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PAC.t lie. II l BARBADOS ADVOCATE WIUM Ml XV Jll.V M. ItM Tractors Provided N change For Peasants THE HOUSE Ol ASSCMBLt >..:.].<... pi hrd Addren lo implement the purchasing ul mutur tractors lo be p %  i DM -inu to cultivate thi %  The liiii form ol the Address which was luroduci %  Smith (Lj intended that the tractors .houlri be kept at the variow AsriOultui i I u Mi AlldefVfeit that .ill the peasants would not 1 benefit hy such an nrranfaanv %  --— %  i'.'i, i-.1 : %  The !Iou> <* A** Qualifications FOR VESTRYMEN W.I. PLAY DURHAM TO DA Y TODAY the WIT i IndMa will open a two UA> fixture iigalnst Durham who play* In the Minor Counties Competition This will be the fifth game wit.i Durham the nrst f which took place In 1923 M Bajrjaatd tat UM third rnnr In KM %  %  A Octet, led ., combined N >ithinnbcrland Of the tour gameplayed data lha Wan tndlai have won one. and the other three left dr Fine Howl inu The Wi lha u %  oat* fine I, .,!,.. %  The We! |nd Kerad lit, I i ouW onl> 0S. I %  made i2 in their second inning* and then dlsmbaed Dwhan '" %  74. Thi* time Pascal] had the reand Pram Li 4 foi 11 In i2B Durham Imoehad J C3t Dot,-,.i getting 105 Met man Onmth 4 tor ;:i and J< Small :i lor 41 did best with the ball The Wi-i ) i %  in their aaeond innings W Si H 101 Durham de. tared ..t iM for 4. and W I had had -u for fli when any ended mi The IMS game Wai BUD drawn when rain Interfered with play. Scores were Durham 256. and Went Indies 140 Following on w.j. had Beared a (at 3 nea ihe end Durham ecored wi arhan the ins ..., op 4 fur M. and Hniph (Irani fl tor Zt being the BuerVadftal bowlers %  piled with 203. and Durham had %  .' 0t low of 3 Wktl when rain vashed out play Fresh trom yesterday'* Teat %  ictory the Went Indies will no doubt go in search "f tbetr twelfth victory of the tour and their lecond win agnlnl Durham . %  Id be itksH loi le ploughing ol i % %  .1 tn* nlaring at each Agn< ttltural laati %  % % % %  red thi 1 Mr Qaaaaff '* > made ii aQggeSbatli ,1., .it ibc Id irate %  I k %  < %  retried by tr Smith Tag ub Uiuti;i ih.it 1. frit that the luntei mamaar lor %  • mber %  be prate lor his/ 1 %  ..1 is.aaa 1 % %  industry Sniliihlr Marliinerv Arundell Presides For First Time e I 10I ul he Bnai Oovlive bodies 01 regarding Ihe %  asset resting with the ertior. An importani chanai In the %  aacuUva Council ol each Legislative Council ii being en to oMat threa aleeted rnembeia to the aaaBuUea and empowered to rt-ino\"o an elerled member fiom the Executive Council by a twothirds majority vote the Governor Is to nomlnaie lo tba Executive Council one of the tkominated members uf the Leeudativa Council with nfftriaU being the urtnunlitrator. Attorney General. Tr urcr und our other ottlcial and th* Governor remains Piaaldai I 1 the Executive Council. At ihe end of the announcement the Governor said this marked the confidence of the seothei Covntrj in the people of ttiaaa bdanda In .the judgment and (jo.. | 1 the common man and in the [ability of chosen laadara ol the [people to play [part In the Government of their country. It l on thr spirit of (he people that our success or failu entually depend What An M.P. Wants To Know R MAPIn 1 ige MI Uaroa to ttdVtl into oil i*rrniin and in' %  %  Iheli land tilled by their netghbourlna tate* t tiere ware, hewever, nav pea bo wan net pot* um nipporl rroea %  %  1 H oelp. lie wan ijtiiti' 10 agieemcnt uith the junior member of St Joseph 111 his view that the Government should take steps to provide trae|nfl which would be placed at the disposal of thr paaeenti for the cultivating or their )and Mr. Hellirl iti il*o in iii|iecment with the junior tot St Joseph The i>e.i ant with hair ,n icra nf land had to pay ilm> tune, aj ulttvabai ha land bj ngrlcullural laboui %  %  and by inaciiinei) Land ultteatad mecJuuUeally yielded 10 to.is per acre more than that culI l.ilmurer lie • add be %  tiinu the labourer out of work. IN that the Government haul' M %  11 lo ihe Director of *. (riculture to Mggeal how many Uiay -lioiild buy and Ihe sites of them. Mr rawiard <4'i agmOll H1.1t the Implementation of the iraCtOI ould not displace Bfjiicultural boni He i' i: thai ihe Oovernenl should purchase tractors to be placed at the disposal of the peasantry nee of cost. Mr \llder il,) said that the AdtlresN said that the tractors hud La in kept at the Agricultural Station lie MM tearful that if >.uiti UmiuUona were made, peasits in some of the partihai would A benafll He -aid that he did not think tiiat the Senior member for St. Joseph should ciuibble over the '"BKCstcd amendment u il was preeentad more or less, as a guartee that all the peasants of the bland -hould benefit. Mr Ganter IC> said that if the Government Implemented the Address. .1 great service would he done to thr colony If somethingwere OOl done quickly to help the peasant*, many of them then working land would not be able lo do so In a short while He had heard that .1 cCHsnara* nt Officer was in the island, but ho could not see what he was doing He wondered whether that officer was sleeping o< inactive or nether it was not his duty to ork among the peasants \ i,.11 ti 9% %  %  • %  u 1 oe qeainv oataai n regis^atJaa • i a Vesu.. sjad %  HHt to amen-i •ne Joeai A -t out the among ihe Csoeofl whwh Mr G H Adams pre sen led to the House of Assembly yesferkajp In doing aa rn look ine oppociunity le explam -because of ha alirtude of the Other Place as egards hnw the Hill bi amend the Representation of the People Act wouh) affect the tHielttlrot'r" Mirors and vestrymen — that these **o BilU have -s theit l %  The retention of the qualification* Mi A an>s he under1 Other Place had postponed the passing of lha Bill to Hi ,.i. 1 talion of the at thej leii that %  not. d.;, 11.1 ..on ir..laron in be abotlahed by tt nge in quaUneallon and Ihal ,I,I also bt ., change (oaim.-t on ('.i 1 veato ure fhe House '. I I %  i b iition a luaUneabU arawa to hai altenUoa ourlng Ihe Bill o. Me Hoi 1 pOUIfed out then that II wsj no) Ihe Uitentl 1 ernrneni I itolMi the quaUnealien \ atlon lor lurorg. iii.'t. wai no hat< 1 tin lo I hange the %  .ion At the none time however, aOovt rnmenl did %  %  ' i*awan attentu am urea dealing aith |ury. %  •"• %  ago Uwrjj Water Extended To Bay Estate THI HOUSE OV ASSEMBLY yesterday pju^d j Pltgnhj Uon for Ihe purp con reasonable, and referred to a case here the Departmetit wai catted to repair a leaking pipe When eaa sent in. he said the rraterlal* only rame tn 12 hile labour fetcheo something r,i, Mr Y. I: OM (U denied that %  •ny partiality where St Michael was concerned It was well known that the greater percentage of the population lived [l 91 HlCtUati and thai wa. where the greater inwOUnl of •vater was consumed A regaids the price of installation, the hon'ble mcmt>er h:>< admitted that the Waterworks DolaarhneM sold the material to the .1 at a very dv nid therefore it was nothinp Igalll I thi company It was a 1 I. .r paring vragas, and in Pf that 'he Snn'Me m* >en* %  w'ni claimed thai hi intevevied if> ageing paapel wmk 0&X mmwcf a Foe quick. pUawni Alk-Seli*ef. D,op 01 tablet! in %  (lai i.| *. it Asa aad drink it ,1 lautive-nuw ii ANY • Alka-Seltzer How them to remain on the Statute Book any longer than the tegutlature remained. [le wmila have Uk, ,1 the House 1 g/lth Ihe two bill t,„i;iv i>ul until the Other Place hnd nossed the Bill to amend the Reiiresentation of the PMpaa Act hey could not prweed He would give the absolute .issuranee. however, that as soon as the Other Place passed the Bill lust referred to. they, who would aarlBlnli he meeting Ihe same day eoiild have passed thtwo BilU. < it them right iway to the Other Place so that the law relntlng to • he quaUAcatloa for vaeUra*an and turnrs would remnln a* it anw FATIMA STATUE HERE INTRANSIT l ,1 %  c-ti 1 Moore arrived 1 Urrdaj by the "Lady ll.oi., wtlh the statue of Our Lad} of Falima. He is intranstt fiom 81 VTneanl to 81 Lucia Meanwhile the Statue | Bi Patrirk'i Church Jammotta IJHW and will remain there until Ihe "Rodney" ksavsa U 1-xpeeled to leave tut St l.nel.i on Frlda\ night at 9 o'clock Horses In GoodFormFor Polo Today WITH schooling on the Plantations and lour practice ga ihe 1'oto ground, most ol ihe new horses art* now ready to play the part in team competitions. It is indeed surprising how qulckJJ "'me horses can learn the game when under The seat of an experienced player, while others 1 em to like or catch on to the various duties expected them. On Saturday afternoon Col Miehelin was riding an that hnd never before been on a PolO Held, but in the capable hands of this good horseman, the mount the end of Ihe evening was us g.iod as if he had 1>een playing tor a seaaatn. Kenneth Frost displayed excellent form on Saturday, while the .1 curate -hots of Lea Deane were I -aullful to watch. Mark Edgehill 1 Flash" missed very few of his b tck and forehand drives at full K.dlop. and John Marsh on speedy "Kitty, ILiwk" played his usual hard hitting rame John tried a BhUkka on Mr Johnson's new thorough bicri •Rascal", but It Menu BI if this four-year-old will n -ed a lot of training before he I n DO considered n good Pol. ("nil Boy Colin Deane -n "Call Boy" 1 b always a power lo reckon with as horse and rider carry a lot of weight between them, and it is -i Idoai Ihal Colin misses a ball Victor Weekes. the left hander. Is one of the mosl natural ridei* I h vg ever seen as no mailer how far the hall may be from his horse he seems to stretch completely out of the saddle and get It Herbert Dowding has been unable to play for many seasons, but .1 few.ifternoona ago he wt rtdlng through tha Belle lands on a magniftrent beast, so it is hoped that this combination may be seen II action ,.t BOnu tune in the future Play todav should tart ai 4 3n and as usual there will he a roped oiT gtsdOBure foi Monde and Houi Guests. rea Operations hud teen .topped because of lack of material, u wee said, but he would now like to know if the work would be restarted as soon as poe-ible as the l-eople JII the area were greatl] need of a water service. The irari house to a suindpost was bout three-quarter mile away Mr. Prod Ooddard suggested that n would t*> a good thing if standIMarlc in areas where thev were now little used could be removed lo other places where they would more dr O. T Allder said that he appreciated the ins la I Lit waWr in the Hay Land I d t.e ,l tioped they would extend ''her places. During ihe last Estimates provision was made fo, \fsnoun for • eatanaloq of the water supply I over the island Half of thi a alloeated lo SI Micnael jnd he remainiler for thoilier len parishes, which together had They 'll Do It Every Time By Jimmy Hjtlo .-' !" E SOSE S *BONS ^ AM7 "n-e -it s A c„^^y O* A c^ ta "MCE -c-E V COj^D C-ASCE P 1 xj-jgEE -o-Ag-ew-_M I VCJMJ EN/ T---V -= ^E?SON"=.0 T LLJ 1 *'ADE *'E TOO A? AIUCH OCT iMrtootrm lkC-4^4c T e^" A "i* "J r • %  -# ir-u^OTaar VfnV CWTSA.T 4I?-TS SOONE9 OR I.4TE? C?4w A CO"C S'T ~THANX TO f ED WMBei_AN, S WSST *— STOleT.



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WEDNESDAY JIXY M. l5n W.I. WIN 3RD TEST BARBADOS ADVOTATF. PW.r THRFI fr .< i that Joe llulme. the former I ntfhsh iritkt-1 and wccer Inter national, picked Ihrre f ihr team in inpresent worl I eleven. Worrell. Hr,.,Mid Rarrudhin were the (.umt-l anilies. but Walcolt and Valentine wenJIMI senou]> roni.l. 1 .! fof -.1. i„„, CM the riihl wUier places tn*land and Australia also had three each, with India and Ntw Zealand letting resumed with Ramadhin continuing his over bowling to Oou.rey tvan* the brilliant Kent Jin! Knatond arlcaal aasapar. There *a% only one ball to come and %  then bowled a maiden to Dewes from the pavilion and and Evans was off the mark with a ;ingie from Ramadhin* first delivery in the next over Another .1 Days The ball H H it til behaving itself n this fame-; Tn-hi Bridge billiard table, refusing the lUghtcsl 1 Is stp n ca to the bowlers and looking good enough for another In dsqn Dewes got past the 60 marc Aith the help of a timely gift of 'our runs He had driven the ball *ard to cover and started to run Stollmeyer fielded brilliantly and hied towards the bowler's end. bill the throw was wide and hard %  nd the bill wen' to the opposite bcundary The next over Dewev appeared to have been dropped at the wicket when 84. Evan* turned one from Ramadnin dangerously nenr to Christian! standing short at fine leg but apart from that small incident cricket was now mMnder11-. 1: mournfully alone, Seen x 1 SaGatfei \f( 5 cX. ^ji> tUnf Ramadtaln '< 1 twa K V.T uit England 101 trig he .\.i r •'-> %  %  !fl> h :>* %  %  before 1 tMn. otat further bfKMcd Ti.k 1 ta.n. : 0M uf a Rtmadlun and eight minute* dhin had tMJU I-' in mfllovi Umd to make IM v.' 1. • %  wlHH. fO when the Waal IndM Kae took a comfortable tingdg afl the fourth ball Stnllmeyei was also of! the roaik a, UM tir-t over with an. 'drive from which the 1*11 areni In the direction of third a li 1. txiwled lo Sinllm.y. r favoured Tea rum • Np In .n nuHllM *., i II.,:,. 1,.-let %  nd Evans for ottoa faal.edrd four bye:t, ml durminutaa of play %  rr -urneri Hedfer ttira* At 14 H ntefrom • %  %  w eg m.nden lo Rtollmeyci Bedser rrm.nned oi, and Radroi %  Kill through a badly spaced covers ..rid took two more byturning lh-fifth delivery lo square leg Kae took single off the last 1 aftsa 1 lb n S'ullmeyer I <'I lies g Stollmeyer drove Redder so th<.n side of the ljwl. r*i wickai lo enter double (inures When Jenkins came on Stol %  meyer took .1 sltiglt .and Htm h I the first boMidary f trv through u b..d certal n immediate length, sen; ilowl ce*s>vr meiifii grit .. ungli 1 ovei In • I H. .' %  •!. to tug It back b At the .1 %  %  Hitaight dl to 3S Foi I .ur I M.I %\|. -I. ..SI. |NS|\(.lV*hhi,..k a I V.IM W y i P rvis MM M miiM>f 1 h a.-w#rd at HW b V.ltnlin* St YaWII... hi • ; D C.-iJurd IJ w r -ri ON 11 iiMMi. Weekes al Brat lUp • oi a b*d laps*' during tl when he drup|K-d Evans off Ramadnin The batsman was then 18 and the score 380 and plav had been In threequarters of an hour. The sun trag now -hmmg brightly aiul Bvaog as if .iwakened by Its warmth came out of his chrysalis to hi; three fours in two overs, one a clean sweep to leg off Rainadhin. one a beautiful square cut off Valentine ana the other not so U.iprwiv. a lucky edge through slip. En ouiaged by these succesie*. the Kent man then hit two boundaries to leg in succession off Valentine'* first two deliveries In the next ovci rand the score past the fourth hundred and de.ighi the loyal band ol 3.000 or so enthusiast*. When SB runs had been added In an hour. Dewes attempted to hook Valentine and was bowled Ju8' II Ha had played a valuable if unattractive innings which '..iilc for strong di'fciiu' Shadtlflton caaM m and inunadlately employed aggressive metheds sc effoctlve on Thursday. This tug ne was not so successful and gave Weekes a catch at first slip off Valentine. 410/7, 1. Evans joinea By Jenkins proteeded to • %  farm" the bowling ;


