Title: Florida Entomologist
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Title: Florida Entomologist
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Florida Entomological Society
Publisher: Florida Entomological Society
Place of Publication: Winter Haven, Fla.
Publication Date: 1934
Copyright Date: 1917
 Subjects
Subject: Florida Entomological Society
Entomology -- Periodicals
Insects -- Florida
Insects -- Florida -- Periodicals
Insects -- Periodicals
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General Note: Eigenfactor: Florida Entomologist: http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1653/024.092.0401
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Bibliographic ID: UF00098813
Volume ID: VID00286
Source Institution: University of Florida
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Florida Entomologist
Official Organ of the Florida Entomological Society

VOL. XVIII JUNE, 1934 No. 2

TWO NEW APHIDS OF THE TRIBE MACROSIPHINI*
A. N. TISSOT

The first of the two species described in this paper is a typical
Macrosiphum while the second belongs to that large group of
species feeding on the Composites and is being referred to the
genus Tritogenaphis.
MACROSIPHUM MESOSPHAERI new species
Alate viviparous female. (Plate I, figs. 1-5). Prevailing color yellowish-
green. General form of the body long and rather narrow. Length, 2.56
mm. Head olive-brown, nearly twice as wide as long, with large prominent
antennal tubercles. The front of the head and the antennal tubercles with
short, curved hairs which are slightly capitate at the tip. Width of head
through the compound eyes, .517 mm. Eyes reddish-brown, large, with
prominent ocular tubercles. Ocelli small, bordered with very dark brown.
Antennae six-segmented, considerably longer than the body. The first two
segments and a small basal portion of the third, dusky or light brown,
the remainder of the antenna jet black. The first segment more than
twice as long as, and considerably wider than, the second. The first two
segments, and most of the third, smooth. The apical portion of the third,
and the remaining segments faintly imbricated. All the segments armed
with a few short, hyaline hairs, slightly spatulate at the apex. Third
segment of the right antenna with 14 sensoria, the corresponding segment
of the left antenna with 16 sensoria. These sensoria are arranged in a
single more or less straight row, are nearly circular in outline and vary
considerably in size. Fourth segment of each antenna without sensoria,
the fifth with the usual terminal one and the sixth with one large and a
few small sensoria at the base of the unguis. Length of the antennal
segments as follows: I, .177 mm., II, .068 mm., III, .925 mm., IV, .843 mm.,
V, .680 mm., VI, base, .163 mm., unguis, 1.278 mm. Rostrum brown, with
extreme tip black; reaching to the second coxae.
Thorax yellowish-green tinged with brown. Lobes pale yellowish-brown,
wing insertions yellow. The prothorax slightly wider than the head, with-
out lateral tubercles. Wings hyaline, the veins dark brown, the stigma
dusky with a greenish cast. Fore wing with radial sector present, rather
long. Media twice-branched, the distance from the second fork to the
Contribution from Department of Entomology, Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station. Published June 30, 1934.









18 THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST'

margin of the wing about equal to the distance between the first and
second forks. Hind wing with two oblique veins. Legs with the femora
pale green at the base and gradually getting darker toward the apex which
is dark brown. Tibiae and tarsi entirely very dark brown or black. The
spines on the femora and bases of the tibiae slightly spatulate, those of
the apical portions of the tibiae and on the tarsi pointed.
Abdomen yellowish-green with a darker bright green irregular band
extending along the mid-dorsal line. Along each lateral margin four
dusky, almost circular spots. Cornicles black. Widest at the base and



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Explanation of Plate I
Macrosiphum mesosphaeri n. sp.
Figs. 1-5-Alate viviparous female: 1, head; 2, antenna; 3, cornicle;
4, cauda; 5, anal plate.
Figs. 6-8-Apterous viviparous female: 6, head; 7, antenna; 8, cornicle.
Tritogenaphis eupatorifoliae n. sp.
Figs. 9-13-Alate viviparous female: 9, head; 10, antenna; 11, cornicle;
12, cauda; 13, anal plate.

