Title: Florida Entomologist
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Title: Florida Entomologist
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Florida Entomological Society
Publisher: Florida Entomological Society
Place of Publication: Winter Haven, Fla.
Publication Date: 1932
Copyright Date: 1917
 Subjects
Subject: Florida Entomological Society
Entomology -- Periodicals
Insects -- Florida
Insects -- Florida -- Periodicals
Insects -- Periodicals
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General Note: Eigenfactor: Florida Entomologist: http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1653/024.092.0401
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Volume ID: VID00294
Source Institution: University of Florida
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Florida Entomologist
Official Organ of the Florida Entomological Society

Vol. XVI JULY, 1932 No. 1

SIX NEW APHIDS FROM FLORIDA
With Description of the Sexual Forms of Another Species*
A. N. TISSOT
Many families of insects of Florida are well known through the
collections and writings of entomologists from this and other
states. The Aphiidae, however, have been largely neglected, espe-
cially from a taxonomic standpoint, with the result that compara-
tively little is known concerning the Florida fauna of this group
of insects. In the fall of 1925 the writer began a systematic study
of the aphids of the state which has been carried on continu-
ously since that time. About one-hundred-ten species are now
known for the state and this number will doubtless be greatly
increased when some practically untouched portions of the state
have been visited by collectors. A number of these species are
apparently new to science and it seems well that they should be
described and recorded. This paper contains the descriptions
of all the known forms of six new species together with the
description of the sexual forms of another species.
CINARA CAROLINA, new species
Alate viviparous female. (Figs. 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, and 9.) Length 2.72 mm.
General color dark brown with black markings. Spines on body and ap-
pendages pale to dusky. Head very dark brown, frontal portion black.
Width of 1Ad through the compound eyes, .68 mm. Eyes black with promi-
nent ocular tubercles. Ocelli bordered with black. First two segments of
the antennae concqlprous with the head; third, fourth and fifth segments
each with basal portion light brown and apical portion very dark brown;
sixth segment entirely dark brown. Right antenna with five sensoria on
third segment, two on the fourth, one on the fifth in addition to the ter-
minal one; sixth segment with one large and four small sensoria at the
base of the unguis. Left antenna with ten sensoria on the third segment,
one on the fourth and one on the fifth in addition to the usual terminal
one; sixth segment with one large and three small sensoria. Length of
the antennal segments as follows: I, .109 mm.; II, .109 mm.; III, .476 mm.;
IV, .204 mm.; V, .252 mm.; VI, .163 mm. Rostrum extending slightly be-
*Contribution from Department of Entomology, Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station. Published Aug. 4, 1932.










THE FLORIDA ENTOMO(LOGrST


yond the openings of the cornicles. Basal portion white or pale yellowish,
middle portion light brown with oval black spots, apical portion black.
Prothorax somewhat lighter brown than the head, without prominent
lateral tubercles. Meso- and metathorax dark brown with lobes black and
wing insertions yellowish. Wings hyaline; fore wing with stigma, and all
veins except the radial sector and the media black; radial sector brown and
media very faintly indicated and so appearing hyaline. The apex of the
stigma meeting the wing margin in an obtuse angle and terminated by a
distinct vein. Hind wing with two oblique veins; veins black. Femora of
all pairs of legs black, with brown bases; tibiae of all legs with middle
portion yellowish-brown; bases and apices black; tarsi of all legs black.
Length of hind tibia 2.12 mm.; first segment of hind tarsus .095 mm., sec-
ond joint .272 mm. in length. Hairs of the hind tibia of medium length,
reclining, though those near the base are more nearly upright.
Abdomen tobacco brown; first segment with two elongated black areas
on the dorsum; between these areas and the cornicles are five transverse
rows of oval to circular black spots; between the cornicles and the cauda
six irregular-shaped black areas. Cornicles large, black, on dark brown,
gradually sloping bases. Cauda and anal plate black, broadly rounded with
numerous hairs of medium length.
Apterous viviparous female. (Figs. 2, 4, and 7.) Length 3.50 mm.
General color dark brown or bronze with numerous black markings on
head, thorax and abdomen. Anterior half of body with a mealy covering.
Hairs on body, antennae, and legs hyaline. Head very dark brown with a
few small black spots. Width of head much greater than the length. Width
through the compound eyes .721 mm. Eyes black, with prominent ocular
tubercles. First two antennal segments dark brown; third segment yel-
lowish except a small apical portion which is light brown; fourth and fifth
segments each with basal half yellowish, and apical half brown; sixth seg-
ment entirely brown. Right antenna with one small sensorium near the
apex of the third segment, a large oval sensorium on the fourth, the usual
apical one of the fifth and the group at the base of the unguis of the sixth
segment. Left antenna with two circular sensoria on the third segment;
sensoria of the remaining segments as in the right antenna. Length of
antennal segments: I, .122 mm.; II, .109 mm.; III, .476 mm.; IV, .204 mm.;
V, .245 mm.; VI, .177 mm. Rostrum reaching to middle of abdomen; basal
portion yellowish, mid-portion light brown with oval black spots, apical
portion dark brown.
Thorax brown, somewhat lighter than the head, with black spots of
various shapes and sizes, most numerous in the mid-dorsal region. Pro-
thorax with rather prominent lateral tubercles. Femora of all legs brown,
with basal portions lighter than the remainder; tibiae of all legs with
yellowish middle portions, bases, and apices dark brown. Tarsi all black.
Length of hind tibia 2.24 mm.; first joint of hind tarsus .109 mm., second
joint .272 mm.
First two abdominal segments each with an irregular black area on
each side of the median line. Last two segments each with two oblong
black areas. In addition to these larger black areas a number of small
circular black spots surround the bases of some of the body hairs. Cor-
nicles and the broad gradually sloping cones black. Cauda and anal plate
black; broadly rounded and with numerous moderately long curved hairs.








