Title: Florida Entomologist
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Title: Florida Entomologist
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Florida Entomological Society
Publisher: Florida Entomological Society
Place of Publication: Winter Haven, Fla.
Publication Date: 1941
Copyright Date: 1917
 Subjects
Subject: Florida Entomological Society
Entomology -- Periodicals
Insects -- Florida
Insects -- Florida -- Periodicals
Insects -- Periodicals
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General Note: Eigenfactor: Florida Entomologist: http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1653/024.092.0401
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Bibliographic ID: UF00098813
Volume ID: VID00262
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Florida Entomologist
Official Organ of the Florida Entomological Society

VOL. XXIV DECEMBER, 1941 No. 3

FLORIDA DIPTERA
By JOHN R. MALLOCH, Vero Beach, Fla.
FAMILY RHOPALOMERIDAE
This family is at present represented in Florida, and the
United States, by a single species. It is not at all unlikely that
more species will be discovered in the tropical section of Florida
as most if not all the known species of Rhopalomerinae are
associated with various species of palms that occur in this State.
Because of this probability I take this opportunity to present
a key to the genera of the latter subfamily and to correct an
error in the generic assignment of the single Florida species.
Curran in his book on the Families of North American Flies
stated that the flies hover like Syrphidae, but the specimens that
I have observed and taken acted more like Scatophagidae, being
very deliberate in their flight and settling steadily, though as
a rule they take rather rapid flight when disturbed.
In March 1937 I was attracted by the odor of fermenting sap
to a recently cut stump of a cabbage palm at Vero Beach and
was surprised to discover feeding thereon a number of flies that
I at once recognized as Rhopalomeridae. Capturing a few I ex-
amined them closely and identified them as Kroeberia floridana
Aldrich. I made no effort to rear the species but took about a
hundred of the flies. Subsequently I took, this year, one specimen
on a palm trunk in my own yard here.
Lately I have given some time to a study of the family and
present the following generic synopsis as an aid to future
students.
Key to the Genera
1. No bristle-like hairs on the upper margin of the metathoracic spiracular
aperture; first posterior cell of the wing not noticeably narrowed to
apex .....-----........--- .. ........... ........................ Subfamily Rhinotorinae
- One or more quite long bristles or bristle-like hairs on the upper margin
of the metathoracic aperture that are directed upward; fourth wing
vein sloping much forward so that the first posterior cell is much
narrowed to apex ..........................-.............. Subfamily Rhopalomerinae










THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


SUBFAMILY RHINOTORINAE
I do not expect that any of the three known genera of this
group will be found in the United States.
SUBFAMILY RHOPALOMERINAE
Key to the Genera
1. Scutellum with numerous erect black bristly discal hairs and six strong
bristles, the four basal ones not on the extreme lateral edges but
on the sides of disc, the scutellar outline rounded, and the disc con-
vex; arista bare; pteropleura bristly haired, some quite strong
bristles on upper portion ........................................... Kroeberia Lindner
- Scutellum without bristly discal hairs and at most four strong marginal
bristles, the posterior outline rarely evenly rounded, frequently
more or less flattened or concave ................................................... 2
2. Scutellum very distinctly flattened centrally above, sometimes shallowly
grooved to apex, and distinctly longer than its basal width; arista
with moderately long hairs ............................ Rhopalomera Wiedemann
- Scutellum usually rounded in posterior outline, not or very little flat-
tened on dorsum, never with a central groove apically, and not
longer than its basal width ................................................................ 3
3. Arista with moderately long hairs; scutellum very short and trans-
verse; ocellar and post-vertical frontal bristles undeveloped; hind
tibia not as thick as hind femur ................ Apophorhynchus Williston
- Arista bare, or haired, but the ocellar and postvertical pairs of bristles
alw ays present ............................................................................................ 4
4. Arista with moderately long hairs; hind tibia much widened, with a
dorsal ridge, and a series of widely spaced bristles situated on slightly
elevated bases on the posterodorsal surface .............. Willistonella Mik
- Arista bare; hind tibia not thicker than hind femur, without a dorsal
ridge and with one or two bristles on the posterodorsal surface that
are not situated on elevated bases ........................ Rhytidops Lindner
KROEBERIA LINDNER
The single known species, fuliginosa Lindner, was described
from Brazil. I have seen specimens from Panama. It probably
does not occur in Florida.
RHOPALOMERA WIEDEMANN
I have seen six or seven species of this genus and some of
them may be looked for in Florida.
APOPHORHYNCHUS WILLISTON
This genus is monobasic, the genotype being flavidus Willis-
ton, described from Brazil. It was unknown to Lindner, and Ald-
rich made no mention of the genus though there is an unidenti-
fied specimen in the collection of the National Museum, from
Bolivia. It can hardly be expected to occur in Florida.