Figs. 14-16-Apterous viviparous female: 14, head; 15, antenna; 16,
cornicle.
Figs. 17-18-Male: 17, head; 18, antenna.
Figs. 19-21-Oviparous female: 19, head; 20, antenna; 21, cornicle.
Figs. 19-21-O0viparous female: 19, head; 20, antenna; 21, cornicle.








VOL. XVIII-No. 2


tapering somewhat toward the apex which is flared. Approximately one-
fourth of the length reticulated, the remainder imbricated, the imbrications
becoming fainter toward the base. Length .639 mm. Cauda and anal
plate light brown. Cauda about half as long as the cornicles with a slight
constriction about the middle. Three slightly curved pointed hairs on
each side between the constriction and the apex and one dorsal hair near
the apex. Anal plate rather sharply rounded with several curved hairs.
Apterous viviparous female. (Plate I, figs. 6-8). General color of head,
thorax, and abdomen yellowish-green. Eyes reddish-brown with small
ocular tubercles. Antennae situated on large, prominent tubercles, six-
segmented, very much longer than the body. The first two segments
yellowish-green or dusky, the remaining segments very dark brown or
black. The first two segments and most of the third smooth, apex of the
third and the remaining segments faintly imbricated. Third segment with
two or three rather small circular sensoria situated near the base of the
segment. All the segments armed with a few short, hyaline, slightly
spatulate hairs. Rostrum brown with the apex black, reaching to the
third coxae. Legs with the femora greenish at the base, gradually becoming
darker toward the apex which is dark brown, tibiae and tarsi dark brown.
Cornicles black. Widest at the base and tapering slightly toward the apex.
About one-fourth of the length reticulated the remainder imbricated, the
imbrications becoming more faint toward the base. Cauda and anal plate
dusky. The form of these structures and the arrangement of the hairs
as in the alate female.
Measurements of the apterous female as follows: length of body, 2.52
mm., width of head across the eyes, .476 mm., length of antennal segments,
I, .163 mm., II, .068 mm., III, .884 mm., IV, .775 mm., V, .639 mm., VI,
base, .177 mm., unguis, 1.238 mm., length of cornicles, .626 mm.
TYPE LOCALITY: Gainesville, Florida.
TYPES: Holotype alate viviparous female from Mesophaerum
pectinatum, taken Nov. 7, 1928 (F 416-28). Morphotype apter-
ous viviparous female same data as the holotype. These types
deposited in the U. S. National Museum Collection, Cat. No.
44299. Paratypes, same data as the holotype in the collection
of the Entomology Department, Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station and in that of the author. Types selected from a
series of twenty-four alate and six apterous viviparous females.
Type material collected by the author.
NOTES: This aphid in general appearance resembles both
Macrosiphum pseudorosae Patch and M. gei (Koch). Specimens
were sent to Dr. Patch who expressed the opinion that this
species is distinct from pseudorosae. The cornicles are much
shorter than the third antennal segment and the unguis of the
sixth segment is much longer than the third, whereas in pseudo-
rosae, the cornicles, third antennal segment, and the unguis of
the sixth segment are subequal. It differs from M. gei in having
the cornicles relatively shorter and thicker, and the tibiae uni-









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


formly black instead of with dark extremities and lighter middle
portion.
Measurements of ten alate females are as follows: length,
2.56-2.68 mm., width of head through the eyes, .476-.517 mm.,
length of antennal segments, III, .843-.925 mm., IV, .680-.843
mm., V, .598-.721 mm., VI, base, .150-.177 mm., unguis, 1.278-
1.392 mm., third segment with 14-17 sensoria.
RECORDS: Mesosphaerum pectinatum, Gainesville, Nov. 7,
1928 (F 416-28).