VOL. XVI-No. 1


Type locality: Gainesville, Florida.
Types: Holotype alate viviparous female, collected near Pond
A., from Pinus taeda, April 18, 1928, (F 354-28), and morpho-
type apterous viviparous female of the same colony deposited
in the U. S. National Museum collection. Cat. No. 44302. Para-
types in the collection of the Entomology Department, Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station and in the collection of the
author. Type material collected by the author, and selected
from a series of forty-five alate and twenty-three apterous
females.
Notes: This species is included in an unpublished manuscript
of H. F. Wilson, which was kindly loaned to the writer by Pro-
fessor Wilson. To this insect he has given the name carolina
which name is being retained with the permission of Professor
Wilson. The species is apparently rather close to Cinara australi
(Ashmead), but differs from his description in that the rostrum
reaches only to the cornicles and the third antennal segment is
not widest at the apex. On account of these differences and due
to the very general nature of Ashmead's description it seems
best to describe this as a new species rather than to refer it to
the species australi.
In the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST, Vol. V, no. 2, 1921, A. C. Mason
lists Lachnus pini as feeding on Pinus taeda and in Vol. V, no.
4, 1922 of the same journal reports upon some life history ex-
periments with this same species. Slides prepared by Mason
and labeled Lachnus pini have been examined by the author and
found to be identical with the species above described. There is
some variation in size and form of body structures in different
individuals. The minimum and maximum measurements of 15
alate females are as follows:
Length of body 2.72-3.52 mm.; width of head across the compound eyes
.653-.680 mm.; length of antennal segments, I, .095-.109 mm.; II, .109 mm.;
III, .462-.544 mm.; IV, .204-.218 mm.; V, .231-.258 mm.; VI, .163-.177 mm.;
length of hind tibia 2.00-.212 mm.; first joint of hind tarsus .095-.109 mm.,
second joint .245-.286 mm. Third antennal segment with 5 to 10 sensoria,
fourth with 1 or 2, and fifth with 1 or 2 in addition to the primary apical
one. A study of seven apterous females gave the following measurements:
length 3.0-3.5 mm.;, width of head through the eyes .694-.725 mm.; length
of antennal segments, I, .095-.122 mm., II, .095-.129 mm., III, .449-.503
mm., IV, .177-.231 mm., V, .204-.245 mm., VI, .136-.163 mm.; length of hind
tibia 2.01-2.16 mm., first joint of hind tarsus .095-.109 mm., second tarsal
joint .245-.286 mm. Third and fourth antennal segments each with 1 to 3
sensoria, fifth with 1 or 2 in addition to the apical one.










THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


Collections: Pinus sp., Lake City, Mar. 28, 1897 (A. L. Quain-
tance) ; Gainesville, Apr. 23, 1926 (F 105*26), Feb. 3, 1928
(F 294-28) ; Pinus taeda, Apr. 16, 1914 (A. C. Mason) ; Gaines-
ville, Mar. 3, 1928 (F 300-28), Mar. 22, 1928 (F 321-28), Apr.
18, 1928 (F 354-28), Apr. 6, 1932 (F 890-32), Apr. 25, 1932
(F 927-32), May 25, 1932 (F 950-32).
CINARA LONGISPINOSA, new species
Alate viviparous female. (Figs. 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 17.) Length 3.0
mm. Prevailing color brown; body with a fine, white, mealy covering. Body
and appendages with prominent, long hairs. Head very dark brown, lat-
eral extensions black. Width of head across the compound eyes .843 mm.
Eyes red, situated on pronounced lateral extensions of the head, without
ocular tubercles. Ocelli bordered with black. Antennae with first two seg-
ments brown, somewhat lighter than the head; third, fourth, and fifth
segments each with basal half yellowish or dusky and apical portion dark
brown; sixth segment dark brown except a very small basal portion which
is yellowish. Measurements of antennal segments as follows: I, .109 mm.,
II, .095 mm., III, .517 mm., IV, .204 mm., V, .272 mm., VI, .231 mm. Right
antenna with nine sensoria on the third segment, three on the fourth, the
usual apical one on the fifth, the sixth with the large primary sensorium,
and three small accessory ones. Numbers of sensoria on the segments of
the left antenna similar to those of the right except that the fourth seg-
ment has but two. Rostrum reaching to third coxae; apical portion dark
brown, base light brown.
Thorax dark brown with the thoracic lobes almost black; wing inser-
tions yellowish. Prothorax without marked lateral tubercles. Wings hya-
line; fore wing with costal margin dark brown, stigma and veins light
brown; media much fainter than other veins. Apex of stigma forming
almost a right angle with margin of the wing, ending rather abruptly but
not terminated by a distinct vein. Hind wing normal, with two oblique
veins; veins light brown. Legs with femora light brown at base shading
to dark brown at apex, middle portion having a mottled appearance.
Tibiae and tarsi entirely black. Tibiae decidedly curved. Femora and
tibiae with very long curved hairs. Length of hind tibia 1.88 mm.; first
joint of hind tarsus .150 mm., second tarsal joint .245 mm.
Abdomen brown, much lighter than head and thorax with numerous
small, oval, dark brown spots in transverse rows on the dorsum. Abdomen
thickly set with long, slightly curved hairs. Cornicles dark brown, situated
on brown, steep-sided cones with curved hairs much shorter and finer
than those of the abdomen. Cauda and anal plate rounded with several
long, curved hairs; color dark brown.
Apterous viviparous female. (Figs. 11, 14 and 18.) Length 3.8 mm.
Coloration much as in the alate form except that the abdomen has many
more of the dark brown spots. Measurements of various structures as
follows: width of head through the eyes .925 mm., length of antennal seg-
ments, I, .095 mm., II, .082 mm., III, .490 mm., IV, .245 mm., V, .258 mm.,
VI, .231 mm.; length of hind tibia 2.08 mm.; first joint of hind tarsus .177
mm., second joint .272 mm. Antennae without sensoria on third and fourth
segments.









VOL. XVI-No. 1 5

Type locality: Gainesville, Florida.
Types: Holotype, alate viviparous female collected at Devil's
Mill Hopper, March 8, 1929 (F 486-29) and Morphotype, apter-
ous viviparous female, same data as above, deposited in the
U. S. National Museum Collection. Cat. No. 44303. Paratypes
in the collections of the Entomology Department, Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Station, and in that of the author. Type
material collected by the author, and selected from a series of
five alate and five apterous females.
Notes: The most outstanding and distinctive characteristic of
this aphid is the shape of the head which is very short and broad
with pronounced lateral projections on which are situated the
eyes. These latter organs are without ocular tubercles and pro-
jecting as they do give the aphids a very peculiar appearance
when viewed from above. There is considerable variation in
size among different individuals from the same colony.
Measurements of four alate females are as follows: length 3.0-4.1 mm.;
width of head across the compound eyes .843-.952 mm.; length of antennal
segments, I, .102-.109 mm., II, .095-.109 mm., III, .490-.585 mm., IV, .204-
.245 mm., V, .252-.272 mm., VI, .231-.258 mm. Third antennal segment
with 6 to 11 sensoria; fourth with 1 to 3; fifth with 0 to 2 in addition to
the usual terminal one. Length of hind tibiae 1.88-2.00 mm.; first joint of
hind tarsus .136-.163 mm., second joint .245-.258 mm. Three apterous fe-
males varied within following limits: length 3.4-4.2 mm.; width of head
through the eyes .925-.952 mm.; length of antennal segments, I, .095-.109
mm., II, .082-.095 mm., III, .490-.544 mm., IV, .245-.272 mm., V, .258-.279
mm., VI, .231-.245 mm.; length of hind tibia 2.04-2.20 mm.; first joint of
hind tarsus .150-.190 mm., second joint .272-.293 mm. Third and fourth
antennal segments without sensoria.
Collections: Pinus taeda, Gainesville, Mar. 8, 1929 (F 486-
29) and Mar. 22, 1929 (F 505-29).