VOL. XXIV-No. 3


WILLISTONELLA MIK
The single species of this genus, pleuropunctatc (Wiede-
mann), is widely distributed, having been recorded from Peru,
Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Surinam, Guiana, and Mexico. I have
seen specimens from Panama, and Venezuela. It may occur in
southern Florida.
RHYTIDOPS LINDNER
This genus was described to receive a single species from the
northern part of Argentina. The species, chacoensis Lindner,
was represented by a single female specimen of which a photo-
graphic figure was given by the describer. This figure shows
all the features common to it and the species described by Ald-
rich as Kroeberia floridana, including the furrowed genae so
that there can be no reasonable doubt about their being con-
generic. In fact I very seriously doubt that they will prove to
be specifically distinct but in the absence of specimens from
Argentina I defer a definite statement on the synonymy.
In any event Aldrich's species must be known as Rhytidops
floridana (Aldrich).
It is very common at cut stumps of Cabbage Palm at Vero
Beach during most of the year.

ANNUAL CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION ANNOUNCED
FOR JUNIOR PROFESSIONAL ASSISTANTS
AND STUDENT AIDS
The United States Civil Service Commission has just an-
nounced two examinations. They are the annual "Junior Pro-
fessional Assistant" and "Student Aid" examinations designed
to recruit young college graduates and junior and senior students
for positions in the Government service. Applications for both
these examinations must be on file with the Commission's Wash-
ington office not later than February 3, 1942.
Optional branches included in the Junior Professional Assist-
ant examination this year are (all in the junior grade, $2,000
a year): Agricultural economist, agronomist, aquatic biologist,
archivist, bacteriologist, biologist, chemist, entomologist, for-
ester, geologist, junior in household equipment, olericulturist,
pomologist, public welfare assistant, range conservationist, soil
scientist, State Department Assistant, and statistician. A 4-year
college course leading to a bachelor's degree is required, with
major graduate or undergraduate study in the field of the op-
tional subject. Senior or graduate students may be admitted
to the examination, and may, upon attaining eligibility, receive
provisional appointment, but cannot enter on duty until evidence
of the successful completion of the required college course is
furnished. Applicants must not have passed their thirty-fifth
birthday.









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF Diatraea saccharalis IN THE
FLORIDA EVERGLADES DURING 1940 AND 1941
J. W. WILSON1
The sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis Fab. is the most
destructive pest of sugarcane in Florida. As its common name
indicates, the larva feeds on the leaves for a few days after
which it bores into the cane stalk where it completes its larval
and pupal development. Because of the difficulty of reaching the
larvae with insecticides biological control methods are the most
promising. Eleven species of parasites have been introduced into
Florida and Louisiana in an attempt to control the sugarcane
borer. Of these, three have become well established in Florida.
During the spring and summer of 1940 the United States
Sugar Corporation purchased three million of the native egg
parasite Trichogramma minutum Riley and in June, 1941 fifty
mated female larval parasites, Metagonistylum minense Towns.
were received from Mr. J. W. Ingram of the Bureau of Entomol-
ogy. Bassus stigmaterus Cress. has been spreading and gradually
increasing in importance since its introduction in 1932.
Trichogramma minutum Riley: This egg parasite becomes
quite abundant in the sugarcane fields of Louisiana and Florida
late in the growing season. Numerous attempts to increase its
effectiveness by mass liberation during the spring and summer
months have been made in Louisiana and other cane growing
countries.
Of the three million Trichogramma purchased from the Cali-
fornia Biological Service, Glendale, California, 1,820,000 were
used in this experiment. The remainder were liberated in fields
belonging to the United States Sugar Corporation. The author
was assisted by Mr. J. V. Fourmy of the United States Sugar
Corporation in the selection of the fields to receive the parasites
and in the liberation of them. The Trichogramma were shipped
in grain moth eggs attached to pieces of cardboard bearing 500
eggs in paper cups. Upon receipt the package was opened and
the parasites held in an open room until the adults began to
emerge. In the field a corner of the cup was torn off and carried
down the cane row until most of the parasites had left the cup
when it was attached to a cane leaf. The effectiveness of the
liberations was judged by a comparison of the percent of joints
bored at harvest time the year before the releases were made
1The author is indebted to D. J. Taylor for assistance with the inocula-
tion of the borers and rearing of the Amazon fly.