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I'M. I FOIB BARBADOS ADVOCATE ui nvi ~i> v^ Ji't.v 2i,. i,-,, BARBADOS^ ADVtXsffE ]! rats M BrMf'UwB Wednesday, July 2>>. lt54l \\AA. IMIM THK Wnl Indict cricfceTtMin di feagland at '1'n'ni Bridft ysatsrdsty iy the decisive n..1114111 of U'n wickets. This Was the second Test victory for the tourists and the win even more pronounced than on the initial occasion at Lord's. By this victory the West Indies have not only strengthened their position as likely winners of the rubber but have removed the possibility of losing it A single test match remain*; to be played in this 1950 series, and even if this ends in a draw the West Indies would have won thv rubber having won two of the four games England won the Hrst fit Old TrafTord. and if they triumph in the fourth and final game at the Oval, then the honours would be even. This is indeed a happy day for Wist Ii. dies cricket and cricketers There is no doubt whatever now remaining, that the day has come when the players from the Caribbean can meet the might of England, on English turf on more than equal terms. The day has perhaps been long In coming, but its advent in this the Jubilee year of West Indian cricket visits to England, is indeed appropriate. To-day the west Indian iram has definitely shown its merit as a fighting ur.it, by outplaying the Englishmen in every department of the game. Victor)' was no freak gift of fortune nor did the vagaries of the weather present it on a platter. From the first few overs of this game the West Indies secured an early advantage, and held on to it grimly in the fare of a determined light by tjirlr opponents. Theirs was no easy task and players of less calibre might understandably have wilted when faced with the dogged determination of the English, a traditional characteristic epitomised in the record breaking partnership of Cyril Washbrook and Reginald Simpson. But the West Indies with a leader in John Goddard who never flinches, also held on tenaciously until victory was assured. Interwoven in this memorable victory are some incidents destined to remain green as lung as memory lasts First there is the remarkable bowling performance of the two youthful West Indies spin bowlers. Alfred valentine and Sonny Ramadhin. Almost tirelessly these two toiled against the English test batsmen and for the third time laid them low. They routed them at Old Trafford in the first game, which the West Indies lost and in the second fixture at Lord's they proved to be the unyielding rock against which the English efforts foundered. Yesterday they reached their peak by bowling an unprecedented number of overs and taking eight English second innings wickets between them. Valentine's 92 overs is the highest number of oral any bowler has ever sent down in a recorded Test Match. The batting of Frank Worrell and Everton Weekes is on a pinnacle by itself. another partnership of 283 a record in its own right. And finallv there was the team spirit which never faltered throughout the stern lest of England's praiseworthy attempt to save the game. And now the game has passed into history, and the Wesl Indies have perhaps surpassed the hopes of their most ardent supporters. In the moment of acclaim for their meritorious performance, we would wish them victory in the rubber and full use of the opportunity to consolidate the position of West Indies cricket in the world of sport. MrEL A. \< MS.IIM WITHIN .i few monthi of bis appointment as Auditor OaDaral of thai bland, Mr. v. A Newwn has Rone into retirement after 42 years service and another member of this family hm given v\ active public service In the Empire It was in 1908 that Mr Newsam joined the Civil Service at an unpaid Supernumerary and during the yearn that followed he MM ved in tinPublic Library, the Curium-, the now defunct Master In Chancery's Office, ti.e Courts and the Audit Ollk-c. Throughout his career his work has always been characterised by a thoroughness which brought him the promotion which he deserved but which came at a late hour. While he was serving in the Barbados Civil Service, his father the lato F.rnet Ncwsam was accountant in th.Ocneral Poet Office, his brothei Mr. A H. V. Newsam was Assistant \lu lei at Ihe Lodge School, another brother was a High Cos Judge In Indie, and >l the Home Office In Lorid his broth, i Sn Ref* Newsam was • himwif %  iliitlinijalieil career n* an Colonial. Quiet and nay of appri for himself the i peel He found lime during tin Volunteer Brigade si d it i that at his appnintmem General, the Wardens despite the fad that the Brigade was standing down, gathered once again to pay tribute to him and the service which he had rendered this island in another capacity. 1 1 %  T n'li Mr Newiera wen all those who met him. %  war to serve with the vas a tribute to the man lo the post of Auditor the various areaH, During the few months Ihe Audit Department the with him as a junior learn* Ship and advice even mon Year Off Greatest Strain 1941 .... THIS IS THE YEAR Winston Churchill analyses in the volume published today of the Second World War series' He writes: "Looking back upon the unceasing tumult of the war, I cannot recall any period when its stresses nd the onset of so many problems all at once or in rapid succession bore more directly on me and my colleagues than the first half of 1941. . .'• 1941 ... A TEAR BORN WHEN "The British fought on with hardship their garment until Soviet Russia and the United States were drawn into the great conflict." The year clothes were rationed . a year of defeat in the East I did my beat to warn Stalin... bnl 4'rippft did not deliver my note O N June 22. the longest day of ment at this or any ether time that tumultuous year. Hitler Stalin even vitgceted to me later invaded Russia Up till the end of on that If |! British were afraid March. Churchill was not eonhe would be willing to eend rounu vinccd that he would invade three or four Russian Army Hut March report" from secret Corps to do U* Job." agents dealt with the movement Churchill adcit: "It was not in of German armour to Cracow my power. thr >.gh lack of ship.V^Z,';* voo Says Churchill. -To me it ping and other physical facts, to Retailr-iril • Illuminated the whole Eastern take him at lu word scene Uke a lightning Hash TIN ea %  • • BLSJ Hidden movement to Cracow of !*i(atlin"w feeble* to much armour needed in the a^HUKCIULL did his utmost to Balkan sphere could only mean l^j Mp ^^ munlUoM ond Hitlers intention to invade supplier—rubber airplanes conRussia in Mav. 1 sent the momenVI(VS tttia news at once to Mr. Eden In s^, !" ,^ Stahn rab le*i: In Athens. ... .. (l wm lo mp lnat Grea' Mr Churchill wanted to warn DriUln couM wi ,hout risk land Stalin of the danger in which Russia stood On April 3 he sent Stafford Cripps, then In "Who is the kvneial of this division, end does he run the %  even null* himself If so, he aaere ueeful tor football Could Napoleon have %  it was h> made run. in baaed on many Man with high athletic qualifications are not usually %  .uccessful in the higher ranks VMS MESS* Minuter to Profeasor l.indrmann (later I-.1.1 4'lirrwelli. March II. I Ml | AM expelling TOSl to have Sready (H ma tonight the general layout of the imports programme under different heads, so that I can see where I can scrape off with a pencil another half-n ..limn tons for ft—I •Itrsl'iiiirHiir Prime Minister to Food Minister. M.i.h 1M1. "f son a %  %  rn C enmunal Feed inn O i.ti to be adopted II Is an BotM expression Ngs)sStlve of Communism and the workhouse I .11 them 'British Everybody associates the word restaurant" with j rood meal, and they may as well have the name If they cannot get anything else" llorv. -Iljirinif Prime Minister to Home Secretary. April 2. 1941:— 1 SEE %  note in the Daily Telegraph thai vou are in Archangel 25 to 30 divisions, shortly going to make a stateOr transport them across Iran to me nt to Parliament on the the southern regions of the future of Inn as using Will ." you kunliv %  | ma know beforecomments: "It is hand what you think of saying Moscow, a mesaage lo that effect to deliver personally to Stalin Sir Stafford replied nine days later thnt he had himself sent a ting personal letter to Vlshlnskv ibout the Soviet failure to counteract German encroachments in the Balkans. He did not send Mr. Churchill's letter as he said it might "weaken the ImprasalOB already made by ^ForeigT. Secretary Eden backed man Mission to Moscow arrived. Up Crippss view Churchill perlr rccpUoa WM bletrnk aim slated His brief note was discussions not Ot all friendly P. delivered on April 22 might almost have been thought that the plight in which the I s.ill rrsrr... ** "; .*C HUHCIUI.l. comments now: 'THE GRAND "I cannot form any final Winston S U S.S.R Churchill almost incredible thnt the head If anything were done of the Russian Government with threatened to terminate horseall the advice of their military racing in lime of war "i ruin the experts could have committed bloodstock it would be necessary himself to such absurdities. It that the whole matter should be seems hopeless to argue with %  man thinking in terms of such absurdities. ..." When the Beaverbrook-HarrlTOMMY IS TOO BUSY FOR KOREA It* J. I Oi-Nlrrirlirr International News Serwtc Foreign Director THKRK are rtrotsj mdicutmns to-day thai j Croat Britain has decided against sending j ground troops to South Korea despite a growing feeling m the United States that at Igssf, a token force should be dispatched to the i bloody battleground. The decision, if iV actually has been taken, was reached by Prime Minister Attlee and his cabinet after profound consideration of all aspects. The British Government has no desire to court criticism or dissatisfaction in the United States or in the United Nations. Therefore all measures having to do with the Korean conflict have been subject to closest scrutiny and consideration. It is undoubtedly true that Britain is heavily committed in the Far East already. Her lines are spread thin because there are vast areas of trouble in the Asiatic world. A Whitehall spokesman explained that any shifting of Far Eastern troops to Korea would imperil local situations. .1 n:.\ns OX i in JOB ALLIANCE, by Churchill. Cassell and Ud 25s Memo Ts*— Pray advise me Tell me on one sheet of paper . AcUon tin. day . ChnrrhUI sped without stint his plth> memoranda to urge on the already eacer . Example*: Telegram* lAeUen thla dsr> Prime Mlaister to Ueneral Ismay aai Sir E Bridie*. February 12. 1M1:— I SEE a new marking tin telegram.* i 'Officers Only.' do not think this is suitable nnsidering how many people _..ly one purpose, the destruction who are not officers must be of Hitler, and my life Is much privy to the most secret matters. simplified thereby. If Hitler I should like to know the reasons "W invaded Hell, I would make at which have led up to starting J, 1..,-! | favourable reference to this, but at present I am entirely th judgment upon whether my message, if delivered with all the promptness ind ceremony prescribed, would have altered the course of events. Nevertheless, I still regret that my Instructions wennot carried out effectively. %  I( I had had any direct eontact with Stalin I might perhaps have prevented him from having %  o much of his Air Force destroyed on the ground." Someone asked Churchill whether, as an arch anti-Communist, he did not consider It lowing down in the House of Rimmon to give aid to Russia He replied; "Not at all. I have thrashed out in Cabinet first." IViismiiN Prime MirlKlrr to < hill rellor o' the exchequer May 4. 1M1:I S it true that the widow of a Service man killed by enemy action on IflSrN gets only half the themselves pension she would if her husband vere killed on duty?* i I'ikew From a memo to the Secretary of State far Air and the ( hlef of the Air Staff, dated June ?9. 1941: pVEftY man must hav Britain's major preoccupation is in Malaya, where the Communist movement is strong For almost three years. 70 thousand British land troops have been on the job in Malaya. hich safeguarding the great peninsula which supplies the world with one-third of all its natural rubber and one half its tin—both of enormous military as well as peacetime value. the Devil in the If oust capon of some kind, be it only a mace or pike. The spirit of Intense individual resistance to this new form of sporadic invasion is a fundamental necesBtt) "I should l.ke Sir Alan Brooke to see this minute and enclosure. and to give me his views about it Let me a'so see some patterns of macee and pikes ....'* Opinion Prime Minister lo Home Secretary. July IS 1941:— [ SHOULD like to have my opinion put on record that sentence (of five years' penal Churchill was aghast at the l.uk "f preparedness In Russia N i imainly a catalogue of imt it may be doubted whether uny mistake in history has equalled that of which Stain, and the Communist chiefs were guilty when they cast away all the possibihues in the Balkans and supinely nwalted, or were incapable of realising, the fearful onslaught which impended upon Russia." •• So far ns strategy, policy, foresight, and competence are arbiters. Stalin ond his commissars showed themselves at this moment the most completely outwitted bunglers of the Second World War." Main rebuff* A LL through 1841. until America was at w,n, Mr Churchill unpnsed I'resident | Roosevelt of British hopes and i fears Relations between the two [leaders were cordial and kindly. [Mr. Churchill tried to foster the auk) relationship with Stnlln Hi says:— "Dut it was not to be. In this I long Moscow series 1 received many rebuffs and only rarely I Lklnd word. In many cases the flelegrnms were left unanswered ; altogether or for many days." "The Soviet Government hail the impression that they wn [conferring great favour on us by lighting In their own country (tor their own lives. The more r(n ,,,i, ItW) toujpst, th* heavier our debt hasanM This was not balanced %  Jview. . ." ,f Comunconvinced that it should conservitude on Miss Elsie Oi tinue saying to two soldiers that Hitlc Allllt lit •* was a good ruler, a better man Prime Minister lo Se' 'r • xpressions of opinion. February 4. 1S4I :— however pernicious, which are not P LEASE see The Times of accompanied by conspiracy. February 4 Is it really ">'' 'Nothing in the internal stale lhat a seven-mile cross-country of the country Justifies such run is enforced upon all In this unreasonable and unnaturadivision, from generals to priseverity. I consider such execs vates* Does the Army Council Bbfl action defeats its own ends." think this a good idea? It At the end of one appendix. looks to me rather excessive. Mr Churchill adds drily: "I "A colonel or a general OUfjbi print thes details to show how not to exhaust himself in trying difficult it is to get things done to compete with yOtSBfl !" %  '= runeven with much power, realised nlng across country seven miles need, and willing helpers." at a time. —L.E S PEOPLE: I eoulclii*< I mj doctor to lake mv advice when he was ill" QVOTES on some Deserved the title with which I famous personalities: acclaimed them of 'Snlamande*.' *> HARRY HOPKINS: "that Both thrived In the lire, and extraordinary man. . His were literally shot to pieceuithwas a soul that flamed out of a out being affected physically or frail and failing body He was in the spirit. . ." a crumbling lighthouse from which there shone the beams that led great fleets Ul harbour He also had a gift of sardonic 1 .ilwajs enjoyed his company, especially when things went ill. . a> I. OR n BFAVFRBItOOK "Was . (in 1841's dark December), as usual In times of optimistic He declared that . once the whole fore*) of the American people was diverted lo the struggle, results .\ .,..., N .| ( %  %  . would be achieved fur beyond %  W * %  CTM "" 1 r,f1 "* anything that had been projected neya. To his unfail HY was there no Second or realised. There would bo probably we my life Front? Churchill says: "In enough for all. the autumn^f 1941. we had no judgment was right mastery of the enemy air over LOU) LEATHERS. Minister could he always counl Europe, except in the Pas_ de 0 f War Transport from inphcit obedience *) (.IMKAI. AlCHINLECK: "I had not altogether liked his attitude in the Norwegian campaign at Narvik. He had seemed Inclined to play too much for safety and certainty, neither of which exists in war. . . However, i had bean much bmpri i twifll his personal qualities, his piesrace and high charLORD MORAN (M Churchill's medical adviser t: came on all my Jourg care 1 Although i could not persuade him to tak> my advice when he was ill. nor on my his I'ln i) he was head of t-iT who had served I lo value his frienothan they had done ^ reputation grew instruction*, we became devoted CM of the four years friends. Moreover we both sur. Leathers was vived. i help to DM _m the s> HESS %  T „ ( v ,. r atloched iii the psst lbwas (or them, one of a team called upon to render leryica to the general punk Hi;, ihoioughness won him their rw| and ins manner, then highest regard. Into lm retirement he carries the l>est wishes of UsBSff and other members of the public for manv more and happy yean. Calais, where the strongest Ger\t a y g fj man fortifications existed The W ith every landing craft were only a-buildthat passed mg. We had not even got an B n immense army in Britain as large, as well conduct of the war . Several anv tfjoui trained, as well equipped a the times when all staff and departthis s*3eapadM I kn.-w H had no one we shffAild have to meet on mental processes had failed to relation u> the inarch of event* solve the problems . I made . He came to us of his own and mil. u personal appeal to him. and the free will, and though without this difficulties seemed to disappear authority, had sumethlng of the • as If by magic. quality of a n envoy. He was a hope s> Generals FREYBERG and medical and not a criminal The British estimate that they arc spending a hundred thousand dollars a day to maintain the Malaya force and pay for its operation They have the equivalent of four full divisions or more on combat status and the British Treasury severely feels this drain. In addition, there is Hong Kong. Troops on battle duty there now total 38 thousand men. Anti-aircraft protection has been stepped up to a degree comparable to London at the height of the Nazi blitzes and the British are convinced that any hostile Communist action there would meet with a hot reception indeed. So far as Korea itself is concerned, Britain dispatched her Far Eastern fieet to Korean waters immediately after President Truman decided upon the first American air and nova! action against the Communist invaders. This is a sizeable force. It has been in action along with United States units in bombarding enemy shore positions and troop concentration and while no naval clashes themselves have been reported, the presence of strong Anglo-American detachments doubtless has served to discourage whatever naval force the North Koreans may have. Mill I Vl\ Ml I AI OM Prime Minister Attlee is expected to explain the situation in detail later in the week Britain is nol alone, of course, in being handicapped with regard to the Korean war France has half a million men devoted to the civil war in Indo-China and the cost maintaining this military establishment forms a major part of the French budget. Holland likewise has heavy commitmentIn Ihe Dutch East Indies. The argument that each of these three nations can put forward is that in the over-all picture, their defence of Asiatic areas is fully as important as quelling aggression in Korea. They can point out that a weakening of forces in any area would be like pulling plug from a dike, enabling large and wellequipped Communist hordes to sweep Into vital regions and put an end to any hope lhat iho Korean war itself can be localized. It does not seem likely that the United States will put any pressure to bear on Great Britain, and the United Nations undoubtedly will take Britain at her word when she says she is sending "al> possible help" t Korea. HI! HAVE Jt ST RKHVIIi SPARE PARTS FOR COLEMAN Products We Will he pleased lo repair >our LIMPS. LANTERNS, STOVES and IRONS if you htmc Ihrm to us. ALSO A Shipment of . SNOWCEM in dW Mlowttl ..lours: \WnL\ ( r'lin I'ink. YHlow. iml TrriMrolU WILKINSON & HAYNKS CO. LTD.—SMCMMM I" C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. MOM : tun, 4472. HI ( KH1TII STORES \VflWNATIO^/ BBS US FOR OUR NI.W KANGF. OF: INTERNATIONAL .NUN CHALKING) QUALITY PAINT LACO.MAT (Flal Oil Paint) in these attractive shades of Pale Blue, Pink. Grey. White, Cream LAGOLINE (Nan Chalking) In Undercoatlng* and Finish In Light Stone : Light Buff : Teak : Ivory : White : Grass Green : Mayfair Green : Sea Green : Navy Green : French Qrey : Lead Colour ALUMINIUM PRIMKKS FOR WOOD YELLOW PRIMOCON (Primer for Aluminium) CEMKNT AND PI.ASTKR PRIMER DANBOLINE (Anti-corrosive) in Red. Gray, (ireen PROPELLOR Light Red for Shlnglai DaCOSI A A << % ., A grill* i.iii. Prtnch soil. "Vet Niagaras of foil; Hateineiit still pour out or question of the Second Front 'There wss certainly <.f eonvlncing the Soviet GovernCARTON DE W I A R T: ami should be KO regarded. This may include dispatch of troops from Australia. The Dominion's Premier, Robert G. Menzies. has been in London talking with British Defence Chiefs. He is known to br anxious to do whatever can be done to safe guard the Far East, particularly the island £ of Australasia where Australia's main interests lie. But Tommy Atkins, it appears at the pre sent, is too busy elsewhere^—INS. [ WE DO IT ALL THE TIMES! OIH IK I AIM Its SAY: Trinitlml t.tilh Th, Cinvmit Tunr To The L'dtior. 7 !",-l4 hC 1 !" !, P""*, 11 mu t •* l '7 ri L< £j c,urc wnich mft >' h <-'"""• owners have sn unduly cinemas through ihe Department go wrong before tue advent oi pointed out that pictures .how., ad ertlsed poor opinion of the public which of Education. 5 U| during the past The motion picture. Thanking in most of the West Indmn Islands It must be realised that the Ihey serve"; nor is il true that vear lt] „ numb r receive,! ha* vnu for nsee are distributed by the ProdueW revenue obtained from Alms "apart from (Urns which depict consideribl" cSmlniini the through ihelr effflOM in Tnnldad. show,, In Ihe West Indies is inllnthe eternal triangle the only OOtt caption "Cinemas and Education", that the Clnomaa must therefore Itesimal compared to large couiiwhich ssjaaa to nuvt with the which Bppoand In last Sunday's show what is supplied to them ,ri <^. nd il the majority of approval uf cinema magnates are • \m ".,te'. and appeals for the f rom Trinidad; and the number '"""""a-goers in those countries those which portray violence and exhibition uf a high standard of ,,„.-. %  „,,,,, nletunw nrodur-J Patronise the type of pictures sudden death." On the contrary i: '"dur,^ wn !" !" *t be given trying to attain this end; but It "*"" %  ''_, !": 1t _*i monotonous regularity, that would credit for wanting lo show Alms is evident that the manner In m n t P* 01 "* ,hlnk '' ? " l SSSni to be the answer as to why of n high standard, which pictures are obtained for P 05 1 !" 0 as mp I* 0 ?}* ;_ fondly tht> are produced in such large Regarding educational the local cinema is not under" %  **•. '•'i^e to various parts numbers, and such films are not (short subjects), these .-t<"! ot the world sgfd obtain any ond shown locally because "most be supplied frequeuly t.> While It is argued thai In recent years the cinemas have mad tot 'v.'ivthing that Is wrong with the comrmmily, it should be realised that in most pictures there Is always a moral. and that a strong point Is nude USBS Of Ihe fact that crime does not :ed to pay. It would be Interesting to the know what made the community Yours very truly, CARIBBEAN THEATRJBS LTD (Operating PLAZA Theatres) PSf (R. N. W. Glttens) Director THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB per (H. P. Spencer) Secretary. llf.V rtcsw i/r/r/Mv mill t.oitiniurs t.Oi.lt Hill lit III M S,1AA*AV.V,'SSsV*V.'*:V.V>'>



