Title: Florida Entomologist
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Title: Florida Entomologist
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Florida Entomological Society
Publisher: Florida Entomological Society
Place of Publication: Winter Haven, Fla.
Publication Date: 1933
Copyright Date: 1917
 Subjects
Subject: Florida Entomological Society
Entomology -- Periodicals
Insects -- Florida
Insects -- Florida -- Periodicals
Insects -- Periodicals
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General Note: Eigenfactor: Florida Entomologist: http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1653/024.092.0401
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Volume ID: VID00291
Source Institution: University of Florida
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Florida Entomologist
Official Organ of the Florida Entomological Society

VOL. XVI JANUARY, 1933 No. 4

FIVE NEW SPECIES OF ANURAPHIS AND APHIS*
A. N. TISSOT
The aphid species described in this paper have the cauda
either distinctly conical or with a very definite constriction and
are being referred to the two genera, Anuraphis and Aphis. If
the view now held by some writers, that the species of these two
groups really represent one genus, becomes established, then the
five species here considered will of course all fall under the
genus Aphis.

ANURAPHIS ARUNDINARIAE, new species

Alate viviparous female. (Plate III, figs. 1-6.) General color of body
and appendages brown. Length of body 1.64 mm. Head very dark brown.
Width much greater than the length. Posterior margin somewhat curved,
front between the antennae strongly arched. Dorsal surface with a few
very short fine spines each arising from a minute circular clear area. Width
of head across the eyes .408 mm. Eyes dark reddish-brown; large, promi-
nent, with elongated ocular tubercles. Ocelli large, bordered with black.
Antennae dark brown except a small basal portion of the third segment
which is somewhat lighter than the rest; six-segmented, reaching about
to the middle of the abdomen. The unguis of the sixth segment slightly
longer than the third segment and the fourth longer than the fifth. The
first two segments smooth, the remaining segments definitely imbricated,
all segments with a few very short reclining spines. Length of antennal
segments as follows: I, .068 mm., II, .048 mm., III, .286 mm., IV, .204
mm., V, .163 mm., VI, base, .082 mm., unguis, .326 mm. Third segment
with 13 oval to circular sensoria scattered over most of one side of the
segment; fourth segment with 5 sensoria arranged in a single rather even
row; fifth segment with one rather small sensorium in addition to the
larger terminal one; sixth segment with the usual group of one large and
a few small sensoria at the base of the unguis. Rostrum light brown with
the tip dark brown, thick and short, reaching only slightly beyond the
prothorax.
Thorax brown; the dorsal lobes of the thorax dark brown, concolor-
ous with the head; wing insertions brown. The prothorax and the an-
terior margin of the mesothorax with cone-shaped lateral tubercles. Wings
'Contribution from Department of Entomology, Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station. Published January, 1933.











THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


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Explanation of Plate III

Anuraphis arundinariae n. sp.
Figs. 1-5-Alate viviparous female.
Figs. 6-8-Apterous viviparous female.
Anuraphis iteae n. sp.
Figs. 9-14-Alate viviparous female.
Figs. 15-18-Apterous viviparous female.
Anuraphis minima n. sp.
Figs. 19-23-Apterous viviparous female.
Figs. 24-25-Male. Figs. 26-27-Oviparous female.
Aphis astericola n. sp.
Figs. 28-32-Alate viviparous female.
Figs. 33-35-Apterous viviparous female.
Aphis floridanae n. sp.
Figs. 36-40-Alate viviparous female.
Figs. 41-44-Apterous viviparous female.


