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Title: Florida Entomologist
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Creator: Florida Entomological Society
Publisher: Florida Entomological Society
Place of Publication: Winter Haven, Fla.
Publication Date: 1951
Copyright Date: 1917
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Subject: Florida Entomological Society
Entomology -- Periodicals
Insects -- Florida
Insects -- Florida -- Periodicals
Insects -- Periodicals
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Florida Entomologist
Official Organ of the Florida Entomological Society


MARCH, 1951
Vol. XXXIV No. 1



CONTENTS
Page
SPENCER, HERBERT, and NORMAN, P. A.-Experiments on
Control of the Citrus Red Mit (Purple Mit) ............-..--.. 3
CHAMBERLIN, F. S.-Aphid Trap Records in Relation to
Green Peach Aphid Infestations in Shade-Grown Tobacco 6
WESTFALL, MINTER J.-Notes on Tetragoneuria sepia
Gloyd, with Description of the Female and Nymph ...... 9
HOFFMAN, RICHARD L.-The Name of the Common Eastern
Spirobolid Milliped .............. ------------ 15
HERRING, JON L.-The Aquatic and Semiaquatic Hemiptera
of Northern Florida. Part 3: Nepidae, Belostomatidae,
Notonectidae, Pleidae and Corixidae -..-------------------- 17
MINUTES OF THE THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL MEETING OF THE
FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY ......... -------------- 30
NEWS ITEMS .......... .....-------------- -- 34




Published quarterly by the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Box 2425, University Station, University of Florida, Gainesville


Mailing Date: April 3, 1951








THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


Uhe
FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST

VOL. XXXIV MARCH, 1951 No. 1

THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY

OFFICERS FOR 1950-1951
President........ -------------- ---- -- W. G. BRUCE
Vice President ._.....---............ .. ......... ..... JOHN WILSON
Secretary -. --..-..--...--...-......-...........MILLEDGE MURPHEY, JR.
Treasurer.... ...--------- --- ---. ---.. ---...... ... ....L. C. KUITERT
Executive Committee ....--............. ............ ------ J. P. TOFFALETTI
) J. J. DIEM

EDITORIAL BOARD
LEWIS BERNER ..---- ....-..-............ ......-..........-Editor
A. N. TISSOT --...--.... .....----........... Associate Editor
L. C. KUITERT .---...... ...-----------..---.........Business Manager

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VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


EXPERIMENTS ON CONTROL OF THE CITRUS RED MITE
(PURPLE MITE)
SECOND REPORT
HERBERT SPENCER and PAUL A. NORMAN
U. S. D. A., Agr. Res. Adm., Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

The citrus red mite,1 or purple mite, has become an import-
ant problem in Florida in recent years. In 1950 this pest was
especially prevalent and troublesome.
Experiments on control of this pest were started in 1937 and
are still under way. Spencer and Osburn (1949) in 1948 sum-
marized progress in control up to that date. Oil emulsion or
emulsive-oil sprays at from 1/2 to 1% gallons per 100 gallons of
water gave adequate control, but such applications are in addi-
tion to the regular sprays and, accordingly, are costly to growers.
Moreover, they may injure the trees in cold weather or in very
dry periods. Much needed was a miticide that could be added
to the regular sulfur sprays. Among the newer insecticides
dinitro-o-cyclohexylphenol (DN) was effective, was compatible
with wettable sulfur, and has come into use for the cooler
months, but may cause injury in hot weather. Neotran, con-
taining 40 percent of bis (p-chlorophenoxy) methane, was ef-
fective in controlling the mites, compatible with materials in
regularly scheduled sprays, and safe in summer and winter.
Parathion gave promise of control, but in one instance a build-
up of citrus red mites followed its use.
In 1949 and 1950 a number of new miticides became avail-
able for the experiments. This paper gives results with these
materials, as well as additional information on the miticides
previously found promising.
In 1949 a grove of Temple orange trees was arranged for a
comparison of control of citrus red mites with parathion plus
wettable sulfur, and combination sprays of wettable sulfur and
the miticides Neotran, Karathane (2-capryl-4,6-dinitrophenyl
crotonate, 25 percent, formerly called Arathane) and azoben-
zene. All the trees had been sprayed in February with a nutri-
tional combination of zinc, manganese, and copper sulfates,
hydrated lime, and wettable sulfur, and in April with a post-
bloom application of basic copper sulfate plus wettable sulfur.
As is usual after nutritional sprays that leave heavy residues,
1Paratetranychus citri (McG.).









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


severe mite infestation developed. On May 27, 80 percent of
the leaves showed infestation by citrus red mites (eggs or
crawlers). The experimental sprays were applied May 31 and
June 3. Twenty days later the infestations were as follows:

Spray combination Percent of
(quantities per 100 gal.) leaves infested
Oil emulsion (1 percent oil) ..... ... ...------------ 4
Parathion, 25% wettable, 1 lb. + wettable
sulfur 6 lbs. .. --- --..... .----......... --..- 89
Neotran 1 lb. + wettable sulfur 6 lbs. ....- ... --.....--- 3'
Karathane 1 lb. + wettable sulfur 6 lbs. ........ ..------ 6
Azobenzer.e, 70/, wettable, 1 lb. + wettable
sulfur 6 lbs. ....----- .... --- .....-.. 24

The oil emulsion gave satisfactory control. The Neotran
plus wettable sulfur and the Karathane plus wettable sulfur gave
as good control as the oil. Some reduction also resulted from
the azobenzene plus wettable sulfur, but the control was not
sufficient. The parathion plus wettable sulfur may hive killed
a few adults when applied, but at the end of 20 days the infesta-
tion was heavier than before the spraying.

TABLE 1.-CONTROL OF CITRUS RED MITES: WITH COMBINATION
SPRAYS, 1950.


Basic copper sulfate 3 lbs. plus wettable
sulfur 5 lbs. per 100 gals. plus-


No miticide (checks) ---... --.~~......-.... ..- .... ..-
Neotran 1 lb ....-.-....----............ ......
Karathane 1 lb. ----........-...-....-... ........--
Azobenzene, 70% wettable, 1 lb. ------...
EPN-300 1 l b. .............................................
Aramite 2 lbs. ..................---...........
R-242 4 lbs. ..............-.. .. ... ................
923, 1 pt ..............- ...-. ....... ....
K-6451, 1 lb............ ------------..-...


Percent of leaves infested
Prespray I After spraying
Mar. 14 May 10

42 71
39 19
36 23
53 9
43 23
37 42
42 27
52 37
37 17


Crawling adults, young stages, or unhatched eggs.

In 1950 several additional materials were available, includ-
ing EPN-300 (ethyl p-nitrophenyl thionobenzene phosphonate, 30
percent), Aramite or 88-R(2- (p-tert-butylphenoxy) -1-methyl-
ethyl 2-chloroethyl sulfite, 15 percent), R-242 (p-chlorophenyl
phenyl sulfone, 25 percent), 923 (dichlorophenyl benzenesulfo-
nate, 50 percent emulsifiable), and K-6451 or C-854 (p-chloro-
phenyl p-chlorobenzene sulfonate, 50 percent). The same grove
was arranged in randomized blocks, with 10 replications of









VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


single-tree plots, for comparison of eight combination sprays of
basic copper sulfate, wettable sulfur, and eight miticides. The
sprays were applied post-bloom on March 15-17. A prespray
estimate of infestation was made on March 14 and estimates of
control were made on May 10. The spray combinations and
results are given in Table 1.

All the new materials gave good control of the heavy infes-
tation. The slow-acting azobenzene was the best miticide in
this test, K-6451 was next, followed by Neotran. Aramite and
923 were the poorest, but they may show up better in future
tests when used in increased amounts per 100 gallons in the
sprays.

LITERATURE CITED
(1) Spencer, Herbert, and Max R. Osborn. 1949. Experiments on control
of the citrus red mite. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. (1948) 61: 95-101.







NOTICE

From time to time it is proposed to publish short notes about
the activities of the members of the Florida Entomological
Society. Items concerning promotions, travels, honors or awards,
publications, etc. are particularly pertinent. Please send all
such information to the editor.








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Trade Mark "ELEPHANT", the ideal black insect pin.
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Both types in sizes No. 000-7. Also MINUTEN-Nadeln.
Request samples and prices from the manufacturer:
EMIL ARLT, Spezialnadelfabrik, Salzburg 2, P. O. Box 76, Austria.








THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


APHID TRAP RECORDS IN RELATION TO GREEN PEACH
APHID INFESTATIONS IN SHADE-GROWN TOBACCO1

F. S. CHAMBERLIN
U. S. D. A., Agr. Res. Adm., Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

Three aphid traps of wind-vane type, similar to the trap
designed by Shands et al. (1942), were operated throughout the
1948 and 1949 tobacco growing seasons in the Quincy, Florida,
area. The object of this work was to obtain information con-
cerning the flight of the green peach aphid, M1y: ,.'- persicae
(Sulz.), which has become an important pest in this shade-grown
tobacco area.
The traps (fig. 1) were operated in typical localities at a
height of 12 feet. They were examined and the aphids removed
five times each week. Aphids were lost from a few traps, owing
to tearing of the cloth netting by birds and windstorms, and
very few aphids were taken on calm days, but the trap operation
as a whole was considered generally satisfactory.
During the 19-week period of operation in 1948 the traps
captured 13 green peach aphids out of the 236 aphids of 37 dif-
ferent species taken.2 In 1949 only 5 green peach aphids were
taken in the traps out of a catch of 191 aphids, involving 39
species.
The relatively small numbers of green peach aphids taken in
the traps indicate a very limited flight of the species in this area
and little probability of any appreciable influx from distant
areas. Field observations in the Quincy area during the 1948-
50 tobacco growing seasons have shown generally light, scattered
populations of green peach aphids on crucifers and other occa-
sional host plants. Only very limited flight movements would
be expected to originate from these sources. Tobacco might
well serve as abundant reservoirs for this aphid, but for the
fact that most of the aphids on all tobacco plants in the area
are eliminated by insecticide applications.
Although flight of the green peach aphid is evidently limited
in the Quincy area, it is a factor of some importance in aphid
control on tobacco. Previous observations (Chamberlin 1950)
have shown that winged migrants of this aphid are the probable

1 In cooperation with the North Florida Agricultural Experiment Station.
The writer is indebted to L. M. Russell, Division of Insect Identification,
Bur. Ent. and Plant Quar., for all identifications included in this paper.








VOL. XXXIV-No. 1 7

source of initial aphid infestations in tobacco plant beds. The
present evidence shows that relatively few aphids fly or are
blown by the wind into shade-grown tobacco fields, where they
may start colonies. This seems to occur most frequently dur-


.1 J
L


Figure 1.-Wind-vane type of aphid trap used in flight studies of the green
peach aphid. Quincy, Florida, 1948-49.


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I

1-









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


ing the tobacco-setting season, where the cloth sidewalls of these
fields have not been erected. The open-mesh cheesecloth used
for these sidewalls and for the tops of the fields serves as a bar-
rier to aphids but does not completely exclude them. To obtain
the greatest possible protection from infestation by these in-
sects the construction of the cloth sidewalls and tops of tobacco
shade fields should be completed prior to the tobacco-setting sea-
son. These facts also emphasize the value of using aphid-free
tobacco transplants as means of minimizing aphid infestations
on shade-grown tobacco.
A list of the species of aphids captured in the traps is given
below:


Amphorophora sonchi (Oestl.)
Amphorophora sp.
Anoecia oenotherae Wilson
Anoecia sp.
Anuraphis maidi-radicis (Forbes)
Anuraphis iiIr;dle tiiii (Thos.)
Anuraphis roses Baker
Aphis abbreviata Patch
Aphis gossypii Glov.
Aphis illinoisensis Shimer
Aphis maidis Fitch
Aphis monardae Oestl.
Aphis oenotherae Oestl.
Aphis oestlundi Gill
Aphis sp.
Aphis spiraecola Patch
Brevicoryne brassicae (L.)
Capitophorus gillettei Theob.
Capitophorus sp.
Carolinaia cyperi Ainslie
Carolinaia sp.
Cinara taedae Tissot
Eriosoma crataegi (Oestl.)
Hysteroneura setariae (Thos.)


Macrosiphum ambrosiae (Thos.)
Macrosiphum erigeronensis (Thos.)
Macrosiphum granarium (Kby.)
Macrosiphum liriodendri (Mon.)
Macrosiphum pisi (Kltb.)
Macrosiphum solanifolii (Ashm.)
Macrosiphum sonchi (L.)
Macrosiphum sp.
Myzocallis discolor (Mon.)
Myzocallis sp.
Myzocallis trifolii (Mon.)
Myzus persicae (Sulz.)
Neothomasia pupulicola (Thos.)
Pemphigus sp.
Prociphilus sp.
Rhopalosiphum prunifoliae (Fitch)
Rhopalosiphum pseudobrassicae
(Davis)
Rhopalosiphum sp.
Rhopalosiphum subterraneum Mason
Sipha flava (Forbes)
Toxoptera graminum (Rond.)
Trifidaphis phaseoli (Pass.)
Unilachnus parvus (Wilson)


LITERATURE CITED


Chamberlin, F. S. 1950. Source of Early Aphid Infestations in Shade-
Grown Tobacco. Fla. Ent. 33: 16-17.

Shands, W. A., G. W. Simpson, and F. H. Lathrop. 1942. An Aphid Trap.
U. S. Dept. Agr., Bur. Ent. and P1. Quar. ET-196, 5 pp. [Processed].







































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VOL. XXXIV-NO. 1


NOTES ON TETRAGONEURIA SEPIA GLOYD,
WITH DESCRIPTIONS OF THE FEMALE AND NYMPH1

MINTER J. WESTFALL, JR.

The adults of the genus Tetragoneuria have long been a prob-
lematical group for odonatologists. Several keys have been sub-
mitted for identification of the males, but the females are espe-
cially difficult of separation. There is still need for the assem-
bly of more material and a further study of the adults such as
those of Muttkowski (1911) and Davis (1933).
Only a few months after Davis published his summary of
the genus, a new species, T. sepia, was described from Florida
by Mrs. Leonora K. Gloyd on the basis of a single male taken
near Greenville in Madison County, Florida, September 7, 1932.
Since this specimen was flying about a swamp flooded by the
adjacent Aucilla River, Mrs. Gloyd stated that it was impossible
to say whether the normal habitat of the species was a sluggish
stream or swamp pond.
In 1941 I reported the capture of this species in Florida.
My first specimens taken were collected from a street in Or-
lando, at least one-half mile from water. The capture of other
specimens in Nassau County and at Lake Redbug, Seminole
County was also described. The earliest record yet is of the
male taken in early March of 1939 on the west end of the
Tamiami Trail by E. M. Davis. Another specimen in the Rollins
College collection, according to my notes, was taken March 28
but this specimen has apparently been given away in exchanges
and the exact locality is not known. Since that time the species
has also been taken in Gainesville and a reared specimen from
Tallahassee was recently determined for Mr. William Cross.
The latest date of capture is that of a female taken November
15, 1936 in Seminole County by Mr. J. A. Fluno. Lake Placid
is now added to the known range and this species appears to
be widely distributed throughout the state. It may certainly be
expected in Georgia also.
In my collection there are now seven females (others having
been given away in exchanges), two of them reared specimens
from lots of nymphs from which males also emerged. The others
with the exception of the single specimen taken by Fluno were

1 Contribution from the Department of Biology, University of Florida.









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


collected in association with males and have the characteristic
appearance of the males. I am now offering a description of the
female although a detailed study of all females in the genus is
needed but must be left for the future.

Tetragoneuria sepia Gloyd
FEMALE: In most details the description of the female fol-
lows Mrs. Gloyd's description of the male.
Head. Labium light yellow; labrum golden yellow; clypeus and sides
of frons olivaceous; front of frons golden yellow, darkening dorsally;
upper part of frons black full-width near the vertex, with a metallic blue-
black projection forward in the midline, forming a short stem of a T-spot;
the dark stem spreads laterally a short distance in some specimens, in
others it does not. Face covered with short dark brown pile. Rear of
head black with a submarginal row of whitish hairs.
Thorax. As in male prothorax is brown, except margin of front lobe
cream colored. Synthorax sepia above, which gives the species its name,
becoming olivaceous brown on sides; lighter near antealar sinuses. A
metallic blackish stripe on the humeral suture is conjoined below with an-
other dark stripe occupying the lower half of the first lateral suture. This
stripe is connected with one on the second lateral by a dark cross band
around the metastigma which is itself narrowly outlined with a darker
black. There is a distinctive bright yellow spot above and another below
the metastigma, similar to those in T. stella Williamson but more con-
spicuous because the pile of the thorax is shorter, less dense, and browner
than in that species. Intersternum as in male dark brown. Legs dark
brown with exception of the coxae, front and middle trochanters and front
femur which are light brown. Legs without tibial keels of male. Front
and hind wings entirely hyaline in all seven females. Pterostigma medium
to dark brown, darker and distinctly shorter than in T. stella.
Abdomen. Ground color yellowish brown; large ventro-lateral areas on
segments 2 and 3 yellow, almost full-length and margined below with dark
brown; segment 4 basally shows a similar yellow in some specimens, in
others almost full-length there also; dark band, quite wide, begins on
posterior half of segment 3 and becomes blackish brown to form a con-
tinuous band on dorsum of 4-10. Ventral margins of 3-7 and lateral carina
of 4-8 black; abdominal appendages dark brown. Hairs on 1 and base of
2 brown to whitish, on appendages dark brown, elsewhere inconspicuous
or lacking. Appendages about as long as segment 9 dorsally. Subgenital
plate as shown in figure.2
Venation. Antenodals, first and second series: front wing, 6 (14
wings); hind wing, 4 (13 wings-one shows 5 in second series only) or 5
(1 wing). Postnodals: front wing, 4 (1 wing) or 5 (10 wings) or 6
(2 wings); hind wing, 5 (10 wings) or 6 (3 wings) or 7 (1 wing).
Substigmal series in both front and hind wings beginning between the

2The drawing of female was prepared by Miss Esther Coogle, staff
artist, Department of Biology.







VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


third and fourth antenodals except in 3 hind wings where it is between
the second and third. Triangles of front wings once crossed in all speci-
mens; subtriangle of 3 cells (13 wings) or 2 cells (1 wing).