PAGE 1

vvrnsEsnw m.v M. ltsii BARBADOS ADVOCATE rsoi nvi Lorry Driver Acquitted Of Manslaughter Charge AN ASSIZE JURY yesterday acquitted Julian Greenidge. a middle aged lorry driver of a charge of the manslaughter of 70-year old Rosa Small but found turn guilty of the lesser count -daoMTOUl drivln| ift*T I l trial Tlie MM occupied the attention of the Court I i the whole day and did not finish until late in the ex Small was fsUllv Injures! on llMfk OMM K.....I .,n. ll.r 'bus from which she had ju-i slier, ted MM alrurk b lorr* romlni I from Ihe oppt.lle direction. Ttae lorry wa loaded with rsnra aad SIM iMvrtinc an inwut of labourer*. a reasonable doubt Greenidge i entitled lo it. But they also ha< another dut> a duly to Hi. Honour the Acting Colo: Justice, Mr. O. L Taylor, njemoe-j over mc Court Counsel for thw %  -.• %  .IKK Wall Ht K.C associated with Mr J S B, Daar. Mr w w. Km.. K c. Solicitor General, prosecuted, on behalf of the Crown After hearing the verdict, Mr. Walcott told Hi* Honour that they would now forget about the count of manslaughter as the offence with which he was found guilty was now one which could be tried by a Police Magistrate. HiHonour postponed sentence and placed Greenidge on a personal bond of £10. As the caw returned Sgt. Gaskin, main Polite witness for the I'l %  • % %  %  I...!. %  %  In Ml MM Visited Scene In reply to Mr ltvet-c Sj(I Gaskin stud Uiai he had visited tho scene of the accident on the previous day and had made another check of the measurements. He would now say that the measurement from the rear of the lorry which he had said previously was 22 feet. 4 inches, is m fa. i bb feet — that is the vehicle was further away. At ihi* stage Mr. Reece told His Honour thai he was calling no more witnesses for the Prosecution and this closed the Prosecution's case. Mr Walcotl called no irtttsMMI for the defence. In his address he told the Jury thai of course they had heard that Greenldge was accused of unlawfully killing Rosa Small. Mr Reece had told them In the opening thai thev had to lind a high decree of negligence. It is his duty as Counsel for Greenidge to go through the law and present the facts He would start off. before wearying them with the law, by saying that the horn was blown before\ Greenidge drove the lorry around the curve, he changed the lorry Into third gear to reduce the upeed and then after all this he finds himself confronted with the 'bus stopping In a place where it actually was not supposed to stop -that is. nowhere near the Bust Stop At a curve is a place where vou would call dangerous to the travelling public and the 'bus was 1 standing an Inch over tho ten foot mark "Bad Liar" He submitted that the 'bus driver is a liar and not only a liar but a bad liar. If the bus driver had stopped where he should have done for Small to ge( off there would not have been an accident and Small would have been alive today. Both drivers should be on trial If the 'bus driver had stopped the •hus at such a spot like that, then why should Greenidge have W face such a serious charge ? He submitted that if there was iwgUMoca on the 'bus driver part according to law he was als. guilty. He said time when the l-uiniiu-Mini.T of Highways put "l> Stop Poles he regarded them as where the 'buses should stop. The Commissioner takes such things as the length of the 'bus and stopping at wrong places into consideration because he knows they rould create a danger The Commissioner had placeT a Bus Stop around thai' same < irner for 'buses going in the direction of Relic Gully with the result that drivers of vehicles coming from the Pine were aware that they were going to encounter this 'Bus Stop. These were the facts but he watntot to go through them piece by piece and if things were brought out in his speech that they did not understand they Could pay another visit to the scene of the accident He submitted that if Greenidge v. as not driving TOO fast then they would have to say that he was driving too much in the road when ho should have been hugging more to the gutter and In that case he would still have struck the old lad?. Si|i of the Rum In dealing with the Cacti at Walcott rlrsv brought the attention of the Jury to the point on drink. h.. said thai there was nothing in this but It was to be noted that the men were cutting cane* fi Lower Esvate They finished work at midday and Greenidge had told them all about how the tup bottle of nm was nought but he did not tell them that he had a sip of that rum. He was putting te them that if Greenidge wa* drunk he could not have driven that three and a half ton load or canes and the labourers on the platform of the lorry. Mr Walcott then pointed out the various curves and corners that Greenidge would have to encounter before reaching Howell's Croat Road. He said that if Greenidge was drunk the labourers would not drive that far with him. While referring to Sgt. Gaskin': evidence Mr Walcott then showed the Jury the plan that Sgt. Gaskin had drawn. He said that in cases nowadays hey usually had photo, graphs and if they had photographs in this ease they would go a long way in bringing o,ut certain point.The Sergeant had given his evidence wrongly because he did not bring his memorandum or notebook. With reference to speed Mr Walcott said that there was no man living that could ju.i,. Mom 11 feel ahoad .ni.l one of was trying to t II them that she could give tho .-peed of the lorry. This witness was Odessa McClean and she had also said that the 'bus had stopped for about three minute* pointed out that this material point buV that he would come to it later. Correct Sides Isaiene Harding, another were on their correct sides and ha was saying that if that was so how could they collide At this stage a shoe, adjournment was taken On resumption Mr Walcott told the Jury that it was hard address, ing them because they could not answer back but if they made a mistake they could not redeem It. It is difficult for them to uraerstand the facts of a case and Mr. Reece and His Honour and himself weie trying to show them That is why he on the other hand was trying to show them that the facts of the Prosecution could not be true. He '.'old liiein not to return a verdict of "guilty'" because one person had told them to say thai and do nut say "not guilty" because* they are advised in that direction. He pointed out that it some of them were neglecting their duty as jurymen then it would be a shame for them to stt there. Reviewing the evidence he said that Ernest Johnson who is employed on the Governments Waterboat and was a passenger tn the 'bus in his evidenco had said that the lorry was on the left going around DM curvf. Johnson had said that the distance from which he had judged tho speed was about 18 feet nad the lorry was moving swiftly. He pointed out that two witnesses fr>r the Prosecution had said tnat the lorry was on llip left therefore Ihe Prosecution could not ay that it was on its wrong side. 1 "Alarming; Lie" As for the evidence of S.muiel Rouse, driver of the 'bus Mr Wakotl said that he is such a liar that he even lies for the Prosecution. He would not say that he had s.upped to let off pashCMJgff. The most alarming lie was when Rouse had said that he had heard the rumbling or the lorry. He pointed out that if the lorry ;.s doing 20 miles an hour and the "bus had Btopped for three minutes, according to Odessa McC*?an. then when Rouse heard roar of the lorry it,' would have been a mile away somewhere out by the Pine bottom or turning into he main road. He said that that %  as three witnesses they could not take Into consideration. Another alarming lie Rouse told is that he did not stop the 'bus long enough for the old lady to .-'light Fitzccrald Walcott in his evidenco said that the distance Lelween the lorry and the THIS was 25 yards and under crossexamination ho said 25 to 90 fceV Going to Walcott's evidence it: May h* aald that the lorry was on the left side and at the present Assizes he said that it was on ether side Why Not? Evans Elcock was travelling lop of the canes and he was saying that the lorry was going so fast that a chicken could not cross the read. Mr. Walcott asked. Why then was he not thrown off?" He poimfcd out that Rouse was a protective liar while Elcock was a vindictive one and he put it to them that u was because Greenidge spoke to Elcock and his wife earlier and told them that If they did not behave he would put them off the lorry, that Elcock was making these statements. Elcock must have been in his .. ee when the accident occurred. It was hero that he would get h> chance of revenging Greenidge Elcock was also telling them that he had his foot against the prop thai* struck the 'bus and vet Elcock's foot was not injured. "Hi an obvious liar", said Mr Walcott. In dealing with the evidence of Alvin Shepherd, Mr. Walcott said that Shepherd had said that he was going to catch the 'bus After he saw the lorry he ran bnck High |KK re> lie load law lne.l inn I all that they had hcam Witt. Nuwslau( a different natUM and certainly did not affec* Ml lOUt*] Whether Rouse stopped to hand it a parcel or whether he stopped to let out a passenger that does not matter the point was that he stopped The witnesses called by the Prosecution gave a complete picture of what took place They said that they saw the loroming down the road vcr. fast It struck the 'bus and the people on the lorry fell off. He is submitting that if Greendge was driving like a lunatic >r a lamb before the accident that did not matter, the point fo. them to consider was how was he dmlng when he collided with the tinGuilty ? Allei Outlining; further rUililr of the witnesses. Mr. Reece said •hat there was once a COM w taWi man was driving a pony can and lying l n the bottom of the The cart knocked dov, and he died. The driver found guilty of manslaughter. If a man was driving through Baxters Road on a busy Saturday night at five miles per hour and %  ked down and killed someone he could be charged with anslaughter. He told them that if there weru satisfied that Greenidge was driving with a very high degree Of negbgence then they will find hu l guilty of manslaughter but If the.. had found that he was only guilty of driving a little bit reckless then they would find him guilty the second count of reckless dangerous driving. They ill id him guilty of this providing there Is great negligence. Th!i second count is purely a statutory offence. Summed Up His Honour then summed up He defined manslauithler. He told Hit t.. that they had listened two very able addresses by counsels and this was a great advantage to both Judge and Jury. •You have listened very carefully to the addresses and have heard Ihe points for the accuseu and also the points for the defence", he said, "but this is not an easy case." After going through the evidence in a summary which lasted nearlv two hours His Honour told the Jury. "If the negligence of the accused went beyond such a* to have disregard for human life you can come to the concluslrthnt he is guilty of manstaughu otherwise, bearing in mind that he was driving recklessly, you will find him guilty of that offence and if you feel that he was not driving recklessly or dangerously, you will And him 'not guilThe Jury retired at 4 40 p —id a few minutes before 6.40 returned with their verdict Tippinge Is New Harbour Master Commander H Gartside Tipptngo <>I1F loyal Nsvj Retired I. ha* temper .irlly I lh afHtolntmenl off Hnrtotir M utt H n .ildos Rtder Tipping** was born Ch. galre. England. Ho .veil %  aval training si the Royal Naval College. Osborne and then at Dartmouth He v enl to sea In January 1913 After spending 38 years in the British Naw. h* served foe two years on ihe Admiralty Civil List His last appointment was Fan il> Welfare Officer for the Devonporl Port Division which appointr.enl he held for two and a half years Ih %  igued in 194 AI ihe end of Wort* %  I .inmander Tippinge had rea hod I rank of Lieutenant He nsutttl World War II as Commander of a destroyer canning out convoy duties. On retirement. Commander Tippinge went to the Bahamas t) live There he was living on the estate Three Bays in the island Elulhera. which .. i snMa OS i" American The cut.' •*•* bonghl by Colonial Development Cornor.dioo and he decided to go to Jamaica From Jamaica he went on to Trinidad. Tobago and Grenada before coming to Barbados. He liked Barbados best and derided lo settle here Turks Discuss Korea ANKARA. July 18 The Turkish Cabinet t.*lj> heM a haattl] -ummoncd meeting which political observers believed discussed what form ltd to South Korea %  hould UUM Many minister* arrived In %  special plane from provincial towns and holiday resorts President Celsl llayar conferrad with the Tuikish dgltgata io the United Nan ma, BeUm Sarper. who WM leaving by air tor I-akr Success tonight —Reuler. COTTON {REAS CHANGED Because the Cotton 1 Barbados u nut as largo in 1906. a aR-up ka the airangi meiits Bar ln fp*e U < >'f the island II Is thought necessary, an end was pti^n* House of AsaembK >< The Hill was piloted through thv Mr F L WaJ L) The Sale of Cotton Act IBOti %  cguirt* the Vestry of each Parish to nominate and appoint an Inspector of Cotton for each Parish In 108 the acreage under Cotton five thousand acres uhereas at the pgaaaal tor..*. It tali hundred acres he lt.ni.ad!* Cotton '• autaUan hum iriati.'n* to the Go. %  that in view of ihe changed IBcaa Of the !ndustr>. the uuand should \f rodUead Into MI t areas as the Director of Agriculture may think fit and noj n> p.u .she.iheretofore The power to appoint as mat > In-.l-'. iirs as may be neeessar> on the recommendation of the DtrOC lor Of Agriculture. f..i ..m-ir. out the provisions of the Act ivested in the Govrrnor-in Executive Committee. The rates of pay are ie.re.i-. to eight eenls per hundred pound2 This Bill iv intended to glv. effoct nerordln glv. Choral Society Sings The "Revenge" TUB atata asarii oa UH Choral s. i amane I tl r Oosnbiriuora H Thursday evening, tltfa Jnl. art) be the Choral Ballad Th< Ilevente" by Sir Charles Stanford The trardi of Tannyi story at the tight of the -Revenge and Ihe Spanish flee! of 53 ship* natk by sir charieyj Stanford, and all music lovai ha\c ihe opportunity of baMBuaj this work which is bein^ dataal )n Barbados for the fli .t time. Other i! 1> > lei look oppor tuntt) io urge the Qovsnunan t.. iiiinish the inaiiagei ot B> 8WI I with a bOUBO at Dodds Planlatioi .i ..f gMn| bun travelUr allowanea i( thai .is done. Mi Garner said, ihe manager who wa an efficient man would be able V canv out his duties more efflci ently. Assize Diary TO-DAY a. 32. Rev vs. Mildred phiuips The last endar. the II\ THE HOUSE YESTERDA 1 An i i'ii<->fa* i %  BOab H i h wiP No • Order. I*-) BaUbushnoal %  Tfn. ISftO No !• %  IPrn.l H* i .AII,."UIIII-III Th* PnwUHi. lAsseaaWMNKI No I Drarr i*o i swing 'IOIIHI. *< n %  %  M. A.l.n. a^'h.Oon — p.>nr Ihr OrS. mutMi TM Civil BsUHV %  Orow 1SW' no.dr UH on x\\r i)th d QI July, ISM. nnd*> uipr. .., wed* I al UM CrvU • *ab*i Bridgetown Celebrates • From Page 1 Cars were decorated with miniature Union Jacks and seme bicycles that passed through thn city also carried II.IK One mauby vendor in a fit of enthusiasm dished out the entire contents of his tub free of charge. Vendors of Sweepstake tickets used the occasion to bolster tie sale of their wares. This is What they said—"The West Indies wir de cricket, people all buy a twwpstake ticket." The town office of Messrs Radii Distribution Ltd. erected a ipeake outside the office at Mnrhill Stree and a crowd wa* gathered there One West Indies supporter held large bottle of rum aloft and with Ihe fall of each wicket "llrcd one 1 t he look pains to see thai only indulged from time lo time this luxury. In Speigthstown a proc*. workers headed by Radio dene. ex-Barbados middleweight star paraded down Church Street and Queen Street and dually olnppe-l at Heywood's Woods when they celebrated the West Indies victory. A feature of ihe picnir was the fact that all Speightstonunwho had supported the Englan. h.d to wear black ties and serve the drinks but were not allowed to drink any themselves At OUtin Town. Christ Church } Whenever you feel discomfort sfter mesU. KM aacfe iwo Realties, one after the other As they diM>lve, their btMBRad blen.1 of .m.-ul tngtediemt BOM u*ilii to where ihe trouble lies, and OBnacai yxir acidity. You nm always -title """hie from add •rnmath immciliatrlv. if you mrry a lew Retimes ihn ic wrapped vcparatelvt in your DOOM t lamlhug ll they don't give you rraWf, H*l time vou taw your doctOf tict Reiunci at any iltcmiii DIGESTIF KENNIES I ; .. %  ,|. I IMS %  v %  we, lato'. FIWI ..n Ihr ISIh is) -1 i 'lir orovi-inn. of wvlUh I .inMIOii'.i-nl Art. ItW i l-t -The FM 'I Hi lAmendmriiii No mmOf by thr•• tl'r 13." I Mi), under the pmvuiw. ..' %  I'. ...:...,. A.' in r MM I. mat... ISM. KiliimlISM SI. n Ihr -hMnl. t... give that doubt to Greenidge. you cannot convict him. Mr. Reece, addressing the Jury for thr ProsccuUon. said that thenwas no camera, nobody walks around with a camera and noboriv knew that the collision was goiuu to t.iko place. It | H Impossible for a man to retain the ptctsn M. tie in his mind. As an example he said that once a great lawyer a K.C. taw a collision and his version was different from the others. Because witnesses may give slight variationand differ slightly that does not mean that they are liars. 6 Months For Wounding DENIS WALCOTT ot Lodge Road. Christ Church, was sentenced to six months' imprisonment at the Court of Orand Sessions yesterday. Walcott was found guilty earlier in the Anises of maliciously wounding Madoline Forde. Jail Sentence tor Habitual Criminal His Honour Mr. G. ITaylor, Acting Chief Justice, yesterdaj imposed three years and four years' penal servitude, lo run concurrently, on Joseph Webster. Webster was also sentenced to five years' preventive detention for being a Habitual Criminal there was no publir celebreti and cricket fans were content to gather in quiet groups nml celebrate the Test win. But in far Gall Hill, a less known district in Christ Church there were flags and bunting on shops and private residences 4 .).|>lrmri. No II —t i %  i %  I" -""Pi..< II 0BB4UI | .,, N" 7 *hi tlir ( %  •in. WATCH FOR "THE KED SHOES" FOR ALL CLASSES OF INSURANCE CONSULT A. S. BRYDEN & SONS PM LTD.) AGENTS FOR NA TIONAL EMPLO YERS MUTUAL GENERAL INSURANCE ASSN. LTD. The Weather TO-DAV Sun Klses: 5.39 a an. Sun Seta: I II I in High Water: 12.39 a m Mi p m Moon: (Full) 2lh VKSTFBDAV Rainfall: It adringU.nl Nil Total for Month to Yesterday: i %  in* Temperature: iMax.l if t Temperature: 'Min.i Wind Velocity: II mileBgff hour Wind Direction: ft. by N Barometer: i s m ) 30VI3. (S p m.) :'< 943 .. I..I '. •aiolnlnt |alltta> Station at Hall — A Hill to |.r.vnlilor IhqusnOMHa ... Or u.ialifl.atl'.rr. f"r J.,... In iv1r f( tlir rra.ilali .. %  ,.! %  |"nl UM IBIIOWIM Una •!> -at-r >opi ... i ifa Ha wlm --rra to ftmrnd Ihr Holier A. %  'to amend Ihr F.-irt arid IH.i %  ta MfUUfl Unrl> i rnt n( LADIES' l>Uod A.i Addrr.. I. Mt.' rlalih I il„ P) ... 'HANDBAGS A very attractive style in imitation Cobra leather. Colours ol Brown, White, and black Also Grey Plastic suitable lor day Of afternoon. Price $2.98 CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street "'W t Mr BMCO told 1M Jury thI II liGrcwiidge is guilty It la their dutv I said thai both vehicles,,, sa) he Is fullty but If there H Learn from the hospital. Whenever infection threatens in your home, use 'DETTOL' IHt MOSItN ANT 1 Sf P T IC \. POIIOHOUI 1PA.V D.,. .-. 1 St.is N -every hour of the da/ When every.>h elw. i* liot ami li-illt>T'-l •/•m will fawinabs \>y y„„r fr.-.lnm-i -~ if you do this. AiW yimr iMlh or Imthe. .h.mer yourself all OTat With "a-hniere ftV.Ui|u- ti a r-.-il, |irof'--tliig fllni (hat keeps you iliiihtiU It.-, ill .lay lonir. Itdelicate •%  '( will av|.l Ban Pur t-'ashni rraraii" I Inn in t" >i.ur MholiiiMfrafrtiality. IIfa! lakUlU I" -H.If.T wilti tho €ashni4-re Bouquet % TALCUM POWDCK *—<** %  —? COlCATf fMHOII.I.MIt CO. i;i;: T ^Sb; j i %  *£**$ l,!l li"l!!ili; ; '% 



PAGE 1

pu.t %n FliRBADOS ADVOCATE WEDVFSI.AY JCI.T 5. 1W HENRY SPECIAL ATTENTION!! BAKERS SHOPKEEPERS HOUSEWIVES USE "GOLDEN CRUST BAKING FLOUR FOR WONDERFUL RESULTS MORE BREAD BETTER BREAD LAKE OF THE WOODS MILLING CO., LTD Vigour Restored, Glands Made Young li 24 Hours .1 > W*k. —.iu t.> -r.d lly*. tro-aWea Mtt r *.w n —li btlnaina nw (ouiri f>4 lmir IM"; •tl 'I lIKi• i Mck. VrTAA* DIM Ml" U faa! IWJ < %  n>NW aad MMfy aftd from li to *•** or io*. maraii* ratura tn •" %  i-" And gal our RtonaT Writ A rl-— UltM. and taa Vi-Taba SACROOL CONQUERS PAIN Alwny, keep u Bottle handy On Sale at: KNIGHTS DRUG STORES Soaping" dulls hair — HALO fbriftesty YOU inu.il luwe a % Yra.-'aosping" your hair with even tine.r liquid or cream ahampooa hides 111 natural lu.rre irli dulling aoap film. Ilalo-oa.la.ri. no auap or itidty oibnohirur lu dull your hair'i natural lutlre. Wilh yoar wy Bra) .haiLooo, Halo brine* oul Ihim. rneriag higliliahb. lu fragrant lather I ...ay quickly in any kind of water— nerd. „, allrr-ruue. Forjoair that'. Itatroui. tae rUlo. AmvaM*ita /. 4aanra. Hat,,„,;,(; Mfc r raaaw 71, r> > A !" ,.., rrmr. tar. p,** ,(, Hd. en,, Ltr rot aararaf r
The Barbados advocate
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098964/02243
 Material Information
Title: The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title: Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title: Sunday advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Advocate Co.
Place of Publication: Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publication Date: Wednesday, July 26, 1950
Frequency: daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Barbados -- Bridgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities: No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note: On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note: Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 17931718
lccn - sn 88063345
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: UF00098964:02243
 Related Items
Preceded by: Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
W l m % 4 m
Jul -Mi
Batfrauos
Quorate
I IV t: (tMs
V.nr 5
BATTLE FOR S. KOREAN TIP IS ON
West Indies Defeat
England For
Second Time
(By K. I. (OZIIK,
-_......, NOTTINGHAM. Juli -
ym. wist immis ra t,ru, virlrl u, .., , ,
[( Maleh ill Trim Bridge Maj ..mi lli.ir MilllMirlrr-
<,,,,.. ,|| -u.i.lHd >,!, ,ho r,sl,. which ha.pi all
ftourm aside rnnrerninc ihe relative
THK WIX.M.M, \im.KI
mrni of ih,
i It Mils
-_ _ ... ,..,. ....,, ,.,,,iiMl, ,,^Vm,u> ,,, ltv
lor and HM spirits oi tin..,- WM laeUan crickr-ient wh
hay linn. - mutll in Uh a^g, , brtai mni.,.m 4r,(.krI
M il'|in.riii pinnacle matt be raisin- ;. lilM t lon*l I IheLf
vtiiriln Min.v-otv
fcjyuu |
team in Hi. inn.I
ivhatevei it i
P
','"*" ""' "" till 'h l* win,
"* -"mi...!. ....
I IM |BM
(Ylclm.tine
C.-nrie Heartiey jn ( mutant..... or* I -
and will ii, i)oub1 already i>,.
-.eiebr.iilnc U I will.- s ('
Brawn, th Witfna,CUff
t VoUffffM) ..f PI .-
I


" in*- hapless bowleo I
hi* knee wan j;iv:i
;v..*.
' nut him;
l>\ ItS til'.,
fvliavMMn
Mid a fuiiiuiiiin.il fi
Biwn dMM.i ','',,. ""' '"'""moth nr*i Innlni
- willIte", infhl ,. W """ by ""** "l"C *"'""-
*'ill be each
Of country, similarly markina th-
ereat event aa it deserves. At aooi
(i* I finish typing thla, have n.
fear I shall do likewv
And now in review me match
Ii IN impoasibl* to say whether I
this match has been won by tha
bowlers or the batsmen, su nuKhtil> i
d.d each contribute to ihe r.-.ul' '
Johnson and Worrell lost Thun- '.
'!% did noblt
tb
work
hip abbwad thai In them, the
Wel Indies have found .11 pen
inn pan. fully dtterving of the
.mantles of George Chalk
|Tim Tarthoo
Their styles, loo. arc remmiaceni
> I'-iibadlans. Stoll-
tha Challenor tradition
Uh fluent strokes and
trty on the DOOI delivery He
..
cream of the English trai
a paltry twenty-live runs, and it
may well be that Yard ley .* nlaM
Inn himself for daddinfl to taki
first knock on a wicket -
expected to bv a hit green an.l
lively for the tUst boui or play
Never Recovered
ii dlsnalti : mmod t" ntii qulat-
cnina influence upon
exuberant partnci
In'
Certainly
blow was
F.inland rtf
Valentine
exceiJant
B'.! oven
that first hour a
struck from which
i !'
id Kamadhin aguui did
rock and Valenune's
. the England secomi
ituiiiiis Is by way of It-in* a record
fof Test Cricket It is Ihe greatest
number of overs ever howled In!
n test inninga, but it it not thai
Kieatest number of balls. George,
deary once bowled 81 overs in it*
Teat Match in Australia, eiaht i
ban overs, or 56 more balls
Hamadhin undoubtedly has the
lust of ihe English batan in
up" aa we sav in the West Indies
and it la quite amazing the number
Of times he boat the bat and un-
luckily beat the wicket a- well
Those two spin bottlers divided
Iba honours between them, bu*
their worth to ihe attack wan by
no means in that ratio Each was
equally useful and West Indians
can thank their stars that th-'
selectors, despite some criticisms
tram lb* omniscient, riskoi thaW
two practically untried young&lei*>
0.1 the tour.
All The Work
Of the batsmen Wnrndl. Week**,
Hae and Stollmeyer did tha work
for the whole eleven, (lomez. it
i' true, had no cfagnc* to show
his qualities, hul the othi d I
(trnpU'tely.
Not that this statement of facts
Is to be mistaken for severe
criticismafter all, batsmen can-
not come oil every time, and
Walcott and ChrisVani have Hone
so well up to now, that Ii
on this occaatoo ara aaaUy '"i
given.
Of wbrraU'i afletilaaa batt'ng
It is Impossible to wrta-
ndl of concentration wa
lost in the CarCMn v:->r of the
stroke, and the hallmark of crafts-
manship Wat On < verv shot. (If
F-igiand's attack pad to
HIll.X CANT
I.VKI IT
NOTTINGHAM .In
Shoril > jlt.-i -m*. 4V*i
Indies Test vtetOt? was over
at Trent Bridge to-day John
(Joddard recaived ,1 t. ,.
paKniarketf Birmingham
"You don't com-
plain about wicket when
>ou are winning "
Of the Engllsn uatxman thu
morning, only Evans really *x-
cvfkM He made three quartota
of the runs3 out of goami
without being in any way rackless.
was never afraid to take WttBtevci
runs wan olTered. His was j
deflance worthy of some reward
Fortunataly tor us, no Mun Nt
iheniM'lve to earn similar praises
So much for the game
Thera Is a strong rumoui that
.1 represeiiUilioii will be v,^\.
the M C.C to have the Watt
Indies visit England again in 11H6
inataad of South Africa, win- will
bl hart ba I52. I understand that
the County Secretaries are behiix
this move, so excellent a drawing
raid have the West Indian cricket-
ers proved. It la felt that South
Africa may be more than wffflni
to let tlu- W*t Indies have 1051
be given 19S8.
Great Deal
1 I lid that Bud) .i
m an great deal to crlcki I
flngflcca In England.
crowds this year have bt
ng to see the bright Bl
bleh ha* been ptovldad
. i,. .
kgatnal n West
Indies haw i onaj at
*
-' nvt sttldtd.
ajatkar Httie anag .% be i
interest Yu i.\ like in henr
a On i.... i
L.8. Troops Forced
Back To Beachhead
Mai-Arthur's Headquarters ior Kor.', July 16
POWERFUL North Korean forces today threat
ned from three sides the last qua. ter of I
Korea held by United Nations forces General Mai'
Arthur's midnight .cimmuniqne, though not mi":
tinning the fall of Vongdong ye;ter.lay (Tuesday
forecast that further withdrawals may be necessai ,
in the western and central sectors
Ir the centre, the badly mm'., v
Division fell back from Ynn(r fighting to take up new positions further south
along the main road and railway line to Taeiu, Soull:
K vea's temporary capital
i. .|,.....i,.n. Armv olliri.iU ...nliiiiu-.l ;inli.u^l\ iiplini
i IHwak law Utetkan pnlllM in K..r.;.......MatUI)
. I,.1.1. .1 4m.....il" -' "I h.'ii. hh'ad
Eutope
Wants More
U.S. Troops
n. ii*.koi ii hiM.
. vlllS Julv M
i (..11
op
..,
I
course open to
.ell.....'
forct '
Kon m
...I.
nri
oootlnui

:
\ wld<
, Imitflanking move h...
Bridgetown
Celebrates
W.I. Victory
. : o'clock
..il. niighl the
,>. indiai had
rtat Match -<
T lent !ti uge
f Marrlaon *
string of
heir Mi
\
and bunting sprouted suddenly
tj ( iowds tol-
. iftatn .i N dnrd & to. Ltd., where Mr.
N. Goddard. fathct of John
Goddard IS hetid of UV
mi rant lhat bears

ireakfast hour for
ie giutary and pOggsblS 'in. i ot
I Intanded it> start
... rtirt
I their >in its" at
the fatlier
f the Wi ptaln
I .. Bl Otlgfa to
. DM I UBd
iv their
wn
ire
All .loin In
On the faahlori-
de Ooddara*! restaurant there
nf Waat
i fans Thaj all
and left
soon as their joos demanded.
Hi. Honour Mr E. H I Warn.
P nt J idgl of Rniish Guiana
Ml War from Bur n wtN
'niniM.n-
As soon as ihe nf*s ainved
rush al the office of
.:. by peo-
le Who wrtiite.i
i iblaj it one
IM \dvaeate Sports Eitttor
i .n' afaort to bt first
abk) office with a con-
ratulalory cable inn Denis
AJMnaort West tndJes1 all round-
> r who " '"* the West
Indies In India Laal real was
first with nil. cable
til** the
town iflee of Mtaari Cabla and
Wireless and Ihe text of one par-
ticular cable was mteri ttai
Nun. rtlmlttls".
nn sir B
momi:.m or virroiiY
RPmn -lOllMMIIi BMkea 4 l.ll u. Ig l... fMI .....
Waal Indies have uon ihe Bktfli Tesl
Hold On 8. Korea
[s A "Secure Base"
MACARTIILR
AKK si CCI 5S. July
General Douglas MucArlliui Comnumdvi-wi-vh-ti nl the
United Nations torci in K uca, In hi> f\nrt up raUun rt
port in thu Sacurity Ontat unday declared
wn tha MUthern pan of Korea repii'sented "g gagij I I
;md that tht* United Nations Porcag wi'ti- thCTg to
General MacAnhur stated [ is of Bourn In | I i
predict with any deyn-e m intftgy tho future h
Of the military cumpaiKn
i road fronl involving
oaUnuoui irui

j tosses as well
t.-T i : M .. \-<,
anqueaUdnabt]
111 Involve

cat idvano
: battk r i
1 in ptoeai i leai ;Im- u>
SPORTS
WINDOW
MBN- -.IN-.I I
I X' lf,1 I.. ,i
MBS. H W.I&
OMoffi I
mi :, s i.h ii.
Csurl FS.I I
' Ilie .
rtl
. i ..
'
ti I
i tjavv been
i it i ItgM
j Uui