CINARA TAEDAE, new species
Alate viviparous female. (Figs. 19, 21, 23, 24, 26, 27 and 28.) Length
of body 2.52 mm.; general color dark brown. Head dark brown with sev-
eral short fine hairs. Width of head through the compound eyes .571 mm.
Eyes dark reddish-brown; rather prominent with distinct ocular tubercles.
Ocelli clear, bordered with very dark brown. First two antennal segments
concolorous with the head; third segment with the greater portion light
yellowish-brown, a small apical portion dark brown, fourth and fifth seg-
ments each with basal one-half yellowish-brown, and apical portion dark
brown; sixth segment entirely dark brown. Measurements of antennal
segments as follows: I, .095 mm., II, .082 mm., III, .346 mm., IV, .163 mm.,
V, .183 mm., VI, .156 mm. The sensoria of the antennae very faint. Right
antenna with 3 sensoria on the third segment, 1 on the fourth segment,
and 1 on the fifth in addition to the primary terminal one; left antenna










THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


with 4 sensoria on third segment, 2 on the fourth, and the fifth with 1
secondary sensorium; sixth segment of both antennae with the usual large
primary sensorium and 3 small accessory sensoria at the base of the spur.
Antennae with a few rather short fine hairs. Rostrum reaching just be-
yond the opening of the cornicles; brown throughout its length but with
the apical portion darker than the remainder.
Prothorax brown, a shade lighter than the head; without lateral tu-
bercles. Meso- and meta-thorax dark brown with the lobes very dark
brown, almost black; wing insertions yellowish-brown. Each of these last
two segments with a small lateral tubercle. Wings hyaline. Forewing with
the stigma black, and the -veins amber colored. Apex of the stigma meet-
ing the wing margin at an acute angle and not terminated by a distinct
vein. Median vein faintly indicated. Hind wing with amber colored veins,
two oblique veins present.
Femora of all pairs of legs dark brown, with a small basal portion
yellowish. Tibiae of first and second pairs of legs with bases and apices
dark brown, the middle portions yellowish-brown; tibiae of last pair of
legs entirely dark brown. Tarsi of all legs very dark brown. Hairs on
the legs short, fine and reclining toward the apices of the joints. Length
of hind tibia 1.76 mm.; first joint of hind tarsus .082 mm., second tarsal
joint .218 mm.
Abdomen dark brown, without markings; each segment with a small
lateral tubercle. Hairs of the abdomen short, slightly curved and hyaline.
Cornicles black, situated on very dark brown, steep sided cones set with
very fine short hairs. Cauda rather sharply rounded; anal plate broadly
rounded; each set with numerous slightly curved short hairs.
Apterous viviparous female. (Figs. 20, 22 and 25.) Coloration of body
and appendages very similar to those of the alate female. Variation in
this form indicated by the following measurements of four individuals:
length of body, 2.08-2.40 mm.; width of head across the eyes, .598-.653
mm.; length of antennal segments, I, .089-.095 mm., II, .068-.075 mm., III,
.313-.340 mm., IV, .136-.156 mm., V, .177-.190 mm., VI, .150-.156 mm.; an-
tennae without sensoria except the usual primary ones at apices of the
fifth and sixth segments; length of hind tibia 1.64-1.72 mm.; first joint of
hind tarsus .068-.982 mm., second joint .225-.245 mm.
Type locality: Gainesville, Florida.
Types: Holotype alate viviparous female collected on Pinus
taeda in the grounds of the Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station, March 15, 1928 (F 311-28), deposited in U. S. National
Museum collection. Cat. No. 44304. Paratypes from same
colony as the holotype in the collection of the Entomology De-
partment, Florida Agr. Exp. Sta. and in the collection of the
author. Type material collected by the author, and selected from
a series of thirty-seven alate and twenty apterous females.
Collections: Pinus taeda, Gainesville, Mar. 15, 1928 (F 311-
28), Apr. 6, 1932 (F 887-32).
Notes: This aphid is a bark-feeder being found between the
bases of the needles on the younger shoots of the pine. It ap-










VOL. XVI-No. 1


pears to be rather close to pergandei Wilson but differs from that
species in the length of the beak, that structure being shorter in
pergandei. This species also lacks the black spots which are
found on the abdomen of pergandei. The variation in four alate
females is indicated by the following measurements: length of
body 2.24-2.80 mm.; width of head through the compound eyes
.571-.612 mm.; length of antennal segments; I, .096-.108 mm.,
II, .074-.082 mm., III, .313-.367 mm., IV, .136-.163 mm., V, .183-
.204 mm., VI, .150-.163 mm. The third segment with 1 to 4 sen-
soria, fourth with 1 or 2, fifth with 0 to 1 in addition to the
apical primary one, and sixth segment with 1 large and 3 small
sensoria in every case. Length of hind tibia 1.72-2.00 mm., first
joint of hind tarsus .068-.082 mm., second tarsal joint, .218-
.245 mm.