VOL. XXIV-No. 3 53

and the harvest following the liberations. It was impossible to
make comparisons of the sucrose or tonnage yields because of
the variation between fields in soil fertility and age of the cane.
Releases of the parasites were begun April 17 and continued
as shown in Table 1 through August 16. As recommended by
Hinds and Spencer (1) and Hinds and Osterberger (2), small
numbers of the parasites were liberated in April and larger
numbers during July and August. Releases were arranged so
that the number released per acre ranged from 1,500 to 11,000
per acre.
TABLE 1. LOCATION AND NUMBER OF Trichogramma minutum LIBERATED
AT CANAL POINT, FLORIDA, WITH PERCENT OF JOINTS BORED BEFORE
AND AFTER THE LIBERATIONS.
Number Date Number
Number [ Date Number Percent Joints Bored
Field Number Parasites Parasites Parasites recent Joints Bored
Liberated Liberated Per Acre 1939-40 1940-41
27-EF-11 ......... 100,000 4/19/40 1,500 5.25 8.46
27-AB-11 .......... 5100,000 4/21/40 3,200 6.02 4.64
(100,000 6/10/40J
(100,000 4/19/401
27-EF-23 ......... 100,000 6/10/40 4,000 5.09 1.16
[100,000 7/16/40J
I120,000 6/13/401
27-CD-26 .......... 200,000 7/16/40 | 7,200 17.14
200,000 8/16/40
S100,000 4/17/401
27-IJ-11 ........... 200,000 6/10/40 11,000 7.61 7.98
200,000 7/16/40
200,000 8/16/40J
27-OP-11 ........ 0 Check 8.34 0.23
27-OP-22 ........ 0 Check 3.42 0.15
27-CD-35 .......... 0 Check 3.11 1.80


As shown in Table 1 the field receiving 1,500 Tricho-
gramma per acre showed an increase in the percent of joints
bored, the fields receiving 3,200 and 4,000 Trichogramma per
acre showed a decrease in the borer population as indicated by
the percent of the joints bored while the field receiving 11,000
Trichogramma per acre showed a slight increase in borer popu-
lation. In the three check fields in which no Trichogramma were
liberated there was a very pronounced reduction in the percent
of joints bored. From this data it must be concluded that the
release of 11,000 Trichogramma per acre did not appreciably de-









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


crease the damage caused by cane borers. In January, 1941
Janes and Bynum (4) published figures showing that release of
ten to forty thousand Trichogramma per acre were of no value in
the control of the sugarcane borer in Louisiana.
Metagonistylum minense Towns.: Because of the success of
this parasite in Puerto Rico, British Guiana, and other cane
growing countries the Amazon river strain of this species was
introduced into Louisiana in May, 1938 by the Bureau of Ento-
mology. In September, 1938 three colonies of flies reared at
the Sugarcane Insects Laboratory, Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, Houma, Louisiana were released in cane fields
of the Everglades by J. W. Ingram and the author. In 1939 and
1940 colonies of the Sao Paulo strain of Amazon fly, also reared
at Houma, were released by Mr. Ingram and the author. No
recoveries have been made from these releases. In June 1941,
45 live and mated females of the Sao Paulo strain were re-
ceived by air mail from Mr. Ingram for breeding purposes.
The technique used was essentially that described by Ingram,
Holloway and Wilson (3). The borer larvae used as host mate-
rial were collected by the United States Sugar Corporation from
their fields. Usually dead hearts containing borer larvae were
collected the day before they were used as host for the parasites.
After inoculation the individual larvae were placed in one and
two ounce salve boxes with small pieces of corn stalk as food
for the borer larvae. Food was changed every two to four days
as the need arose. Usually two or three changes were sufficient.
The puparia were placed in petri dishes lined with moistened
paper towels, 50 to 75 puparia in each petri disk, and these were
placed in emergence cages. Four hundred and eighty of the
borers inoculated with second generation parasites were placed
in pans with chopped corn stalks for food. These larvae yield
45 percent parasite puparia as compared with 78.3 percent of
puparia from inoculated borers placed in individual boxes. For
this reason all of the remaining borer larvae inoculated were
placed in individual boxes.
Data on the number of borers inoculated and the number
of adult parasites obtained are given in Table 2. From a total
of 3,535 borer larvae inoculated, 1,718 adult parasites were ob-
tained. Of the 1,718 parasites 802 were females and 916 males,
a ratio of one female to 1.14 males.
The newly emerged adult flies were placed in cylindrical
cages 10 inches in diameter and 14 inches high and fed a sugar