( / r
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Tetragoneuria sepia Gloyd. Upper figure, photograph of full grown
nymph; lower figure, ventral view of segments 9, 10 and appendages of
female.









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


Measurements (in millimeters). Total length including appendages,
37-42; abdomen with appendages, 26-30; appendages 1.7; hind femur 6.7-7;
hind wing 27-29.5; pterostigma 2.3.
Material examined. Seven females, all collected in Florida by me,
unless stated otherwise. Orlando, April 21, 1940 (designated as the
allotype and deposited in the collection of the Museum of Zoology, Univer-
sity of Michigan, along with the holotype); Nassau County, June 7, 1939;
Seminole County, April 8, 1940; Seminole County, November 15, 1936,
Coll. J. A. Fluno; Maitland, April 28, 1941, Coll. D. W. Thornton; reared
specimen from Lake Redbug, Seminole County, emerged June 25, 1948;
reared specimen from Lake Placid, emerged May 15, 1950, nymph collected
by J. G. Needham and reared by me.

All of the males collected from southern Florida do not show
any coloration of the wing base whatever and the membrane
is clear. Males from Nassau County only show a coloration
approaching that described for the holotype. In these the en-
tire membrane is also slightly smokey.
NYMPH: While searching for the nymphs of Gomphus aus-
tralis at Lake Redbug, Seminole County, Florida, in the spring
of 1948 with Mr. J. A. Fluno, several nymphs of Tetragoneuria
were found. They were taken from the floor of the lake in a
mucky type of bottom, associated with the nymphs of G. aus-
tralis, and transported to Gainesville where they were kept
in pillow cages set in gallon jars of water. A male emerged
June 10 and a female June 25. Four of the other nymphs were
preserved before they emerged. In the spring of 1950 Dr. J.
G. Needham brought to Gainesville a number of nymphs of this
genus he had taken at Lake Placid. I cared for them hoping
they might be the desired T. stella which I wished to compare
with sepia, but when they emerged a male and female of sepia
appeared on May 10 and May 15 respectively. Several other
nymphs were preserved. From this material the following brief
description is given.

Raptorial setae of the lateral labial lobe usually 6; four of nine speci-
mens show at base of one side a small seventh which is less than half the
size of the others. Mental setae usually 6 + 3 (the first series of 6 larger
setae in line, the others out of line at end and smaller); two specimens
have 7 + 3 each side, and a third has a small seventh seta in the first
series on one side only. Lateral spines on segments 8 and 9, the one on
8 about one-sixth the length of the lateral margin of segment 8 of which
it is a part, and incurved. Spines of 9 long and straight, slightly divergent,
but varying somewhat in length. In most specimens it is about one-fifth
longer than the length of segment 9 at the base of spine. In one specimen








VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


(the one figured) it is almost one-half longer than the shortest distance
from base of spine to the front margin of segment 9. The lateral, superior
and inferior appendages measured in tenths of the length of the inferiors
take as ten are about as 6 or 7:9:10. Dorsal hooks are on 2-9 as in the
other species, those on 2 and 3 thin, needle-like, and straight, on 4 thin
and decurved toward tip, highest on 5 and 6, becoming low and ridge-like
on 9. Wing pads extend to middle of segment 6. Total length 20-21.5
mm., width of abdomen 7.5-8 and width of head 5.5-6.

The nymphs of this genus have not been well known. Need-
ham (1901) presented a key to separate the nymphs of four
species, spinigera, cynosura, semiaquea and spinosa. His spinosa
was canis and the semiaquea was what is now considered cyno-
sura simulans. The true semiaquea has probably been taken
only in the south Atlantic states from New Jersey to Florida.
Records from Massachusetts are said by Muttkowski to be
doubtful. That species has not yet been reared but a specimen
in the Cornell collection from North Carolina has been referred
by supposition to semiaquea. Broughton (1928) described stella
from supposition, but it is difficult from the description to be
sure that she did not have sepia. I hope to successfully rear
stella soon. Dr. Needham has reared a female of petechialis
from New Mexico. It was collected at the Bottomless Lakes
near Roswell and emerged May 5, 1936. The characters of this
and all known species will be given in key and tabular form in
the forthcoming Manual of the Odonata of North America. In
this reared petechialis the spines of 9 are long, pointing directly
backward, their axes parallel, but they are not quite so long as
the distance across 9 from their base to segment 8, whereas in
sepia and our supposed specimens of stella they are longer than
this distance. The dorsal hooks of petechialis are a little more
sharply pointed than in cynosura. The adults of petechialis and
stella have been closely associated by students of the genus.
How different the true nymph of stella is from that of petechialis
will be known when the former species has also been reared.
The specimens Dr. Needham and I have tentatively referred to
stella have 7 lateral setae consistently and 7 + 3 mental, also
the spines of 9 much like those of sepia. Further distinctive
characters will be sought when we have reared the remaining
species. The nymphs of spinosa, williamsoni and morio (this
may not be a valid species) are still unknown. As stated previ-
ously we have semiaquea and stella only by supposition.









14 THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Broughton, Elsie. 1928. Some new Odonata nymphs. Canad. Ent.,
60:32-34, figs.
Davis, W. T. 1933. Dragonflies of the genus Tetragoneuria. Bull. Brook-
lyn Ent. Soc., 28:87-104, figs.
Gloyd, Lenora K. 1933. A new Corduline dragonfly, Tetragoneuria sepia,
from Florida (Odonata). Occ. Pap. Mus. Zool. Univ. Mich., 274:1-5,
figs.
Muttkowski, R. A. 1911. Studies in Tetragoneuria. Bull. Wis. Nat. Hist.
Soc., 9:91-134, figs.
.-.--.....-.-. ........... ........... 1915. Studies in Tetragoneuria (Odonata).
II. Bull. Wis. Nat. Hist. Soc., 13:49-61.
Needham, J. G. 1901. Aquatic insects in the Adirondacks. Bull. N. Y.
State Mus., 47:489-495, figs.
Westfall, M. J., Jr. 1941. Notes on Florida Odonata. Ent. News, 52:15-16.


FICO BRAN INSCICID


APPK 0 --A D INE AE




/
/
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/
I.


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VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


THE NAME OF THE COMMON EASTERN
SPIROBOLID MILLIPED

RICHARD L. HOFFMAN
Blacksburg, Virginia

Information accumulated during the preparation of a check-
list of North American millipeds reveals the unfortunate neces-
sity of having to change the specific name of what is probably,
to the average zoologist, the most familiar American species.
This is the form long known as Spirobolus marginatus.
Described by Thomas Say in 1821 under the name Julus
marginatus, this species was placed in the Brandtian genus
Spirobolus by our pioneer student of diplopods, Horatio C. Wood,
in 1865. With few exceptions, all subsequent workers have un-
critically accepted Wood's disposition of the name.
In 1893, however, a posthumously published article by C. H.
Bollman pointed out that Say's name is obviously a junior pri-
mary homonym of Julus marginatus Olivier, 1792. Curiously
enough, this observation has been overlooked by all later inves-
tigators. Bollman further showed that Say's name was in all
probability based on the population of Florida and adjacent
regions, now known as S. spinigerus Wood. These two facts
serve to demonstrate that the other, more northern, spirobolid
of the Eastern Seaboard is left without a specific name. Boll-
man suggested usage of an old name proposed by Palisot de
Beauvois in 1805-Julus americae borealis.
Dr. E. A. Chapin, to whom I appealed for information about
the original Beauvois description, has kindly supplied some very
pertinent facts bearing on the nomenclature as well as a copy
of page 155 of Insectes recueillis en Afrique et Amerique.
Dr. Chapin points out, in a letter dated September 21, 1950:
"The legend on Plate 4-Apteres shows that Palisot at one
time intended to call the species Julus americanus. .. .The text
on page 155 shows the different name, Julus americae borealis.
This is not hyphenated. According to Griffin's findings, this page
of text and Plate 4-Apteres were published simultaneously.
Therefore we have a case of simultaneous synonymy and the
first reviser has the right to select one of the two names."
However, it is understood that, in such cases, no selection
has been made if the selector fails to mention both names. Boll-
man in 1893 did not point out that two names were originally









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


available, and it is thus felt that he did not make a selection.'
There is no objection to the present choice of Julus americanus
for the proper name. In any event the other name, being tri-
nominal, is not properly proposed and is thus unoccupied.
The figures on Plate 4 are good, but do not show any charac-
ters of a specific nature (such as male gonopods). Some work-
ers might prefer to regard the species as unidentifiable, but I
feel that since there is at least a strong likelihood of conspecificity
involved, I am inclined to arbitrarily adopt the name americanus
for the animal heretofore known as Spirobolus marginatus.
The species will now be Spirobolus americanus (Beauvois).
It is known to occur from at least Maryland south and west to
Louisiana and the upper Mississippi Valley (exact limits of
range very imperfectly known). In Virginia, and North Caro-
lina, it is a lowland form, and is replaced in the mountains by
S. dolleyi (Loomis).
Various specific names proposed by early American workers,
notably ornatus and atratus Girard, 1854, and agilis Cope, 1869,
have been thrown into the synonymy of "marginatus" by Wood
and Bollman. It is scarcely possible, without a painstaking re-
vision of the genus, to properly evaluate these names, but it is
felt that at least the first two may be specifically or subspecific-
ally distinct.
There is no way to be sure of the provenance of Beauvois'
type specimen and probably it will become desirable to designate
an empirical type locality. Many of the species described by
Beauvois are known to have come from the vicinity of Philadel-
phia, Pennsylvania, which might well be chosen for a restricted
type locality. I hesitate to take such action, however, until such
a time as it is possible to study the genus in some detail.