TRITOGENAPHIS EUPATORIFOLIAE new species
Alate viviparous female. (Plate I, figs. 9-13). Prevailing colors of
body, dark green and brown. Length 3.16 mm. Head dark dusky-green.
Width much greater than the length, antennal tubercles large. Width
across the compound eyes, .476 mm. Eyes reddish-brown, large with rather
small ocular tubercles. Ocelli bordered with very dark brown. Antennae
six-segmented slightly longer than the body. First two segments very dark
brown, remaining segments black. First three segments smooth, last three
faintly imbricated. First segment large, nearly twice as long and much
wider than the second. Third segment longer than either the fourth or
fifth, unguis of the sixth longer than the third. Third segment with
approximately 30 sensoria scattered over more than half the surface of
the segment. Fourth segment without sensoria, fifth with the usual one
near the apex, sixth with one large and five small sensoria at the base of
the unguis. Hairs of the head and antennae short, and spine-like, some
of them with slightly spatulate tips. Length of antennal segments as
follows: I, .136 mm., II, .082 mm., III, .789 mm., IV, .585 mm., V, .558 mm.,
VI, base, .136 mm., unguis, .952 mm. Rostrum dark brown, reaching to
the second coxae.
Thorax dark green, the lobes yellowish-brown. Prothorax somewhat
wider than the head, without lateral tubercles. Wing insertions yellowish-
green. Wings hyaline, stigma and veins pale brown. Fore wing with
radial sector long. Media twice-branched, the second fork nearer to the
margin of the wing than to the first fork. Hind wing with two oblique
veins. Legs with the basal portion of the femora pale greenish; the apical
portion dark brown. Tibiae and the tarsi black. All segments of the
legs armed with spine-like hyaline hairs.
Abdomen with anterior third and the lateral margins a very dark dull
green mottled with lighter areas, middle portion reddish-brown with irregu-
lar darker markings. Lateral margins with hyaline hairs similar to those
of the head and appendages. Cornicles black, widest at the base and
tapering slightly toward the apex which is flared. Reticulated area
extending about two-fifths the length of the cornicle. The portion below
the reticulated area definitely imbricated, though the imbrications become
fainter at the base. Length .680 mm. Cauda dark greenish-brown; long
and narrow with a marked constriction below the middle; about three-
fifths as long as the cornicles. Five long, slightly curved hairs on each
side, two dorsal hairs, one above the middle and the other near the apex.