VOL. XXIV-No. 3


solution on pieces of cotton placed on top of the cage. The cages
were placed outdoors in the shade of a tree during the morning
of the first two days and were liberated in the cane fields on the
third or fourth day. Colonies of from 22 to 98 mated females
were liberated in 18 fields. During September and October
collections of borer larvae were made in these fields, but re-
coveries were obtained in only two of the 18 fields.

TABLE 2. DATA ON BREEDING OF AMAZON FLIES AT BELLE GLADE,
FLORIDA, 1941.
Number Number Percent of
Date of Generation of of Parasites
Inoculation Number Borers Parasites Obtained from
Inoculated Obtained Borers Inoculated
June 14-19 ................ 1 1 734 313 42.64
July 10-16 ... ....... 2 1185 534 45.06
August 6-11 ............ 3 856 464 54.20
September 3-9 ...... 4 760 407 53.55

Total ..................-- 3535 1718 48.60


Bassus stigmaterus (Cress.) : This wasp was introduced into
Florida in shipments of Ipobracon rimac Wolc. in 1932. Num-
bers of the adult female and one adult male were reared from
borer larvae collected for rearing the Amazon fly. Since this
parasite is spreading and increasing in importance attempts
were made to rear it in the laboratory.
On September 15 forty-three borer larvae were placed in
pieces of corn stalk in two of the cages used for holding the
Amazon flies with nine Bassus females. The Bassus were fed
sugar solution absorbed by cotton and were kept in the cage
with the borers for seven days. At the end of this time the
borer larvae were removed to individual boxes and fed pieces
of corn stalk. No Bassus larvae emerged from these borer larvae.
From 17 borer larvae placed in shell vials with a Bassus female
in each vial one Bassus larvae emerged after 29 days. A total
of 33 borer larvae in pieces of corn were placed in pint jars,
two to five larvae and one to three Bassus females to each jar
and covered with cheesecloth produced one Bassus larva in 24
days. From material collected in the field for determining the












TABLE 3. COLLECTIONS OF BORER STAGES MADE IN SUGARCANE FIELDS OF THE EVERGLADES DURING SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER,
1941, WITH DATA ON THE STAGES OF Bassus stigmaterus FOUND IN THESE FIELDS.


Location
Field
Number

27-IJ-12 ..........

28-IJ-19 ..........

28-EF-19 ....-...

28-KL-19 ........

28-KL-19 ......

46-H-7 ............

46-D-7 ............

46-H-7* ..........

27-AB-11 ........

27-0-12 ..........

28-MN-19 ....

27-AB-12 ........

17-IM-26 ........


Borer Stages Collected


Larvae


Pupae

3

7

9

61

10

3

3

6

2

6

1

3

3


Pupal
Skins


Total Stages
Collected
Including
Bassus Cocoons

37

73

58

528

62

10

28

44

29

45

58

65

55


Larvae


Bassus stigmaterus


Coccons

2

2

1

23

5

0

1

2

0

2

2

1

2


Empty
Cocoons


Total
Bassus


*Collection made with Mr. J. W. Ingram and Mr. E. K. Bynum of the U. S. Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