H

i
an i
ixploll II
We .....hen
t]

if. nt.
War Brides
Ordered Home
HfatTFORDSHnUC. July 25

In ihi* raugrkry are benic rushed
-. - .
m New ^ ork
Tonight the first lo...
:n children, and flvt
< took on into a rain
rrgtR this airport. 30 mik-s
.north of Lendea, to flj harat to
CallfoffjaB.
An Ofhcial of the comi
Hrutrr his instructions had com-
' fron New York tad
know the reason, heater
To-iiKirripu l> \
Holiduv In Trinidad
PORT OF SI'AIN
, ii.,i...i.. .. ....
Thin mi. |
1
*. i -.ii |i
i a\ Waal Indk
i gland
i
hi -lu Kofyal <; '


li. Uu ii Ui i
.'
c-i tf parade on Uu
|
this n i
Dull
urifiiiK Trinidad and TObago to
the proposed H
1
> l
,i..i. cha
agtai to tl
sMrporated n in. < barnbai at
tan | tl

li. port undoes thi m|
dictatorship over a on |
bt..
\rgea tines
Reeogni.se
Trade Unions
iTUTTOAItl lul) .:?>
ih. International Tran p.n<
readj U
ith tin Argentina Oov
nrnei i u r. boycotting <'
i Oovarn*
" ogntae Pri
Oenaral 8ei ro
lai....... lodat
iiecu aau 4i th. Paeferatlon.
1 art to Bwadssfa Kinmsh
11 delegatai lhat an i
all Uaaari ta Utt fad
i tha implication <>i tht
.re not respoinlinK I"
raUaari call foi boycotting
'iii-
iti- u .no thai hi. Fadi ration
r ave [" It i 100 pel cant sup-
port for ill deChttOO If Araeii
fail howavai. ttttj
'^ill have rtrtick ureal blow.
Which will keep the spirit of Fre.
tliVC bl A,wen

Nona ol tha fsrltlth
..... addrai ad Iht Congraai
cawernlng the m .
i Renter that at the clon |
ol the mtetlni rtttarday r*antatg
the Congraai, iimmh leoresen '
. .ii.iin.li from diarutMng
r-port r thedtap ifa
Uu- Britssk attttudt bl Koverneii
Mt 'iidiingerinR Ihe Brttl I
ii | nt by furthei "dis-
irbances' m Uritmii docks, pai
i ularl) I.imdon
Tht Dookars and lltawaiii
Uatn i.. Ormanv.
I Heliiuui and to a leu,
1 iken the
' -ui in acting mi tht Ft !
.- boycott
KcmIci i
I repi .i aetli
the North UI
. puaa i i
ii., ik well Inl
are lo Autii.-t itattva airck hert hold
.' I .1 uffll] I
r Weati
I. Bucctaafulh la dtftri
h irontian *t -
it
OUtd not provul. n- i.
I ,.i -
i win a ii.itii.
N-i-i r i
,
.ii
1.1, i
omplelv n tap
lha.....i
Kvni .if. in.
ild ml) i-
i i iiinniM-i ni American
i ton teak then
rich, liriti.i, hiiM ii ii. i
hat
.i' ibV Rem-r
No Ckmor
Itohilinnship
Wanted
ATT LEE
LOlfDOlS i.
Prime Mm o i laraanl Attlae
i m ' < tht Lujga
ht Hou i ol Cot moi thai be
hould approat h f*n
in MHurr eloati relationahip ba
-Men si...........i uu Atlanta Pai'
l ..null n
He laid he did not think i-lnsei
lelatiunship would strenKthrn aot-
iborai on between Altai I
courttriei aaalnat Bovkd Comntun
Ceoaarvatlw launawl Q*
had madt . ugjSaaUaa In aSt
House in Ihe hghl of ill......
I ikksg international otu.itioi.
Realer.
i .
. iihv
pUll

the
Mokpe

'south%"->i rfp). and Km ..
!N" The 1.....
\..... i I'll hoci;
from Toraadang bul iwforc i,un
- i (avalr*
DtvfcsV bttd t eo nerl i
frap the
Htttagl oT their

. .
avai I lean bi ahead
p iiiist-hei.i
fungrl

i .mk ii,i mti ind uppty em


part to the Stcu
dai "..i i .. of the
United N itlou .i Km. i
with the poll es of thi
nggreaaoi I.....
"Until tht l"i
i i ther ui
Ueagth, the rapiditj with which

i m trthui repot
it had lieen
,
ai
dated bad cootributed naval
I.....
iiiH-.n lustra
1 ..nds had
aaatoi Warren i
th* in,'. i ..
makin* Hi. port puh
rlty <
m lal I
resolu-
hi of luj
Afltl .inn. Ilk no: Iht
at ih. aoutk Kon
place it fun- indai the corn*
md of (. rthor, Mi
-..' Iin ......
the Oaaeral ba Uu
-iRcutcr .

Mrs. McCarthy
Appeals To
Privy Council
.
i full court here thla
..i I..-.
lughtei Vioi-i
led to the Prlw
t.-l-y
apnaaltd
'. Juatiea
21. bad
..i in i child '
fk Patrick
.. bravdled all
n bt U am-
rrlaJdad '<
Ion "' hea aJUVi
which ihi larnaloan cotut hut
I i -,- .

Sin- tl till
tttitu in Ve'eds Ga dgt> is
To Counter Radiation
l.i A I" >N .1 .
Ill A text ImioIi for Civil Defenci ire the
Britlah Ciuvtmmeiu lo-doj Mid protect i-thi
results oi raftto activity is practical > Bach
garden shelters UggfJ in tha I-
ffg|Mllg declared.
In.itcari i,i jja.i mask, ttoirj eon i boa Britain should nuke
dosimeter, small inducts with which m could maasuf)
im the I1114I1 aflOct Ol ladialiui,
------------------------------ rhc taxi bo.....id thai in a
BrrtM orab 'ike tht>-
Thtv lirt'iillii' ,]n- "' "" *"
tnvy nniiiiu .....h0Mi wiai0
m m m 'ft 1-nille lidn thi .iilrc nl
Life Into thv
iiii.n.d : 1
1 11.000 1.>
D
..
Arundell Presides Over Public
Session Of Legislature
Will \ THI list hall w*s hwlrd it Trent Bridjr aaterdaj aaal leha UtaH inounced a uiri for the
West Indies b\ 11 wirkMv -. rr-Md armed with lafaaea *a simins ralyi Hhrrrd nUUIdl
f.oddard h. Breaul Streci.
Mr J. S. Goddard. fathei ni the HJ %kipper kssfcl 1. Ihr lull oti
I Bl -,.*.., 1
RT LUCIA, July 24
In the traditional eolouefull
on Monday. Covern-i(
I Ai 1 tlmt over a public sesdoi.


taaaa in the Wlndwani
1 '.rai ln| wiuening of thi
franrhise. elected majoritv
CXhea rhanres represetulng a ven
considerable constitutior.j!
advance
Universal adult BurTragi
l

. depoatt
of si2n no Impaa




Officer bavini
iddraas the Legilativ
Council at any time and u-
.

of 11
ing Am



1,.
It In Laffkthtlva CeuoeM

1
ih the Govern.
local repronta-
gj aa paf
llrvitthv
*> Into Thv
Paper AUianw"
UfNIwiN J
n dm 1 :
11 to -.. Organi si
a lodai to bn llw
Si "F'..|K-; ' I
lm ill balanced
Ulttv rnaehlm rrotl '
: rinta
1 ii. 1 Inlti .1 SUV- .,' ,
1 1 ifrr.i.i I of 12 Pki
i-~ tod t" nbraat tl 1
llowlng the 1
I itoantratt ta largaat
otolem tJUNcd for thi
1 !( ^>^ in Korean f] 1
The deputies i mini mm ah
ariei M. Sp- (I I
United States Depute

. aMtl PI
lots morning's Nortk Autntl
matting ai


II fiss for their initial a I
\triofiast otaei

I
rk will de-si larberj
n
111 for


.
Htion.
"The Deputies agreed to mee'
dally". rtcutcr
-
net 11 1-
1




II.* !
be removi
ail
marree ..

-

'.




. n tl





neuter


pagi: TWO
BARBADOS ADVOCATE
WCnVESDAT JULY B, 1S5H
W/> QaUinq
GIRL IN THE ?'*
---------------^ of *>
S m :
fivr fahkki the right
this should be
thu corner
h
T
Family
Re-union
Fins g
ii and Mi-
P I) W Moore'of !* R<
: q having
illy rr-nnion.
Uteir daughter*, Pat sad
.i f i oa
3 and
Swiszle and Swish
iiosk who remember lara
OUOg Union* who. during .
i we in their
"Content**, i>Und hopped
. Wetl Indies, will tx-
. i thai :t.c> have just
Mlai
,|i M llli hl'illK i'
,i "in Yaimoulh Ul
KdVl BlUftl and riches
Tr get enough m i-*ey to gel from
i-nt the three voyager*
on odd Jobs The.
Saturday who should be among worked as handymen for Amcr
the pawengerf. arriving by the
GaJRW than their fourth daughter
June, here until September in
June hat been lo England for
four years, two at school, and the
remainder of thv time sin
studying Soeial Science at the
London Behoof Of Economics. She
hopes to finish her training next
year and |hU wil
i. Social Worker
!>:
. net Fn; i-hme- H |hey made
through the West Indie*
Sometime* they ferried, llttlr
ko7* fr.rt
Thej are now out
but trr till without
Up goes the Union Jack or
Goad-rd's ll-a/stan*. Mgnalling tin
\ ictoi>
DR. F. 0. READER, one of the
new Medical Officers at the
General Hospital arrived from
England recently. This office wag
CotBariy known as House Sur-
geon
Dr. Reader was born
town. British Guiana.
most of hi* boyhood life in BBf-
bados and was educated at Ihi
on wand to uland. and
otht i ( n
ihtii rut.
forluniv
Th< Taint <\nitin!" i OWMd
by W I a. < tealork. a naval
architect who U sailing as sklp-
nualify her as per With him nrc Ernest Cham-
berlain, a civil engineer. aSd Don
lit Hodge, a research chemist
On Labour Officer's Rut when they landed at Miami
- -- last week, thev had an esttra pas-
UOUfie lenaer yellow mongrel named
MR F .1 ODLE. Acting Labour Swlrzlc They picked him up In
Inspector, has just returned British Guiana because they wen'
from England, where he has been bothered by thieves, and named
for about three months doing a him Switalc after the rum swli-
Labour Officer's Course with the I"s they met there.
by of Labour He left Bar-
bados on March 2!f and was away
for four months.
Housewives' Guide Rupert and thTBack-room BoyS

for Cabbage an,!
phenes when the Advocate
checked yesterday were:
Cabbage cent, per [t>
Christophenc* 1 cents per ID
,,|,l. RADIO PROGRAMME
Edllonal.. 10 m Pi" ,
rsd*. 11 m amlHirwn
* N i i ** *
k 00 m. !."' !>"*. ''
HwMi 19 M P "> NW. '
I U li iii lino <' Daiwin*.,
(iriitirmrii > MS***
... Mid War* T-lh. Ill III" |
kasta Mowoeasl, i 9 > I
o( Mwmwxi, I 00 |* m Thr N.--
k lit p m Homr *Jr. fl
; H p n, S*-..i. Hnir.. JM 1> ">
goal |
> DaBa
.
Th. ns, easpo half w.y aWwa ih.
ah M da, thsag aWdt SOU
ihuaaas aboM in tho BBsshM. Fall
I aarioMy. ftapaui dasceado "*
wily and $<'* the hanttb. Pt-.'
iog tha tap of sha bin* ho lumi
ih. not iht othor way up " .*"
OhW a. Immediately thoie a
Whmfn The- WiJV
ANAOBAM n u ance Ji
leuen U in. l
III cpitnls Lfl the (list UN '
I guLgla *ord to which cb
Hie text, and insert it i
place of "COMPLETE"
t aameaasM aad oty >
SmC np .;- < 'Oh. to
h t yo. % bM SMfl" h hour *.
riufe ., hi m Rup#r> tMfl.
Marh > pUy n aa i w
dial la* BBS -.r iii &!?
i... h Va ff >t 1
And wtdi r > -1 ., " ..r>
way.
For The Auguat Races
A HRIViNti from Trmidi
?\ yarnn
i Lodge Si-hool, before he went to
England to study Medicine He
>liscd to practise In England lx-
/ore he came out here.
Those Dangerous Bends
esterday morning by B.WI.A
v.ere Mr. and Mrs. D Svnaroo
who are here for the August races.
n George- A frequent visitor to Barbados. Mr.
It spent SMmajoo a ke#n turtlle They
pi Maying n' Indramer Guest
Hi UOi
Returned By "Rodney"
MR LISLE INNISS. Manager
of the Barbados Cotton Fac-
tory, returned from the Southern
Islands yesterday by the S S
"Lady Rodney"
M"
En Ruute To Iceland
R FJ>WAKm,LUNKBTT. wno
Barb'ado-i on May
13th on lonti leave left yestenlay
by H.WI.A for Puerto Rico.
Mi route to Ireland. Mrs. Plunketi
"Ver is rernainliiK on in Bar-
CAHl.K hi Hill betBg put down
along1 the Rotkley coast road.
.Hid workmen digging the trench badOS t"r ., eaUBss) IRO.....
on one side of the road have just Maying with relative
i cached a dangerous corner ju>l Mr. Plunkctt Is Deputy Com-
betorc the Blue Waters site. missioiu-r .of Police in North
Thi.n morning a motorist passing Borneo and before he return-
loaf |bjg road passed a nurse on there he U stopping over in Ireland
tho bend with a small child In a for a fcw wecks visiting hi-.
pram. The pram was sticking out
CRoaswoan
rfc \
J 1 to
g 'u|a
:\ a i r
1 i \~
r
a> ul
II 1
**U a.i.
into the road and she Was stand*
ing on a heap of rubble, talking to
two friends. nVlHbri
No one was nearby to tell them f\
to move on. When the motorist
atked them to. he received abuse
Later in the day another motoi-
jst on hi| way from town came to
tho corner. Blowing his horn, lie
Slowly crept around the sharp
bend.
He got around it to find a bus
coming in the opposite direction.
By this time other cars had come
Up behind him so he could not
reverse He put his car as far as
Ciseible up on the rubble as the
U| slowly went by. But before .Lodge
parent*
crunch ManagerCaracas
*1I||-Nl>
W I A. orticial
u Barbados is Mi.
Braiicn Manager
i arat., Ma !
HWSt end accom-
ic and b,ii>> and
l UM .Marine
Tii
; itonumo Miinii. coin, ii'
S. rnod. ift) II. II..njiii
i. I'uwor lino T m
ciuti i fy pornapo. ia, >
q Courts with Polo iar a.
''
fli
"Invaaion" Continues
'EAWILL i-N ^li
srltfl
. -lill crowded
I children. returning
the long holidays. Yes-
ii'ie were about four
>>. looking very smart
il completely passed him, his car in tl u blazers, who went off, as
wheels slipped oB the rubble and avail .i- .< couple of girl* from
the two vehicles marie slight con- Codnngton High School. To-mor-
tact. '"W afternoon there will be nn-
Genetally when roads arc beinit oii'i invasion of Svawell for tho
mi* up iind especially around dan- I.nlisli Guiana and Grenada
gcrous bends men with flags are flights which are due to arrivo
stationed at either end of the within half an hour of each other.
iboon mote it
il W.T. aor*ico. is>
li CleifDutia c.aaprd wSS ISI
XI. Ona uf pair.
B ArV.n craft. i
3o Ciotd inu> tot cnana* it
gaent
I i> ... iim It iXO It I IHI
i L'-Mh i J I
*. Mtici to i a I'icnic p*u.
S M...-> ". -i, |7I
a A bad place inu. i
10 UUuwn. 141
If. Arehltoeuirui .'.! .li
19 bwtM laoort. (> i. > .v
It Hmneihln*. l-i too boor 111
?u ex ('murr wood. 1*1
Oi*'
IIUI'
..l.l.fl ..
Ul
...
BY THE WAY -By Beachcomber
OF Mrs Mctinrule it has been
well siiid "T" Bee her con-
cede u second portion of Cabbage
a la Reine to an importunate
guest ih to experience catering at
Hi raoat humanitarian"
In order to qualify for Govcrn-
in'ii .1-1 -i tan Mi a ilullai -earn-
ing establishment, Mrs. McGurgle
has already affixed to the neo-
Palladian facade of her house a
small plaque Iteming the words
Ulgate II. Ifufungle reold'd here
June ~Jul\j. 11*40. Whcmvi i |
QovarnnMnl laapaetat is in the
nelghltourhiKKl. her loyal ptArODI
at once develop American nc-ents
Even old Mrs Tulter, who has
lived on the top floor since the
Flood, leans from her window to
civ "Yippee"' in a cracked voice,
litid the shyest roiiiincr, i.d fSSV
Ucman demands iced waduah
v.ilh Ul breakfast. _______ ____
III \iiwrititii Ihnnv front
llomti
nnilE MeQurgla herself h;is
in.ki kmm ^lniiit chai
the menu "1'nlage du Jour has
become "Crvmc W.ihash Kse;i-
lopps de /eau" is now "Vea"
Keimuky," and remains frozen
mutton "Omelette si aerrnain*1
has yielded bo *^>rnaletta Broad-
way.' ,
Thv Rvlurn / lUulhnl
T*"K first visit to England for
live years of Bndhat. the cen-
lorki-ili violinist. wn\
stir musical memories of his last
.appearance here "His .lonin.ilent style of playing
is not unattractive, but there are
regrettable moments when he
appear* to Ik- scraping his bow
aexoas tin- wooden part of his
instrument Sounds hitherto un-
heard mi the concert platform
.ne the lesuii His lampo, owing
tu Ins great age. is on the slow
side, and sometimes there an
long gaps of silence, when soin-
i .: n i n-ins to yield to profound
slundiei Mil!, taken all in all.
this aged virtuoso can hold his
own with any centenarian violin
1st." I understand he will play
at the huge evening party I ai\
Cabstanleigh is giving for Miss
Freezia Guwkinge, whose engage-
ment to Mr. Tony Dr.m. has just
been denied for the thirty-sixth
'line.
Dior'* hiiiuilimi /or a
Bum
HER ambition, she confessed,"
writes a woman with both
ears literally glued to the ground
and tacked down, "was to be the
best-groomed woman."
"Is there an ostler In the
house?" cries jolly Jack Hopkins,
with a light laugh
I Hagao after a *Mt to her
lni''ii'iil III -i-i..li .- i lull..... -i i
-'-'' *Hr*. I .in \..1,|. Tnr hal. In strawbrrr. rulourrg
niaanw. on fcter wa< homr U | w. .. 'n ,
Firat Stop 7 ?"
RUDOLI'H DUNBAR. famoy
West Indian conductor nn*i
clarinet player was In Loimun last
week with some interesting news.
Later this year he intends to re-
turn to the West Indieshu first
visit for ovr 20 yearsand to
conduct a series of concerts. His
first stop will be his birth-place.
British Guiana, where he has two
hair-brothers He will visit each
of the islands in turn, and hopes
to play ami conduct also In Cuba.
Haiti and some or ihe South
American republics
After Thre* Months
MRS. V ROSS PALMEH f
1 .- Pulmas" St Jomes.
I'll hi England for three
months. \is;tuiK relat.'.e. :. once
again in Barbados. Originally
from England, she has now mad*
Harbadot her home
Mac'" Model
MEMORIES came flooding back
to J. It N. "Sonny* Cumber-*
batch, former Weat Indies sprint"
i hamyton last week. With McDon- ,
lid ll.iley he went to the AAA
Championships at the White City.
vhrre in 1839. he was third In the
100 yards event. Ho saw Mac re-
tain his 100 and 220 ran
lor the third successive rear and
in doing so. set up a Champion*
liip record Confessed Mac after-
wards: "I owe most of my suc-
cess to Cumbcrbatch. When I first
saw bbn ruanlni hi ihe West
'idles, I was greatly inipnaaad returned lo Barbados by the
with his effortless style and I de- "Goliito" on Saturday. Mrs. Chal-
errnUkad to model my running on lenor was formerly the wife of
Ins 1110 result you can see for Hie late George Chauenor the
Miurself famous West Indian cricketer
CRVPTOQUOTEHere's how to work It:
AXVDLBAAXR
Is LONGFELLOW
One letter simply stands for another. In this example A Is used
for the three L's. X for the two O'a. etc. Single letters, apos-
trophles. the length and formation of the words are all hint*.
Each day the code lettera are different
A Cryptogram Quotation
NZHS TW 1PP NZUSW
IPF I'JNHZUQ NTWir
NTI PLW IPJCWJU.'
Cryptoqiiote: I p,\T MY DEBTS. BELIEVE, AND
SAI M* PRAYERS POPE.
Hou- nerelp the toi-ch of the lowed
A rapturous ilirni con bcuef. It
. lit..' this Mkal be prim
.
i sa aun o Mi
. set,
1 .Vhttc pui-es beal .Uitc, u'I'O are
LOVE CAST tr'.Tld at fee.
Th's c'osa of hclnqt t.-e -niflht
faotad ' pahl i complete.
id, "i_L "in: '.* i ' *"'**'
Halt
..-. ii. a
loin hi
|i..inti
Hirinis.
.... Olll
I Vorh
Back in Barbados
MRS H. W. CHALLENOR. wife
of the Hon. Robert Chall
C Z Q P I X
;oHH^r;TABueTs
*^at*fcJ3|typi^'-ai
*a-fl n-v-at.v
-' * u
GLOBE
CALLING ALL SCHOOL CHILDREN- TO A
SPKClAI. M MINI I
2 O'CLOCK TlllKSDAV. Jl'I.Y 27TH
TO SEE
\l.i:X\M)RK DUMAS'
"THE THREE MUSKETEERS
Van HEKI.1N Lana TURNER
CB1UMSM anywiieki: 12<\
ADULTS Id 30 40 54c
lubrication is Important I
For prompt and stalled lubrication ilrive your Fordaoo
vehicle in tu us We ire your l\- J .:; tpecialistii and do
the job thoroughly si low hxed price-t. Let us also tell you
all about the latest Thames Tnuks with their big bodies,
roomy all-steel cabs, semi-fonrard conodl, etc You will be
as enthusiastic as we are about them.
FordSOIY Vans ^UmetlLkt
CnARLES MfENEARNEY & CO., LTD.
mik
FOR YOUR SUGAR
FACTORY REPAIRS
We can Supply
FIREBRICKS
FIRECLAY
FIRE CEMENT
STEAM PIPE & FITTINOS
BAR IRON
PORTLAND CEMENT
Stocked by our Plantation Supplies Department
Telephone No. 46S7
*
BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE COTTON
FACTORY LTD.
Jimc!!
Jl VI Mil TIMK
FOn HIS I AMI
RELAXATION
TAME \I.O\1. A MWPiVV OF
MURRAY'S
milk STOUT
EXCELLENT DRI.VK AFTER
f.V THE Hltl.xr
Ml I
Oil IH It IIIHHMS Mil h STOUT
FROM YOrR GROCER
MANNING CO. LTD.Alls
.........I /,w/.-/.-.w-/.w,v.ww/-v-'*'-'/.v-w-