REFERENCES
Beauvois, Palisot, 1805. Insects receuillis en Afrique et Amerique. Apteres.
Bollman, Charles H., 1893. Notes upon the species of Myriapoda Syn-
gnatha, described by Thomas Say. Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus., no. 46, pp.
144-149.
Say, Thomas, 1821. Description of the myriapodae of the United States.
Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Phila. 2:102-114.
Wood, Horatio C., 1865. The Myriapoda of North America. Trans. Amer.
Philos. Soc., ser. 2. 13:137-148.
Bollman (1893, p. 146) stated, in a footnote "This name [americae-
borealis] has been reduced and mutilated by Gervais and other authors,
to americanus." He was obviously unaware that Beauvois himself had used
the latter name.









VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


THE AQUATIC AND SEMIAQUATIC HEMIPTERA OF
NORTHERN FLORIDA. PART 3: NEPIDAE,
BELOSTOMATIDAE, NOTONECTIDAE, PLEIDAE
AND CORIXIDAE

JON L. HERRING
Department of Biology, University of Florida

This paper completes the annotated lists of the families of
aquatic and semi-aquatic Hemiptera of northern Florida; two
families, Hydrometridae and Naucoridae, have been omitted.
I published taxonomic and distributional notes on the family
Hydrometridae in 1948 and no new data have been gathered.
The family Naucoridae has been omitted as I am now under-
taking a taxonomic revision of the genus Pelocoris.
Part 4 of this series will include keys to the species and a
classification of the northern Florida habitats.

FAMILY NEPIDAE
Genus RANATRA Fabricius
The members of this genus, known commonly as alligator
fleas and water scorpions, are all quite similar in their life history
and habits. They have been taken in all habitats which provide
coves and bays with a layer of black silt or leaf debris. On
many occasions, they have been collected from the tangled roots
of water hyacinths and their eggs are usually laid in the floats
of this plant. Occasionally, eggs have been collected from the
stems of grass growing along the edge of streams. Mating and
oviposition seem to occur at night, and usually take place on
floating or emergent vegetation.

Ranatra nigra Herrich-Schaeffer
Adults of this form have been taken throughout the year;
nymphs in April, July and August.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Biven's Arm of Payne's Prairie,
March 22, 1946, W. Beck, 1 S ; March 27, 1948, D. E. Miller, 1 ; March
30, 1946, W. Beck, 2 S $, 1 ; April 2, 1946, W. Beck, 1 19 ; April 23,
1946, W. Beck, 1 nymph; July 13, 1946, W. Beck, 2 S ; sinkhole pond, 3
miles southeast of Gainesville on Pearl Street Road, October 17, 1934, H.
T. Townsend, 1 1 Y ; February 3, 1935, H. T. Townsend, 1 9 ; Lake Wau-
berg, April 23, 1935, A. M. Laessle, 4 $ 8 ; May 7, 1938, collector unknown,









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


1 ; August 15, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling, 1 $; Lake Alice, November
12, 1937, S. H. Spurr, 1 ; May 24, 1938, S. H. Spurr, 4$ S 1 9, 4n; Twin
Oaks Pond, August 8, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling, In; Cross Creek, May
22, 1947, 1 .
Ranatra kirkaldyi Bueno

This species is known to me from only two Florida speci-
mens; one from a Nymphaea marsh and the other from a sand-
bottomed lake.
SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Biven's Arm of Payne's Prairie,
March 12, 1946, W. Beck, 1 9. Marion Co.: Lake Bryant, April 16, 1938,
S. H. Spurr, 1 9.
Ranatra buenoi Hungerford

Adults of R. buenoi have been collected in January, February,
March, April, May, September, October and November. A sin-
gle nymph was taken in November.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: sinkhole pond, 3 miles southeast
of Gainesville on Pearl Street Road, November 10, 1934, H. T. Townsend,
13, 1 9; January 3, 1935, H. T. Townsend, 1 S; February 3, 1935, H. T.
Townsend, 1 ; Hogtown Creek, February 29, 1932, collector unknown, 1 ;
May 16, 1947, 1 &, 1 9 ; Hogtown Sink at entrance of the creek, May 1, 1947,
1 9 ; Biven's Arm of Payne's Prairie, November 12, 1946, W. Beck, 2 9 ;
November 15, 1946, W. Beck, 1 S ; Blues Creek, 6 miles northwest of Gaines-
ville, April 10, 1947, 1 & ; swamp near Blues Creek, September 11, 1947, 1 ;
sinkhole in Hibiscus Gardens, Gainesville, March 16, 1934, A. M. Laessle,
1 Levy Co.: Otter Creek, April 13, 1948, 2 & ; hammock pond near
Williston, March 22, 1947, J. Grant and K. Strawn, 1 3.

Ranatra drakei Hungerford

Gainesville, Florida, is the type locality of R. drakei. It is
also kown from Raleigh, North Carolina, and the Marion County,
Florida, locality listed below.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Twin Oaks Pond, August 3, 1946,
H. G. and P. Dowling, 1 9; August 8, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling, 1 ;
sinkhole pond 3 miles southeast of Gainesville on the Pearl Street Road,
January 3, 1935, H. T. Townsend, 1 9 ; June 20, 1935, H. T. Townsend, 1 9.
Marion Co.: sinkhole pond in the southwest corner of Ocala National For-
est, 6 miles southeast of Moss Bluff, March 19, 1938, O. E. Frye, 1 a.

Ranatra australis Hungerford

I have found this to be the most prevalent Ranatra in Florida.
It abounds in almost every type of aquatic habitat-the grassy









VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


margins of roadside ditches, the silty coves of sinkholes, or the
masses of water hyacinths along the creeks and inlets of rivers.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: sinkhole pond 3 miles southeast
of Gainesville on the Pearl Street Road, March 22, 1934, H. T. Townsend,
2 S8, 2 9 9 ; June 30, 1934, H. T. Townsend, 3 S 29 9; October 17,
1934, H. T. Townsend, 7 S 19 ; November 10, 1934, H. T. Townsend,
In; December 8, 1934, H. T. Townsend, 4 S 19 ; January 3, 1935, H. T.
Townsend, 2 3$ 3 9 9 ; February 3, 1935, H. T. Townsend, 3 3 3 9 ;
March 9, 1935, H. T. Townsend, 7 8 $, 5 9 9 ; April 15, 1935, H. T. Town-
send, 2 $8, 7 9 ; May 24, 1935, H. T. Townsend, 19 ; June 20, 1935, H. T.
Townsend, 4 8 8, 39 9 ; November 14, 1935, H. T. Townsend, 3 9 9 ; Biven's
Arm of Payne's Prairie, February 17, 1937, S. H. Gaylord, 19 ; March 5,
1946, W. Beck, 19 ; March 18, 1946, W. Beck, 19 ; Twin Oaks Pond, Au-
gust 8, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling, 18 ; May 14, 1948, F. N. Young, 29 9,
In; Hogtown Sink, March 27, 1947, 2 8 S ; May 16, 1947, 3 8 19 ; River
Styx, 6 miles southeast of Gainesville, April 13, 1947, 2$ $& ; small pond
500 yards north of River Styx, April 13, 1947, 1 ; sinkhole in Hibiscus
Gardens, Gainesville, A. M. Laessle, 1 ; flatwoods pond, 1 mile northwest
of Devil's Millhopper, September 16, 1947, 2 S8 29 9, 3n; Miller's Pond,
4.2 miles east of Science Hall on the Newman Lake Road, August 13, 1946,
In; Freezer's Pond 11/2 miles northwest of Science Hall, March 13, 1937,
F. N. Young and L. Berner, 1 9 ; Cross Creek, May 22, 1947, 1 $ ; small
shallow pond 1/ mile northwest of University of Florida tennis courts,
February 28, 1937, F. N. Young and L. Berner, 19. Dixie Co.: small
pond underneath Suwannee River Bridge, September 9, 1947, 1 Putnam
Co.: St. John's River, 41/ miles southeast of Bostwick, March 28, 1948, 19.


FAMILY BELOSTOMATIDAE

Genus BENACUS Stal

Benacus griseus (Say)
This is the largest of the Florida "electric light bugs." It
seems to prefer the grassy flatwoods ponds but the largest col-
lections have been made from lights at night: On warm nights
after a rain, while the streets are still wet, Benacus flies to city
lights in great numbers. They are quite clumsy on the pave-
ment, and dozens of them can be found dead and trampled on
the streets on the following day. In Gainesville, they prefer the
flourescent lights of the State Theatre. On many occasions I
have found them at no other place. Other writers (sc. Blatchley,
1926) mention that Benacus griseus comes to lights in the early
summer only. I have collected specimens in February, June
and August at lights, and on several occasions, this species has
been taken in company with Lethocerus uhleri. Usually, one









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


or the other predominated, but they never occurred in equal
numbers.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: State Theatre, Gainesville, Feb-
ruary 12, 1948, 1 9 ; August 2, 1948, 4 $& 3 9 9 ; Piggie Park, Gainesville,
June 2, 1948, no specimens preserved; Miller's Pond, 4.2 miles east of
Science Hall on the Newman Lake Road, August 8, 1946, 2n; Biven's Arm
of Payne's Prairie, July 13, 1946, W. Beck, 1 9 ; Payne's Prairie, May 6,
1947, 19.