Percent
Parasitism


27.0

32.9

41.4

26.3

29.0

10.0

7.1

25.0

3.4

22.2

27.6

7.6

9.1










VOL. XXIV-No. 3


amount of parasitization, the last Bassus larva emerged as long
as 18 to 29 days after the collection was made. Thus the larval
period of Bassus stigmaterus lasts from 18 to 29 days. Twenty-
one Bassus larvae just emerged from borer larvae were observed
to spin their cocoons and emerge as adults as follows: 1 in 8
days, 16 in 9 days and 4 in 10 days, giving an average of 9.14
days for the pupal period.
Collections of borer stages were made in 20 different lo-
calities during September and October, 1941 and Bassus stig-
materus were recovered at 13 of these localities. Data on the
number of stages collected and the percent parasitization are
given in Table 3. It will be noted that the percent of parasitiza-
tion ranges from 3.4 to 41.4 percent indicating that this parasite
has become widely established and is becoming economically
valuable in borer control.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
1. HINDS, W. E., and HERBERT SPENCER. 1929. Trichogramma experi-
ments in 1928 for control of the sugarcane borer. J. Econ. Ent.
22:633-636.
2. and B. A. OSTERBERGER. 1935. Recommendations for
control of the sugarcane borer in Louisiana. Proc. Int. Soc. Sugar-
cane Tech. 5th Congress, Brisbane p. 476-483.

3. INGRAM, J. W., T. E. HOLLOWAY, and J. W. WILSON. 1939. Recent
developments in biological control of Diatraea saccharalis in the
continental United States. Proc. 6th Pacific Sci. Congress. IV,
359-363.

4. JANES, H. A., and E. K. BYNUM. 1941. Experiments with Tricho-
gramma minutum Riley as a control of the sugarcane borer in
Louisiana. U. S. D. A. Tech. Bul. 743.









5he
FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST
Official Organ of the Florida Entomological Society
Gainesville, Florida

VOL. XXIV DECEMBER, 1941 No. 3

J. R. WATSON, Gainesville.. ................................................Editor
E. W. BERGER, Gainesville-............-...-..--............. Associate Editor
J. W. WILSON, Belle Glade...--.........-....................Business Manager
Issued once every three months. Free to all members of the
Society.
Subscription price to non-members is $1.00 per year in ad-
vance; 35 cents per copy.


PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE
FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Gainesville, Florida, December 5-6, 1941
The 1941 Annual Meeting of the Society was held in the
Agricultural College on the University of Florida Campus with
President Homer Hixson presiding. In his presidential address
he pointed out and discussed some of the relationships between
entomologists and citizens of the state and indicated some ways
in which greater service could be rendered by entomologists.
Particular emphasis was laid on the problem of pest control and
the speaker suggested that there is a great need for trained
entomologists in this field of work.
A symposium entitled "Entomological Services in Florida,"
was an important and interesting feature of the program. Dr.
H. Harold Hume, Dean of the College of Agriculture, introduced
the speakers and led the discussion in a graciously capable man-
ner. Hon. Nathan Mayo, Commissioner of Agriculture, prepared
a paper on the Entomological Services of the Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture. He was unable to be present and the
paper was presented by his son, Nathan Mayo, Jr. This paper
outlined the services and discussed some of the problems en-
countered by the Department in administering the Florida
Insecticide Law. W. W. Others, recounting some of his ex-
periences, showed his usual wisdom and wit in his discussion of
the Problems of the Consulting Entomologist. J. R. Watson
outlined and discussed some of the insect problems which are
now receiving the attention of entomologists of the Agricultural









VOL. XXIV-No. 3


Experiment Stations. A. C. Brown spoke of those functions
of the State Plant Board having to do with Regulatory and
Quarantine Services in Entomology. Particular emphasis was
placed on the increasing danger of foreign insect pests getting
into this country in service planes which fly to and from
foreign countries and often land at remote air fields where ade-
quate inspection cannot be given. R. L. Miller, discussing In-
secticide Problems in Entomological Service, called attention to
the growing complexity of insecticidal sprays and dusts and
mentioned some of the difficulties involved in the manufacture
of insecticides that are effective and safe.
Other papers presented during the meeting were: Parasites
of the Sugar Cane Borer Released in the Cane Fields of the
Everglades During 1940-41, by J. W. Wilson; The Changing
Status of Natural Agencies in Commercial Control of Scale on
Citrus, by W. L. Thompson; Fruit Piercing Moths in Cuba, by
W. W. Others; and Further Tests with Thallium Baits for the
Control of Fire Ants, by B. V. Travis. A great deal of interest
was shown in all the papers and some of them brought forth
some lively discussions.
On Friday evening with Dr. R. L. Miller acting as toast-
master, the Annual Dinner of the Society was enjoyed by about
thirty-five members and guests. Mrs. Horton H. Hobbs honored
the assemblage with two piano selections which were rendered
in a pleasing and talented manner. Following the dinner, Dr.
Herbert Osborn, the first Honorary Member of the Society, gave
a most interesting talk on Early Work and Workers in South-
ern Entomology. This was illustrated with a large number of
lantern slides of photographs of workers who have been closely
identified with the development of entomology in the South.