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VOL. XVI-No. 4 51

hyaline, stigma dark brown, veins black. Fore wing with the media twice-
branched, the second fork much nearer to the margin of the wing than
to the first fork. Hind wing with two oblique veins. Legs dark brown
with the bases of the femora yellowish. The forelegs slightly lighter than
the other two pairs.
Abdomen yellowish-brown with dark brown markings as follows: an
irregular, median, longitudinal band on the dorsal surface, two rows of
more or less connected black spots along each lateral margin, and two
wide transverse bands between the cornicles and the cauda. Small cone-
shaped lateral tubercles on several of the abdominal segments. Cornicles
dark brown; elongated, wider at the base and apex and slightly constricted
in the middle. Deeply imbricated, giving the surface a wrinkled appear-
ance. Length, .204 mm. Cauda and anal plate very dark brown. Cauda
cone-shaped without a constriction, the surface covered with short, thick,
spine-like processes, four curved hyaline hairs on each side near the tip.
Anal plate hemispherical, the surface covered with spine-like processes
similar to those of the cauda, armed with numerous rather long slightly
curved hyaline hairs arising from conical bases. Length of cauda .109 mm.
Apterous viviparous female. (Plate III, figs. 6-8.) General color of
body and appendages brown. Length of body 1.56 mm. Head dark brown,
very short antennal tubercles, the anterior margin between the antennae
strongly arched. The dorsal surface with a few short hyaline hairs arising
from conical bases. Eyes very dark reddish-brown. Width of head across
the eyes .408 mm. Antenna dark brown, except the basal half of the
third segment which is light brown. Segments III to VI very definitely
imbricated. Length of segments as follows: I, .082 mm., II, .054 mm., III,
.258 mm., IV, .163 mm., V, .163 mm., VI, base, .082 mm., unguis, .326 mm.
Segments without sensoria except the primary ones of the fifth and sixth
segments. Rostrum light brown with dark brown tip, thick and rather
short, reaching only to the second coxae.
Thorax and abdomen yellowish-brown, darker brown along the lateral
margins. Prothorax and some of the abdominal segments with elongated,
round tipped, lateral tubercles. Surface of the abdomen reticulated, espe-
cially along the sides. Legs medium brown, the hind pair somewhat dark-
er than the preceding pairs. Cornicles dark brown; widest at the base
and very slightly constricted in the middle. Cornicles definitely imbricated
throughout their length and having a wrinkled appearance. Length .272
mm. Cauda and anal plate dark brown. Cauda triangular, the surface
covered with blunt spine-like processes. Four curved, hyaline hairs on
each side near the apex. Anal plate hemispherical with the surface cov-
ered with spine-like processes similar to those of the cauda, and armed
with several slightly curved hyaline hairs, each arising from a conical
base. Length of cauda, .122 mm.
Type locality: Gainesville, Florida.
Types: Holotype alate viviparous female from Arundinaria
tecta, Apr. 16, 1930, and morphotype, apterous viviparous fe-
male, same data as the holotype, deposited in the U. S. National
Museum Collection, Cat. No. 44292. Paratypes from the same









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


lot in the collection of the Entomology Department, Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station, and in that of the author.
Type selected from a series of 20 alate viviparous females. Type
material collected by the author.
Notes: This brown aphid occurred in thick colonies on the
ventral side of the younger leaves of cane-brake. The most dis-
tinctive feature which serves to separate the species from other
species of the genus is the form of the cornicles. The fact that
these structures are narrowed in the middle and wider at the
base and apex may be sufficient reason for placing this form in
another genus but for the present it seems best to retain it in
the genus Anuraphis. Measurement of ten alate females indi-
cate the following range in size: length, 1.40-1.64 mm.; width
of head, .367-.408 mm.; antennal segments, III, .245-.286 mm.,
IV, .163-.204 mm., V, .136-.183 mm., VI, base, .074-.082 mm.,
unguis, .286-.326 mm.; length of cornicles, .190-.218 mm.; third
segment of the antenna with 6-13 sensoria, fourth segment with
2-5 sensoria and the fifth segment with 0-2 sensoria.
Records: Arundinaria tecta, Cane-brake, Gainesville, Apr. 16,
1930 (F 588-30).

ANURAPHIS ITEAE, new species

Alate viviparous female. (Plate III, figs. 9-14.) General color of
body and appendages brown. Length of body, 1.36 mm. Head dark brown.
Width greater than the length, posterior margin nearly straight, frontal
portion between the antennae produced. Anterior margin with a few short
spines. Width through the compound eyes .340 mm. Eyes dark reddish-
brown; large, with large prominent ocular tubercles. Ocelli bordered with
black. Antennae six-segmented, about three-fourths as long as body. The
sixth segment far exceeding the others in length, nearly or quite as long
as the combined lengths of the three preceding segments. The first two
antennal segments dark brown though somewhat lighter than the head,
the remaining segments light brown or dusky. First two segments smooth,
remaining segments imbricated. The third segment considerably thicker
than the succeeding segments. Length of the antennal segments as fol-
lows: I, .068 mm., II, .048 mm., III, .177 mm., IV, .122 mm., V, .117 mm.,
VI, base, .075 mm., unguis, .381 mm. Third segment with 7 rather large
circular sensoria, fourth segment without sensoria, the usual apical sen-
sorium on the fifth segment and the group at the base of the unguis of
the sixth segment. Antennal segments with a few minute spines. Ros-
trum light brown with dark brown tip, thick and short, reaching but little
beyond the posterior margin of the prothorax.
Thorax brown, the dorsal lobes concolorous with the head. Prothorax
with conical lateral tubercles. Wings hyaline, stigma and veins brown.
Forewing with media twice-branched. Distance between first and second