Genus LETHOCERUS Mayr
Lethocerus uhleri (Montandon)
Like Benacus griseus, this species is most easily collected on
wet nights at lights. As far as I know, the habits and life
history of this form are very much like those of B. griseus.
Nymphs have been collected in August.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: sinkhole pond, 3 miles southeast
of Gainesville on the Pearl Street Road, January 3, 1935, H. T. Townsend,
1 9 ; June 20, 1935, H. T. Townsend, 1 8 ; Santa Fe River near Poe Springs,
May 14, 1934, H. T. Townsend, 1 ; May 21, 1934, H. T. Townsend, 19;
State Theatre, Gainesville, September 11, 1947, 11 & 8, 29 9 9 ; August 2,
1948, 10 8 3, 9 9 9 ; Gainesville business district, May 10, 1947, 1 8 ; Payne's
Prairie, May 6, 1947, 1 9 ; Miller's Pond, 4.2 miles east of Science Hall on
Newman Lake Road, August 20, 1946, 2n.

Genus BELOSTOMA Latreille
Belostoma lutarium (Stal)

This is the most common belostomatid in north Florida. It
has been taken in almost all types of habitats. This species has
never been taken at lights, although it is capable of flight.
Males with clusters of eggs on their backs have been taken
in March, April, and May. Nymphs have been collected in
April, May, July, September, October and November.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Biven's Arm of Payne's Prairie,
February 17, 1937, S. H. Gaylord, 2 8 3, 4 9 9 ; January 31, 1946, W. Beck,
1 ; March 12, 1946, W. Beck, 1 1 ; March 19, 1946, W. Beck, 28 8,
49 9 ; March 30, 1946, W. Beck, 2 S 19 ; April 8, 1946, W. Beck, 1 ,
29 9, In; April 27, 1946, W. Beck, In; April 30, 1946, W. Beck, In; July
10, 1946, W. Beck, 28 8, 1 9 ; July 13, 1946, W. Beck, 19, 3n; October 15,
1946, W. Beck, 5 3S 19, 4n; October 31, 1946, W. Beck, 18 ; November 5,
1946, W. Beck, 29 9, In; April 15, 1947, W. Beck, 1 ; sinkhole pond, 3
miles southeast of Gainesville on the Pearl Street Road, March 30, 1934,
H. T. Townsend, 1 9 ; October 17, 1934, H. T. Townsend, In; November 10,









VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


1934, H. T. Townsend, In; December 18, 1934, H. T. Townsend, 4 & 5, 1 ;
January 3, 1935, H. T. Townsend, 5 3 8, 2 9 9 ; March 9, 1935, H. T. Town-
send, 45 8, 59 9; April 15, 1935, H. T. Townsend, 55 3, 19; June 20,
1935, H. T. Townsend, 1 S, 19 ; September 27, 1937, H. T. Townsend, In;
Santa Fe River, May 14, 1934, R. Rubin, 1 2n; May 21, 1934, collector
unknown, 4n; Poe Springs on the Santa Fe River, May 14, 1934, J. B.
McCullagh, 2n; May 21, 1934, W. Stirling, In; Pond "C", 3 miles southwest
of Gainesville, April 4, 1933, J. S. Rogers, 1 9 ; May 18, 1933, collector un-
known, 2n; Hogtown Sink, March 27, 1947, 1 1 ; sinkhole in Hibiscus
Gardens, Gainesville, A. M. Laessle, 19 ; Alachua Sink, March 14, 1937,
collector unknown, 1 ; Prairie Creek, on Florida Highway 20, March 26,
1948, 1 8 ; Big Hatchet Creek, February 27, 1947, I. J. Cantrall et al, 2 S S ;
Lake Wauberg, April 30, 1938, J. R. Preer, 5n; Lake Alice, March 17, 1937,
S. H. Gaylord, 3 9 ; River Styx, 6 miles southeast of Gainesville, April
13, 1947, 1 ,4 99.

Belostoma testaceum (Leidy)

This species has been collected in most of the habitats that
the other belostomatids inhabit except that it has not been col-
lected at lights.
Males with eggs have been taken in February, March, April
and May. Nymphs have been collected in April and May.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Biven's Arm of Payne's Prairie,
October 22, 1946, W. Beck, 1 9 ; February 25, 1927, Sholze, 2 $ S ; April 15,
1947, W. Beck, 1 S ; Pond "C", 3 miles southwest of Gainesville, March 2,
1933, collector unknown, 1 S ; April 4, 1933, J. S. Rogers, 1 $, 3n; May 18,
1933, J. Kilby, 2 5 2 9 9, 6n; Payne's Prairie, March 12, 1947, J. Haeger,
1 ; Hogtown Sink, March 27, 1947, 1 ; Big Hatchet Creek, February
27, 1947, I. J. Cantrall et al, 1 9.

Genus ABEDUS Stal
Abedus immaculatus (Say)

The taxonomic status and locality records of this species
have been discussed in two recent papers by Hussey and Herring
(1950a, b).


FAMILY NOTONECTIDAE

Genus NOTONECTA Linnaeus
Notonecta indica Linnaeus
This species prefers the smaller ponds and ditches where
there is an abundance of submerged vegetation. It has been
taken most frequently in the roadside ditches, sinkholes, and








THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


fluctuating ponds in hammocks. Tremendous numbers of indica
were collected in November from a small ditch approximately
four feet wide and ten or fifteen feet long on Payne's Prairie.
The ditch was filled almost completely with a thick mass of
aquatic plants. By using a seine, Mr. Herndon Dowling and I
were able to collect hundreds of adults and nymphs in only a
very few minutes. The only other aquatic hemipteran collected
was Gerris canaliculatus. In September, Kirk Strawn collected
several adults and nymphs from a sewage dump at the Alachua
County Airbase. They were taken along with 395 specimens
of Buenoa scimitra.
I have collected adults in almost every month of the year,
and nymphs in January, February, March, April, May, August,
September and November.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Twin Oaks Pond, July 30, 1946,
1 9 ; August 3, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling, 1 9, 2n; August 7, 1946, H. G.
and P. Dowling, 2 & 2 9 9, 9n; August 8, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling,
August 13, 1946, In; Pond "C", 3 miles southwest of Gainesville, collector
unknown, 1 S ; April 4, 1933, J. S. Rogers, 9n; May 8, 1933, J. S. Rogers,
3 8 8, 1 9, 2n; May 18, 1933, J. Kilby, 2S 3, 11 n; January 5, 1938, J. S.
Rogers, 1 In; Lake Lochloosa, February 3, 1937, F. N. Young, 19;
Sewage Dump, Alachua Airbase, September 1, 1947, K. Strawn, 3 & ,
49 9, 4n; cypress pond, 1/2 mile west of Alachua Airbase, August 31, 1947,
K. Strawn, 19, 4n; Hailes Siding Pond on Payne's Prairie, November 23,
1947, 20 & S, 35 9 9, 8n; flatwoods pond, 100 yards east of Gainesville
city limits on the Hawthorne road, April 5, 1934, J. S. Rogers, 3 9 9 ; tem-
porary woods pond on the west end of Payne's Prairie, 400 yards south
of Haile's Siding, April 1, 1934, J. S. Rogers, 1 ; Pond "A"?, Sugarfoot
Hammock, February 16, 1933, collector unknown, 3 3 5 9. Levy Co.:
sinkhole near Williston, March 22, 1947, K. Strawn, 38 1 9, 9n. Marion
Co.: sinkhole pond in southwest corner of Ocala National Forest, 6 miles
southeast of Moss Bluff, February 26, 1938, S. H. Spurr, 6 8 &, 4 9 9, In;
March 19, 1938, 0. Frye, 1 &, In.

Notonecta uhleri Kirkaldy
I have collected this species in only one type of habitat. This
was a very acid swamp-and-bog stream. The decaying branches
and logs along the shore of this stream are covered by rank
growths of sphagnum moss. It is a well shaded stream with a
pH that ranges from 4.3 to 5.3.
The life history of N. uhleri is unknown. One adult female
was collected in April and a male in September.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Blues Creek, 6 miles northwest of









VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


Gainesville, April 10, 1947, 1 9 ; Blues Creek Swamp, September 11, 1947,
1i.