Calaphis castaneoides Baker
Baker, A. C., Proc. Ent. Soc. of Washington,
XVIII, p. 187, 1916 (orig. desc.).

The sexual forms of this species appear to be undescribed
and descriptions are here presented.
Alate male.-Prevailing colors yellowish-brown and black. Length of
body 1.40 mm. Head yellowish-brown. Width somewhat greater than the
length. Frontal margin with a few pointed spine-like hyaline hairs. Width
through the compound eyes .371 mm. Compound eyes reddish-brown, large,
with prominent ocular tubercles. Median ocellus large, prominent, lateral
ocelli inconspicuous. Antennae six-segmented, considerably longer than the
body. First two segments and small basal portion of the third about same
color as the head, remainder of the third darker brown. Basal portions
of the fourth, fifth, and sixth light brown, the apical portions dark brown.
Unguis of the sixth yellowish brown. All segments armed with a few
rather long, pointed, hyaline spines. Secondary sensoria present on third,
fourth, fifth, and sixth segments; those on the third segment scattered over
most of the surface of the segment, on the fourth, fifth, and sixth largely
confined to one side of the segments, in some specimens to a single irreg-
ular row. Comparative length of the antenna segments as follows: III,
.500 mm.; IV, .257 mm.; V, .228 mm.; VI, base, .143 mm.; unguis, .400
mm. Rostrum yellow with extreme tip brown, rather thick and short ex-
tending but little beyond the first coxae.
Prothorax yellow, long, and somewhat wider than the head, meso- and
meta-thorax yellow with the lobes brown. Wings hyaline, costal margin
of fore wing and posterior margin of stigma dark brown, a dark brown
spot near the base of stigma. Anal and cubital veins bordered with brown
shading, the shading of cubital confined to basal one-half of vein. Sec-
ond fork of media somewhat closer to first fork than to margin of the
wing. Radial sector faint, basal portion nearly obsolete. Hind wing with
two oblique veins very faintly indicated. Legs long and slender. Femora










8 THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST

yellowish, tibiae and tarsi mostly dark brown. The tibiae armed with
numerous pointed, hyaline spines, a smaller number on the other leg
segments.
Abdomen yellow, without markings. Cornicles, cauda, and anal plate
concolorous with the abdomen. Genitalia brown. Cornicles truncate, length
.071 mm., width at base .078 mm. Cauda knob-like, anal plate very slightly
indented. Cauda and anal plate armed with several rather long, curved,
hyaline hairs.
Apterous oviparous female.-Prevailing colors yellow and dark brown
or black. Length 2.11 mm. Head yellowish-brown, anterior margin darker
than remainder. Anterior portion armed with six or eight long, slightly
curved hyaline hairs, several similar though shorter hairs on the dorsal
surface. Width of head through the compound eyes .428 mm. Eyes red-
dish, rather large, with prominent ocular tubercles. Antennae six-seg-
mented, slightly shorter than the body. First two segments dusky or light
brown, remaining segments light yellowish brown with apices dark brown.
Spines on the first two segments pointed or slightly enlarged at tip, those
on remaining segments about as long as width of segments and somewhat
enlarged at tip. Segments III to VI imbricated. Length of antennal seg-
ments as follows: III, .543 mm., IV, .257 mm., V, .228 mm., VI, base, .128
mm., unguis, .443 mm. Rostrum yellow with tip brown, reaching nearly to
second coxae.
Pro- and meso-thorax mostly brown; metathorax and abdomen yellow-
ish with brown markings. Anterior abdominal segments with dorsal trans-
verse brown stripes and large lateral areas of the same color. Anterior
to the cornicles the dark spots have largely merged forming a large dorsal
brown patch. Prothorax slightly wider than the head with a small lateral
tubercle on each side near the posterior margin. Femora of all legs yel-
lowish, tibiae and tarsi brown. Hind tibiae swollen, with sensoria confined
to basal half. Legs, especially the tibiae, with numerous rather long
pointed spines. Cornicles dusky or light brown, truncate, .071 mm. long.
Cauda knobbed, yellowish or dusky.
Note: The specimens on which the above descriptions are
based have been deposited in the U. S. National Museum Collec-
tion.
Collections: Castanea nana, Gainesville, Oct. 1, 1928 (F 407-
28) alatee vivip. females and pupae), Nov. 15, 1928 (F 420-
28), alatee vivip. females and ovip. females), Nov. 4, 1929
(F 544-29), Nov. 8, 1929 (F 547-29) alatee vivip. females, ovip.
females and males).