BUSINESS MEETING
The business session of the Society was held Saturday morn-
ing, December 6, 1941.

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY
The report of the Secretary was read and approved.

REPORT OF THE TREASURER-BUSINESS MANAGER
The Treasurer-Business Manager read his report covering
receipts and disbursements for the past year. B. V. Travis,
serving as the Auditing Committee, moved the acceptance of









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


this report, stating that he had examined the books and had
found the accounts accurate and the books in order. This was
seconded by J. C. Goodwin and passed. This report is published
on another page of this issue.

COMMITTEE ON DUES AND SUBSCRIPTIONS
At the 1940 annual meeting, the Society authorized the in-
coming president to appoint a committee to investigate the cost
of enlarging the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST and to consider the
need or desirability of increasing dues and subscription rates.
The committee appointed by President Hixson consists of: J. R.
Watson, Chairman; W. P. Hunter; H. K. Wallace; J. W. Wilson;
and C. B. Wisecup. Professor Watson reporting for this com-
mittee, stated that the proposal to increase dues had not elicited
a very enthusiastic response from the members. He further
stated that an increase had not been needed during the past
year as sufficient papers had not been submitted to the Editor
to permit the publication of the four issues of regular size. No
recommendations were made by the committee.

COMMITTEE ON INSECT LIST PROJECT
T. H. Hubbell and J. R. Watson reported on the W.P.A. pro-
jects having to do with insects. Dr. Hubbell briefly outlined the
work that has been done on the species catalogue and bibliog-
raphy of the Orthoptera of the New World. Professor Watson
stated that most of the available literature has been examined
and all records of Florida insects found there have been entered
on filing cards. He raised the question of the best procedure
to be followed to secure records from Florida insect specimens
in the collections of museums and other institutions. There was
then brought to the attention of the members the W.P.A. ruling
which does not allow workers to be employed continuously on a
project for more than eighteen months. However, persons who
have worked eighteen months may be reemployed after having
been off for two weeks, provided they have had private employ-
ment during this period. Two of the workers have been on the
insect project for nearly eighteen months and their services will
be lost unless some private employment is provided for them
for a two weeks' period. T. H. Hubbell moved that the Society
allocate the sum of thirty dollars for the employment of these
two workers. This was seconded by L. W. Ziegler and passed.









VOL. XXIV-No. 3


MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE
The Society at the 1940 meeting authorized President Hixson
to appoint a standing membership committee. The committee
named by him consists of: J. W. Wilson, Chairman; A. H. Mad-
den; R. L. Miller; Herbert Spencer; and L. W. Ziegler. Dr.
Wilson speaking for this committee recommended that the fol-
lowing associate members be raised to the rank of active mem-
bership: Wallace Dekle; Stephen S. Easter; Wm. S. Fletcher;
Mrs. C. N. Grimshaw; Norman C. Hayslip; C. D. Kime; W. W.
Lawless; W. R. Lyle; H. C. Moennich; T. W. Reed; and J. C.
Stancil. The recommendation was also made that the following
persons be elected to associate membership: M. L. Anderson;
J. G. Brunton; P. W. Calhoun; J. C. Crawford; W. E. Dove;
A. B. Gurney; Arthur M. Hill, Jr.; R. F. Joyce; C. F. Ladeburg;
M. D. Leonard; J. M. McGough; and A. M. Phillips. J. L. Ingle
was recommended for student membership.
K. E. Bragdon moved the acceptance of the recommendations
of the committee and instructed the secretary to cast an unani-
mous ballot for the candidates named. This motion was seconded
by J. R. Watson and passed.
In order to clarify certain points regarding membership and
dues, the Membership Committee recommended the following
changes in the By-Laws of the Society: (1.) Insert under
Article I:
"Section 2.-The Membership Committee may at any time restore to
full active membership, any former active member who for good cause had
allowed his membership to lapse. Applications for reinstatement by former
members of other than active rank, shall be considered by the Membership
Committee and shall be submitted by them together with their recommenda-
tions to the Society for final action.
"Section 3.-Student members of one year's standing or longer, may,
on recommendation of the Membership Committee, be elected to active
membership at any annual meeting."
(2.) The first sentence under Article IV, Section 1, is rather
ambiguous regarding the membership status of University and
High School students. This now reads as follows: "The annual
dues of associate and active members shall be $1.00, except for
University or High School students who may affiliate with the
Society by the payment of $ .50." It is recommended that this
be amended to read as follows: "The annual dues of associate
and active members shall be $1.00. University and High School
students affiliated with the Society shall pay annual dues of
fifty cents."