VOL. XVI-No. 4


forks about two and one-half times as great as distance from second fork
to margin of wing. Hind wing with two oblique veins. Femora of the
legs dark brown with bases yellowish, tibiae and tarsi yellowish or dusky.
End of tibiae funnel-like. Tibiae of all pairs of legs with a peculiar knob-
like structure at the apex.
Abdomen brown, apparently with darker markings. Rather prominent
lateral tubercles on some of the segments, the one between the cornicles
and cauda larger than the preceding ones. Cornicles dark brown; short,
somewhat curved, of almost equal width from base to apex; imbricated.
Length, .088 mm. Cauda and anal plate very dark brown or black. Cauda
abruptly conical, without a constriction, about as long as the cornicles.
Surface covered with numerous short, thick, spine-like processes. Four
or five much curved hairs on each side near the apex. Anal plate broadly
rounded, the surface covered with spine-like processes similar to those of
the cauda. Several long slightly curved, hyaline hairs arising from con-
ical bases.
Apterous viviparous female. (Plate III, figs. 15-18.) General color of
the body and appendages brown. Length of body, 1.20 mm. Body broadly
oval, but little longer than wide. Head dark brown. Much wider than long,
the anterior margin between the antennae somewhat produced. Eyes dark
reddish-brown; rather small with prominent ocular tubercles. First two
antennal segments concolorous with the head, the remaining segments
lighter brown. The two basal segments smooth, the remaining ones faintly
imbricated, without sensoria except the usual primary ones at the apex
of the fifth segment and at the base of the unguis of the sixth. Length
of the antennal segments as follows: I, .075 mm., II, .054 mm., III, .231
mm., IV, .136 mm., V, .122 mm., VI, base, .082 mm., unguis, .340 mm. Ros-
trum dark brown, thick and short, reaching only to first coxae.
Thorax and abdomen reddish-brown with darker brown markings. The
skin of the abdomen very definitely reticulated. Femora of all pairs of
legs reddish-brown, tibiae yellowish, tarsi brown. The apex of the tibiae
with the same knob-like structure found in the alate female. Cornicles
dark brown; of uniform width from base to apex; surface covered with
fine imbrications. Length, .128 mm. Cauda broad and blunt without con-
strictions, the surface covered with numerous short, thick, spine-like pro-
cesses, five long curved hyaline hairs on each side. Anal plate broad,
slightly rounded, the surface covered with the shorter spine-like struc-
tures similar to those of the cauda, armed with numerous hairs shorter
and finer than those of the cauda.
Type locality: Keystone Heights, Florida.
Types: Holotype alate viviparous female collected Apr. 24,
1927 (F 217-27), deposited in the U. S. National Museum Collec-
tion, Cat. No. 44291. Paratypes from the same lot as the holotype
in the collections of the Entomology Department of the Florida
Experiment Station, and in that of the author. Type selected
from a series of ten alate viviparous females. Type material col-
lected by the author.









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


Notes: This brown aphid in general appearance resembles
Aniraphis caliginosa H. & F. from dogwood. A closer examina-
tion of the two species will, however, reveal the following dif-
ferences: the sixth antennal segment in comparison with the
other segments is much longer in iteae. The lateral tubercles of
the thorax and abdomen are very much larger in caliginosa and
the cauda is armed with numerous hairs as contrasted with the
few hairs on the cauda of iteae. A study of the alate females gave
the following measurements: length, 1.08-1.52 mm.; width of
head through the eyes, .313-.354 mm.; antennal segments, III,
.150-.231 mm., IV, .095-.136 mm., V, .109-.136 mm., VI, base,
.075-.095 mm., unguis, .313-.394 mm.; length of cornicle, .088-
.109 mm.; third segment of the antenna with 5-9 sensoria, the
usual number being 6 or 7.
Records: Itea virginica, Keystone Heights, Apr. 24, 1927
(F 217-27).