WEDNESDAY JIXY M. l5n
W.I. WIN
3RD TEST
BARBADOS ADVOTATF.
PW.r THRFI
fr
.< i
that Joe llulme. the former
I ntfhsh iritkt-1 and wccer Inter
national, picked Ihrre f ihr
team in in- present worl I
eleven. Worrell. Hr,.,- Mid
Rarrudhin were the (.umt-l
anilies. but Walcolt and Valen-
tine wen- jImi senou]> ron-
i.l. 1 .! fof -.1. i,
CM the riihl wUier places tn*-
land and Australia also had three
each, with India and Ntw
Zealand letting < I'.tIs West Indian cricket nas
.rrr-t^d attention.
It was another Krcy cold aTsOflstad
when pl> resumed with Ramadhin
continuing his over bowling to
Oou.rey tvan* the brilliant Kent
Jin! Knatond arlcaal aasapar. There
*a% only one ball to come and
then bowled a maiden to
Dewes from the pavilion and and
Evans was off the mark with a
;ingie from Ramadhin* first de-
livery in the next over
Another .1 Days
The ball HH it til behaving itself
n this fame-; Tn-hi Bridge
billiard table, refusing the lUghtcsl
1 Isstpnca to the bowlers and
looking good enough for another
In dsqn
Dewes got past the 60 marc
Aith the help of a timely gift of
'our runs He had driven the ball
*ard to cover and started to run
Stollmeyer fielded brilliantly and
hied towards the bowler's end.
bill the throw was wide and hard
nd the bill wen' to the opposite
bcundary
The next over Dewev appeared
to have been dropped at the
wicket when 84. Evan* turned one
from Ramadnin dangerously nenr
to Christian! standing short at
fine leg but apart from that small
incident cricket was now mMnder-
11-. 1: mournfully alone,

Seen

x
1

*
SaGatfei
\f( 5 -
cX. ^ji> !
tUnf Ramadtaln
'< 1 twa K v.t
uit England 101
trig he .\.i r '->

!fl> h:>*


before 1
tMn.
otat further
bfKMcd
Ti.k 1
ta.n. :
0M uf a
Rtmadlun and
eight minute*
dhin had tMJU
I-' in
mfllovi
Umd to make IM
v.' 1.
wlHH. fO
when the Waal IndM
. -
Kae took a comfortable tingdg afl
the fourth ball
Stnllmeyei was also of! the
roaik a, Um tir-t over with an.
'drive from which the
1*11 areni In the direction of third
a li 1. txiwled lo Sinllm.y. r
-min took U. fiom on.' if
'I'll ho >
favoured Tea rum Np In
.n nuHllM *., i II.,:,. 1,.-let
nd Evans for ottoa faal-
.edrd four bye:t,
ml dur-
minutaa of play
rr -urneri Hed-
fer ttira* At 14
H nte- from
w ,
eg
m.nden lo Rtollmeyci Bedser rr-
m.nned oi, and Ra- droi
Kill through a badly spaced covers
..rid took two more by-
turning lh-- fifth delivery lo square
leg
Kae took single off the last
1 aftsa 1
lb n S'ullmeyer
I <'I lies
g
Stollmeyer drove Redder so th<-
.n side of the ljwl. r*i wickai lo
enter double (inures
When Jenkins came on Stol
meyer took .1 sltiglt .and Htm h I
the first boMidary f trv
through u
b..d certal *
n immediate *
length, sen; ilowl
ce*s>vr meiifii
grit .. ungli 1
ovei In
I H. .'!.
to tug It back b
At the .1


Hitaight dl
to 3S Foi
I .ur
I M.I %\|. -I. ..SI. |NS|\(.-
lV*hhi,..k a I V.IM
WyiP rvis MM M
miiM>f 1 h a.-w#rd at
HW b V.ltnlin* St
YaWII... hi ;


D C.-iJurd IJ
w r -ri on 11 iiMMi.
Weekes al Brat lUp
oi a b*d laps*' during tl
when he drup|K-d Evans off
Ramadnin The batsman was then
18 and the score 380 and plav had
been In three-
quarters of an hour. The sun trag
now -hmmg brightly aiul Bvaog
as if .iwakened by Its warmth
came out of his chrysalis to hi;
three fours in two overs, one a
clean sweep to leg off Rainadhin.
one a beautiful square cut off
Valentine ana the other not so
U.iprwiv. a lucky edge through
slip.
En ouiaged by these succesie*.
the Kent man then hit two
boundaries to leg in succession off
Valentine'* first two deliveries In
the next ovci rand the score
past the fourth hundred and
de.ighi the loyal band ol 3.000 or
so enthusiast*.
When SB runs had been added
In an hour. Dewes attempted to
hook Valentine and was bowled
Ju8' II Ha had played a valu-
able if unattractive innings which
'..iilc for strong di'fciiu'
Shadtlflton caaM m and inunadl-
ately employed aggressive meth-
eds sc effoctlve on Thursday.
This tug ne was not so suc-
cessful and gave Weekes a catch
at first slip off Valentine. 410/7, 1.
Evans joinea By Jenkins pro-
teeded to farm" the bowling
; utes. Refusing to be Intimidated
by the position he hud always
lieen ready to puni-fo anv1hir:
looso and kepi alive tl
which was threatened (0
bund itata if left to his colleagues
Evans was eventually well
caujhl ai backward square leg by
Slollmrs-er In a one handed high
overhead catch.
It was a brilliant end to
brilliant inning*. 434/8/03.
Evans had never been reckless
t-iough be never lost opportuniti"-
Irr scoring
His defence was attractively
11 und and there had been nothing
scratchy about his display
FRANK WORRELL
ALF VALENTINE
SONNY RAMADIIIN
REO. SIMPSON
HERE AGAIN
THREE STARS'
SWEDEN'S BEST
MATCHES
OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE.
c.immiv EVANS
-11
m
.
During their Jour of the United
Kingdom the West Indies Test Team
are having their shirts, flannels and
sweaters washed exclusively with
Kinso. This is a service Rinso is
proud to give.
For a whiter, brighter wash use fiinsn.
Kinso's rich hard-working suds soak away
all the dirt m quickly so gently toot
Rinso makes white clothes clean and smart
keeps colours gay. h'or thorough, easy
washing use Kinso every time!
RINSO
WASHES WHITER I
*f
'/ *. 5ofinv amsdhln
7. Ro MaMhilt
1 John Condird (Copt.) 8. Cecil WlflUim
1. "obert Cri'Xtisni Clr* Waleott
1. Linos PMrre 10. CVry Gomel
4 Jeffrey Stoltmeyer II. Prior ktnet
5 EvartOA WeekM 12. AMn Kae
QUICKER!
EASIER!


I'M. I FOIB
BARBADOS ADVOCATE
ui nvi ~i> v^ Ji't.v 2i,. i,-,,
BARBADOS^ ADVtXsffE ]!
rats M BrMf'UwB
Wednesday, July 2>>. lt54l
\\AA. IMIM
THK Wnl Indict cricfceTtMin di
feagland at '1'n'ni Bridft ysatsrdsty iy the
decisive n..1114111 of U'n wickets. This Was
the second Test victory for the tourists and
the win even more pronounced than on the
initial occasion at Lord's. By this victory
the West Indies have not only strengthened
their position as likely winners of the rub-
ber but have removed the possibility of
losing it A single test match remain*; to
be played in this 1950 series, and even if
this ends in a draw the West Indies would
have won thv rubber having won two of
the four games England won the Hrst fit
Old TrafTord. and if they triumph in the
fourth and final game at the Oval, then the
honours would be even.
This is indeed a happy day for Wist Ii.
dies cricket and cricketers There is no
doubt whatever now remaining, that the
day has come when the players from the
Caribbean can meet the might of England,
on English turf on more than equal terms.
The day has perhaps been long In coming,
but its advent in this the Jubilee year of
West Indian cricket visits to England, is
indeed appropriate. To-day the west In-
dian iram has definitely shown its merit as
a fighting ur.it, by outplaying the English-
men in every department of the game. Vic-
tor)' was no freak gift of fortune nor did
the vagaries of the weather present it on a
platter. From the first few overs of this
game the West Indies secured an early
advantage, and held on to it grimly in the
fare of a determined light by tjirlr oppon-
ents. Theirs was no easy task and players
of less calibre might understandably have
wilted when faced with the dogged deter-
mination of the English, a traditional
characteristic epitomised in the record
breaking partnership of Cyril Washbrook
and Reginald Simpson. But the West In-
dies with a leader in John Goddard who
never flinches, also held on tenaciously
until victory was assured.
Interwoven in this memorable victory
are some incidents destined to remain
green as lung as memory lasts First there
is the remarkable bowling performance of
the two youthful West Indies spin bowlers.
Alfred valentine and Sonny Ramadhin.
Almost tirelessly these two toiled against
the English test batsmen and for the third
time laid them low. They routed them at
Old Trafford in the first game, which the
West Indies lost and in the second fixture
at Lord's they proved to be the unyielding
rock against which the English efforts
foundered. Yesterday they reached their
peak by bowling an unprecedented number
of overs and taking eight English second
innings wickets between them. Valentine's
92 overs is the highest number of oral any
bowler has ever sent down in a recorded
Test Match.
The batting of Frank Worrell and Ever-
ton Weekes is on a pinnacle by itself.
another partnership of 283 a record in its
own right. And finallv there was the team
spirit which never faltered throughout the
stern lest of England's praiseworthy
attempt to save the game.
And now the game has passed into his-
tory, and the Wesl Indies have perhaps
surpassed the hopes of their most ardent
supporters.
In the moment of acclaim for their meri-
torious performance, we would wish them
victory in the rubber and full use of the
opportunity to consolidate the position of
West Indies cricket in the world of sport.
Mr- EL A. \< ms.iim
WITHIN .i few monthi of bis appointment as
Auditor OaDaral of thai bland, Mr. v. A Newwn
has Rone into retirement after 42 years service
and another member of this family hm given v\
active public service In the Empire
It was in 1908 that Mr Newsam joined the
Civil Service at an unpaid Supernumerary and
during the yearn that followed he mm ved in tin-
Public Library, the Curium-, the now defunct
Master In Chancery's Office, ti.e Courts and the
Audit Ollk-c. Throughout his career his work
has always been characterised by a thoroughness
which brought him the promotion which he
deserved but which came at a late hour.
While he was serving in the Barbados Civil
Service, his father the lato F.rnet Ncwsam was
accountant in th.- Ocneral Poet Office, his brothei
Mr. A H. V. Newsam was Assistant \lu lei at Ihe
Lodge School, another brother was a High Cos "
Judge In Indie, and >l the Home Office In Lorid
his broth, i Sn Ref* Newsam was
himwif iliitlinijalieil career n* an .
Colonial.
Quiet and nay of appri
for himself the i peel
He found lime during tin
Volunteer Brigade si d it i
that at his appnintmem
General, the Wardens
despite the fad that the Brigade was standing
down, gathered once again to pay tribute to him
and the service which he had rendered this island
in another capacity.
11*
T
n'li Mr Newiera wen
all those who met him.
war to serve with the
vas a tribute to the man
lo the post of Auditor
the various areaH,
During the few months
Ihe Audit Department the
with him as a junior learn*
Ship and advice even mon
Year Off Greatest
Strain
1941 .... THIS IS THE YEAR Winston
Churchill analyses in the volume published today
of the Second World War series' He writes:
"Looking back upon the unceasing tumult of the
war, I cannot recall any period when its stresses
nd the onset of so many problems all at once or
in rapid succession bore more directly on me and
my colleagues than the first half of 1941. . .'
1941 ... A TEAR BORN WHEN "The British
fought on with hardship their garment until Soviet
Russia and the United States were drawn into the
great conflict." The year clothes were rationed . .
a year of defeat in the East___
I did my beat to warn Stalin...
bnl 4'rippft did not deliver
my note
ON June 22. the longest day of ment at this or any ether time
that tumultuous year. Hitler Stalin even vitgceted to me later
invaded Russia Up till the end of on that If |! British were afraid
March. Churchill was not eon- he would be willing to eend rounu
vinccd that he would invade three or four Russian Army
Hut March report" from secret Corps to do U* Job."
agents dealt with the movement Churchill adcit: "It was not in
of German armour to Cracow my power. thr >.gh lack of ship- .V^Z,';* voo
Says Churchill. -To me it ping and other physical facts, to Retailr-iril
Illuminated the whole Eastern take him at lu word "
scene Uke a lightning Hash TIN ea blsj
Hidden movement to Cracow of !*i(atlin"w feeble*
to much armour needed in the a^HUKCIULL did his utmost to
Balkan sphere could only mean l^j Mp ^^ munlUoM ond
Hitlers intention to invade supplierrubber airplanes con-
Russia in Mav. 1 sent the momen- VI(VS
tttia news at once to Mr. Eden In s^,,^ Stahn rable*i:
In Athens. ... .. (l wm, lo mp lnat Grea'
Mr Churchill wanted to warn DriUln couM wi,hout risk land
Stalin of the danger in which
Russia stood On April 3 he sent
Stafford Cripps, then In
"Who is the kvneial of this
division, end does he run the
even null* himself If so, he
aaere ueeful tor football
Could Napoleon have
*
it was
h> made run. in
baaed on many
Man with
high athletic qualifications are
not usually .uccessful in the
higher ranks "
VmS
Mess* Minuter to Pro-
feasor l.indrmann (later
I-.1.1 4'lirrwelli. March II.
I Ml
| AM expelling TOSl to have
S- ready (H ma tonight the
general layout of the imports
programme under different
heads, so that I can see where I
can scrape off with a pencil
another half-n ..limn tons for
ftI -
Itrsl'iiiirHiir
Prime Minister to Food
Minister. M.i.h 1M1.
"f son a rn C enmunal
Feed inn O i.ti
to be adopted II Is an BotM
expression Ngs)sStlve of Com-
munism and the workhouse I
.11 them 'British
Everybody asso-
ciates the word restaurant" with
j rood meal, and they may as
well have the name If they
cannot get anything else"
llorv. -Iljirinif
Prime Minister to Home
Secretary. April 2. 1941:
1SEE note in the Daily
Telegraph thai vou are
in Archangel 25 to 30 divisions, shortly going to make a state-
Or transport them across Iran to ment to Parliament on the
the southern regions of the future of Inn as using Will
." you kunliv ! | ma know before-
comments: "It is hand what you think of saying
Moscow, a mesaage lo that effect
to deliver personally to Stalin
Sir Stafford replied nine days
later thnt he had himself sent a
ting personal letter to Vlshlnskv
ibout the Soviet failure to coun-
teract German encroachments in
the Balkans.
He did not send Mr. Churchill's
letter as he said it might "weaken
the ImprasalOB already made by
^ForeigT. Secretary Eden backed man Mission to Moscow arrived.
Up Crippss view Churchill per- lr rccpUoa wm bletrnk aim
slated His brief note was discussions not Ot all friendly P.
delivered on April 22 might almost have been thought
that the plight in which the
I s.ill rrsrr... ** "; .*-
CHUHCIUI.l. comments now: 'THE GRAND
"I cannot form any final Winston S
U S.S.R
Churchill
almost incredible thnt the head If anything were done
of the Russian Government with threatened to terminate horse-
all the advice of their military racing in lime of war "i ruin the
experts could have committed bloodstock it would be necessary
himself to such absurdities. It that the whole matter should be
seems hopeless to argue with
man thinking in terms of such
absurdities. ..."
When the Beaverbrook-Harrl-
TOMMY IS TOO BUSY
FOR KOREA
It* J. I Oi-Nlrrirlirr
International News Serwtc Foreign Director
THKRK are rtrotsj mdicutmns to-day thai j
Croat Britain has decided against sending j
ground troops to South Korea despite a grow-
ing feeling m the United States that at Igssf,
a token force should be dispatched to the i
bloody battleground.
The decision, if iV actually has been taken,
was reached by Prime Minister Attlee and
his cabinet after profound consideration of
all aspects.
The British Government has no desire to
court criticism or dissatisfaction in the United
States or in the United Nations.
Therefore all measures having to do with
the Korean conflict have been subject to clos-
est scrutiny and consideration.
It is undoubtedly true that Britain is heav-
ily committed in the Far East already.
Her lines are spread thin because there are
vast areas of trouble in the Asiatic world. A
Whitehall spokesman explained that any
shifting of Far Eastern troops to Korea would
imperil local situations.
.1 n:.\ns OX i in JOB
ALLIANCE, by
Churchill. Cassell and
Ud 25s
Memo Ts*
Pray advise me Tell
me on one sheet of paper . .
AcUon tin. day . ChnrrhUI
sped without stint his plth>
memoranda to urge on the
already eacer . Example*:
Telegram*
lAeUen thla dsr> Prime
Mlaister to Ueneral Ismay
aai Sir E Bridie*.
February 12. 1M1:
I SEE a new marking tin
telegram.* i 'Officers Only.'
do not think this is suitable
nnsidering how many people
_..ly one purpose, the destruction who are not officers must be
of Hitler, and my life Is much privy to the most secret matters.
simplified thereby. If Hitler I should like to know the reasons "W
invaded Hell, I would make at which have led up to starting J,
1..,-! | favourable reference to this, but at present I am entirely th,
judgment upon whether my
message, if delivered with all the
promptness ind ceremony pre-
scribed, would have altered the
course of events. Nevertheless, I
still regret that my Instructions
wen- not carried out effectively.
I( I had had any direct eon-
tact with Stalin I might perhaps
have prevented him from having
o much of his Air Force
destroyed on the ground."
Someone asked Churchill
whether, as an arch anti-Com-
munist, he did not consider It
lowing down in the House of
Rimmon to give aid to Russia
He replied; "Not at all. I have
thrashed out in Cabinet first."
IViismiiN
Prime MirlKlrr to < hill
rellor o' the exchequer
May 4. 1M1:-
IS it true that the widow of a
Service man killed by enemy
action on IflSrN gets only half the
themselves pension she would if her husband
vere killed on duty?* i
I'ikew
From a memo to the
Secretary of State far Air
and the ( hlef of the Air
Staff, dated June ?9. 1941:
pVEftY man must hav
Britain's major preoccupation is in Malaya,
where the Communist movement is strong
For almost three years. 70 thousand British
land troops have been on the job in Malaya.
hich safeguarding the great peninsula which sup-
plies the world with one-third of all its nat-
ural rubber and one half its tinboth of
enormous military as well as peacetime
value.
the Devil in the If oust
capon of some kind, be it
only a mace or pike. The spirit
of Intense individual resistance
to this new form of sporadic
invasion is a fundamental neces-
Btt)
"I should l.ke Sir Alan Brooke
to see this minute and enclosure.
and to give me his views about
it Let me a'so see some patterns
of macee and pikes ....'*
Opinion
Prime Minister lo Home
Secretary. July IS 1941:
[ SHOULD like to have my
opinion put on record that
sentence (of five years' penal
Churchill was aghast at the
l.uk "f preparedness In Russia
N i i- mainly a catalogue of
imt it may be doubted
whether uny mistake in history
has equalled that of which Stain,
and the Communist chiefs were
guilty when they cast away all
the possibihues in the Balkans
and supinely nwalted, or were
incapable of realising, the fearful
onslaught which impended upon
Russia."
So far ns strategy, policy,
foresight, and competence are
arbiters. Stalin ond his commis-
sars showed themselves at this
moment the most completely out-
witted bunglers of the Second
World War."
Main rebuff*
ALL through 1841. until
America was at w,n, Mr
Churchill unpnsed I'resident
| Roosevelt of British hopes and
i fears Relations between the two
[leaders were cordial and kindly.
[Mr. Churchill tried to foster the
auk) relationship with Stnlln Hi
says:
"Dut it was not to be. In this
I long Moscow series 1 received
many rebuffs and only rarely I
Lklnd word. In many cases the
flelegrnms were left unanswered ;
altogether or for many days."
"The Soviet Government hail
the impression that they wn
[conferring great favour on us
by lighting In their own country
(tor their own lives. The more ,r(n,,,i,
ItW) toujpst, th* heavier our debt
hasanM This was not balanced
Jview. ."
,f Com- unconvinced that it should con- servitude on Miss Elsie Oi
tinue saying to two soldiers that Hitlc
Allllt lit * was a good ruler, a better man
Prime Minister lo Se tar* of Stale for ffeaW. -v>' 'r xpressions of opinion.
February 4. 1S4I : however pernicious, which are not
PLEASE see The Times of accompanied by conspiracy.
February 4 Is it really ">'' 'Nothing in the internal stale
lhat a seven-mile cross-country of the country Justifies such
run is enforced upon all In this unreasonable and unnatura-
division, from generals to pri- severity. I consider such execs
vates* Does the Army Council Bbfl action defeats its own ends."
think this a good idea? It At the end of one appendix.
looks to me rather excessive. Mr Churchill adds drily: "I
"A colonel or a general OUfjbi print thes details to show how
not to exhaust himself in trying difficult it is to get things done
to compete with yOtSBfl !"'= run- even with much power, realised
nlng across country seven miles need, and willing helpers."
at a time. L.E S
PEOPLE: I eoulclii*< I mj
doctor to lake mv advice when
he was ill"
QVOTES on some Deserved the title with which I
famous personalities: acclaimed them of 'Snlamande*.'
*> HARRY HOPKINS: "that Both thrived In the lire, and
extraordinary man. His were literally shot to piece- uith-
was a soul that flamed out of a out being affected physically or
frail and failing body He was in the spirit. ."
a crumbling lighthouse from
which there shone the beams
that led great fleets Ul harbour
He also had a gift of sardonic
1 .ilwajs enjoyed his
company, especially when things
went ill. . "
a> I. OR n BFAVFRBItOOK
"Was . (in 1841's dark
December), as usual In times of
optimistic He declared
that . once the whole fore*)
of the American people was
diverted lo the struggle, results
.\ .,...,N.| (. would be achieved fur beyond
W* CTM""1 *r,f1"* anything that had been projected neya. To his unfail
HY was there no Second or realised. There would bo probably we my life
Front? Churchill says: "In enough for all.
the autumn^f 1941. we had no judgment was right
mastery of the enemy air over LOU) LEATHERS. Minister could he always counl
Europe, except in the Pas_ de 0f War Transport from inphcit obedience
*) (.IMKAI. AlCHINLECK:
"I had not altogether liked
his attitude in the Norwegian
campaign at Narvik. He had
seemed Inclined to play too much
for safety and certainty, neither
of which exists in war. . .
However, i had bean much bm-
pri i twifll his personal quali-
ties, his piesrace and high char-
LORD MORAN (M
Churchill's medical adviser t:
came on all my Jour-
g care 1
Although
i could not persuade him to tak>
my advice when he was ill. nor
on my
his
I'ln i) he was head of
t-iT who had served
I lo value his frieno-
than they had done
^ reputation grew instruction*, we became devoted
CM of the four years friends. Moreover we both sur-
. Leathers was vived. "
i help to DM _m the s> HESS t (. v ,. r atloched
iii the psst lb- was (or them, one of a team
called upon to render leryica to the general
punk Hi;, ihoioughness won him their rw|
and ins manner, then highest regard. Into lm
retirement he carries the l>est wishes of UsBSff
and other members of the public for manv more
and happy yean.
Calais, where the strongest Ger- \tay g fj
man fortifications existed The With every
landing craft were only a-build- that passed
mg. We had not even got an Bn immense
army in Britain as large, as well conduct of the war Several anv tfjoui
trained, as well equipped a the times when all staff and depart- this s*3eapadM I kn.-w H had no
one we shffAild have to meet on mental processes had failed to relation u> the inarch of event*
solve the problems I made He came to us of his own
and mil. u personal appeal to him. and the free will, and though without
this difficulties seemed to disappear authority, had sumethlng of the
. as If by magic. quality of an envoy. He was a
hope s> Generals FREYBERG and medical and not a criminal
The British estimate that they arc spending
a hundred thousand dollars a day to maintain
the Malaya force and pay for its operation
They have the equivalent of four full divis-
ions or more on combat status and the Brit-
ish Treasury severely feels this drain.
In addition, there is Hong Kong.
Troops on battle duty there now total 38
thousand men. Anti-aircraft protection has
been stepped up to a degree comparable to
London at the height of the Nazi blitzes and
the British are convinced that any hostile
Communist action there would meet with a
hot reception indeed.
So far as Korea itself is concerned, Britain
dispatched her Far Eastern fieet to Korean
waters immediately after President Truman
decided upon the first American air and nova!
action against the Communist invaders.
This is a sizeable force. It has been in
action along with United States units in bom-
barding enemy shore positions and troop
concentration and while no naval clashes
themselves have been reported, the presence
of strong Anglo-American detachments
doubtless has served to discourage whatever
naval force the North Koreans may have.
Mill I Vl\ Ml I AI OM
Prime Minister Attlee is expected to ex-
plain the situation in detail later in the week
Britain is nol alone, of course, in being
handicapped with regard to the Korean war
France has half a million men devoted to
the civil war in Indo-China and the cost
maintaining this military establishment
forms a major part of the French budget.
Holland likewise has heavy commitment-
In Ihe Dutch East Indies.
The argument that each of these three na-
tions can put forward is that in the over-all
picture, their defence of Asiatic areas is fully
as important as quelling aggression in Korea.
They can point out that a weakening of
forces in any area would be like pulling
plug from a dike, enabling large and well-
equipped Communist hordes to sweep Into
vital regions and put an end to any hope lhat
iho Korean war itself can be localized.
It does not seem likely that the United
States will put any pressure to bear
on Great Britain, and the United Nations un-
doubtedly will take Britain at her word when
she says she is sending "al> possible help" t -
Korea.
HI! HAVE Jt ST RKHVIIi
SPARE PARTS
FOR
COLEMAN Products
We Will he pleased lo repair >our LIMPS. LANTERNS,
STOVES and IRONS if you htmc Ihrm to us.
ALSO
A Shipment of .
SNOWCEM
in dW Mlowttl ..lours:
\WnL\ ( r'lin I'ink. YHlow. iml TrriMrolU
WILKINSON & HAYNKS CO. LTD.SMCMMM I"
C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD.
MOM : tun, 4472. HI ( KH1TII STORES
\VflWNATIO^/
BBS US FOR OUR NI.W KANGF. OF:
INTERNATIONAL .nun chalking)
QUALITY PAINT
LACO.MAT (Flal Oil Paint) in these attractive shades
of Pale Blue, Pink. Grey. White, Cream
LAGOLINE (Nan Chalking)
In Undercoatlng* and Finish
In Light Stone : Light Buff : Teak : Ivory : White :
Grass Green : Mayfair Green : Sea Green : Navy Green :
French Qrey : Lead Colour
ALUMINIUM PRIMKKS FOR WOOD
YELLOW PRIMOCON (Primer for Aluminium)
CEMKNT AND PI.ASTKR PRIMER
DANBOLINE (Anti-corrosive) in Red. Gray, (ireen
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DaCOSI a A < A grill*
i.iii.
Prtnch soil.
"Vet Niagaras of foil;
Hateineiit still pour out or
question of the Second Front
'There wss certainly
<.f eonvlncing the Soviet Govern-
CARTON DE W I A R T: ami should be ko regarded. .
This may include dispatch of troops from
Australia. The Dominion's Premier, Robert
G. Menzies. has been in London talking with
British Defence Chiefs. He is known to br
anxious to do whatever can be done to safe
guard the Far East, particularly the island
of Australasia where Australia's main inter-
ests lie.
But Tommy Atkins, it appears at the pre
sent, is too busy elsewhere^INS.
[ WE DO IT
ALL
THE
TIMES!
OIH IK I AIM Its SAY:
Trinitlml t.tilh Th,
Cinvmit Tunr
To The L'dtior. 7
!",-l4hC 1!, P""*,11 mu!t * l'7riL< jc,urc wnich mft>' h- <-'""" owners have sn unduly cinemas through ihe Department go wrong before tue advent oi
pointed out that pictures .how., ad ertlsed poor opinion of the public which of Education. 5U| during the past The motion picture. Thanking
in most of the West Indmn Islands It must be realised that the Ihey serve"; nor is il true that vear lt] numb-r receive,! ha* vnu for nsee
are distributed by the ProdueW revenue obtained from Alms "apart from (Urns which depict consideribl" cSmlniini
. the through ihelr effflOM in Tnnldad. show,, In Ihe West Indies is inlln- the eternal triangle the only OOtt
caption "Cinemas and Education", that the Clnomaa must therefore Itesimal compared to large couii- which ssjaaa to nuvt with the
which Bppoand In last Sunday's show what is supplied to them ,ri<^. nd il the majority of approval uf cinema magnates are
\m ".,te'. and appeals for the from Trinidad; and the number '"""""a-goers in those countries those which portray violence and
exhibition uf a high standard of ,,.-.,,,,, nletunw nrodur-J Patronise the type of pictures sudden death." On the contrary
i: '"dur,^ wn -*t be given
trying to attain this end; but It "*"" ''_, !": 1t,. _*i monotonous regularity, that would credit for wanting lo show Alms
is evident that the manner In m*n*t P*01"* ,hlnk '' ? "l SSSni to be the answer as to why of n high standard,
which pictures are obtained for P05*10- .as mp. I*0?}*;_ fondly tht> are produced in such large Regarding educational
the local cinema is not under- "**. ''i^e to various parts numbers, and such films are not (short subjects), these
.-t<"! ot the world sgfd obtain any ond shown locally because "most be supplied frequeuly t.>
While It is argued thai In re-
cent years the cinemas have
mad tot 'v.'ivthing that
Is wrong with the comrmmily, it
should be realised that in most
pictures there Is always a moral.
and that a strong point Is nude
USBS Of Ihe fact that crime does not
:ed to pay. It would be Interesting to
the know what made the community
Yours very truly,
CARIBBEAN THEATRJBS LTD
(Operating PLAZA Theatres)
PSf
(R. N. W. Glttens)
Director
THE BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB
per
(H. P. Spencer)
Secretary.
llf.V
rtcsw
i/r/r/Mv
mill
t.oitiniurs
t.Oi.lt Hill lit
III M
S,1AA*AV.V,'SSsV*V.'*:V.V>'>-