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


(3.) Insert under Article IV:
"Section 2.-Applications for membership in the Society will be re-
ceived by the Membership Committee at any time. Dues paid at time of
making application shall apply to the year immediately following election
to membership. Applicants shall be furnished the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST
without cost while their applications are pending."
G. B. Merrill moved the acceptance of the recommendations
in regard to the By-Laws. This was seconded by W. W. Lawless
and passed.
During the year the Society has lost one member by death
and seven by resignation. The deceased member is Thos. H.
Jones, Morristown, N. J. At the close of the year the Society
roll included 97 active and associate members, 16 student mem-
bers, and five honorary members.

COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS
At the opening session of the meeting President Hixson
named a Committee on Nominations consisting of H. K. Wallace,
G. B. Merrill, and Willis Mathis. The committee named the
following as candidates for the various Society offices and posi-
tions to be filled by election: President, K. E. Bragdon; Vice-
President, T. H. Hubbell; Secretary, A. N. Tissot; Editor of
the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST, J. R. Watson; Associate Editor,
E. W. Berger; Member of the Executive Committee (for two
year term), L. S. Maxwell. J. C. Goodwin moved that the rec-
ommendations of the committee be accepted and that the secre-
tary be instructed to cast an unanimous ballot for the candidates
named. This was seconded by G. B. Merrill and passed.
J. C. Goodwin moved adjournment, which was seconded by
R. L. Miller. The Society adjourned at 12:30 P. M.
A. N. TISSOT, Secretary




FOR SALE
Back Numbers of the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST: Volumes I
and II, $5.00 each; Volumes III to V, $2.00 each; Volumes VI
to XXIII, $1.00 each; Index Volumes I to XIX, $1.00 each.
Send orders to J. W. Wilson, Experiment Station, Belle Glade,
Florida.









VOL. XXIV-No. 3


REPORT OF THE TREASURER-BUSINESS MANAGER OF
THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY
For the Year Ending November 30, 1941
Receipts
Balance, November 30, 1940 .......... -- --................................ $101.81
Dues and Subscriptions ...................----------------............ -........ 145.00
A advertising ..................................... .................. .. ..... .. ................... 80.00
Sale of Index and Back Numbers .............-----..--.... .................43.50
Refund on Bank Charges .-...------ --................. ...... ...... ........ .25
Collected on Old Account ..................................................... 30.37

Total R eceipts ........................................ ............... ................... $400.93
Disbursements
Pepper Printing Company, Printing the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST
and Supplies .-...... --....--...-...-..--- -----............... ..... ........................ $225.77
Last Year's Meeting (Programs, Decorations, Free Tickets) ........... 25.81
Postage ..................- .................... ...................-................ 23.50
Exchange to Bank ....--........... .....- ----------............. .........-- ..... 2.50
Subscriptions Refunded ........................................ -- --............ 1.55

Total Disbursem ents ........................... ............................. $279.13
BALANCE, NOVEMBER 30, 1941 ..............-...... -...................-- $121.80
Signed: J. W. WILSON

I hereby certify that the books have been examined and
found to be in order, and that the above statement was found
to be correct.
Signed: B. V. TRAVIS,
Auditing Committee




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