ANURAPHIS MINIMA, new species

Apterous viviparous female. (Plate III, figs. 19-23.) Prevailing color
brown. Body broadly pear-shaped. Length 1.04 mm. Head pale yellowish-
brown to dark reddish-brown. Width across the compound eyes .313 mm.
Front of head rounded, posterior margin nearly straight. Eyes very dark
brown, with large ocular tubercles. Antennae six-segmented, reaching
about to the middle of the abdomen. The third and fourth segments only
partially separated, in most specimens completely fused. The first two seg-
ments brown, the third, fourth, and base of the fifth pale, the apical por-
tion of the fifth and all of the sixth brown. The first two segments smooth,
the remaining ones imbricated. All segments with a few short spines.
The usual sensoria near the apex of the fifth segment and the base of the
unguis of the sixth. Length of antennal segments as follows: I, .06 mm.,
II, .045 mm., III, .114 mm., IV, .099 mm., V, .105 mm., VI, base, .072 mm.,
unguis, .134 mm. Rostrum rather thick, reaching to the third coxae.
Thorax and abdomen yellowish-brown to dark reddish-brown. Just in
front of and between the cornicles a few dull greenish markings. The pro-
thorax with very large elongated cone-shaped lateral tubercles. Similar
lateral tubercles on the first abdominal segment and another pair between
the cornicles and the cauda, those of the latter pair somewhat smaller
than in the two preceding ones. Legs brown, the tarsi and the apices of
the femora and tibiae somewhat darker than the remaining portions.
The femora and tibiae with numerous rather long, curved, hyaline hairs.
Cornicles very dark brown, cylindrical, or slightly tapering from base to
apex. Definitely imbricated throughout their length. Length, .109 mm.
Cauda dark brown, broadly conical, the tip rounded. Four or five rather
long curved hairs on each side. Anal plate dark brown, large, rounded
and armed with numerous slightly curved hairs. The surface of the cauda
and anal plate thickly studded with short, thick, spinelike processes.










VOL. XVI-No. 4 55

Apterous male. (Plate III, figs. 24, 25.) Prevailing color brown.
Length from vertex to tip of cauda .914-.971 mm. Head dark brown. Width
much greater than the length, frontal margin rounded. Width through
eyes .285-.300 mm. Eyes reddish-brown, with large ocular tubercles. An-
tennae brown, first two segments and base of the third lighter than the
head, remainder very dark brown, almost black. First two segments
smooth, remaining ones imbricated. All segments with a few very short
and fine hyaline hairs. Third and fourth segments each with 1-3 sensoria,
fifth segment with 1 or 2 sensoria in addition to the terminal primary
one. Length of antennal segments as follows: III, .143-.150 mm., IV,
.085-.092 mm., V, .085-.092 mm., VI, base, .071-.078 mm., unguis, .100-.114
mm. Rostrum brown with apex black, reaching to coxae of last pair of
legs.
Prothorax brown, slightly lighter than the head; remainder of thorax
and the abdomen reddish- or yellowish-brown, much lighter than the head.
Prothorax with large blunt lateral tubercles similar to those of the vivi-
parous female. Legs brown, the bases of the femora and tibiae yellowish-
brown, the apices and the tarsi dark brown. First abdominal segment
with lateral tubercles similar in shape but somewhat smaller than those
of the prothorax; more pointed tubercles on the segment posterior to the
cornicles and sometimes on the other segments also. Cornicles dark brown,
nearly cylindrical without a flare at the apex, definitely imbricated. Length
.078-.085 mm. Cauda concolorous with the abdomen, short and abruptly
conical with the tip rounded. Four or five rather long, slightly curved
hyaline hairs on each side. Anal plate dark brown, large, broadly rounded,
with numerous hairs similar to those of the cauda. The surface of the
cauda and anal plate with numerous short, thick, chitinous spine-like
processes.
Oviparous female. (Plate III, figs. 26, 27.) Prevailing color brown.
Length of body from vertex to apex of anal plate 1.28-1.40 mm. Head
reddish-brown, somewhat narrowed in front with the anterior margin
rounded. Width through the eyes .300-.314 mm. Eyes reddish-brown with
rather large ocular tubercles. Antennae five- or six-segmented, somewhat
less than half as long as the body. First two segments yellowish-brown,
third, fourth, fifth, and base of sixth yellow, the apical portion of the
sixth dark brown. First two segments smooth, the remaining ones imbri-
cated. All segments with a few short, hyaline, spine-like hairs. The third
and fourth segments without sensoria, the usual primary ones at apex
of fifth and at base of the unguis. Length of antennal segments as fol-
lows: III, .143-.171 mm.; IV, .071-.085 mm., V, .100-.107 mm., VI, base,
.071-.085 mm., unguis, .114-.128 mm.
Thorax and abdomen brown, the prothorax more yellowish than the
head, the remainder of the thorax and the abdomen concolorous with the
head, except the segment behind the cornicles which is sometimes more
yellowish. The yellowish prothorax gives the insect the appearance of
having a broad light collar just behind the head. Prothorax with a large
blunt lateral tubercle. First abdominal segment and the segment just
behind the cornicles with large pointed tubercles, smaller tubercles on the
remaining abdominal segments. Legs mostly yellowish, the apex of the