VOL. XVIII-No. 2 21

Anal plate dark brown, nearly semi-circular in outline, with several long
hyaline hairs each arising from a raised circular base. The surface of
the cauda slightly imbricated and covered with rows of minute points.
Apterous viviparous female. (Plate I, figs. 14-16). Head, thorax, and
abdomen a dull, dark green mottled with lighter areas. Head with large
diverging antennal tubercles and bearing several rather long, hyaline hairs.
These hairs with somewhat flattened tips and each arising from a globe-
like base. Eyes reddish-brown, large. Antennae six-segmented, longer
than the body. First two segments greenish-brown, remaining segments
very dark brown or black. First three segments smooth, remaining seg-
ments faintly imbricated. Third segment with 15-20 scattered, circular
sensoria. Fourth segment without sensoria, the fifth with the usual one
near the apex, the sixth with a group of one large and five or six small
sensoria at the base of the unguis. Rostrum very dark brown, reaching
to the third-coxae.
Legs with bases of the femora greenish, the apical portion dark brown,
tibiae dark brown, the apices black, tarsi black.
Cornicles black, widest at the base and tapering slightly toward the
apex. The apical one-third reticulated, the portion below the reticulations
definitely imbricated. Cauda dark dusky green, long and narrow with a
definite constriction below the middle. Four long slightly curved hairs on
each side, two or three shorter dorsal ones.
Measurements of the apterous female as follows: length 2.36 mm.,
width of head across the eyes, .476 mm., length of antennal segments,
I, .136 mm., II, .068 mm., III, .816 mm., IV, .612 mm., V, .517 mm., VI,
base, .136 mm., unguis, .938 mm., length of cornicles, .748 mm.
Male. (Plate I, figs. 17-18). Coloration of the male very similar to
that of the alate viviparous female. Head with large antennal tubercles.
Eyes dark reddish-brown, very large with large ocular tubercles. Antennae
six-segmented, considerably longer than the body. Rostrum reaching to
the third coxae. Cornicles subcylindrical, wider at the base and tapering
slightly to the apex. About one-third the length reticulated, the remaining
portion very strongly imbricated. Cauda with slight constriction, and
armed with numerous slightly curved hairs.
Measurements of five males as follows: length, 1.76-2.28 mm., width
of head across the compound eyes, .476-.490 mm., length of antennal seg-
ments, III, .626-.680 mm., IV, .449-.517 mm., V, .476-.544 mm., VI, base,
.109-.136 mm., unguis, .884-.966 mm., length of cornicles, .381-.408 mm.,
third segment of the antenna with 40-50 sensoria, fourth segment with
13-22 sensoria, fifth segment with 11-18 sensoria.
Oviparous female. (Plate I, figs. 19-21). The coloration of this form
is much as in the apterous viviparous female. The body form is somewhat
more broad than in the viviparous female. Head with broad antennal
tubercles and armed with several hyaline, spatulate tipped hairs. Eyes
reddish-brown, large. Antennae six-segmented about equal in length to
the body. Third segment with 10-14 sensoria scattered over the basal
three-fifths of the segment. Fourth segment without sensoria, the fifth
and sixth with the usual ones near the apex and at the base of the unguis.
Hind tibiae considerably swollen, with numerous small scattered sensoria.









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


Cornicles with about one-third their length reticulated. Cauda somewhat
constricted above the middle with several curved, hyaline hairs.
Measurements of the oviparous female as follows: length, 2.72 mm.,
width of head across the eyes, .503 mm., length of antennal segments,
I, .136 mm., II, .068 mm., III, .680 mm., IV, .476 mm., V, .503 mm., VI,
base, .122 mm., unguis, .816 mm., length of cornicle, .639 mm., length of
cauda, .340 mm.
TYPE LOCALITY: Gainesville, Florida.
TYPES: Holotype, alate viviparous female, from Eupatorium
incarnatum, Oct. 1, 1928 (F 406-28), on slide with an immature
apterous female. Morphotype, apterous viviparous female, same
data as the holotype on slide with three alate viviparous females,
an apterous viviparous female, and an immature alate female.
Allotype, male, from Eupatorium incarnatum, Gainesville, Dec.
11, 1926. (F 173-26) on slide with morphotype oviparous female.
Morphotype, oviparous female, same data and slide as allotype
male. All of above types deposited in the U. S. National Museum
Collection, Cat. No. 44300. Paratypes in the collection of the
Entomology Department, Florida Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion and in that of the author. Types selected from a series of
seventeen alate viviparous females, nine apterous viviparous
females, fourteen males, and eight oviparous females. Type
material collected by the author.
NOTES: This Eupatorium aphid is apparently rather closely
related to Tritogenaphis erigeronensis and T. eupatoricolens. It
differs from these species, however, in the following respects:
the body is duller and darker green and the unguis of the antenna
is proportionately much longer than in erigeronensis. This
species has the cornicles consistently shorter than the third
antennal segment, whereas in erigeronensis the cornicles are
longer than the third antennal segment.
This species differs from eupatoricolens in coloration, the
latter being brown. The cornicles of eupatorifoliae are definitely
imbricated to the base, whereas in eupatoricolens the cornicles
below the reticulated area are smooth or with but a faint sug-
gestion of imbrication. The cauda in this species is quite dark
and long and narrow, as contrasted with the yellow and rela-
tively broad cauda of eupatoricolens.
Measurements of ten alate females indicate variations as
follows: length, 1.76-3.16 mm., width of head through the com-
pound eyes, .462-.503 mm., length of antennal segments, III,
.653-.802 mm., IV, .476-.612 mm., V, .490-.558 mm., VI, base,
.109-.136 mm., unguis, .843-1.061 mm., length of cornicles, .598-









