phosphate
occurs as a replacement of limestone, and is generally developed in localized A
deposits on the top of the Ocala Limestone, often in paleokarst features.
Historic mining often occurred as scattered operations in small pits. Many such
pits are difficult to recognize today. Hard rock mines larger than ten acres
were situated primarily in Alachua and Gilchrist Counties. Data on these larger
pits was derived from Epenshade and Spencer (1965), and mines are indicated as
circles on the mine maps. No hard rock phosphate mines in the District are
currently in operation.
Sand
*
Numerous sand pits occur in all counties within the SRWMD. By far, the vast
majority of these pits supply local fill, and most are smaller than 10 acres in
size. The exceptions typically include large borrow pits whose fill was used in
highway and overpass construction, or construction company sand pits, such as the
inactive Craggo Company pit in east-central Alachua County.
While mines labeled "borrow pit" on the topographic maps are probably sand
or gravel pits, the actual commodity extracted is not known, and they are
designated separately on the map legend. Several mines were labeled as "gravel
pit" on the USGS topographic maps. The actual material mined is uncertain, but
portions of the topographically high ridges in the northern highlands do contain
quartz pebble-bearing fluvial and marine sediments.


3E 4E 5E 6E 7E 8E 9E 10OE 1


_ACHULJA COUNTY
LIMESTONE MINE
1 WILLISTON SHELL ROCK CO., (INACTIVE)
2 LIMEROCK IND., (INACTIVE)
3 UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
4 LIMESTONE PROD. INC., (INACTIVE)
(5) HOUDAILLE IND. (INACTIVE)
(6) NEWBERRY CORP., (INACTIVE)
(7) WILLISTON SHELL ROCK CO., (INACTIVE)
(8) HOUDAILLE IND., (INACTIVE)
(9) LIMESTONE PROD. INC., (INACTIVE)
(10) LIMESTONE PROD. INC., (INACTIVE)
(11) ALACHUA CORP., (INACTIVE)
12) LIMEROCK IND., (INACTIVE)
13) DIXIE LIME AND STONE CO., (INACTIVE)
(14) LIMEROCK IND. INC., (ACTIVE)
(15) DICKERSON FLA. INC., (INACTIVE)
(16) LIMESTONE PROD. INC., (ACTIVE)
(17) FLORIDA ROCK IND., (INACTIVE)
(18) S.M. WALL CO., (ACTIVE)
SAND PIT
(19) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(20) CRAGGO CONSTRUCTION CO., (INACTIVE)
(21) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(22) D&M JOHNSTON (ACTIVE)
(23) ALACHUA COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS (ACTI\
(24) ALACHUA COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS (ACTI\
(25) OSTEEN BROTHERS (ACTIVE)
GRAVEL PIT
(26) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(27) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(28) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(29) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
HARD ROCK PHOSPHATE MINE
(30 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
31 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
32 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
33 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
34 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
35 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
36 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
37 UNKNOWN COMPANY INACTIVE
38) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE
(39) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(40) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(41) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(42) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(43) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(44) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
(45) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)


Data Sources ii I UIlNRI-NUVIlN ',UIVII/-iIT i IIlMMI-IlVL)
aa Sources (19) UNKNOWN COMPANY (INACTIVE)
TDAVL/-D r'lI IKITV


'4'












N


( I F) -LUOIUR KULOC IIN., SUVWAMINELL 4UMAKT R IINL, I IVL)
(12) SOUTHERN DOLOMITE AND HICAL CO. (INACTIVE)
(13) SUWANNEE CO. ROAD DEPT. (ACTIVE'