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


hind femora, the apices of all the tibiae and all the tarsi dark brown. The
tibiae of the hind legs not swollen and without sensoria. The legs with
short hyaline spines, these being most numerous on the tibiae. Cornicles
dark brown, sub-cylindrical, widest at the middle and slightly narrowed
both at base and apex. Apex not flared. Finely but definitely reticulated
throughout their length. Length .114-.128 mm. Cauda yellowish to dark
brown, abruptly conical or nearly hemispherical, with five or six slightly
curved hyaline hairs on each side. Anal plate dark brown with numerous
hyaline hairs. Surface of the cauda and anal plate thickly covered with
short thick spine-like processes.
Type locality: Gainesville, Florida.
Types: Holotype apterous viviparous female taken from
Prunus americana June 6, 1930 (F 656-30). Allotype male,
Gainesville, from Prunus americana, Dec. 4, 1931 (F 831-31),
on slide with an oviparous female. Morphotype oviparous fe-
male, same data as allotype male, on slide with a male and four
oviparous females. All of above types deposited in the U. S.
National Museum Collection, Cat. No. 44293. Paratypes in the
collections of the Entomology Department, Florida Agricul-
tural Experiment Station, and in that of the author. Types
selected from a large number of apterous viviparous females
and oviparous females and from ten males. Type material col-
lected by the author.
Notes: This small brown aphid is found on the leaves and
tender twigs of the native plums. The insect feeds almost ex-
clusively along the midrib and larger veins of the leaves and
frequently cause the leaves to become tightly curled. The spe-
cies has been under observation for more than three years and
an alate individual has never been observed. It seems altogether
probable that only apterous forms occur. In the latter part of
November and during December 1931 a few males were found
among large numbers of oviparous females upon a small plum
tree. The females were depositing eggs in abundance upon the
smaller twigs. Apparently none of these hatched. There is a
strong tendency to a variation in the number of antennal seg-
ments in this species. About one-third of the viviparous and
oviparous females have six segments in the antennae, a few
have the third and fourth joints only partially divided and the
remainder have only five segments. In the case of the males a
larger proportion show the six-segmented condition. In some
individuals one antenna is six-segmented, the other having but
five segments. In those individuals having only five joints, or
having the third and fourth only partially divided, the length
of the third is about equal to the combined lengths of the third









VOL. XVI-No. 4


and fourth in the six-segmented antennae. The bodies of the
living insects are covered with a light bloom which gives them
a slightly bluish appearance.
Records: Prunus angtistifolia, Gainesville, Sept. 19, 1928
(F 402-28), (apterous vivip. females) ; Prunus umbellata, Mon-
ticello, June 4, 1930 (F 650-30), (J. R. Watson), (apterous
vivip. females) ; Prunus americana, Gainesville, June 6, 1930
(F 656-30), July 30, 1930 (F 679B-30), (apterous viviparous
females), Nov. 27, 1931 (F 814-31), (oviparous females and
males), Dec. 4, 1931 (F 831-31), (oviparous females and males).