vvrnsEsnw m.v m. ltsii
BARBADOS ADVOCATE
rsoi nvi
Lorry Driver Acquitted
Of Manslaughter Charge
AN ASSIZE JURY yesterday acquitted Julian Green-
idge. a middle aged lorry driver of a charge of the man-
slaughter of 70-year old Rosa Small but found turn guilty
of the lesser count -daoMTOUl drivln| ift*T I l
trial Tlie MM occupied the attention of the Court I i
the whole day and did not finish until late in the ex
Small was fsUllv Injures! on llMfk OMM K.....I .,n. ll.r
'bus from which she had ju-i slier, ted mm alrurk b lorr* romlni I
from Ihe oppt.lle direction. Ttae lorry wa loaded with rsnra '
aad sIm iMvrtinc an inwut of labourer*.
a reasonable doubt Greenidge i
entitled lo it. But they also ha<
another dut> a duly to
Hi. Honour the Acting Colo:
Justice, Mr. O. L Taylor, njemoe-j
over mc Court Counsel for thw
-. .IKK Wall Ht
K.C associated with Mr J S B,
Daar. Mr w w. Km.. K c.
Solicitor General, prosecuted, on
behalf of the Crown
After hearing the verdict, Mr.
Walcott told Hi* Honour that they
would now forget about the count
of manslaughter as the offence
with which he was found guilty
was now one which could be tried
by a Police Magistrate.
Hi- Honour postponed sentence
and placed Greenidge on a per-
sonal bond of 10.
As the caw returned Sgt. Gas-
kin, main Polite witness for the
I'l I- ...!. ' In Ml
MM
Visited Scene
In reply to Mr ltvet-c Sj(I Gas-
kin stud Uiai he had visited tho
scene of the accident on the pre-
vious day and had made another
check of the measurements.
He would now say that the
measurement from the rear of the
lorry which he had said previously
was 22 feet. 4 inches, is m fa. i bb
feet that is the vehicle was
further away.
At ihi* stage Mr. Reece told His
Honour thai he was calling no
more witnesses for the Prosecu-
tion and this closed the Prosecu-
tion's case.
Mr Walcotl called no irtttsMMI
for the defence. In his address
he told the Jury thai of course
they had heard that Greenldge
was accused of unlawfully killing
Rosa Small.
Mr Reece had told them In the
opening thai thev had to lind a
high decree of negligence. It is
his duty as Counsel for Greenidge
to go through the law and present
the facts
He would start off. before weary-
ing them with the law, by saying
that the horn was blown before\
Greenidge drove the lorry around
the curve, he changed the lorry
Into third gear to reduce the
upeed and then after all this he
finds himself confronted with the
'bus stopping In a place where it
actually was not supposed to stop
-that is. nowhere near the Bust
Stop At a curve is a place where
vou would call dangerous to the
travelling public and the 'bus was1
standing an Inch over tho ten foot
mark
"Bad Liar"
He submitted that the 'bus
driver is a liar and not only a
liar but a bad liar. If the bus
driver had stopped where he
should have done for Small to ge(
off there would not have been an
accident and Small would have
been alive today.
Both drivers should be on trial
If the 'bus driver had stopped the
hus at such a spot like that, then
why should Greenidge have W
face such a serious charge ?
He submitted that if there was
iwgUMoca on the 'bus driver-
part according to law he was als.
guilty. He said time when the
l-uiniiu-Mini.T of Highways put "l>
Stop Poles he regarded them as
where the 'buses should stop. The
Commissioner takes such things
as the length of the 'bus and stop-
ping at wrong places into con-
sideration because he knows they
rould create a danger
The Commissioner had placeT
a Bus Stop around thai' same
< irner for 'buses going in the
direction of Relic Gully with the
result that drivers of vehicles
coming from the Pine were aware
that they were going to encounter
this 'Bus Stop.
These were the facts but he
watntot to go through them piece
by piece and if things were
brought out in his speech that they
did not understand they Could pay
another visit to the scene of the
accident
He submitted that if Greenidge
v. as not driving too fast then they
would have to say that he was
driving too much in the road when
ho should have been hugging more
to the gutter and In that case he
would still have struck the old
lad?.
Si|i of the Rum
In dealing with the Cacti at
Walcott rlrsv brought the attention
of the Jury to the point on drink.
h.. said thai there was nothing
in this but It was to be noted that
the men were cutting cane* fi
Lower Esvate They finished work
at midday and Greenidge had
told them all about how the tup
bottle of nm was nought but he
did not tell them that he had a
sip of that rum. He was putting
te them that if Greenidge wa*
drunk he could not have driven
that three and a half ton load or
canes and the labourers on the
platform of the lorry.
Mr Walcott then pointed out
the various curves and corners that
Greenidge would have to encount-
er before reaching Howell's Croat
Road. He said that if Greenidge
was drunk the labourers would
not drive that far with him.
While referring to Sgt. Gaskin':
evidence Mr Walcott then showed
the Jury the plan that Sgt. Gaskin
had drawn. He said that in cases
nowadays hey usually had photo,
graphs and if they had photo-
graphs in this ease they would
go a long way in bringing o,ut
certain point.- The Sergeant had
given his evidence wrongly be-
cause he did not bring his memor-
andum or notebook.
With reference to speed Mr
Walcott said that there was no
man living that could ju.i,.
Mom 11 feel ahoad .ni.l one of
. was trying to t II
them that she could give tho
.-peed of the lorry. This witness
was Odessa McClean and she had
also said that the 'bus had stopped
for about three minute*
pointed out that this
material point buV that he would
come to it later.
Correct Sides
Isaiene Harding, another
were on their correct sides and ha
was saying that if that was so how
could they collide At this stage
a shoe, adjournment was taken
On resumption Mr Walcott told
the Jury that it was hard address,
ing them because they could not
answer back but if they made a
mistake they could not redeem
It. It is difficult for them to ur-
aerstand the facts of a case and
Mr. Reece and His Honour and
himself weie trying to show them
That is why he on the other hand
was trying to show them that the
facts of the Prosecution could
not be true.
He '.'old liiein not to return a
verdict of "guilty'" because one
person had told them to say thai
and do nut say "not guilty" be-
cause* they are advised in that
direction. He pointed out that it
some of them were neglecting their
duty as jurymen then it would be
a shame for them to stt there.
Reviewing the evidence he said
that Ernest Johnson who is em-
ployed on the Governments
Waterboat and was a passenger
tn the 'bus in his evidenco had
said that the lorry was on the
left going around dm curvf. John-
son had said that the distance
from which he had judged tho
speed was about 18 feet nad the
lorry was moving swiftly. He
pointed out that two witnesses fr>r
the Prosecution had said tnat the
lorry was on llip left therefore Ihe
Prosecution could not ay that it
was on its wrong side. 1
"Alarming; Lie"
As for the evidence of S.muiel
Rouse, driver of the 'bus Mr
Wakotl said that he is such a
liar that he even lies for the
Prosecution. He would not say
that he had s.upped to let off pas-
hCMJgff. The most alarming lie
was when Rouse had said that he
had heard the rumbling or the
lorry.
He pointed out that if the lorry
;.s doing 20 miles an hour and
the "bus had Btopped for three
minutes, according to Odessa
McC*?an. then when Rouse heard
roar of the lorry it,' would have
been a mile away somewhere out
by the Pine bottom or turning into
he main road. He said that that
as three witnesses they could
not take Into consideration.
Another alarming lie Rouse told
is that he did not stop the 'bus
long enough for the old lady to
.-'light Fitzccrald Walcott in his
evidenco said that the distance
Lelween the lorry and the This
was 25 yards and under cross-
examination ho said 25 to 90 fceV
Going to Walcott's evidence it:
May h* aald that the lorry was on
the left side and at the present
Assizes he said that it was on
ether side
Why Not?
Evans Elcock was travelling
lop of the canes and he was saying
that the lorry was going so fast
that a chicken could not cross the
read. Mr. Walcott asked. Why
then was he not thrown off?"
He poimfcd out that Rouse was
a protective liar while Elcock was
a vindictive one and he put it to
them that u was because Green-
idge spoke to Elcock and his wife
earlier and told them that If they
did not behave he would put them
off the lorry, that Elcock was
making these statements.
Elcock must have been in his
.. ee when the accident occurred.
It was hero that he would get h>
chance of revenging Greenidge
Elcock was also telling them that
he had his foot against the prop
thai* struck the 'bus and vet
Elcock's foot was not injured. "Hi
an obvious liar", said Mr
Walcott.
In dealing with the evidence of
Alvin Shepherd, Mr. Walcott said
that Shepherd had said that he
was going to catch the 'bus After
he saw the lorry he ran bnck
High |K-Kre>
lie load law
lne.l inn I
all that they had hcam
Witt. Nuwslau nagUfssnai must be high When
I that negligence is so culpabV
that 11 shows the disregard for
t pedestrians then it is a ease of
nigh degree of negligence.
The Court at this stage adjourn
ed for lunch. On resuniut; n M
Ml through th. avsdtfsea
of witnesses for ihe PlOaOCUtlOi
With regards to Rouse, he salt
thai Rouse had said thai he had
stopped his 'bus because he
heard the rumbbng of a motor
hiele and there was no evlttanea
to say that he did no: Hi- dm
) that before the Polio
Magistrate.
Bet.nise he did not tell th
Police Magistrate this it did not
mean that he was telling lies
Dim repiineie- ,11. .'... : ti.
variations were <>( a different na-
tUM and certainly did not affec*
Ml lOUt*]
Whether Rouse stopped to hand
it a parcel or whether he stop-
ped to let out a passenger that
does not matter the point was that
he stopped The witnesses called
by the Prosecution gave a com-
plete picture of what took place
They said that they saw the lor-
oming down the road vcr.
fast It struck the 'bus and the
people on the lorry fell off.
He is submitting that if Green-
dge was driving like a lunatic
>r a lamb before the accident
that did not matter, the point fo.
them to consider was how was he
dmlng when he collided with the
tin-
Guilty ?
Allei Outlining; further rUililr
of the witnesses. Mr. Reece said
hat there was once a COM wtaWi
man was driving a pony can
and lying ln the bottom of the
The cart knocked dov,
and he died. The driver
found guilty of manslaughter.
If a man was driving through
Baxters Road on a busy Saturday
night at five miles per hour and
ked down and killed
someone he could be charged with
anslaughter.
He told them that if there weru
satisfied that Greenidge was driv-
ing with a very high degree Of
negbgence then they will find hu l
guilty of manslaughter but If the..
had found that he was only guilty
of driving a little bit reckless
then they would find him guilty
the second count of reckless
dangerous driving. They
ill id him guilty of this providing
there Is great negligence. Th!i
second count is purely a statutory
offence.
Summed Up
His Honour then summed up
He defined manslauithler. He told
Hit t.. that they had listened
two very able addresses by coun-
sels and this was a great advan-
tage to both Judge and Jury.
You have listened very care-
fully to the addresses and have
heard Ihe points for the accuseu
and also the points for the de-
fence", he said, "but this is not
an easy case."
After going through the evi-
dence in a summary which lasted
nearlv two hours His Honour told
the Jury. "If the negligence of
the accused went beyond such a*
to have disregard for human life
you can come to the concluslr-
thnt he is guilty of manstaughu
otherwise, bearing in mind that
he was driving recklessly, you
will find him guilty of that of-
fence and if you feel that he was
not driving recklessly or danger-
ously, you will And him 'not guil-
The Jury retired at 4 40 p
id a few minutes before 6.40
returned with their verdict
Tippinge Is
New Harbour
Master
Commander H Gartside Tip-
ptngo <>I1F loyal Nsvj Re-
tired I. ha* temper .irlly I
lh afHtolntmenl off Hnrtotir
M utt H n .ildos
Rtder Tipping** was born
Ch. galre. England. Ho
.veil aval training si
the Royal Naval College. Osborne
and then at Dartmouth He v enl
to sea In January 1913
After spending 38 years in the
British Naw. h* served foe two
years on ihe Admiralty Civil List
His last appointment was Fan il>
Welfare Officer for the Devonporl
Port Division which appointr.enl
he held for two and a half years
Ih . igued in 194
ai ihe end of Wort* I
.inmander Tippinge had rea hod
I rank of Lieutenant
He nsutttl World War II as
Commander of a destroyer cann-
ing out convoy duties.
On retirement. Commander Tip-
pinge went to the Bahamas t)
live There he was living on the
estate Three Bays in the island
Elulhera. which .. i snMa OS i"
American
The cut.' ** bonghl by Co-
lonial Development Cornor.dioo
and he decided to go to Jamaica
From Jamaica he went on to
Trinidad. Tobago and Grenada
before coming to Barbados. He
liked Barbados best and derided
lo settle here
Turks Discuss
Korea
ANKARA. July 18
The Turkish Cabinet t.*lj> heM a
haattl] -ummoncd meeting which
political observers believed dis-
cussed what form ltd to South
Korea hould UUM
Many minister* arrived In
special plane from provincial
towns and holiday resorts
President Celsl llayar confer-
rad with the Tuikish dgltgata
io the United Nan ma, BeUm
Sarper. who WM leaving by air
tor I-akr Success tonight
Reuler.
COTTON
{REAS
CHANGED
Because the Cotton 1
Barbados u nut as largo
in 1906. a aR-up ka the airangi
meiits Bar lnfp*eU<
>'f the island II
Is thought necessary, an
end was pti^n*
House of AsaembK ><
The Hill was piloted through thv
Mr F L WaJ L)
The Sale of Cotton Act IBOti
cguirt* the Vestry of each Parish
to nominate and appoint an In-
spector of Cotton for each Parish
In 108 the acreage under Cotton
five thousand acres uhereas
at the pgaaaal tor..*. It tali
hundred acres
he lt.ni.ad!* Cotton '
autaUan hum
iriati.'n* to the Go.
that in view of ihe changed
IBcaa Of the !ndustr>. the
uuand should \f rodUead Into mi t
areas as the Director of Agricul-
ture may think fit and noj n>
p.u .she- .i- heretofore
The power to appoint as mat >
In-.l-'. iirs as may be neeessar> on
the recommendation of the DtrOC
lor Of Agriculture. f..i ..m-ir.
out the provisions of the Act i-
vested in the Govrrnor-in
Executive Committee.
The rates of pay are ie.re.i-.
to eight eenls per hundred pound-
2 This Bill iv intended to glv.
effoct nerordln glv.
Choral Society
Sings The
"Revenge"
TUB atata asarii oa Uh
Choral s. i amane I
* tl r Oosnbiriuora H
Thursday evening, tltfa Jnl. art)
be the Choral Ballad Th<
Ilevente" by Sir Charles Stanford
The trardi of Tannyi
story at the tight of the -Revenge
and Ihe Spanish flee! of 53 ship*
natk by sir charieyj
Stanford, and all music lovai
ha\c ihe opportunity of baMBuaj
this work which is bein^
dataal )n Barbados for the fli .t
time.
Other i! ritNO I'ART HON.-
a"a"aa".".V.VaV.".V.V%
81 FOR THE COMFORT OF YOUR 81
_ PETS ....... USE D
" PUHI.XA LICE POWUEH and
PI IIIM IXMII Kll I I II
H. JASON JONES S CO. LTD a
^ D.ttribulot.
' aaaia*|
rmtD Mr P. A K Tiiche;
1