VOL. XVIII-No. 2


.734 mm., third antennal segment with 25-35 sensoria, fourth
segment always without sensoria.
RECORDS: Eupatorium incarnatum, Gainesville, Sept. 8, 1926
(F 146-26), (Bratley), Dec. 4, 1926 (F 172-26), Dec. 11, 1926
(F 173-26), Jan. 14, 1927 (F 177-27), Oct. 1, 1928 (F 406-28),
Nov. 21, 1929 (F 551-29).

A PEPPER PEST NEW TO THE UNITED STATES
J. R. WATSON
In November, 1931, there was sent to the Experiment Station
from Dade County, Fla., peppers infested with grubs or weevils.
Due to the limited amount of the material, adults were not raised
from these larvae, but in the fall of 1933 larger numbers were
received from the County Agent of Dade County, and from these
adults were raised. Specimens of these were sent to Prof. S. C.
Bruner, Santiago De Las Vegas, Cuba, who states that they are
identical with specimens in their collection identified by Mr.
A. J. Mutchler of the American Museum of Natural History as
Cryptorhynchus cubae Boh. According to Prof. Bruner, this is
not a common pest in Cuba but has been observed attacking
peppers in the provinces of Pinar del Rio and Havana. It is
mentioned in Gundlach's "Contribucion a la Entomologia Cu-
bana". Apparently it was not common in his time, as he says
"I have not observed this species". He states that the pupae
are formed inside of the hollow stems, and this stage requires
from 10 to 12 days. Specimens were reared in cages in the
laboratory at Gainesville by Dr. A. N. Tissot, and some observa-
tions made on their habits. The larvae are found in the entire
length of the pepper plants, from the base to and even including
the peduncles of the fruit, although, unlike the pepper weevils
of the West, none were found in the peppers themselves. As
stated by Gundlach, they pupate in the burrows in the stems.
The plants received from Dade County were so highly infested
as to be rendered commercially worthless. The County Agent
states the depredations in some plantations of that County to
be so severe as to discourage the planting of peppers, a crop
which never seems to have been very extensively reared in that
section. It has been reported only from the southern part of
Dade County, south of Miami. In surveys of the section by
Mr. George B. Merrill of the State Plant Board and Mr. F. S.
Chamberlain of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, the weevils
were found only in the southern part of Dade County. An
observation made by Dr. Tissot in the laboratory would seem to
suggest the only practical means of control, except that of
promptly destroying all infested plants. He observed that the
newly emerged adults fed on the outside of the plant, puncturing
the petioles of the leaves which promptly withered and dropped.
This habit would seem to offer the only chances of poisoning the
weevils.








THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


A NEW SPECIES AND VARIETY OF PLESIOTHRIPS
(Thripidae-THYSANOPTERA)1

By J. G. WATTS
Plesiothrips andropogoni n. sp. (Plate II, figs. 1-3)
Female (macropterous).-Average length .935 mm. (.812 to
1.160 mm.). Color yellow; head straw yellow; thorax naples
yellow, with margins and sutures tinted with deep chrome;
basal abdominal segments much paler straw yellow, shading
to naples yellow towards the posterior; trace of deep chrome
on side margins of 9th and 10th abdominal segments; all legs
only very slightly paler than head. Segments 1 and 2 of antennae
concolorous with legs; 3 raw umber brown; 4 broccoli brown,
basal sixth paler; 5, 6, and 7 sepia brown. (Nomenclature of
Colors by Robert Ridgeway, Copyright 1885, Little, Brown &
Co., Boston).
Head but little smaller than prothorax; slightly wider than
long; cheeks weakly arched, almost parallel; a weak but notice-
able constriction behind eyes. Posterior third of occiput weakly
transversely striate. Five postocular bristles on each side, the
total of ten bristles crudely semi-circularly arranged across the
head with the free ends of the crescent pointing in a posterior
direction. Middle pair largest and about equal in length to the
first antennal segment. Eyes blackish, slightly protruding, to-
gether occupying about .6 the width of the head, margins fused
with yellow; ocelli widely separated and placed well forward,
the posterior pair opposite the anterior third of the eyes, bright
chrome yellow with the inner crescents burnt sienna; ocellar
bristles conspicuous, about equal in length to the 2nd antennal
segment. A pair of rather small inconspicuous postantennal
bristles anterior to the ocellar bristles. Maxillary palpi 3-
segmented, segments rather weakly defined. Antennae twice
as long as head. Relative lengths and widths of segments:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Length:
14 18 21 25 18 28 13
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Width: : -
16 13 10 10 10 10 4