CALAPHIS NANAE, new species

Alate viviparous female. (Figs. 29-35.) General color yellow and black.
Length 1.44 mm. Head greenish-yellow, anterior margin dusky. Width
much greater than length with rather definite antennal tubercles. Armed
with a few short, curved, capitate spines. Width through the compound
eyes .422 mm. Eyes red, rather large with prominent ocular tubercles.
Antennae as long as, or longer than, the body. First segment greenish-









VOL. XVI-No. 1 9

yellow; second dusky; third yellowish with black or dark brown areas
surrounding the sensoria and at the apex; fourth, fifth, and sixth yellow-
ish at base and shading to dark brown at the apex. All segments with very
short, reclining, capitate spines. Length of the antennal segments as fol-
lows: I, .095 mm., II, .068 mm., III, .734 mm., IV, .340 mm., V, .340 mm.,
VI, base, .150 mm., unguis, .734 mm. Third segment with six circular sen-
soria arranged in a straight row and unevenly spaced along the segment.
Fourth segment without sensoria. Rostrum yellowish, with apex black;
reaching to the first coxae.
Thorax greenish-yellow, the lobes light brown, membranes and wing
insertions yellow. Prothorax slightly wider than the head, without promi-
nent lateral tubercles; mesothorax with small lateral tubercles near the
anterior margin. Wings hyaline. Fore wing with radial sector very faintly
indicated. Stigma yellow, with the inner margin black. Anal vein and base
of the cubitus bordered with black, other veins dark brown. Hind wing
with veins light brown; rather faint. Femora of all pairs of legs yellow
at bases and shading to brown at the apices; tibiae with middle portions
yellow, bases and apices dark brown; tarsi dark brown. Legs with short,
reclining, capitate spines, especially numerous on the tibiae.
Abdomen greenish-yellow, with a yellowish-brown area between the
cornicles. Along each side of the mid-dorsal line a longitudinal row of oval,
dusky spots; larger dusky markings along the lateral margins of the
abdomen. A few rather long, capitate hairs between the cauda and the
cornicles. Cornicles light brown with the apices somewhat darker. Some-
what longer than wide, truncate with the apex slightly flared. Length
.095 mm. Cauda light brown; distinctly knobbed and armed with a few
long, slightly curved hairs situated on rather large conical bases. Anal
plate yellowish, bilobed, with numerous curved hairs arising from conical
bases, those at the apices of the lobes longer and thicker than the lateral
ones.
Type locality: Gainesville, Florida.
Types: Holotype alate viviparous female collected May 4,
1928 near the Devil's Mill Hopper; deposited in the U. S.
National Museum Collection. Cat. No. 44305. Paratypes from
the same locality in the collections of the Ent. Dept., Florida
Agr. Exp. Sta., of A. A. Granovsky, and in that of the author.
Type selected from a series of fifty-four specimens. Type mate-
rial collected by the author.
Notes: This species has been collected only from the small
reclining chinquapin, Castanea nana. The alate viviparous fe-
male and nymphs are the only forms that have been taken. This
insect occasionally occurs in association with the preceding
species. A study of ten alate females gave the following meas-
urements: length 1.32-1.92 mm.; width of head .394-.428 mm.;
length of antennal segments, I, .095-.109 mm., II, .054-.068 mm.,
III, .694-.816 mm., IV, .340-.394 mm., V, .299-.381 mm., VI, base,










THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


.122-.163 mm., unguis, .734-.816 mm. Third segment with 4 to
9 sensoria, fourth segment without sensoria.
Collections: Castanea nana, Gainesville, May 4, 1928 (F 375-
28), Oct. 1, 1928 (F 407B-28), Apr. 22, 1930 (F 602-30), May
25, 1932 (F 949-32).