Genus BUENOA Kirkaldy
Buenoa margaritacea Bueno

This form appears to be entirely unselective in its choice of
habitat. It has been taken from all of the usual types of habitats,
and in addition from borrow pits and swimming pools which
were almost devoid of any vegetation. Bueno records it from
a rock hole in a trap-rock quarry and Hussey (1922) found it
in large numbers in a concrete tank at New Buffalo, Michigan.
SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Twin Oaks Pond, August 3, 1946,
H. G. and P. Dowling, 1 S, 1 9; August 8, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling,
19, In; temporary woods pond on the west end of Payne's Prairie, 400
yards south of Hailes Siding, April 1, 1934, J. S. Rogers, 3 9 9 ; April 8,
1934, J. S. Rogers, 1 ; sinkhole in Palm Terrace, Gainesville, January 5,
1938, O. Frye, 2 99 ; flatwoods pond, 100 yards east of Gainesville city
limits on the Hawthorne road, April 5, 1934, J. S. Rogers, 4 $, 12 9 9 ;
borrow pit, T.9S., R.20E., S.14, June 7, 1947, I. J. Cantrall, 1 5 9.
Levy Co.: high pine-turkey oak pond, 10 miles northeast of Cedar Key on
Florida Highway 24, October 12, 1947, 2 S 8, 2n.

Buenea limnocastoris Hungerford

I have collected this form only from a flatwoods pond in
Putnam County. The pond is rather shallow and overgrown
with Ludwigia sp. and Myriophyllum sp. This is the first record
of the species from Florida.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Putnam Co.: flatwoods pond near Camp Rosa,
4'/2 miles southeast of Bostwick, August 24, 1948, 4 3 8, 6 9 9.

Buenoa elegans (Fieber)

B. elegans has been taken more often in the fluctuating ponds
of the hammock regions, although it does occur rather commonly
in the other habitats.
I have adults that were collected in January, May, July and
August.
SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Twin Oaks Pond, July 30, 1946,
2 9 9, In; August 3, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling, 4 $ 59 9, 15n; August
7, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling, 1 3 9 9, 5n; August 13, 1946, 2 9 ;
Pond "C", 3 miles southwest of Gainesville, May 8, 1933, J. S. Rogers,
2! 99 ; May 18, 1933, J. Kilby, 2 3 S, 4 9 9, 2n; sinkhole in Palm Terrace,
Gainesville, January 5, 1938, O. Frye, 18, 3 9.









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


Buenoa scimitra Bare

Like many of the other species of Buenoa, this form occupies
a wide choice of habitats. Most of the habitats in which it was
taken were choked with tangles of aquatic vegetation.
I have adult specimens that were collected during the follow-
ing months: January, February, April, and September. Nymphs
have been taken only in September. This is a new record for
Florida.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: sewage dump at Alachua Airbase,
September 1, 1947, K. Strawn, 200 $8, 1609 9, 35n; temporary woods
pond, 400 yards south of Hailes Siding on the west end of Payne's Prairie,
April 8, 1934, J. S. Rogers, 7 & $, 7 9 9 ; flatwoods pond, 100 yards east of
Gainesville city limits on the Hawthorne road, April 5, 1934, J. S. Rogers,
14 3 15 9 9 ; sinkhole in Palm Terrace, Gainesville, January 5, 1938, 0.
Frye, 5 9 9 ; Pond "A"?, Sugarfoot Hammock, February 16, 1933, collec-
tor unknown, 11 S 3, 15 9 9. Marion Co.: sinkhole pond in southwest cor-
ner of Ocala National Forest, 6 miles southeast of Moss Bluff, February
26, 1938, S. H. Spurr, 3 9 9.

FAMILY PLEIDAE

Genus PLEA Leach
Plea striola Fieber

I have adults of this tiny water bug that were collected in
January, February, March, April, August, November and Decem-
ber. Nymphs were collected in August.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: sinkhole, 3 miles southeast of
Gainesville on the Pearl Street Road, November 22, 1934, H. T. Townsend,
19 ; December 18, 1934, H. T. Townsend, 1 ; January 3, 1935, H. T.
Townsend, 4 9 9 ; Biven's Arm of Payne's Prairie, April 5, 1937, collector
unknown, 3 3 49 9; March 6, 1947, 3 $ 19; Twin Oaks Pond, Au-
gust 8, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling, 4 8 3 9 9, 2n; Lake Alice, March 17,
1937, S. H. Gaylord, 1 $, 1 9; Lake Wauberg, December 3, 1932, collector
unknown, 1 &; sinkhole in Palm Terrace, Gainesville, January 5, 1938,
O. Frye, 3 & &, 89 9; sinkhole in Hibiscus Gardens, Gainesville, A. M.
Laessle, 2 $& 3 9 ; temporary woods ponds, 400 yards south of Haile's
Siding on the west end of Payne's Prairie, March 27, 1943, J. S. Rogers,
3 &, 3 9 9 ; San Felasco Hammock Pond, November 28, 1947, 1 &. Marion
Co.: sinkhole pond in southwest corner of Ocala National Forest, 6 miles
southeast of Moss Bluff, February 26, 1938, S. H. Spurr, 13 3& 5 9 9.

FAMILY CORIXIDAE

Almost every mudhole or ditch in northern Florida has pro-









VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


duced a different species of corixid. The family is the largest
one in this area and is represented at present by fourteen species.
Due to the local distribution of the forms, northern Florida is
probably far richer in number of species than the fourteen thus
taken would seem to indicate.

Genus HESPEROCORIXA Kirkaldy
Hesperocorixa interrupta (Say)

The only specimens of this species known to me were taken
from a mudhole known as Pond 1 (Dickinson, 1949). Excerpts
from his description follow:
"A small pond located in a pasture that is often heavily stocked with
cattle and horses. The pond is roughly circular in outline and has the
broad shallow contours of a watch glass. The surface of its east quad-
rat was hidden in summer during the period from June, 1940, to March,
1942, beneath a dense mat of a nearly pure stand of the spiny aquatic
perennial, Nama. quadrivalve. By 1945, however, most of this growth
had been replaced by Persicaria sp. A few scattered clumps of two
species of Juncus are found in this emergent growth as well as along
the margins. The remainder of the pond is practically devoid of any
permanent vegetation except for small patches of Persicaria sp. along
the north and south margins. The water is usually muddy (Secchi disc
disappeared at less than one foot on several occasions), due, no doubt in
large measure, to the fact that the bottom is composed of soft clay that
is repeatedly stirred by the horses and cattle as they use it as a water
hole. . .The pond was completely dry on two occasions during the
twenty months covered in the study, once for a period of some weeks
during November and December, 1940, and once for two days in June,
1941. This pond is permanent throughout most 'normal' years."
SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: temporary pond, T.10S., R.19E.,
S.14-23, April 16, 1941, J. C. Dickinson and W. Beck, 9 $, 119 9.

Hesperocorixa brimleyi (Kirkaldy)

This is a new record for Florida. H. brimleyi has been col-
lected in only two localities in this area. One of the two is an
extensive marsh overgrown with Pontederia sp. and Panicum
hemitomum. The second is a roadside ditch.
SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: roadside ditch in a cypress swamp
between Rochelle and Grove Park, October 8, 1948, B. Cooper, 3 38 4 9 ;
Hawthorne Prairie, February 16, 1949, 2 9 9.

Hesperocorixa nitida (Fieber)

This form was collected from the same mudhole with H.
interrupta, and from a grassy ditch on the margin of a marsh.









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: temporary pond, T.10S., R.19E.,
S.14-23, April 16, 1941, J. C. Dickinson and W. Beck, 13 3S, 16 9 9; tem-
porary woods pond, 400 yards south of Haile's Siding on the west end of
Payne's Prairie, April 8, 1934, J. S. Rogers, 1 9.

Hesperocorixa lucida (Abbott)

I have not taken this species in the area under consideration
but it probably occurs here since I have numerous specimens
taken at a light in Jefferson County.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Jefferson Co.: Monticello, May 9, 1932, F. Walk-
er, 278 S, 229 9.

Hesperocorixa martini (Hungerford)

H. martini is a fairly abundant form. It has been collected
in various sinkholes and a cypress-gum swamp with a pH vary-
ing from 4.9 to 5.7. Adults have been collected in March, May,
August and December.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Twin Oaks Pond, August 3, 1946,
H. G. and P. Dowling, 19 ; August 20, 1946, H. G. Dowling, 1 S, 1 9;
May 14, 1948, F. N. Young, 1 ; Green Sink, campus of University of
Florida, March 8, 1938, collector unknown, 1 9; cypress-gum swamp, T.10S.,
R.21E., S.19, December 28, 1947, D. E. Miller, 1 9. Marion Co.: sinkhole
pond in southwest corner of Ocala National Forest, 6 miles southeast of
Moss Bluff, March 19, 1938, O. Frye, 1 S.


Genus SIGARA Fabricius

Sigara hubbelli (Hungerford)

This species is known only from the mudhole in which H.
interrupt and H. nitida were taken.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: temporary pond, T.10S., R.19E.,
S.14-23, April 16, 1941, J. C. Dickinson and W. Beck, 13 S a, 37 9 9, 7n.

Sigara bradleyi (Abbott)

This form is known from sinkholes, flatwoods ponds and
sand-bottomed lakes.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: sinkhole pond, 3 miles southeast of
Gainesville on the Pearl Street Road, November 22, 1934, H. T. Townsend,
1 19; December 8, 1934, H. T. Townsend, 1 9; Twin Oaks Pond, August
7, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling, 18, 19 ; Pond "B", Sugarfoot Hammock,









VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


October 21, 1947, 1 Marion Co.: unknown pond in Ocala National For-
est, February 19, 1938, collector unknown, 1 9 ; Lake Bryant, April 16,
1938, S. H. Spurr, 2 8 S, 3 9 9. Putnam Co.: flatwoods pond Camp Rosa,
41/2 miles southeast of Bostwick, August 24, 1948, Adrian Hancock, 1 S,
29 9.

