The wire

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wire
Uniform Title:
Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher:
362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication:
Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Notes

System Details:
Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID:
UF00098620:00614


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

United against sexual assaultStep Afrika!GTMO Volunteers aid sea creatures Brings rhythm and dance Manatee Rescue Volume 16, Issue 8 April 11, 2014

PAGE 2

10 Candlelight vigil held to raise awareness for Sexual Assault Prevention Month Cover photo by Pvt. Kourtney Grimes of the week TSgt Joshua TempleBase Emergency Engineering ForceSGT Kenneth Henriquez613th Military Police Company 2 During Mongolian BBQ Night April 17 at the Bayview, there will be an auction to support the 2014 Army Ball from 6:00 9:00 p.m. Auction items include guided dives, a fishing trip, Cuban dinner for 12, Alaskan smoked salmon, scuba gear, sea glass jewelry, many assorted baskets, flags, coins, signs, advanced open water dive classes, handcrafted wood and much more. Build a boat and race your friends at the course! The regatta will be held April 26 during the Day at the Beach at Ferry Landing. Race starts at 2:30 p.m. Register your boat by Thursday, April 24 and pick up rules and tips at the marina. Call 2345 for more information. Its that time once again to enjoy a savory t-bone, NY strip or top sirloin in the Caribbean moonlight. Dine at the Bayview Friday, April 18 from 6:00 9:00 p.m. Dance troupe breaks it down 12 13 AND IN OUR PAGES Around the Bay5 7Bataan Death March team returns Chaplains Corner 15 Bay Wire ReportCartoon and upcoming events 1614Mind, Body & Soul CORRECTIONS

PAGE 3

THE WIRE Troopers ChapelProtestant Worship Sunday 6:40 a.m. Sunday 9:00 a.m. Sunday 7:00 p.m. Bible Studies Monday 7:00 p.m., Cuzco block E Wednesday and Friday 7:00 p.m., Troopers Chapel 3 Joint Task ForceSafe Humane Legal TransparentGuantanamo /jointtaskforceguantanamo /photos/jtf gtmo /jtf gtmo @jtf gtmo Editor Army Sta Sgt. Carmen Steinbach Copy Editor/ Photo Editor Army Sgt. Spencer Rhodes Graphic Designer/Webmaster Army Sgt. Kenneth Tucceri Sta Writers Army Sgt. Christopher Vann Army Sgt. Debra Cook Army Pvt. Kourtney GrimesStaffGuantanamo Bay, Cuba Commercial: 011-5399-3651 DSN: 660-3651 E-mail: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire/wire.htmlCommand StaffHQ Building, Camp America Catholic Mass Mon.-ur. 5:30 p.m. Saturday 5:00 p.m. Sunday 9:00 a.m. Protestant Services General Protestant Sunday 11:00 a.m. Gospel Worship Sunday 1:00 p.m. Camp America :00, :20, :40 Gazebo :01, :21, :41 Camp America NEX :02, :22, :42 Camp Delta :04; :24, :44 Camp 6 :07, :27, :47 TK 4 :13, :33, :53 JAS :14, :34, : 54 TK 3 :15, :35, :55 TK 2 :16, :36, :56 TK 1 :17, :37, :57 CC :19, :39, :59 Windjammer/Gym :22, :42, :02 Gold Hill Galley :24, :44, :04 NEX :26, :46, :06 NEX Laundry :27, :47, :07 C Pool :30, :50, :10 Downtown Lyceum :31, :51, :11 NEX :33, :53, :13 Gold Hill Galley :35, :55, :15 Windjammer/Gym :37, :57, :17 CC :40, :00, :20 TK 1 :41, :01, :21 TK 2 :42, :02, :22 TK 3:43, :03, :23 TK 4 :44, :04, :24 Camp 6:50, :10, :30 Camp Delta :53, :13, :33 HQ Building :55, :15, :35 Camp America NEX :57, :17, :37 Gazebo :58, :18, :38 Camp America :00, :20, :40 Sat. and Sun. only Location #1-4 Windward Loop 9 a.m., 12 p.m., 3 p.m., 6 p.m. East Caravella SBOQ/Marina 9:05 a.m., 12:05 p.m., 3:05 p.m. NEX 9:08 a.m., 12:08 p.m., 3:08 p.m., 6:08 p.m. Phillips Park 9:14 a.m., 12:14 p.m. 3:14 p.m. Cable Beach 9:17 a.m., 12:17 p.m., 3:17 p.m. Windward Loop 9:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m. NEX 9:25 a.m., 12:25 p.m., 3:25 p.m., 6:25 p.m. SBOQ/MARINA 9:35 a.m., 12:35 p.m., 3:35 p.m. Return to Oce 9:40 a.m., 12:40 p.m., 3:40 p.m.Pentecostal Gospel Sunday 8:00 a.m. & 5:00 p.m., Room D LDS Service Sunday 1 p.m., Fellowship Hall Islamic Service Friday 1:15 p.m., Room 2 Seventh Day Adventist Friday 7:00 p.m., Room 1 Sabbath School: Saturday 9:30 a.m., Room 1 Sabbath Service: Saturday 11:00 a.m., Room 19:55 a.m. 7:55 p.m.Camp America :55, :48 TK 1 :05, :36 Denich Gym/Windjammer :11, :31 Gold Hill Galley :14, :29 NEX :16, :27 Downtown Lyceum :17, :25The Wire is an authorized publication for members of the Department of the Troopers of JTF-GTMO. The contents of The Wire are not necessarily Guard. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Joint Task Look for us on your favorite Social Media: Commander Navy Rear Adm. Richard W. Butler Deputy Commander Army Brig. Gen. Marion Garcia Sergeant Major Marine Sgt. Maj. Juan M. Hidalgo, Jr. Oce of Public Aairs Director Navy Cmdr. John Filostrat Deputy Director Air Force Maj. Christian P. Hodge Command Information Ocer Army Capt. Allison Givens