STechnical Contribution No. 35 from the South Carolina Experiment
Station, Clemson College, S. C.









VOL. XVIII-No. 2


Prothorax about .6 longer than head, a little longer than wide,
sides parallel, roughly forming a rectangle; beset with several
irregularly arranged inconspicuous pale yellow bristles; pos-
terior angles each with two strong bristles. Mesothorax 1.4
times wider than prothorax, sides evenly arched. Length of








0 /





I `2


Explanation of Plate
Fig. 1-Head, prothorax and fore legs of female of P. andropogoni.
Fig. 2-Left antenna.
Fig. 3-End of abdomen of female of P. andropogoni.

fore wings 17 times their width at middle, reaching the 8th or
9th abdominal segment. Costa with 18 to 21 long spines in
addition to the fringe hairs which number 12 to 16; fore vein
with 13 to 16 and the hind vein with 11 to 14 weaker spines.
Metathorax a little narrower than the mesothorax. All legs
short and somewhat thickened and beset with numerous spines,
those on inner surface of hind tibiae heavier.








THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


Abdomen cylindrical; about 2.8 times as long as wide when
segments are not distended; last three segments tapering abrupt-
ly into a sharp point. Ovipositor reduced. Tenth segment
sulcate above throughout.
Measurements of holotype: Length .959 mm.; head, length
.110 mm., width .119 mm.; prothorax, length .148 mm., width
.127 mm.; mesothorax, length .112 mm., width .180 mm.; meta-
thorax, length .105 mm., width .147 mm.; abdomen, length .490
mm. (1st segment is partially inserted in the metathorax, there-
fore, the length of the abdomen was measured from the posterior
edge of the metathorax), width .180 mm.
Antennae: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Length (Microns) : 24.5 31.5 36.8 43.8 31.5 49.0 22.8
Width (Microns) : 29.8 22.8 17.5 17.5 17.5 17.5 7.0
Described from 21 females collected by the writer from com-
mon broom sedge (Andropogon sp.) as follows: Clemson College,
Oconee County, S. C., 21 March 1931, one; November 29, 1933,
three (elevation 600 to 850 ft.), 17 on top of Sassafrass moun-
tain, Rocky Bottom, Pickens County, S. C., February 6, 1934
(elevation 3548 ft.).
Male unknown.
This is the second North American species and may be dis-
tinguished from its relative P. perplexus (Beach) by its decided
yellow color throughout except antennal segments 5 to 7 which
are brown and the wings which are gray-brown, by the close
union of the head and prothorax, forming almost a continuous
line, and by the small inconspicuous spines on the prothorax in
contrast to the heavier and more conspicuous ones in perplexus.
Specimens collected in 75 per cent alcohol, soaked in terpineol
for 24 hours, rinsed in 95 per cent alcohol 15 minutes to one
hour, mounted in diaphane.
Type and paratypes in author's collection.
Plesiothrips andropogonis watsoni n. var.
Female (macropterous).-Average length 1.207 mm. (1.096
to 1.344 mm.). Color yellow; head straw yellow; thorax straw
yellow with traces of deep chrome by transmitted light. Basal
and mid abdominal segments straw yellow shading to naples
yellow in distal segments. Legs concolorous with head. An-
tennal segments 1, 2, and basal half of 3 concolorous with head
and legs; distal half of 3 and basal half of 4 slightly darker;
distal half of 4 abruptly shading to yellowish brown which