Sigara sigmoidea (Abbott)

This southern form is not specific in its selection of habitat.
It has been taken in the hammock-region ponds, sinkhole ponds,
flatwoods ponds and in a borrow pit that was almost devoid of
vegetation.
Adults have been collected in February, July, August and
October. I have not seen nymphs of this species.
SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Twin Oaks Pond, August 3, 1946,
H. G. and P. Dowling, 1 8, 5 9 9 ; borrow pit, T.9S., R.20E., S.14, July 7,
1947, I. J. Cantrall, 3 9 9 ; Pond "B", Sugarfoot Hammock, October 21,
1947, 1 S. Marion Co.: sinkhole pond in southwest corner of Ocala National
Forest, 6 miles southeast of Moss Bluff, February 26, 1938, S. H. Spurr,
1 &, 1 9. Putnam Co.: flatwoods pond near Camp Rosa, 41/ miles south-
east of Bostwick, August 24, 1948, Adrian Hancock, 1 &, 8 99.

Sigara zimmermani (Fieber)

S. zimmermani occupies an assortment of habitats. It occurs
in a modified calcareous stream, a sand-bottomed lake, a very
acid swamp-and-bog stream, and has been taken from various
sinkholes and fluctuating ponds in hammocks.
There are adults in my collection that were collected in the
following months: February, March, May, September, October
and December. Nymphs are unknown to me.
SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Santa Fe River near Poe Springs,
May 8, 1947, 2 & 1 9 ; Lake Santa Fe, December 4, 1947, E. D. McRae,
1 9; Blues Creek, 6 miles northwest of Gainesville, September 21, 1947,
1 & ; Blues Creek Swamp, September 11, 1947, 1 9 ; sinkhole, 3 miles south-
east of Gaiiesville on the Pearl Street Road, December 8, 1934, H. T.
Townsend, 1 9 ; Pond "B", Sugarfoot Hammock, October 21, 1947, 19.
Marion Co.: sinkhole pond in southwest corner of Ocala National Forest,
6 miles southeast of Moss Bluff, March 19, 1938, 0. Frye, 5 9 9.

Genus PALMACORIXA Abbott
Palmacorixa buenoi Abbott

P. buenoi appears to be primarily a lake form. It has also
been collected in sinkholes. I have adults that were collected in
February, March and December.








THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Lake Newman, March 16, 1932,
collector unknown, 1 $ ; Orange Lake, December 26, 1947, G. K. Reid, 1 ?,
19. Marion Co.: Swim Pond, 6 miles southeast of Moss Bluff, February
19, 1938, O. Frye, 1 9 ; sinkhole .pond, 6 miles southeast of Moss Bluff,
February 26, 1938, S. H. Spurr, 3 5 .

Genus TRICHOCORIXA Kirkaldy
Trichocorixa louisianae Jaczewski
Although it has been taken from two sand-bottomed creeks,
T. louisianae was taken in greater numbers in a Nymphaea marsh.
In one of the sand-bottomed creeks, the water was very high
due to recent rains and the swift current had caused masses of
leaf-debris to collect along the shore. A single specimen was
collected from the leaf-debris in the dark, acid-stained water.
Ten nymphs were collected from a Nymphaea marsh in
March.
SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Biven's Arm of Payne's Prairie,
March 2, 1933, J. S. Rogers et al, 5 S3 26 9 9, 10n; River Styx, 6 miles
southeast of Gainesville, January 31, 1948, 1 $ ; Big Hatchet Creek, April
24, 1948, I. J. Cantrall et al, 1 .
Trichocorixa verticalis verticalis (Fieber)
This race appears to be strictly confined to the coast in Flor-
ida. The only specimens seen from this area by me were taken
along the Coastal Lowlands, as defined by Cooke (1939). Al-
most one hundred specimens were collected in a roadside ditch
one mile northeast of Cedar Key. The water in the ditch was
very salty and vegetation was thick. The corixids were so
abundant that it was possible to scoop them up with the bare
hands. At the other locality, three miles northeast of Cedar
Key, they were collected from fresh water in a small sand-
bottomed creek located in a mesic hammock.
SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Levy Co.: 1 mile northeast of Cedar Key, Flor-
ida Highway 24, December 31, 1947, 26 S 8, 31 9 9, 50n; 3 miles northeast
of Cedar Key, Florida Highway 24, December 31, 1947, 1 .
Trichocorixa minima (Abbott)
This form is abundant in Nymphaea marshes. It has been
taken in the sand-bottomed lakes and occasionally in the ham-
mock ponds. It appears to prefer the Nymphaea marshes as
it has been collected there almost year-round, but rather rarely
in the other habitats.
I have nymphs from a Nymphaea marsh that were collected
in November and December.









VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Biven's Arm of Payne's Prairie,
February 12, 1946, W. Beck, 3 S 3, 19, 15n; March 1, 1946, W. Beck, 18,
29 9 ; April 30, 1946, W. Beck, 1 ; July 13, 1946, W. Beck, 1 2 9 ;
October 31, 1946, W. Beck, 19; November 13, 1947, 12 S 69 9, 7n;
Twin Oaks Pond, August 3, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling, 3 9 9 ; Lake Wau-
berg, April 30, 1938, J. R. Preer, 1 2 9 9 ; Lake Santa Fe, December 16,
1947, 1 ; sinkhole in Palm Terrace, Gainesville, O. Frye, 1 19; Pond
"B", Sugarfoot Hammock, October 21, 1947, 1 S.

Trichocorixa naias (Kirkaldy)

T. naias is not very selective in its choice of a habitat. It
appears to be equally abundant in the fluctuating flatwoods and
hammock ponds, sinkholes, lakes, rivers, Nymphaea marshes,
and swamp-and-bog streams.

SPECIMENS EXAMINED: Alachua Co.: Biven's Arm of Payne's Prairie,
January 31, 1946, W. Beck, 1 19; July 27, 1947, 1 ; Santa Fe River
at Worthington Springs, February 6, 1949, 2 9 9 ; Lake Santa Fe, Decem-
ber 16, 1947, 1 9; Lake Newman, March 16, 1932, collector unknown, 1 ;
Lake Alice, October 17, 1948, collector unknown, 1 39 9 ; Twin Oaks
Pond, August 7, 1946, H. G. and P. Dowling, 1 S, 1 9 ; Blues Creek Swamp,
6 miles northwest of Gainesville, September 11, 1947, 1 & ; sinkhole in
Palm Terrace, Gainesville, January 5, 1938, O. Frye, 1 S ; Miller's Pond,
4.2 miles east of Science Hall on Newman Lake Road, October 4, 1937, J. R.
Preer, 2 3, 9 9 Levy Co.: 1 mile northeast of Cedar Key, December
31, 1947, I. J. Cantrall, 1 a ; hammock stream, 3 miles northeast of Cedar
Key, V4 mile south of Florida Highway 24, December 31, 1947, 1 3 9 .

LITERATURE CITED
Blatchley, W. S. 1926. Heteroptera or True Bugs of eastern North Amer-
ica. 1116 pp. Indianapolis.

Cooke, C. W. 1939. Scenery of Florida. Fla. Geol. Surv. Bul. 17, 118 pp.,
58 figs.
Dickinson, J. C., Jr. 1949. An ecological reconnaissance of the biota of
some ponds and ditches in northern Florida. Quart. Jour. Fla. Acad.
Sci. 11 (2-3): 1-28.
Herring, Jon L. 1948. Taxonomic and distributional notes on the Hydro-
metridae of Florida. (Hemiptera). Fla. Ent. 31 (4): 112-116.
Hussey, Roland F. 1922. Hemiptera from Berrien County, Michigan.
Occas. Papers, Univ. Mich. Mus. Zool. No. 118: 1-39.
Hussey, Roland F. and Jon L. Herring 1950a. A remarkable new belos-
tomatid (Hemiptera) from Florida and Georgia. Fla. Ent. 33 (2):
85-89, 2 figs.
...................... 1950b. Rediscovery of a belostomatid named by Thomas Say
(Hemiptera). Fla. Ent. 33 (4): 154-156.









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


MINUTES OF THE THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL MEETING
OF THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY

The thirty-second annual meeting of the Florida Entomo-
logical Society was held in Sanford, Florida, at the Mayfair
Inn during December 7 and 8, 1950. The meeting started at
9:00 A.M. December 7, with papers being given during the
morning and afternoon sessions. An outdoor barbecue was
held at the Sanford Country Club on the night of the 7th. On
December 8, papers were presented from 9 to 11, after which
followed the business meeting of the society.
The business meeting was called to order by President John
A. Mulrennan. The reading of the minutes of the 1949 meeting
was dispensed with as they had been published in Volume 33,
Nos. 2 and 3, of the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST. President Mulren-
nan called for the report of the Secretary. Mr. Murphey, secre-
tary, reported on the Executive Committee meeting of August
28, 1950, which acted upon the suggestions made by President
Van Horn at the 1949 meeting. The action of the Executive
Committee was as follows:

1. A post office box has been secured in Gainesville, Florida. It is Box
2425, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
2. All letter heads of the society in the future will be standardized, for use
of all officers, and the practice of the various officers printing stationery
with their own names, to be discontinued.
3. Applications for membership in the future will be printed with the
permanent post office box in Gainesville as the mailing address of the
society.
4. A committee was appointed to study the constitution with the idea of
amending it to permit the executive committee to elect entomologists to
membership in the society, so it would be unnecessary to have a full
meeting of the society to bring in new members. The following mem-
bers were appointed to this committee, Dr. Wilson, Mr. Toffaletti, Dr.
Griffiths.