HulUluil... Art Basrlai


C Uta-a
BalUdr m \ v as
m-iniri'Ai -
a* .1 n An <-im.a pagi
SoOl.!. fit r haltlr o Jr An H -
II. .. tn M .-1
-'ll 1H.I *
aVaV
Mr. Factory Manager
LET US IIEI.P YOU WITH TOUR FEPAfR PROBLEMS
IV* can -uaply th* following n 8TOCK
BOLTS NTJT8
Iron a Bright Steal All dreg
BEARINO (Pluninwr Block)
SKT BALL .nd Oaal Iron Braes
aabai
l-IRE CLAV. BAPri.F. BRICKB. rtc.
MORE LAND
ATSEAWELL
iruiGgniH
Bsgasgabati
#** BARBADOS l-WXIBBY i.ul.
IIEADQUARTERH i i ALL PACTORY AND PLANTATION
SUPPLIES
The HOU
i] pasaad
Executive t
portlo
lation
Planta
of Assembly yestei-
Hiil authorising the
nmlttaa to exchange
of land at Sea well Plan
portsoni . m for the purpuse .' '
Si ..
lending the runway
Mi !> 1> >.....lei look oppor
tuntt) io urge the Qovsnunan
t.. iiiinish the inaiiagei ot B> 8WI I
with a bOUBO at Dodds Planlatioi
.i ..f gMn| bun travelUr
allowanea i( thai .is done. Mi
Garner said, ihe manager who wa
an efficient man would be able V
canv out his duties more efflci
ently.
Assize Diary
TO-DAY
a. 32. Rev vs. Mildred
phiuips
The last ,
endar.
the
II\ THE HOUSE
YESTERDA1
An i i'ii<->-
fa*
i
BOabHihwiP
No Order. I*-)
BaUbushnoal Tfn.
ISftO
No
!
IPrn.l
H* i
.Aii,."Uiiii-iiI
Th* PnwUHi.
lAsseaaWMNKI No I Drarr i*o
i swing 'ioiihi. *< n
M. A.l.n. a^'h.Oon p.>nr
Ihr OrS. mutMi TM Civil BsUHV
Orow 1SW' no.dr .
UH on x\\r i)th d
qI July, ISM. nnd*> ui- pr.
.., wed* I al UM CrvU *ab*i
Bridgetown
Celebrates
From Page 1
Cars were decorated with
miniature Union Jacks and seme
bicycles that passed through thn
city also carried iI.ik
One mauby vendor in a fit of
enthusiasm dished out the entire
contents of his tub free of
charge.
Vendors of Sweepstake tickets
used the occasion to bolster tie
sale of their wares. This is What
they said"The West Indies wir
de cricket, people all buy a twwp-
stake ticket."
The town office of Messrs Radii
Distribution Ltd. erected a ipeake
outside the office at Mnrhill Stree
and a crowd wa* gathered there
One West Indies supporter held
large bottle of rum aloft and with
Ihe fall of each wicket "llrcd one1'
t he look pains to see thai only
indulged from time lo time
this luxury.
In Speigthstown a proc*.
workers headed by Radio dene.
ex-Barbados middleweight star
paraded down Church Street and
Queen Street and dually olnppe-l
at Heywood's Woods when they
celebrated the West Indies victory.
A feature of ihe picnir was the
fact that all Speightstonun- who
had supported the Englan.
h.d to wear black ties and serve
the drinks but were not allowed to
drink any themselves
At OUtin Town. Christ Church }
Whenever you feel discomfort sfter
mesU. KM aacfe iwo Realties, one
after the other As they diM>lve,
their btMBRad blen.1 of .m.-ul
tngtediemt BOM u*ilii to where
ihe trouble lies, and OBnacai yxir
acidity. You nm always -title
"""hie from add rnmath im-
mciliatrlv. if you mrry a lew Retimes
ihn ic wrapped vcparatelvt in your
DOOM t lamlhug ll they don't give
you rraWf, H*l time vou taw your
doctOf tict Reiunci at any iltcmiii
DIGESTIF
KENNIES
I
; .. ,|.
I
IMS
'
v .......we, lato-
'. Fiwi
. ..n Ihr ISIh is) -1
i 'lir orovi-inn. of wvlUh
I .inMIOii'.i-nl Art. ItW
i
l-t -The FM...... 'I
Hi lAmendmriiii No
mmOf by thr- tl'r 13."
I Mi), under the pmvuiw.
..'. I'. ...:...,. A.'
inr Mm
i.mat...
ISM.
. Kiliiml- ISM SI.
n Ihr -hMnl. t... . RsoohiUon '"' i "
l Hi .. 1M0SI.
because lie eould see that Aero
was going to be an accident.
Mr Walcott further said that
Shepherd had said that he was
pproaehing the rear of the 'bus
but under cross-examination he
took ill so he did not worry to
cross-examine him further.
Dtscrepanciei
Other discrepancies in itie evi-
dence of witnesses for the Prose-
cution were brought out by Mr
Walcott
He next told the Jury that he
had gone through the evidence
with them and thev had to keep
what Aey had heard In mind
There were three verdicts they
could give. One was manslaugh-
ter, the other was dangerous
c'riving under tho Motor Vehicle
i.nd Road Tragic Act-and (3) if
the evidence is such that you can-
convict him or if the evidence
uch that you have a reasonable
doubt and since the law compels
you A> give that doubt to Green-
idge. you cannot convict him.
Mr. Reece, addressing the Jury
for thr ProsccuUon. said that then-
was no camera, nobody walks
around with a camera and noboriv
knew that the collision was goiuu
to t.iko place. It |H Impossible for
a man to retain the ptctsn
M. tie in his mind.
As an example he said that once
a great lawyer a K.C. taw a col-
lision and his version was differ-
ent from the others. Because wit-
nesses may give slight variation-
and differ slightly that does not
mean that they are liars.
6 Months
For Wounding
DENIS WALCOTT ot Lodge
Road. Christ Church, was sen-
tenced to six months' imprison-
ment at the Court of Orand
Sessions yesterday. Walcott was
found guilty earlier in the Anises
of maliciously wounding Madoline
Forde._______________
Jail Sentence
tor Habitual
Criminal
His Honour Mr. G. I- Taylor,
Acting Chief Justice, yesterdaj
imposed three years and four
years' penal servitude, lo run con-
currently, on Joseph Webster.
Webster was also sentenced to
five years' preventive detention
for being a Habitual Criminal
there was no publir celebreti
and cricket fans were content to
gather in quiet groups nml cele-
brate the Test win.
But in far Gall Hill, a less
known district in Christ Church
there were flags and bunting on
shops and private residences
4 .). ' arovfl i
item Act, in"
... .upl*<""'
Su|>|>lrmri.
No II t.....
i i '
I" -""Pi-........
..< II 0BB4UI
. | .,,---
N" 7 *hi I .
> tlir (in.
WATCH FOR
"THE
KED
SHOES"
FOR ALL CLASSES OF
INSURANCE
CONSULT
A. S. BRYDEN & SONS
PM LTD.)
AGENTS FOR
NA TIONAL EMPLO YERS
MUTUAL GENERAL
INSURANCE ASSN. LTD.
The Weather
TO-DAV
Sun Klses: 5.39 a an.
Sun Seta: I II I in
High Water: 12.39 a m
Mi p m
Moon: (Full) 2lh
VKSTFBDAV
Rainfall: It adringU.nl Nil
Total for Month to Yester-
day: i in*
Temperature: iMax.l if t
Temperature: 'Min.i
Wind Velocity: II mile- Bgff
hour
Wind Direction: ft. by N
Barometer: i s m ) 30VI3.
(S p m.) :'< 943
.. i..i '. aiolnlnt
|alltta> Station at Hall......
A Hill to |.r.vnli- lor Ih- qusnOMHa
... Or u.ialifl.atl'.rr. f"r J.,...
In iv1r f( tlir rra.ilali
..,.! |"nl UM IbIIOWIM
Una !> -at-r >opi
... i ifa Ha wlm --rra
to ftmrnd Ihr Holier A. '-
to amend Ihr F.-irt arid IH.i
ta MfUUfl Unrl>
i rnt n(
LADIES'
l>Uod
A.i Addrr.. I.
Mt.' rlalih I
il P) ... '-
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Of afternoon.
Price $2.98
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD.
10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

"'W
t
Mr Bmco told 1M Jury thI II
li- Grcwiidge is guilty It la their dutv
I said thai both vehicles,,, sa). he Is fullty but If there H
Learn from
the hospital.
Whenever infection
threatens
in your home,
use
'DETTOL'
IHt MOSItN ANT 1 Sf P T IC
\. Poiiohoui 1- Pa.v D.,. .-. 1 St.is
N
-every hour
of the da/
When every.>h elw. i* liot ami li-illt>T'-l /m will
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iMlh or Imthe. .h.mer yourself all OTat With "a-hniere
ftV.Ui|u- akin lo "ilk l"lhi- >.....ti a r-.-il, |irof'--tliig fllni (hat
keeps you iliiihtiU It.-, ill .lay lonir. It- delicate -'( .
will av|.l Ban .
Pur t-'ashni
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Inn in t" >i.ur MholiiiMfrafrtiality.
I- Ifa! lakUlU I" -H.If.T wilti tho
ashni4-re Bouquet
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'-


pu.t %n
FliRBADOS ADVOCATE
WEDVFSI.AY JCI.T 5. 1W
HENRY
SPECIAL ATTENTION!!
BAKERS
SHOPKEEPERS
HOUSEWIVES
USE
"GOLDEN
CRUST

BAKING FLOUR
FOR
WONDERFUL RESULTS
MORE BREAD
BETTER BREAD
LAKE OF THE WOODS MILLING CO., LTD
Vigour Restored,
Glands Made Young
li 24 Hours
.1 >
W*k. .- iu t.> -r.d lly*. tro-aWea
Mttr*.wnli
btlnaina nw (ouiri f>4 lmir IM";
MTN, And puU na*. n*A blaod Aftd
rn I" ur * la "our* T *n **
ad fa*. Ttmnatf MUH rw-njar fa 5
m 1Mb IDAWM. ni- t'r* -*J "f-1
Mtrnr. MlUvrTM. & *T*arant.* ku kMn provaal by IMMUdi in An*r:
and l mow dlambotad b rnamlati ("
UltTT pKWAAlM Of Atl.f "li>tl 'I lIKi- i
Mck. VrTAA* DIM Ml" U faa! IWJ <'
n>NW aad MMfy aftd from li to ***
-----, or io*. maraii* ratura tn "i-"
And gal our RtonaT Writ A rl-
- UltM. and taa
Vi-Taba
SACROOL
CONQUERS
PAIN
Alwny, keep u Bottle
handy
On Sale at:
KNIGHTS
DRUG STORES
Soaping" dulls hair
HALO fbriftesty
YOU inu.il luwe a%
Yra.-'aosping" your hair with even tine.r
liquid or cream ahampooa hides 111 natural
lu.rre irli dulling aoap film.
Ilalo-oa.la.ri. no auap or itidty oib-
nohirur lu dull your hair'i natural lutlre. Wilh
yoar wy Bra) .haiLooo, Halo brine* oul Ihim.
rneriag higliliahb. lu fragrant lather I
...ay quickly in any kind of water nerd. ,
allrr-ruue. Forjoair that'. Itatroui. tae rUlo.
AmvaM*ita
/. 4aanra. Hat,,,;,(;Mfcr raaaw 71, r>> A,..,
rrmr. tar. p,** ,(, Hd. en,, Ltr rot aararaf r HALO reveal. Ike hidden beau!) ol yoar hair
WANTED
by every motorist, a tyre that will wear
well And evenly .. grip the road at all tiinen
... stand up to all conditions... resist akid-
diug on wet surfaces ... provide safe driving
nl high speeds.. maintain its tread pattern
to the end of its life . always run silently
. have a distinctive appearance that
will hui'inuuise with the modern car.
FOUND
J&Oft /fa, DUNLOP/^-
ALL MALT STOUT
lour
crituqe
YOUR babv li entitled 10 have the beat possible start
in Hfc, for On this \*. ill gmt-V depend his future well-
being. For this reason you will know how important it
is that your babv should be fed from the breast.
mat milk i. the on* perfeci food Eai I
conttltuted 10 nil their del!.*<. dlaa iUom
lift element* mjuired Co enMire health %
(-. I- 1. nArurll
and to pro* ide I he nniri-
groiith .111.I d.nelopmem.
ECKSTEIN BROS. Bay Stre.t
Ba guided by the eopcrtrn.e ol Nutf- And other. li
rW value of Ovmltin*' 10 p**-trtt moth>t.. I .km baftan and
fler bAhy .tun... Jel.iiou. Otalnnr ', > m. j 10 r>IufBIIvr and
nutrnixf proprtir<. .timulr.tn hctadon ai.J thai hclp< Iumkuki
rich And Ample *upplv of Itim.i n, I.
In Addition. 'Ovaltinr' NppMH tht? form of concentrated And
balanced nmirl-hmmt -hi.h doe- nuch to m.intAin the mother'*
urength and vtraliit during the nuroni period.
Ova I tine
/in.!il, MoIImtx toBrrastFiiiItheirBahies
% Wwurrtr*r ,'m avu.( e.... ... p
l-9i'/;


m DOT -.11 IV .H'l.T 2. ItSO
BARIIADOS ADVOCATE
I'M.I M.VIA
CLASSIFIED ADS. L9SLt 1^ HARBOUR LOG -**
LOST-
BIRTH
,-'. >. Ml
FOR rk.vt
i**r.\K* t*-ket- v. ...
1 and Oil finder pi-..- ..-
me tn Evelyn Yeare.na-1 rv.ii.
t-ue St T Se--ln.
euruj ..i *J an
fei '-- I
i ntinrTAM th-kit
K K 87*7 Finder plea** return urn.
I io Audxn Graham K-Mil si
1 John "-> I"
In Carlisle Bay
tUIVAU
Cap*
as :ad KoO"'
ie Blue, Stuga SI.------------
Munur I~.u4.k-**. at low net. Cap*
Ova .- Rajaa .! Luri*
M V H.floa. rasa t< net. Capl Hrv.m.
'r. >. Lucia
hU'Uli BBS
Schooner Manuata N ww *. <"aut
inr rot I tv>i vs.i
*BtD COMMIT
\nukh* ii mieriMRii
*r...i *
I .1 |>MK-
T.I.

Mm
lor Bti
i


n km n
i ki, othn
,lh them mi
of her O.- ,
If-IMS
a* MM
Um furntahed Bono
Tmi nudiiu T> mi
a Club* n> > '
** 7 M 11
IN MEMORIAM
m .. .,.,.....
HMtl
! !:
Ur away
1 .., '..

i:..
deughlt i ii.
B.MJ-ll BRCXtHBB FORTE I .mil- return thank* to all i
ml I the late m mahy
FOR SAUR
AUTOMOTIVE
H P lets riir i
Driven. >n mileage
condition Cole J
7 SO-4n
. ,. One 111 1*34 an Apply i Chevrolet Truck c Herbert. *> & l.aO Jn
CAH Appl> I olrl Intl. 39 1 fid 3n
Far ii n.a d AaMari I P : 11 A,, h id Qnaa Cuuer .. H b > el B 7 M In
RsnopiBATma unit om s-
by S Inch Twin CM "Tllafc" Combined
I n| ur.ll wllh dming mi
tubular ondir recover and with
frewlng coll. for TJJOO t-u fl refrig
rration rapacity, all complete >n work
nig order Central Foundry I .Id
I *
Two HOVsaa
-
KI M % K*
so SIMPLE
V' "TJT BJlsl!! -
fwH in The lf|> PERFECT ci1 and ee At your G luni of a lap a ,. of a Oa- Cooker ... in BAK1N4. H' III- i*te*1 I I m JUvmroorr.- Today
laar, '
CHM 1' Ha>a KM SI VlAfWl
41 A HO* K.iiin HI
SEAWELL
UllllVAU
m LA tif AIRA _
ttbloa Kd**rd Ooii. P> "
PTMi ANTIi.l'A
M.i.Jr Mr Mtrhal.
I CflA
WM>lhlKM-l
Martv i
t'.abrtmir (JranftoW".
Jc-iv Immi Barb.r.
. n :
Ficdrti.-k Hr**r. Doroihy Kin
>tir K Fd...d Flit.-'
20 MONTHLY
EASILY jrn*d al hom in .par* tlmt
i.jiun in lUmpa. No aipananc**
i.wraaarv SulUbl* for th 1
also contact you with Studant* an
Colon ic> and DomlnUm* for pan car-
inpnidrnU Cncloav f, ilamp All
Hail only labr fewa day* t Paitina-
low. PToapoct Horn*. 339 Wufan Boad.
L4h Unn Bnajktnd
GOVERNMENT NOTICES
M
Strife
URRAVS
., MILK
STOUT
*-.%',--'.'--,'-'^'*'>-'-'.
si i'i II SALE
IIAIM.AI.XS
. t
m VKW GITST
^ *-....... I"
M.d>- C.

ul.l.
llklrl.
pan
EDINBURGH SCOTLAND
NOTKE
hrrvby ilvtn that It
; Philip lo INM H M IuIt.-Il,,
th* lloua* irf Aaacmbk-
t . Hal .niih IbU
racprdlni
ili.oao to nwwt th* coat of major rv>
ptaH i.. ihr PaiUh Church. Chapel*
and Parochial Bulldiiica ,u.h loan to
b rvoald bv fwanty annual tnilalnwnta
of annum oul of the rain of the aald
Partah,
W V GOODING .
Voalry Clerk. Kt Philip
m i so- an
V M C A
All Mrmbrn. Hiib.tribrii and Fllnd'
of the Auorlallon are invited to attend
an important Meeting in (he Naval
Hall t!radqiiailr>, Pinfold Sue", on
Friday the Mth July. 1K0. al 4 30 p m
for the purpoa* o( receivUig from O*
Dlrrctor* information concerning Uie
*.....I Headquarter*. Purchaae of
Wak.neld and Plain for the r.pan.ion
A C. ARMSTRONG
FfS-MW
liratlllJIT II WILLIAM-*.
OSMTfJ Secrelary
I? TV I"
NOlfCE
VACANT POSTS OF GRADE II AGRICULTURAL INSTRUC
T0R8 IN THE DEPARTMENT OF AORICULTURE.
BRITISH GUIANA
Applirsuorie are invtWd lot ihi.x- ssasjM BflSBI of Grade II Agn-
cullural Iimructors in the Depurlment of Afrtcullute. British Gulsnj
The posts are pensionable. Appointments are on twelve months pu-
baUon In the firm instance Applicants hould possess the Cambridge
School CerUflcate or IU equivalent, and nhould preferably have had
some training in agriculture and some experience in animal hus-
bandry, cultivation of tropical crops, and cither farm management or
agricultural extension work.
2. The salary scale is ASS 101600 *780 x $84$U00 x *U0
- $1,800 per annum. A successful candidate may be appointed at
point within this scale commensurate with his qualifications and
experience.
t. Successful candidates will be required lo assume duty m
rural areas and will be engaged either in the extension service or on
Cnvernmenl Experimental Station* or Stock Farms
4 \pplicants should apply to the Director of Agriculture, IV-
partmtnt of Agriculture, Gfttrgetown, British Guiana. .in-losing details
of qualideations and expeni-n... and two CofjtM of wiit t.>stimonials
5. Applicants who are already employed in a Department of
Agriculture must submit their applications through the normal official
li.,n!..-K
8 Applications receive,! after 31*t July. IWU. will not be con-
-iili'lril
M. II. CROIX'HF.R.
Director .l Agn.ullure
26 SO- Sn
SOLE AGENTS:
MANNING & CO. LTD.
MECHANICAL
Krnm M f..,>,'.
,,1,,-r i,lv
phone a 7 M 3n


III Lurk. Bell A Ighl (Prtea
we 00> Artvncat II ...Hi I-. iba (HI M 1 n Co 30 On
MISCEU ANEOUS
ANTIQL'Ea of evaa-* dr-rlpUon
(ilaa-. Chin*, old Jewel*. M gfeMff
Wanrcoloura Rwrly booka. Map*. Auio-
eraph*. etc at Gotrinawo Antique Shop,
diolnlnc Royal Yacht Club
Hr Ik* f.ialr al
LEWIS OLIVER YARDE
know..... I.FWIS
Dl.lVCK Bt'HKE'
NOTICE i. hereby siven that all per-
-..n. having any debt or claim uairut the
Estate of Lewio Oliver Yarde- niore often
known a* Lewi* Oliver Burke. Servant
of The Barbed,.1 Fire Hrvaadr deceaaed
of Enterpri^ in the pariah of Chrlat
fl.
> the
CALYPSO
title*, only 1
A DARNER t
Hi lav of May ISM).
q..e-ied t -end In particular* of their
,Uln, duly atteeled to the undenlsaed
Miriam Ailina Sttaker. e/d llrqri. Havne*
A r.rimth. Solicitor.. No. 1 Swan Street,
lln IgMnwii, on or befure Uie Hat day ol
AMdu-t. ISM. after which dale I -hall pro-
ceed to dutrlbule the >eaU of the de-
ceeard amona the partle* rntiUed thereto
havlns regard only to luch claim, uf
which I ahall then have !t*a notice and
I -.11 not be liable for the aa*eU or any
part thereof ut dlatrlbuled lo any per-
son of whoae debl or claim I ahall not
Unn have had nolle*.
ANT) all penona Indebted lo Uie *airi
citata are requewled lo aritle their aaid
.itdilit.duM without dala-..
n-ted thl. Mth day of June, lt
MIRIAM AOINA STHAKFR.
Quallfled Admlnntratrii of the Eatale
of Lewn Oliver Yarde. "ol
31 a m. '
: I
TYRKS AND PATTrniFS sum 34 1.
T. 33 x B. 30 x 5 and other itt-a, aim
Oldnam IT plate haltrrlr< Ooaranteed '
rnqviirc Aulo Tyre Company TrBfalaar
Streel Phone 30M 11110-11"
I'I III.H SALES
PKRSOI\.%l.
THE public -le h
SKFTTE 'nee Tho"
., ( taaMrOiataSal '
bv
I l,v ,
OAjaDINg
I do i hold
or anyone Ue
debt! In ml
n order "ifnea
The public are herebv warned ag>
,-ivlng -..' IJSA l-Kl
. nee Armftronaji n. I do not hold 1
,t( iwapanaDtta I" her or anyone
debt or debl* In
order ->
UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER
ON TnrRSOAY 37th bv nnlii nl Mr.
I G MrKiiutfry -. win hI| the
Furniture at the -Mall". St Michael
which Include.
Writing .ind Ser\ing
Tublee, Mini Cabinet. Kcolving Book
TSbie, Tub Chair*, very nice Double
Knd Settee. Couth. Linen Pre**.
.".bla. all In Mahnan> Ruah
nd Berblre Chair*. Chippendale Chair*
Dookoie in Manchlneal and Cordia.
Ola** Door-; Urge and amall M T
T.ble-. Electric Finings. Screens. Tele-
.iaw. Picture*. Dinner Ware. Coffee
d.p and SaiH-er*. Clodc Mall l*n.|
nlaaw and Chun. I'I 1.ted and Braaa Wai .
Dinlnn Table t-r-l . rolding Card
TiHm Phi-i of Drawer* Round Titbli
.1; in Pine. Larder*. Invalid Chair.
Garden Benehew. Garden Tool*. L*wt
Mower*. Divan Uphola Couch. Book
HrBfj Dumaxk Table Cloth
nr.Her. Pigeon Itoiine. B.rt-
IS*.
36c ea
> Hoollen*. Shoe-, a M .-.
v1 Uhite 1 lull >. mi
\ t hildren % V#ita S0c ea
O Khaki Drill Sfle. yd
J Rota' Caps Sir. ea
K \ 1 1.. ut- a Ladles)
Childn-M'. l-.nl.- iv.-ii, 1
J I hull-. ii,l nl It IIMIIK III
llrrs* (mhmIi A llouoebolri
Departments
THANIS
I'r. Wm. Henry and
" " Slreeta
SHIPPING NOTICES
ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.
Bailing fram Aaaiieraaaa. datum.-.
.. Aalwer*
S 1 "ABNBTA- July it. ) "
M S "HECUBA Aug. 4. i. Slh
M ^ HEI.ENA- Sept I. 1. Sth
aalllni I'-iai AwtrrSaa* aad n
a s -corncA1 Augu.i ia-i
Salllag te Madeira PliBMalh
Anlw*rp aad AaaiMrdaaa
M S WIlXEMSTAn Jul)
M M "ORANJESTAIi" \ .
lalllai le Trtaldad. f.i.a.,,,1,..
HURRICANE RELIEF ORGANISATION
A practice of certain section* of the Hurricane Relief Organisation
will take place on Sunday, the 30th of July. IM0, between 10 am.
id 1 p.m. The frequcnciei. that may be used for broadcasting Mr*
7.1; S.4 and 214 megacycles or wavelengths of 4225; 5S.55 and W0J
ictres respectively
2 During the practice It is planned to test out the rocket firing
ci|iiipmcnl to lie used in connection with hurricane warnings at UM
Police Stations.
S. This notice Is Issued to allay any alarm which may be caused
by the discharge of the rockets or by messages which may be picked
up by priv.itc wim'I.s. receivers.
26 7 50- 3n
M S
lllh-.11 11
, Ste.
M
aro and P**-en