APHIS ASTERICOLA, new species

Alate viviparous female. (Plate III, figs. 28-32.) Prevailing color, vari-
ous shades of brown. Length, 1.32 mm. Head dark olive-brown, wider than
long, the front somewhat produced. Width of head through the eyes, .367
mm. Eyes dark reddish-brown; large, with prominent ocular tubercles.
Ocelli bordered with very dark brown. Antennae six-segmented, about as
long as the body. First two segments concolorous with the head, remain-
ing segments slightly lighter brown. Unguis of the sixth segment a little
longer than the third segment, and the fourth slightly longer than the
fifth. Segments III to VI definitely imbricated and with a few very fine,
short spines. Length of the antennal segments as follows: I, .082 mm.,
II, .054 mm., III, .340 mm., IV, .231 mm., V, .204 mm., VI, base, .109 mm.,
unguis, .367 mm. Right antenna with 7 sensoria on the third seg-
ment; left antenna with 9 sensoria on the third segment. The sen-
soria arranged in a single rather irregular row along one side of the
segment. The sensoria more or less circular in outline and varying
greatly in size, the largest having a diameter twice as great as that of
the smallest. The fourth segment of both antennae without sensoria, the
fifth with the usual primary terminal one, and the sixth with the usual
group at the base of the unguis. Rostrum brown with dark brown apex;
reaching to middle coxae.
Thorax reddish-brown, the lobes olive-brown, concolorous with the
head; wing insertions yellowish. Prothorax slightly wider than the head
with pointed cone-shaped lateral tubercles. Wings hyaline, stigma and
veins grayish-brown. Fore wing with media twice-branched, the second
fork nearer to the margin of the wing than to the first fork. Hind wing
with two oblique veins though the cubitus is only faintly imbricated.
Hind wing rather small and narrow. First two pairs of legs with the.
femora yellowish or very light brown, the tibiae with dark brown extremi-
ties and yellowish middle portions, and the tarsi dark brown. The hind
legs considerably darker than the other two pairs, entirely dark brown
except the basal portions of the femora which are yellowish.
Abdomen a uniform reddish-brown without markings. Cornicles dark
brown; long slightly tapering with a slight flare at the apex, definitely
imbricated throughout their length .286 mm. Cauda dark brown; long,
slender and somewhat constricted near the middle. Two curved hairs on










THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


each side near the apex. Length of cauda .150 mm. Anal plate dark
brown, rounded, with several slightly curved hairs.
Apterous viviparous female. (Plate III, figs. 33-35.) General color dark
brown. Length 1.72 mm. Head yellowish-brown to reddish-brown. Eyes
dark brown, rather small and closely appressed to the head. Width of
head through the eyes .326 mm. Antennae six-segmented, somewhat
shorter than the body. First two segments olive-brown, darker than the
head, third, fourth, and fifth, with middle portions yellowish-brown and
the extremities dark brown; sixth segment entirely dark brown. Third
and fourth segments without sensoria, the fifth with the usual terminal
one and the sixth with the usual group at the base of the unguis. Third
to sixth segments imbricated. Length of the antennal segments as follows:
I, .082 mm., II, .054 mm., III, .340 mm., IV, .204 mm., V, .177 mm., VI,
base, .095 mm., unguis, .326 mm.
Thorax and abdomen very dark reddish-brown with yellowish globules
showing through the body wall. Prothorax with small blunt lateral tuber-
cles. First two pairs of legs with yellowish femora, tibiae with yellowish
middle portions, and dark brown apices, and the tarsi dark brown. Hind
legs entirely dark brown except the bases of the femora which are yel-
lowish. Cornicles dark brown, widest at the base, tapering toward the
apex, imbricated throughout their length. Length, .354 mm. Cauda dark
brown, elongated, constricted below the middle.
Three sharply curved hairs on each side above the middle. Length
.150 mm. Anal plate dark brown, semicircular, with three or four slightly
curved hairs on each side.
Type locality: LaCrosse, Florida.
Types: Holotype alate viviparous female taken from Aster
sp. Aug. 18, 1930 (F 682-30), deposited in the U. S. National
Museum Collection, Cat. No. 44294. Paratypes in the collections
of the Entomology Department, Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station and in that of the author. Type selected from a
series of eight alate females. Type material collected by H. E.
Bratley.
Notes: This dark brown aphid from wild aster, in general
appearance closely resembles the brown Aphis floridanae from
Lactuca. It can, however, be separated from that species by the
following characteristics. The fourth segment of the antenna
is without sensoria, while the third segment of floridanae has
from two to five sensoria; the cornicles are relatively longer in
astericola and the hind tibiae are entirely brown as contrasted
with the yellowish hind tibiae of floridanae.
Measurements of eight alate females are as follows: length,
1.16-1.36 mm.; width of head across the eyes, .340-.367 mm.;
length of antennal segments, III, .299-.340 mm., IV, .204-.231
mm., V, .177-.204 mm., VI, base, .095-.109 mm., unguis, .340-










VOL. XVI-No. 4


.367 mm.; length of cornicles .231-.286 mm.; third antennal
segment with 6-10 sensoria.
Records: Aster sp., LaCrosse, Aug. 18, 1930 (F 682-30)
(Bratley).