NEOSYMYDOBIUS LUTEUS, new species

Alate viviparous female. (Figs. 43-45 and 47-50.) Prevailing colors
yellowish and brown. Length 1.24 mm. Head dark brown; width somewhat
greater than the length. Frontal portion between the antennae somewhat
produced so that when viewed from above the head is triangular in outline.
Width of head across the compound eyes, .394 mm. Head with a few very
short, fine spines. Eyes reddish; closely appressed to the head, with defi-
nite ocular tubercles. Ocelli rather small. Antennae slightly over half as
long as body. First two segments dusky or light brown; third, fourth, fifth,
and base of the sixth segment pale or very light brown, apices dark brown;
unguis of the sixth segment with basal portion pale and apex light brown.
Third segment with four rather large circular sensoria, fourth segment
without sensoria. Antennae with a few extremely short fine hairs. Length
of segments as follows: I, .048 mm., II, .048 mm., III, .190 mm., IV, .136
mm., V, .136 mm., VI, base, .109 mm., unguis, .122 mm. Rostrum yellow-
ish, with the tip light brown.
Prothorax olive-brown, lighter than the head. Meso- and meta-thorax
dark brown with the lobes very dark brown, almost black. Prothorax
somewhat wider than the head, narrowest in front, with low, blunt, lateral
tubercles. Meso- and meta-thorax each with a conical tubercle at the
anterior lateral margin. Wing insertions yellowish. Wings hyaline. Fore
wing with radial sector present though somewhat fainter than other veins;
media twice-branched. Stigma and veins light brown, a very faint shading
at the tips of the veins. Hind wing with two cross veins present; veins
very light brown. All pairs of legs dusky or light yellowish-brown, with
the tarsi light brown. Legs with short, fine, reclining, hyaline hairs, most
numerous and longest on the tibiae.
Abdomen with first two segments dusky, remainder very pale green-
ish-yellow. Along each side of the dorsal median line is an irregular longi-
tudinal band of brighter yellowish-green with areas of the same color
along the lateral margins. Cornicles very pale yellow, almost white; trun-
cate, slightly longer than wide, somewhat constricted above the middle.
Cauda knobbed, much wider than long; armed with several curved hyaline
hairs which are slightly longer than the cauda. Anal plate bilobed with
numerous hairs much longer and thicker than those of the cauda, situated
on large conical bases. Cauda and anal plate pale dusky.
Type locality: Gainesville, Florida.
Types: Holotype alate viviparous female collected from Quer-
cus nigra, May 12, 1928 (F 302-28), placed in the U. S. National
Museum Collection. Cat. No. 44306. Paratypes from same host
and locality in the collections of the Entomology Department,
Florida Agr. Exp. Sta., of A. A. Granovsky, and in that of the









VOL. XVI-No. 1


author. Types selected from sixty-three alate females. Type
material collected by the author.
Notes: This species appears to be rather close to Neosymy-
dobius mimicus Hottes but differs from that species in the fol-
lowing respects: the abdomen does not have the greenish-brown
bands found in mimicus; the fourth and fifth antennal segments
are subequal and the unguis of the sixth is as long as, or longer
than, the fifth, and the base of the sixth is longer than the
unguis. It also appears to be rather similar to Neosymydobius
memorialis Hottes and Frison but can be distinguished from
that species by the sensoria of the third antennal segment and
the relative length of the base and unguis of the sixth segment.
This species has four to six sensoria on the third antennal seg-
ment, whereas memorialis has eight to ten. The unguis of the
sixth antennal segment is subequal to the base in luteus; in
memorialis the unguis is much longer than the base. In some
specimens of this species the abdomen is pale yellowish with
orange markings taking the place of the brighter green mark-
ings of the specimess having the greenish-yellow abdomen. A
single apterous viviparous female was taken. This specimen
was yellowish with the tarsi and the apices of the antennal seg-
ments dusky or light brown. Measurements of five alate females
as follows: length, 1.24-1.72 mm.; width of head, .367-,435 mm.;
length of antennal segments, III, .177-.258 mm.; IV, .136-.190
mm.; V, .136-.177 mm.; VI, base, .109-.136 mm.; unguis, .122-
.136 mm.; third segment with 4-6 sensoria, fourth segment
always without sensoria.
Collections: Quercus nigra, Gainesville, Apr. 24, 1928.
(F 357-28), May 12, 1928 (F 382-28), Quercus cinerea, Lady
Lake, Apr. 8, 1932. (F 899-32 & F 902-32).

THERIOAPHIS TECTAE, new species
Alate viviparous female.-(Figs. 36-42.) Prevailing colors green and
brown. Length of body 2.08 mm. Head yellowish, with a dusky, median,
longitudinal band. The anterior margin and an area surrounding the eyes
and antennae also dusky. Front of head with a few fine, curved hairs.
Width through the compound eyes .435 mm. Eyes red; large, with distinct
ocular tubercles. Antennae slightly shorter than the body. First two seg-
ments dark brown; third segment with basal portion yellowish-brown,
middle yellow, and apical portion very dark brown or black; fourth seg-
ment with basal half yellowish, apical half dark brown; fifth segment with
basal half light brown and apical part dark brown; sixth segment entirely
light brown. Third segment with the basal one-third somewhat thicker
than the remainder of the segment. Third to sixth segments imbricated.










THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


Length of antennal segments: I, .095 mm., II, .075 mm., III, .666 mm., IV,
.381 mm., V, .313 mm., VI, base, .163 mm., unguis, .177 mm. Third seg-
ment with five oval sensoria in a single row on the thickened basal portion.
Fourth segment without sensoria. Hairs on the antennae very short, and
spine-like. Rostrum short and thick reaching not quite to hind margin of
prothorax, light brown with tip dark brown.
Thorax yellowish-green with a faint, median, longitudinal, dusky band;
lobes pale, almost white. Prothorax somewhat wider than the head, with-
out lateral tubercles. Wings hyaline. Fore wing with radial sector faintly
indicated, media twice-branched. Stigma broad, tapering rapidly, brown;
veins light brown with small shaded areas at the tips. Hind wings with
both media and cubitus present. Legs entirely light brown. All segments
of the legs with short reclining hairs, especially numerous at the apex of
the tibiae.
Abdomen yellowish-green without markings. Cornicles truncate, widest
at base and somewhat constricted above the middle. Length .055 mm.
Cauda distinctly knobbed, with two thick curved spines and several finer
slightly curved hairs, arising from raised conical bases. Anal plate deeply
bifid, the lobes separated by a U-shaped cleft. Each lobe with several
curved hairs arising from conical bases. Cauda and anal plate dusky
green.
Type locality: Gainesville, Florida.
Types: Holotype alate viviparous female collected on the
grounds of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station April
16, 1930 (F 587-30), deposited in the U. S. National Museum
Collection. Cat. No. 44307. Paratypes from the same host and
locality, in the collections of the Ent. Dept., Florida Agr. Exp.
Sta., of A. A. Granovsky, and in that of the author. Type
selected from a series of one-hundred-three alate females. Type
material collected by the author.
Notes: On the growing tips and young leaves of the native
bamboo, Arundinaria tecta were found during the spring of
1930 rather large colonies of this green aphid. The alate vivi-
parous female is the only form that has been taken, and appar-
ently all mature females are winged.
Collections: Bamboo, Jacksonville, May 11, 1922 (Beyer);
Gainesville, Apr. 16, 1930 (F 587-30), Apr. 25, 1930 (F 619-30).
Explanation of Plate I
Figs. 1-9 Cinara carolina, n. sp. (1, 3, 5, 6, 8, & 9 alate; 2, 4, & 7 ap-
terous).
Figs. 10-18 Cinara longispinosa, n. sp. (10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17 alate; 11,
14, 18 apterous)
Figs. 19-28 Cinara taedae, n. sp. (19, 21, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28 alate; 20, 22,
25 apterous).
Figs. 29-35 Calaphis nanae, n. sp. alatee).
Figs. 36-42 Therioaphis tectae, n. sp. alatee).
Figs. 43-50 Neosymydobius luteus, n. sp. (43-45, 47-50 alate; 46 ap-
terous).











VOL. XVI-No. 1


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Florida Aphids-Plate I


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Uhe
FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST
Official Organ of The Florida Entomological Society, Gainesville,
Florida.

Vol. XVI JULY, 1932 No. 1

J. R. WATSON...........------------------------ Editor
E. W. BERGER -------------------------------Associate Editor
H. E. BRATLEY -. -----------....--........- Bsiness Manager
Issued once every three months. Free to all members of the
Society.
Subscription price to non-members is $1.00 per year in ad-
vance; 35 cents per copy.

PIN WORM ON TOMATOES
Growers of tomatoes in the Bradenton district suffered rather
severe losses during the past spring from attacks of a small
caterpillar. This caterpillar bores into the fruit under the calyx.
It does not enter the fruit far, but attacked tomatoes will invari-
ably decay before they get to market; and, because of the fact
that these caterpillars are so well hidden under the calyx, detec-
tion of infested fruit is very difficult.
The caterpillars became particularly abundant towards the
close of the season. An investigation after the season closed
revealed that practically 100', of the fruit still clinging to the
vines had been attacked.
These insects were reared by Mr. H. E. Bratley of the Depart-
ment of Entomology, and submitted to the Bureau of Ento-
mology, U.S.D.A. They were identified as Gnorimoschema lyco-
persicella Busck.
J. R. WATSON AND W. L. THOMPSON.



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