m v 1 11 Baas
Carat, and Panenaera for
I flreMda.
lailliMI Weilncdav. Itth July
It \\ I Schooner Owner*
Asamutiiiii In.
'.onuUnee. Dial: 4047
Cuuadian Malional Sleauislii>t>
SOI FBBKII ND
CAN Ml IS kit
LADY NELSON
CAN CIIAI.LF.M11H
I.ADY RODNEY
LADY Nl-LSON
Hallfa*
No
Ilii, Juli iMh Ji.lv Mth luhi JVh
31n.l July Mth July Sllh July Mh Aug. tth
lllh Aug Illh AuS, ltll. Ana 34th
Urd Alia ~*th Ana 3Blh Aug BlhSep. 1th
mil Mp urn sep istn Sop th Sep agth
BASTINfW. BARBADOS
1XHI.II .1 ( T MM.
n LLV .sit>c.'. D r 'K
RAVES: $!> per Day *
ap wards
llli lll-H'l
P> ait, W S I!
HAVE YOU GOT A
COLD or COUGH
IF SO TRY
BROWNE.
I CERTAIN COUGH |
CURE
The C.1.1 ' Remedy far Ougb*.
C CARLTON BROWNE 5
WaMleaaie, Retail DruiiUt o
lit. Roebuck St. nisi 281 S
.V,V//.'.VM'''-'-''''Wl'1''''
THF HANDIEST Till NO WE HAVE SEEN FOR A TH
IU it 1 1* 1 1 1
Ml I M POLISH
WW TRY A TIN TODAY
THE < l.vrilAI. IMIMMIII M
(CENTKAI. MH'NIIRY LTD. Proprietoml
Corner of Mi.. ..I and Tudor Streets
Sr.f.iP(/i.n/ Iom H'ili <\pprvriatv
l.AUIES I'l.ASIU' HAltvi"OATS i %2 20 each.
MKIUKRIZKD PRINTED LINtiERIE | BOV.per Yd
I.\RI1\DINE In rlraersld Oreen. I'lnk. Red, i.oid Lime Green
and While -f $LSt par ui
SHANTI'NCi In Blue, Rose. Cream, Pink Gold ) $1,141 per yd.
1910 STYLES LADIES SHOES In White. Black A Brown Suede
rrtrea ranging from $11.30 to $12.37 Cabaa Heels.
Also DREHHEK, HI'NSUlTtl. SHORTS A SLACKS Etc.. Kte.
inioaiiwav muss shop.
NOBTBBOt NO
LADY RODNEY
1AI-Y NELSON
IADV RODNEY
LADY NEI-SON
na j.iu itt't. j..iv m Aaa
mil. Aug -'""I Aug 3*1 h A.ia
Itth Sep 3I.I Rev. 30th Sep
Slh Ana- I3lh A
GARDINER AUSTIN A CO.. LTD. AteBts.
TENDERS FOR PUR0HA8E OF GAS COOKING
APPARATUS
Tenders are invited for the purchase of one (1) No 6 standimi
clectricallv driven AEROGEN Petrol Gas Generator with 1/3 H P,
motor wound lor J10 volts. 50 cycles, single phase supply complete
with burners and stove. The equipment Is at present housed Rl
Erdisto'i Teachers' Training College, and may be inspected by appoint-
ment with the Principal.
2. The original cost of the apparatus was $1,609.70. In addition
to the price tendered, the purchaser will be required to pay Customs
duty amounting to $262. I
3. Tenders should be forwarded in sealed envelopes addressed
to the Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by name) so us to J
reach the Colonial Secretary's Office not later than 4 p.m. on Friday
the 28lh of July, 1950 The envelopes should be clearly marked
"Tender for Gas Cooking Apparatus".
4. The Government does not bind itself to accept the highest of
any tender. _
v 16.7.302n.
HARRISON LINE
OI'TWAIID I KOM I Hi: INITHl KINGDOM
I.I I .(III! (.1,041KIIS FROM IIS.
Ovallini'. t.i.vuii. Egg N.K-llf. QllfdbBf Oatl (pktfs '.
Hi.m.I MolU-tl Oats, MufTets. All Uruu. Prunes in Tins,
Apricots, Orange and I.eiiiun alaurnaiade, Spaghetti
and Cheev.-. Ki.ift Ei-h Spread. Three B.iv .mil Bahama Pine-
uppli' June. Tmpical Eruit Salad. Surfmaid Stnuuli-u. llraiiA.
Tina Carrots, Tins Beel.
ss
SS
S S.
s s
Venel
"SPECIALIST"
"HIVEHCREST
NATURALIST '
M( MN'( KEST"
illtOOKlHMlST
IIOMIU AKD
Veisel
CRAFTSMAN*'
LORD CHURCH'
DANCE REMINDER
TICKET Holder. ,.re letni.idai
nt the Donre to be held I, Ih
commllle.. .d Mar.ageme..t .1 in
llarbadna Elementary Te-he>
School' on Friday Mth Jab
DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.-Agcnt.
UNION MEETING
MEMBERS Off THE
( AKIBHKAN WORKERS
IINION
vmlnded of a Meeting
to be held on Thurvdny
Night. July 27th. 1950, at 8
o'clock at Headquarter*:
Synagogue UulldU>K*>.
Synagogue Lane.
Bridgetown
BUgfa M
M 2.488 Sq f>< t KUbbI tfi
oiK'ii to offers which 1
mi. t-l.t.. iir\.\Sx\ir\\n^i ir
FRENCH LINK
S.S. "GASCOf.NE'- Sailm! to Trinidad on the II
1950.
ACCepUnl l,a-*enlrrn; Mi......u
$IB.
S.S "GASCOGNE" Sailing lo Plymouth on the 17lh August.
IBM,
Deluxe Cabin lor Twe uvuilalile $622.00
H W 1 bob
lor Further PiirllruUrn. Apply to:
a. M. JONES & CO., L'lD.-Agents.
40. lloi 111 (k Si hi 1 1
CITY
.11..: n bull) Co 1'
Haki-rv. Gr. ... 1
' d '.. Iba Agent.
JOHN M. BLADON
AFS, FV.A,
REAL ESTATE AtiEN'l AlfCTIONKEK SVRVBTOl
Phone 4fM0 rnantMloiU1 Huililing
Mrs. HOUSEWIFE
Foot Itch
Healed in 3 Day^
Iflk, p-l or bleed' Th-
reat cause if men* *kln trouble* In a germ
that haa apr.-ai) ilm.iighiiiit ih- M 1
.I varlmi* tin til. *u--h a- Athlefa
K^t.SI
e( rid i.....
irritl NUN A newdlaiover,. ;.;l-d NI--
derm. *t"|>* th- It. In.i In 7 ininiilea. kill*
> In It hours iii"I alitris heallna;
the akin a-.tt. -moolh and rlear In 3 Oa\*l
Niaoderm i- . aaful It la guarant.-l
to end th* Itch and heal tie -m- i -
on the f. ^'iitilH-rn caaea of
mn. I'linplea Am*. BarnH
nof fa.-#..r I1> or B
i Ark
I today.
We can now lupply yuu with the followfng
Earthenware -
MIXING B0WI S (in various litei)
TEA POTS do
TKA CUPS
TANKARD JUGS (in various sizes)
MEAT PLATTRR8 do.
PLATES ij. i and Shallow
DISHES
SAUCE B0AT8
And many others too numerous to mention
Pay Ui a Visit before Purchasing Elsewhere
1
(Tilt UOU.Hl. FOR dARGAlNS)
f&KB&SSI?.
The Barbados Hardware Co., lid. :
Rot 33 A 62 SWAN STREET PHOI. E 2109, 3634 or 4400 S
FerrodoR
Mil Al. l.\l.\rS nl On,.1.1,1
FF.KROOOK PAINT will solvt your problem of
Protecling Slccl from ihe ravages of Corrosion.
City Garage Trading Co., Ltd.
VICTORIA ST.
4671


PAC.t lie.II l
BARBADOS ADVOCATE
WIUM Ml XV Jll.V M. ItM
Tractors Provided N* change
For Peasants
THE HOUSE Ol ASSCMBLt >..:.].<... pi hrd Addren
lo implement the purchasing ul mutur tractors lo be p
i dm -inu to cultivate thi
The liiii form ol the Address which was luroduci
Smith (Lj intended that the tractors .houlri be kept at the
variow AsriOultui i I u Mi AlldefVfeit that .ill
the peasants would not1 benefit hy such an nrranfaanv
------------------------------------- -- i'.'i, i- -.1 :
The !Iou> <* A**
Qualifications
FOR VESTRYMEN
W.I. PLAY
DURHAM
TO DA Y
today the witi IndMa will
open a two ua> fixture iigalnst
Durham who play* In the Minor
Counties Competition
This will be the fifth game wit.i
Durham the nrst f which took
place In 1923 M
Bajrjaatd tat Um third rnnr In
KM a
Octet, led ., combined N >ithinnbcr-
land
Of the tour game- played
data lha Wan tndlai have won
one. and the other three left dr
Fine Howl inu
The Wi
lha u oat* fine
I, .,!,..
.
The We! |nd
Kerad lit, I i ouW onl>
0S. I.....
made i2 in their second inning*
and then dlsmbaed Dwhan '"
74. Thi* time Pascal] had the re-
and Pram Li 4 foi 11
In i2B Durham Imoehad j
C3t Dot,-,.i getting 105 Met man
Onmth 4 tor ;:i and J< Small :i
lor 41 did best with the ball The
Wi-i ) i in their
aaeond innings W Si H
101 Durham de. tared ..t iM for 4.
and W I had had -u for fli
when any ended
mi
The IMS game Wai BUD drawn
when rain Interfered with play.
Scores were Durham 256. and
Went Indies 140 Following on
w.j. had Beared a (at 3 nea
ihe end
Durham ecored wi arhan the
ins ..., op .
4 fur M. and Hniph (Irani fl tor
Zt being the BuerVadftal bowlers
piled with 203. and
Durham had .'
0t low of 3 Wktl when rain
vashed out play
Fresh trom yesterday'* Teat
ictory the Went Indies will no
doubt go in search "f tbetr
twelfth victory of the tour and
their lecond win agnlnl Durham
. .
Id be
itksH loi
le ploughing ol i .- .1 tn*

1 ,., I 1-1 'i
The HO
. with tba vita u>
nlaring at each Agn< ttltural
laati red thi
1
Mr Qaaaaff '* > made ii aQggeS-
batli ,1., .it ibc
Id irate I k < retried by
tr Smith Tag ub Uiuti I
veahmeo
1 Hi- pi iii traeton
the Oov-
.1 tlH'
hmoI of the peasant* for bV P
uHmllaa Iheli land
Mr ihmdfnc ra>;i ih.it 1.
frit that the luntei mamaar lor
mber
be prate
lor his/
1 ..1
is.aaa 1

industry
Sniliihlr Marliinerv
Arundell
Presides
For First Time
e I
10I ul he
Bnai
Oov-
live bodies 01
regarding Ihe
asset..... resting with the
ertior.
An importani chanai In the
aacuUva Council ol each Legis-
lative Council ii being en
to oMat threa aleeted rnembeia to
the aaaBuUea and empowered to
rt-ino\"o an elerled member fiom
the Executive Council by a two-
thirds majority vote the Governor
Is to nomlnaie lo tba Executive
Council one of the tkominated
members uf the Leeudativa Coun-
cil with nfftriaU being the urtnun-
litrator. Attorney General. Tr
urcr und our other ottlcial and th*
Governor remains Piaaldai I 1 '
the Executive Council.
At ihe end of the announcement
the Governor said this marked the
confidence of the seothei Covntrj
in the people of ttiaaa bdanda In
.the judgment and (jo.. |
1 the common man and in the
[ability of chosen laadara ol the
[people to play
[part In the Government of their
* country.
It l on thr spirit of (he people
that our success or failu
entually depend

What An M.P.
Wants To Know
R MAPI-
n 1 ige mi Uaroa to
ttdVtl into oil i*rrniin and in'

Iheli land tilled by
their netghbourlna
tate* t tiere ware, hewever,
nav pea bo wan net pot*
um nipporl rroea
1 H oelp.
lie wan ijtiiti' 10 agieemcnt uith
the junior member of St Joseph
111 his view that the Government
should take steps to provide trae-
|nfl which would be placed at the
disposal of thr paaeenti for the
cultivating or their )and
Mr. Hellirl iti
il*o in iii|iecment with the junior
tot St Joseph
The i>e.i ant with hair ,n icra
nf land had to pay ilm> tune, aj
. ulttvabai ha land bj
ngrlcullural laboui
and by inaciiinei) Land
ultteatad mecJuuUeally yielded 10
to.is per acre more than that cul-
I l.ilmurer lie
add be
tiinu the labourer out of work.
IN that the Government
haul' M 11 lo ihe Director of
*. (riculture to Mggeal how many
Uiay -lioiild buy and Ihe sites of
them.
Mr rawiard <4'i agmOll H1.1t
the Implementation of the iraCtOI
ould not displace Bfjiicultural
boni He i' i: thai ihe Oovern-
enl should purchase tractors to
be placed at the disposal of the
peasantry nee of cost.
Mr \llder il,) said that the
AdtlresN said that the tractors hud
La in kept at the Agricultural
Station lie MM tearful that if
>.uiti UmiuUona were made, peas-
its in some of the partihai would
A benafll
He -aid that he did not think
tiiat the Senior member for St.
Joseph should ciuibble over the
'"BKCstcd amendment u il was
preeentad more or less, as a guar-
tee that all the peasants of the
bland -hould benefit.
Mr Ganter IC> said that if the
Government Implemented the Ad-
dress. .1 great service would he
done to thr colony If something-
were OOl done quickly to help the
peasant*, many of them then work-
ing land would not be able lo do so
In a short while
He had heard that .1 cCHsnara*
nt Officer was in the island, but
ho could not see what he was
doing He wondered whether that
officer was sleeping o< inactive or
nether it was not his duty to
ork among the peasants
\ i,.11 ti 9% ' u 1 oe qeainv
oataai n regis^atJaa i
a Vesu.. sjad HHt to amen-i
ne Joeai A -t out the
among ihe Csoeofl
whwh Mr G H Adams pre sen led
to the House of Assembly yesfer-
kajp
In doing aa rn look ine op-
pociunity le explam -- because of
ha alirtude of the Other Place as
egards hnw the Hill bi amend
the Representation of the People
Act wouh) affect the tHielttlrot'r"
Mirors and vestrymen that
these **o BilU have -s theit
l . The retention of the
qualification*
Mi A an>s he under-
1 Other Place had post-
poned the passing of lha Bill to
Hi ,.i. 1 talion of the
at thej leii that
.not. d.;, 11.1 ..on ir..- laron
in be abotlahed by tt
nge in quaUneallon and Ihal
,i,i also bt ., change
(oaim.-t on ('.i 1 veato "
ure fhe House '.
.
I I
i b iition a
luaUneabU
arawa to hai altenUoa ourlng Ihe
. Bill o. Me Hoi 1
pOUIfed out then that
II wsj no) Ihe Uitentl 1
ernrneni I itolMi the quaUnea-
lien
\ atlon lor
lurorg. iii.'t. wai no hat< 1 tin
lo I hange the
.ion At the none time however,
aOovt rnmenl did " ' i*awan attentu
am urea dealing aith |ury- .'" ago Uwrjj
Water Extended
To Bay Estate
THI HOUSE OV ASSEMBLY yesterday pju^d j Pltgnhj
Uon for Ihe purp B- ckteg Ruad to the Bay Estate Housing area
The Do...- .1 - from the igie.iter population than Si. Ml'-
Department states: Inawl They all knew what meat!
ttatci
This plan la submitted to 'he
Legislature lor approval m
iicrorua ee with sertioao 12 and
It of the Waterworks Act. 185-i
iKisal is to lay 1-nun
diameter Cent Iron Pipe from the
exiatsaa aaam of the Depanmem
in Deckles Road along and under
Ihe Bay Estate Housing Board's
private roads aad band, for a
dt'tanee of 5*0 varoa and fix
ti.ieon four (4) staodpipes ano
four (4) Are hyurants
The proposed gMenSion is
itted by
Ihe Housing Board by a blue
line The PMndpipei by blue
souares marked A.B.C.D 1 rd
The asturuuad coat of the
1 I atorh 1- m i--i
Mr M. E. Cox moved the passing
ol the Resolution. He said that the
l.esolu'.ian ssnighi tn give the
Waterworks Deport men: pennut-
KMl to install four hydrants on
Of Hay Kslate which had
Ucn already develope I It wai
customary thai before the Watrr-
weraa Department Ix'gan lo da
anything in such oases that a It so-
lution he paasssd hy the II .use
rivmg the
Qustftlsj
lb v.as asjHe gartj
i.ii.i. mi n ksg ..
1 1.tog th. watei prograiama
:et tluougli as OjUst I
tie would therefore beg to movi
Uuu tti Resolution be paaaed
Mr F. L WaVrott <.
air R e 0 11. ti.rii Bald thai
e would like to draw to the Gov-
that about 13
_ started tn lay
.,eie anything Uk. v.hat they ""' four inch mam pipe towards
ii i.e and iti nol propoa* to *** (i|fT coitage and Stuan mil
istancaa the peoage in :he count
lUrtrleal had to travel le
.tandpost and he did not think It
was fair to allocate halt the tola.
grant for the water MTVia
Michael
Mr. Allder said that private m*
ttallations as well as repairs were
itlng people for whom the vrorg
done more than wa> con
reasonable, and referred to a case
here the Departmetit wai catted
. to repair a leaking pipe When
eaa sent in. he said the
rraterlal* only rame tn 12
hile labour fetcheo something
. r,i,
Mr Y. I: OM (U denied that
ny partiality where St
Michael was concerned It was
well known that the greater
percentage of the population lived
[l 91 HlCtUati and thai wa.
where the greater inwOUnl of
vater was consumed
A regaids the price of instal-
lation, the hon'ble mcmt>er h:><
admitted that the Waterworks Do-
laarhneM sold the material to the
.1 at a very dv
nid therefore it was nothinp
Igalll I thi company It was a
1 I. .r paring vragas, and in
Pf that 'he Snn'Me m*
>en* w'ni claimed thai hi
intevevied if> ageing paapel wmk
.
- 0&X
mmwcf
a Foe quick. pUawni
Alk-Seli*ef. D,op 01
tablet! in (lai i.| *.
it Asa aad drink it ,1 ,
lautive-nuw ii ANY
Alka-Seltzer
How them to remain on the
Statute Book any longer than the
tegutlature remained.
[le wmila have Uk, ,1 the House
1 g/lth Ihe two bill t,i;iv
i>ul until the Other Place hnd
nossed the Bill to amend the
Reiiresentation of the PMpaa Act
hey could not prweed
He would give the absolute
.issuranee. however, that as soon
as the Other Place passed the Bill
lust referred to. they, who would
aarlBlnli he meeting Ihe same day
eoiild have passed th- two BilU.
< it them right iway to the Other
Place so that the law relntlng to
he quaUAcatloa for vaeUra*an and
turnrs would remnln a* it anw
FATIMA STATUE
HERE INTRANSIT
l ,1 c-ti 1 Moore arrived
1 Urrdaj by the "Lady
ll.oi., wtlh the statue of Our
Lad} of Falima. He is intranstt
fiom 81 VTneanl to 81 Lucia
Meanwhile the Statue | Bi
Patrirk'i Church Jammotta Ijhw
and will remain there until Ihe
"Rodney" ksavsa U 1- -xpeeled to
leave tut St l.nel.i on Frlda\
night at 9 o'clock
Horses In
GoodFormFor
Polo Today
WITH schooling on the Planta-
tions and lour practice ga
ihe 1'oto ground, most ol ihe new
horses art* now ready to play the
part in team competitions.
It is indeed surprising how
qulckJJ "'me horses can learn the
game when under The seat of an
experienced player, while others
1 em to like or catch on to
the various duties expected
them. On Saturday afternoon Col
Miehelin was riding an
that hnd never before been on a
PolO Held, but in the capable hands
of this good horseman, the mount
the end of Ihe evening was us
g.iod as if he had 1>een playing
tor a seaaatn.
Kenneth Frost displayed excel-
lent form on Saturday, while the
.1 curate -hots of Lea Deane were
I -aullful to watch. Mark Edgehill
1 Flash" missed very few of his
b tck and forehand drives at full
K.dlop. and John Marsh on speedy
"Kitty, ILiwk" played his usual
hard hitting rame John tried a
BhUkka on Mr Johnson's new
thorough bicri Rascal", but It
Menu BI if this four-year-old will
n -ed a lot of training before he
I n DO considered n good Pol.
("nil Boy
Colin Deane -n "Call Boy"1 b
always a power lo reckon with as
horse and rider carry a lot of
weight between them, and it is
-i Idoai Ihal Colin misses a ball
Victor Weekes. the left hander. Is
one of the mosl natural ridei* I
h vg ever seen as no mailer how
far the hall may be from his horse
he seems to stretch completely
out of the saddle and get It
Herbert Dowding has been un-
able to play for many seasons, but
.1 few- .ifternoona ago he wt
rtdlng through tha Belle lands on
a magniftrent beast, so it is hoped
that this combination may be seen
II action ,.t BOnu tune in the
future
Play todav should tart ai 4 3n
and as usual there will he a roped
oiT gtsdOBure foi Monde and Houi
Guests. ,
rea Operations hud teen .topped
because of lack of material, u wee
said, but he would now like to
know if the work would be re-
started as soon as poe-ible as the
l-eople jii the area were greatl]
need of a water service. The
irari house to a suindpost was
bout three-quarter mile away
Mr. Prod Ooddard suggested that
n would t*> a good thing if stand-
IMarlc in areas where thev were
now little used could be removed
lo other places where they would
more
dr O. T Allder said that he
appreciated the ins la I Lit
waWr in the Hay Land I d
t.e ,l tioped they would extend
''her places.
During ihe last Estimates pro-
vision was made fo, \fsnoun for
eatanaloq of the water supply
I over the island Half of thi
a alloeated lo SI Micnael jnd
he remainiler for th- oilier len
parishes, which together had
They'll Do It Every Time

-____By Jimmy Hjtlo
.-' e sose s *bons ^
AM7 "n-e -it s a c^^y
O* A c^ta- "MCE -c-E
V COj^D C-ASCE------P
1 xj-jgEE-o-Ag-ew-- _M I
VCJMJ E- n/ T---V -=
^E?SON"=.0T llJ 1 *'ADE *'E too
a? aiuch oct iMrtootrm
lkC-4^4cTe^" A "i* "J r
-# ir-u^OTaar
VfnV CWTSA.T 4I?-TS
SOONE9 OR I.4TE?
C?4w A CO"C S'T ~-
Thanx TO f
ED WMBei_AN,
S WSST * STOleT.


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