APHIS FLORIDANAE, new species

Alate viviparous female. (Plate III, figs. 36-40.) Prevailing color
brown. Length, 1.12 mm. Head dark brown, much wider than long, with-
out antennal tubercles, front rounded. Width through the compound eyes,
.367 mm. Eyes very dark brown; large, with prominent ocular tubercles.
Ocelli bordered with very dark brown. Rostrum light brown with extreme
tip dark brown; reaching nearly to the middle coxae. Antennae shorter
than the body, six-segmented. All the segments brown, somewhat lighter
than the head. Segment III of the right antenna with eight circular sen-
soria, the fourth segment with 3 sensoria. Left antenna with 11 sensoria
on the third segment, and 2 sensoria on the fourth. Fifth segment of each
antenna with the usual primary sensorium, secondary sensoria absent.
The sixth segment with the usual group of sensoria at the base of the
unguis. The sensoria of the third segment are scattered over most of
one side of the segment and extend from base to apex. The sensoria of
the fourth segment are arranged in a straight row. Length of the anten-
nal segments as follows: I, .054 mm.; II, .054 mm.; III, .258 mm.; IV,
.136 mm.; V, .122 mm.; VI, base, .068 mm.; unguis, .231 mm. Segments
III to VI are distinctly imbricated.
Thorax brown, the lobes same shade as the head, the remaining por-
tions somewhat lighter. Prothorax slightly wider than the head with
small lateral tubercles. Wing insertions yellowish. Wings hyaline, the
veins brown, the stigma yellowish-brown. Fore wing with radial sector
present, media twice-branched, the second fork much nearer to the mar-
gin of the wing than the first fork. Hind wing with two oblique veins.
Legs mostly brown. The femora dark brown with the bases yellowish;
those of the fore legs somewhat lighter than those of the other two pairs.
Tibiae yellowish, with apices dark brown; tarsi dark brown.
Abdomen mostly dark brown with lighter brown areas where the em-
bryos are visible through the body wall. Cornicles dark brown; imbri-
cated, somewhat curved, not much variation in width from base to apex.
Length, .163 mm. Cauda brown; elongated, tapering, somewhat constricted
near the middle, with a few hyaline, curved hairs on each side. Length of
cauda, .136 mm. Anal plate dark brown; broadly rounded with numerous
curved hyaline hairs.
Apterous viviparous female. (Plate III, figs. 41-44.) General color
brown. Head dark yellowish-brown; somewhat wider than long, front
sharply rounded so that the outline of the head is triangular when viewed
from above. Eyes dark reddish-brown; with definite ocular tubercles.
First two antennal segments concolorous with the head; third, fourth,
and base of the fifth pale yellowish; apex of the fifth and all of the sixth
light brown. Segments III to VI imbricated. The usual sensoria near the
apex of the fifth and at the base of the unguis of the sixth. Rostrum
light brown, reaching slightly beyond the first coxae.









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


Prothorax yellowish-brown, remainder of the thorax and the abdomen
reddish-brown. Femora dark brown, the tibiae mostly yellowish, with the
apices dark brown; tarsi dark brown. Cornicles dark brown; somewhat
curved, imbricated; widest at the base and tapering slightly. Cauda yel-
lowish-brown; elongated, with a constriction above the middle; five or
six hyaline, curved hairs on each side. Anal plate slightly darker than
the cauda; rounded, with several hyaline hairs. Measurements of the
apterous female as follows: length, 1.32 mm.; width of head, .340 mm.;
antennal segments, I, .068 mm., II, .048 mm., III, .177 mm.; IV, .102 mm.,
V, .095 mm., VI, base, .074 mm., unguis, .204 mm., cornicles, .190 mm.,
cauda, .150 mm.
Type locality: Tampa, Florida.
Types: Holotype alate viviparous female collected July 21,
1930 from Lactuca floridana, deposited in the' U. S. National
Museum Collection, Cat. No. 44295. Paratypes from the same
collection as the holotype in the collections of the Entomology
Department of the Florida Agr. Exp. Sta., and in that of the
author. Type selected from a series of eight specimens. Type
material collected by F. S. Blanton.
Notes: This brown aphid though smaller than Aphis rumicis
resembles that species in general appearance. It differs from
Aphis rumicis in the following respects: the third antennal seg-
ment has a smaller number of sensoria than in rumicis. The
third segment is longer in proportion to the fourth and fifth,
and the base of the sixth is shorter in relation to the unguis
than is the case in rumicis. The cornicle is distinctly longer
than the fourth antennal segment while in rumicis the cornicle
is usually shorter than the fourth segment. A study of eight
alate females gave the following measurements: antennal seg-
ments, III, .218-.258 mm., IV, .129-.150 mm., V, .109-.122 mm.,
VI, base, .068-.073 mm., unguis, .218-.245 mm.; cornicles, .150-
.163 mm.; the third segment with 8-12 sensoria, the fourth with
2-5 sensoria.
Records: Lactuca floridana, Tampa, July 21, 1930 (F 672-30)
(Blanton).