PAGE 4

ommandCCorner 4 In all the largest branches of historic Christianity the week between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday is a Holy Week as it commemorates the culmina tion of Jesus life and mission. This year, around the world, Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant Christians will be observing Holy Week from April 13-20. The week begins with Palm Sunday, remembering the day Jesus entered Jerusalem riding on a donkey with palms waved in triumphal procession by the crowds who hailed him as King. Various traditions remember and observe other events of that week including Holy Thursday or Maundy Thursday which commemorates the night Jesus was betrayed. On that night he celebrated the Passover feast with his disciples and instituted The Lords Supper, or The Eucharist, as a lasting remembrance. Good Friday focuses on the suffering and sacrificial death of Jesus on a cross, as he died for the sins of the world, and then was buried in a nearby tomb. Easter Sunday culminates the week, celebrating Jesus resurrection and victory over sin and death. At GTMO we have people of various religious traditions and some who adhere to no religion. How wonderful that we serve and represent a nation that has always treasured religious liberty. Our government does not establish religion, but we all respect and protect the free exercise of it. From our earliest days as a nation, people have come to America looking for a place where they will be free to practice their faith without fear of persecution or prejudice. Thank you for defending that freedom. For people of religious faith, it is so important that we are allowed freedom and opportunity to practice it. We are blessed with many such opportunities at GTMO including, for Christians of Orthodox faith, Navy Lt. William Butts, an Orthodox Chaplain will be among us to conduct Orthodox Holy Week services. A list of Catholic, Protes tant and Orthodox special observances for Holy Week is provided in this issue of The Wire. Included is information about an interdenominational Easter Sunrise Service to be held at Windmill Beach at 6:30 a.m. on April 20 then followed by breakfast at the beach. Transportation will be available from Cuzco and Tierra Kay housing and on Camp America from the camps and a stop at the Old Troopers Chapel. For more information about these services or any other religious ministries needs contact any chaplain. Ttrooper to rooper Staying MOTO By Army Sgt. 1st Class Melissa N. Black JTF Joint Visitor Bureau NCOIC By Navy Cmdr. Stephen A. Gammon JTF Command Chaplain When I arrived here at Guantanamo, I thought to myself: wow, this is going to be a long deployment. My motivation was the dedicated support from my loved ones and my unit, but I thought what am I going to do with myself for nine months? All I could think about is a saying I heard in basic training, Stay moti vated, recruit. I repeated this to myself on more than one occasion throughout this mission to keep me motivated. This brought me to research the textbook defi nition of motivation: the driving force that causes the flux from desire to will in life. I must and will drive through this deployment and make the very best of this situation. I soon learned there were so many things that we can do here at GTMO to break away from the daily grind and stress. The island has an outstanding MWR, which has a vast amount of events to keep us active. There is soft ball, kickball, football and many other sports that you can get involved with. You have access to three gyms to keep yourself fit and in shape. There are also two pools, exercise classes and many more physical fitness activities to get involved with. This gives many of us a way to release stress and stay physically active to meet the high demands of todays military. There are endless activities on the island. Many of us adopt the hobby of diving, boating, fishing, bowling, hiking, running, pottery, woodworking, painting, etc. Some of you may choose to challenge yourself academically. Whether it is through military or civilian education, I challenge you to do it. No better time to catch up with your military education online or come closer to a long-awaited degree you have been working on. Your civilian education will excel you above your peers in future promotional oppor tunities. Take advantage of this time. Do not wait until life catches up with you back in the states. There is something here for everyone. I challenge all to DO WORK AND STAY MOTIVATED! The main thing that everyone needs to remember is to look after yourself and your fellow Soldier, Airman, Marine, Coast Guardsman and Sailor. This is not a combat environment but remember people adapt to situations differently. Some may not be as mentally or morally tough as others. Extend yourself to show others you care. Everyone should understand mission first, but Trooper welfare is often forgotten. Trooper welfare is key in an isolated environment and to mission success. It takes everyone in the JTF to keep all engaged and moti vated. We are all here for a short period to accomplish a very important mis sion. Lets do it and prepare to engage ourselves actively with our family and friends back home who have supported us throughout this deployment. They are usually our true motivation to con tinue.