VOL. XVIII-No. 2 27

continues into the basal third of 5; distal two-thirds of 5 and
segments 6 and 7 sepia brown.
Head large, but little smaller than prothorax; slightly wider
than long; a weak constriction behind eyes; cheeks parallel or
almost.
Bristles on head and prothorax moderately heavy and con-
spicuous, more so than in P. andropogoni. All measurements
greater and the coloration a little richer, otherwise the variety
is the same as andropogoni.
Measurements of holotype: length, 1.096 mm.; head, length
.123 mm.; width .135 mm.; prothorax, length .158 mm.; width
.145 mm.; mesothorax, width .189 mm.; metathorax, width
.166 mm.
Male unknown.
This variety may be distinguished from the species by its
larger size, richer color, and the coloration of the antennae.
Upon the acquisition and examination of a larger series of
this form, watsoni may be raised to specific rank.
Described from nine females collected by J. R. Watson from
Andropogon virginicus at Gainesville, Florida as follows: one
on 24 November 1933, two on 24 December 1933, one on 18
January 1934, and five on 20 February 1934.
The author is indebted to Professor J. R. Watson of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, in whose honor this
variety is named, for the type material.
Type and two paratype slides in the collection of Professor
J. R. Watson. One paratype slide in the writer's collection.



PERSONALS
Among recent visitors at Gainesville were James Zetek of the
Canal Zone, Dr. Johannes Wille of Lima, Peru, and a group from
Batum, U.S.S.R. interested in the citrus industry.
Dr. T. H. Hubbell is spending the summer in the Museum of
the University of Michigan, and Prof. J. T. Creighton in study
at Ohio State University.









*Ghe
FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST
Official Organ of The Florida Entomological Society,
Gainesville, Florida.

VOL. XVIII JUNE, 1934 No. 2

J. R. W ATSON --........--........---- ............................................... Editor
E. W. BEERGE ---.................-........--- ......--...... Associate Editor
H. E. BRATLEY--.....-.......---..--....- ..-..--........ Business Manager
Issued once every three months. Free to all members of the
Society.
Subscription price to non-members is $1.00 per year in ad-
vance; 35 cents per copy.

FRED WINTER WALKER
Fred Winter Walker was born in Richmond County, Georgia,
March 22nd, 1892, son of George Beverly and Ann Elizabeth
Walker. He attended the elementary and high school at Augusta,
Ga. He moved to Macon in 1909. Mr. Walker in his early school
days showed an intent interest in insects, and had a collection
of butterflies before he was 10 years old. In 1914 he joined
the Macon Volunteers and served with them on the Mexican
Border in 1916. In November of 1917 he was sent over seas
with the 151st Machine Gun Battalion. In France he participat-
ed in five major engagements. In 1919 he became located at
Orlando, Fla. In 1922 he entered the University of Florida.
During his senior year he was offered a position with the United
Fruit Company at Santa Marta, Colombia, where he resided for
two years, doing notable work on the insects attacking bananas.
In 1927 he accepted a position with the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station, and was located in the laboratory for the
study of pecan insects at Monticello. Here he did notable work
on the insects of pecans, and published a bulletin on the shuck
worm, and had worked out what appears to be a very satis-
factory control for the nut case-bearer and leaf case-bearer of
pecans at the time of his death.
Mr. Walker was an enthusiastic collector and student of en-
tomology. It is said of him that he collected insects while under
fire in France, earning the nickname of "Bugs", which he is
still called by his fellow soldiers. He brought back from South
America a very large insect collection from Colombia, and contin-
ued his work in Florida. He was an expert at locating larvae of








VOL. XVIII-No. 2


the cypress moth, Cupressa, and at the time of his death probably
had more of this species than exists in all the collections of
entomologists. He was apparently collecting food for this moth
at the time of his death.
In addition to his bulletin on the shuckworm, Mr. Walker
has contributed a number of articles to the proceedings of the
Georgia-Florida Pecan Growers Association for their publica-
tion. He was much interested in Orthoptera, and in connection
with Professor T. H. Hubbell of the Department of Biology of
the University of Florida was the author of several new species.