Also in point 4, concerning the appointing of a committee to
secure ads for the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST, the Business Manager
reported that 25 per cent of the magazine now consisted of ad-
vertising, and that he saw no need of this committee being ap-
pointed. The Business Manager questioned the advisability of
having more than 25 per cent of the magazine advertising matter.
He also reported that he could obtain more ads if it was the
wish of the Society.








VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


5. The matter of electing a permanent secretary was discussed, but due
to the financial status of the society it is recommended the Society pro-
ceed as in the past. The Executive Committee recommends to the So-
ciety that a token payment of $25.00 annually be given to the Business
Manager to help him in carrying out his duties,
6. The Secretary be empowered to employ student help. No action was
taken on this because it was the belief of the committee that the Sec-
retary had this power at the present time.
A discussion followed the above report. Dr. Griffiths said
he did not think an author should be charged for tables and cuts
in his articles-that if necessary more ads should be added to
pay for same. Dr. Kelsheimer said he agreed with Dr. Griffiths.
Dr. Kuitert said he did not like to charge, but the policy of the
FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST was to charge the author when cuts ex-
ceeded one-half page.
A motion was made by Dr. Griffiths to accept the report of
the Secretary. Seconded by Dr. Wilson. Passed.
President Mulrennan said the books would have to be checked
again because of an error before the next meeting of the Society.
Dr. Kuitert called for a report of the Auditing Committee. Mr.
Toffaletti said the next meeting would be Gainesville and the
mistake could be ironed out. Dr. Wilson recommended the Busi-
ness Manager be allowed to work on his books. This motion
passed. President Mulrennan brought up the matter of not
over one-third of the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST being advertising.
Mr. Toffaletti made a motion the advertising rate be increased
$5.00 a half page and $5.00 per full page. Mr. Deckle said he
didn't think the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST was at the present time
of a nature where we could go up on the price because the lack
of commercial papers. Dr. Griffiths seconded Mr. Toffaletti's
motion. Dr. Wilson said he thought it was a matter of the Busi-
ness Manager to increase costs if he can get it. Dr. Spencer
asked if bids had been obtained for the printing of the FLORIDA
ENTOMOLOGIST. Dr. Kuitert said someone had passed on to
him word that the Pepper Printing Company had carried the
Society during hard times, and also the Pepper Printing Com-
pany was located in Gainesville, and for this reason no bids had
been obtained. Dr. Spencer said we should follow good business
practices. Mr. Rogers said advertising costs should increase
with printing costs. Mr. Lawrence said members should be
solicited for more articles, thereby, getting more advertising
and still stay within one-third or one-fourth ads. Mr. Hayslip
asked if we could take contributions instead of more ads, and









THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


suggested a committee be appointed to work on this matter.
Dr. Griffiths asked a commercial man to comment on sustaining
memberships. Motion passed 18 to 9.
Dr. Wolfenbarger moved the appointment of a committee to
study ways and means of the society. Seconded by Dr. Spencer.
Dr. Wilson wanted to amend the motion to study the possibility
of discontinuing the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST. Dr. Wolfenbarger
refused Dr. Wilson's amendment. Motion carried.
Mr. Hayslip moved to add to the duties of the above com-
mittee the duties to work out ways and means of increasing the
number of economic papers to be published in the FLORIDA EN-
TOMOLOGIST. Motion carried. President Mulrennan appointed
the committee as follows: Mr. Toffaletti, Mr. True, Mr. Russell,
Dr. Tissot and Dr. Kelsheimer.
The Report of the Resolutions Committee, consisting of Dr.
Wolfenbarger, Mr. Rogers and Dr. Spencer presents the follow-
ing recommendation, that:
Be it resolved that the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGICAL SO-
CIETY, in recognition of the many efforts expended for it does
hereby recognize and appreciate the following:

1. The Reverend A. G. McGinnis, Pastor of the First Presbyterian
Church, Sanford, and the Honorable Andrew Carraway, Mayor of the
City of Sanford, who gave freely and graciously of their time to offer
the invocation and address of welcome,
2. Dr. J. W. Wilson, Mr. Jack Russell, and Mr. James P. Toffaletti,
who constituted the local committee on arrangements put forth much
personal effort and gave unstintingly of their time in arranging the
meeting place, barbecue, and entertainment for the ladies, which was
largely responsible for the great success of the 33rd annual meeting.
3. The Shell Oil Company which generously supplies refreshments
at the barbecue,
4. The personnel of the Mayfair Inn who showed unusual hospital-
ity and courtesy in their efforts to make the meeting a success,
5. The outgoing officers of the Society for their excellent services
during the past year, and recommends that the Secretary be instructed
to write a letter of appreciation and thanks to each and every person
and/or organization named above.

A second set of resolutions were presented to the Society by
the committee. The Resolutions Committee present the follow-
ing recommendation, that,

Be it resolved that the Florida Entomological Society, in recognition
of its outstanding successes, compliments these workers and is whole
heartedly in accord with the efforts of Federal and State malarial con-









VOL. XXXIV-No. 1


trol authorities. The Resolutions Committee urges the continued sup-
port of this program, and recommends that more widespread publicity
be given to the accomplishments attained by these workers.
The above resolutions were adopted by the society.
President Mulrennan called for a report of the Nominating
Committee consisting of Mr. Van Horn, Dr. Tissot, and Dr.
Kelsheimer:
President --.----------------................. W. G. Bruce
Vice President --............. ..- .................. John W ilson
Secretary ---..------................ Milledge Murphey, Jr.
Editor ...---....-----------............. Lewis Berner
Associate Editor ---.----...... --.. ----... --- A. N. Tissot
Executive Committee -----......-----.-----... John Diem

Motion made that the Secretary be instructed to cast a unani-
mous ballot for the new slate of officers.
As the next order of business, President Mulrennan called
on the Secretary for a report on new members. Mr. Murphey
in turn called on Dr. Kuitert, the Business Manager for a list
of proposed members. For election to membership from asso-
ciate membership: J. F. Aycock, C. C. Ballentine, J. E. Bussart,
R. C. Colter, C. J. D'Angio, W. P. Dean, R. F. Hussey, G. H.
Lucas, A. S. Mills, E. T. Nielsen, S. B. Parnell, C. V. Reichart,
C. F. Rollins, G. D. Sloan, W. N. Stoner, R. B. Trueman, F. N.
Turner, R. E. Williams.
For Associate membership: T. C. Burns, W. B. Bradock,
Elizabeth C. Beck, F. Gray Butcher, Thomas L. Cain, Jr., W. B.
Hayter, Calvin M. Jones, Henry Kaplan, R. M. Pratt, Daniel R.
Murphy, M. W. Provost, Raymond R. Sheppard, C. L. Sutton.
For student membership: Marshal Nirenberg.
The above individuals were elected to membership in the
society.
Dr. Kuitert reported student members pay only 50 cents
and the cost of sending them the FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST was
35 cents a copy. He moved the student members be charged
one dollar a year. Motion carried 14 to 12.
President Mulrennan then turned the chair over to the in-
coming president, Mr. W. G. Bruce, who thanked the society
for the honor that had been bestowed on him.
The business meeting was adjourned.

MILLEDGE MURPHY, JR.
Secretary








THE FLORIDA ENTOMOLOGIST


NEWS ITEMS
Frank N. Turner, of Jacksonville, has been appointed assist-
ant sales manager of the Florida Agricultural Supply Company,
one of the largest insecticide manufacturing plants in the south-
east.
Turner's appointment was announced recently by M. C. Van
Horn, manager of FASCO, which is a division of the Wilson &
Toomer Fertilizer Company with general offices and plant in
Jacksonville.
A native of Heflin, Alabama, Turner attended Heflin High
School, Athens, Ala., and was graduated from Alabama Poly-
technic Institute, Auburn, Ala., with a B.S. degree in agricul-
tural science in 1947. From January of 1941 to August of 1945
he served as a technical sergeant with the U. S. Army and saw
two and a half years of combat action in the Aleutians and
nearly a year in the European Theatre.
Son of Mr. and Mrs. Alf M. Turner, of Heflin, his father is a
retired farmer. Turner worked on his father's farm as a boy
and at the age of 14, purchased his own mule and established
a profitable business raising cotton, corn and peas.
After college, he was first employed by the Capital Chemical
Drug Company at Montgomery, Ala., as a salesman. Later he
joined the sales staff of the Agricultural Sulphur and Chemical
Company of Dothan, Ala. In June of 1949 Turner was named
Alabama representative for the Florida Agricultural Supply
Company.
Turner is married and has one stepson. His appointment as
FASCO's assistant sales manager became effective September 1
and he succeeds the late D. L. Evans, Jr., who died from injuries
suffered in an automobile accident several months ago.


The annual meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biolo-
gists will be held on the campus of the University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa, from April 21-22.




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