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FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST
Official Organ of The Florida Entomological Society, Gainesville,
Florida.

VOL. XVI JANUARY, 1933 No. 4

J. R. WATSON................--------------------.--------Editor
E. W. BERGER--............. ------------- ---......Associate Editor
H. E. BRATLEY--..................-.---- -------....-...Business Manager
Issued once every three months. Free to all members of the
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vance; 35 cents per copy.

SOME THYSANOPTERA OF THE
GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS

The Thysanoptera here listed were collected near Gatlinburg,
Tenn., on the western edge of the Great Smoky Mountain
National Park, during the latter half of August and the first few
days of September, 1932.
No claim is made that the list is at all complete for the region
and the time of year. Nevertheless, it is not without interest
as it contains several new species and greatly extends the range
of several other species. The new species will be described in
another paper.
Frankliniella tritici (Fitch). As was to be expected this com-
mon flower thrips was the most abundant of all species in blos-
soms. It occurred in nearly all species of blossoms examined.
Frankliniella stylosa Hood. This species was also found com-
mon in nearly all species of blossoms examined and at all alti-
tudes from 1000 to 5000 feet. It is a widespread species but
does not seem to have before been reported as abundant in any
locality.
Frankliniella williamsi Hood. Taken in blossoms of Ragweed,
apparently not as common as in South Carolina, judging from
a collection of Thysanoptera from that state gathered by Mr.
J. G. Watts and examined by the writer.
Ctenothrips frosti Moulton. This species was described by
Moulton (Bull. Brooklyn Ent. Soc., Vol. XXIV, No. 4, p. 233-4.)
from a single female taken in Massachusetts. Three macrop-
terous females and four males were taken by sweeping vege-
tation (mostly Solidago spp. and asters) at an altitude of ap-









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


proximately 4000 feet. Descriptions of the macropterous fe-
males and males follow:
Macropterous female.
Color: Pterothorax lighter than other parts of body, otherwise colored
as described for brachypterous female.
Wings slender, reaching beyond the tip of abdomen. Basal fifth a
light yellowish brown, second fifth dark brown, remaining three fifths
lighter brown with a lighter longitudinal streak. Anterior vein with 18
to 21 conspicuous, brown, long, pointed bristles. Posterior vein with 14 to
17, evenly spaced except the apical one. Otherwise as described for the
brachypterous holotype.
Male.
Colored as in the female, a long-oval, light spot on each abdominal seg-
ment from 3rd to 8th.
Somewhat smaller than the females.
Measurements (average of 4 males). Total body length 1.5 mm.; head,
length .16 mm.; width across the eyes, .16 mm.; prothorax, length .15
mm., width .22 mm.; pterothorax, width .33 mm.; abdomen, width .30 mm.
Antennal segments: length (width) I, 35 (36); II, 44 (31); III, 91 (23);
IV, 74 (25); V, 58 (20); VI, 75 (24); VII, 14'(10); VIII, 23 (7) microns;
to'al length .41 mm.
Thrips impar Hood. In blossoms of Impatiens and Saponaria,
Sericothrips variabilis Beach. On ragweed.
Plesiothrips perplexes Beach. Under leaf sheaths of barn-
yard grass (Panicum Crus-galli L.).
Haplothrips graminis Hood. On grass. In blossoms of Indian
Pipe (Monotropa uniflora).
The following species were collected from decaying leaves
taken from the ground and dried out in a simplified Berlese-
funnel. This sort of material was not nearly as rich in Thysan-
optera as similar material in Florida. A dozen collections of
such material taken from the western slope of the Great
Smokies, even the driest situations, yielded not a single indi-
vidual. The six species taken were in material from a drier
(east slope) ridge to the west of Gatlinburg. Evidently the
western slope of the Smokies is too wet and cold for the devel-
opment of this chiefly southern fauna.
Trichothrips americana Hood. Trichothrips pergandi Hood.
Trachythrips watsoni Hood. Two apparently undescribed spe-
cies of Plectrothrips and one of Zygothrips. The presence of
the Trachythrips, hitherto recorded only from Florida, was sur-
prising. The writer has also taken it in Clayton, Ga., and Parris
Island, S. C.
J. R. WATSON.




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