ATHENA PELEUS (Sulger) New
ARGONUT PETREUS (Sulger) Old; TIMETES PETREUS (Cramer)
PI. xxi. "The Butterfly Book", Holland.
ELLEN ROBERTSON-MILLER
On June 3, 1926 at Coronado Beach, Fla., a caterpillar of
Athena peleus was found feeding on fig. It is the only larva
of the species I have seen during my ten years in this section
of the state. The length of the larva was one and one-half
inches and its diameter was that of a slate pencil. It had three
diamond shaped patches on the dorsum, light, and opalescent
in color. The anterior diamond began on the fifth segment; a
stiff black hair arose from a dull orange red tubercle at this
point and the distinctive mark occurred at the posterior point
of each triangle. There were three lateral obliques, the first
starting low on the sixth segment and the last ending on the
eleventh at the dorsal tubercle; each area was made up of a
gray oval outlined in metallic blue with a black line above and
below. Small ovals, similar in appearance, were seen on seg-
ments 2, 3, 4 and 5, but a dark spot occupied the place of the
oval on the first segment, and there was a pair of dark spots
on the reddish dorsum of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd segments. The
head was bilobed and the rugosity of the epicranial surface was
pronounced. Starting near the adfrontals and in line with the
upper margin of the clypeus, a pair of rough spined welts, like
raised cords went up over the face, one to each cranial apex,
where a stiff slender projection arose having a length greater
than that of the head. The organ seemed to be the continuation
of the face marking.
The caterpillar ate well for a couple of days, then on the
morning of June 6, it contracted and attached itself to the lid
of the breeding cage. The red in the larva disappeared and the







THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


body became light amber in color, with an iridescent sheen. On
June 7, at nine-thirty A.M. a pale greenish-yellow pupa emerged
and it was peculiar, due to the fact that it had a pair of lateral,
black, branched spines standing out from its thorax and three
rows of tubercles along the dorsum of the body. Those in the
middle row each held an erect black spine, and together they
formed a kind of defensive crest on the back of the pupa. The
length of the chrysalis was three-fourths of an inch.
I was leaving that day for two weeks and could not carry a
freshly emerged chrysalis, so I left it in the breeding cage. On
June 20, I found the butterfly out but it had died and was
somewhat frayed from its efforts to escape. At first I thought
it was a Papilioninae because the hind wings were tailed like
butterflies of the Papilio genus. Not only did the hind wing
show one prolongation but two, the second much shorter, how-
ever. The upper surface of the wings and of the body had a
golden-brown color; dark lines crossed both pairs of wings and
this color bordered them. The under surface of the butterfly
was light. This was especially true of the wings near the body
and they were slightly opalescent. When folded at right angles
to the back they simulated a brown leaf even to the mid rib,
for one of the dark lines, reproduced on the under surface,
carried with it a shadow line of blue and it extended from the
apex of the fore-wing to the anal angle of the hind-wing.
The butterfly with a spread of two and one-third inches was
identified by Dr. Kahl of Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh, who
kindly gave much time to looking up the bibliography on this
insect. He found little had been reported about it except that
in 17- the larva and chrysalis had been drawn and painted.
The pictures illustrated an early book on Lepidoptera which I
saw in the Museum library.
Cramer also has figured this butterfly.
The insect is a native of the West Indies, I believe, and is
occasionally taken in Texas and southern Florida.


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