PAGE 5

eed toNKnow 5 According to the DoD Safe Helpline, sexual assault is a personal and destructive crime. Its effects can be psychological, emotional, and/or physical, and they may be brief in duration or last a very long time. Senior leaders have made it perfectly clear that this violent act has no place in the military. It breaks down teams, destroys members and prevents mission accomplishment. The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SA PRO) was formed in 2005 to improve prevention of sexual assault, significantly enhance support to victims and increase reporting and accountability. Sexual Assault Response Coordinators and Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Victim Advocates offer expertise to prepare victims for the road ahead and will advocate on behalf of a victim along the way. They will provide professional assistance with obtaining medical care, counseling services, legal and spiritual support and obtaining off-base resources when available. Since SAPROs creation, several resources have been made available to victims of sexual assault. In addition, units in all branches of the military attend annual training to recognize that this is a real problem that will not be tolerated and to be better equipped to stop or report a sexual assault. Fiscal year 2013 saw a 46 percent increase from the previous year in the reporting of sexual assault. It is believed that awareness and training efforts have led to an increase in reporting. A climate where sexist behaviors and sexual harassment exist may be indicative that sexual assault is also tolerated, said Susan Perez, the Sexual Assault Response Coordinator for Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. Also, alcohol tends to be a factor in many sexual assaults, so occasions where large amounts of alcohol are being consumed might be problemat ic. The military offers two reporting options. Unrestricted Reports allow a victim of sexual assault to participate in the military criminal justice process. Restricted Reports are kept confidential, and law enforcement is not notified by SAPR personnel. The victims commander is only given non-identify ing information. To begin either process you must first contact a SARC or SAPR VA. The first thing they will do is establish the victims safety. Then, in order to assess the victims needs and give information appropriately, a face-to-face meeting needs to be conducted in the very near future. Before a sexual assault takes place however, there is some thing we all can do in order to prevent it from occurring. Active by-standard intervention is being actively taught in the services right now, continued Perez and according to https://www.safehelpline.org, there are some things everyone can do to help ensure the decline of sexual assault in our military. Preventing sexual assault Story by Staff Sgt. Carmen Steinbach Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milAnyone can play a role in reducing sexual assault, said Perez. If you see a shipmate, battle buddy, wing man, fellow Marine or Coast Guardsmen, friend or neighbor in a poten tially dangerous situation, remember your core values and step up to stop sexual assault. Ms. Perez can be contacted at 4227, and for emergency response at 84577. A victim advocate can be reached 24-hours a day, seven days a week at 84578. Victims can also confiden tially call the DoD Safe Helpline anytime at (877)995-5247 or chat with a DoD Safe Helpline representative online. Please visit https://www.safehelpline.org for more information. How can I prevent a sexual assault? Some people might be concerned that they are being encouraged to place themselves in jeopardy to stop crimes in progress. This is not the case. There are many situations and events that occur prior to a sexual assault, that are appropriate for intervention. Active bystander intervention encourages people to watch for those behaviors and situations that appear to be inappropriate, coercive and harassing. If you consume alcohol, do so in moderation. Do not leave your beverage unattended or accept a drink from an open container.When you are with someone, communicate clearly to ensure he or she knows your limits from the beginning. Both verbal and nonverbal (body language) communication can be used to ensure the message is understood. If you go on a date with someone you do not know very well, tell a close friend what your plans are. You have the right to say "No" even if you: First say Yes, and then change your mind;Have had sex with this partner before;Have been kissing or making out"; and are wearing what is perceived to be provocative clothing. Always have extra money to get home. Have a plan for someone you can call if you need help. If you feel uncomfortable, scared or pressured, act quickly to end the situation. Say "Stop it" and leave or call for help. When you go to a party, go with a group of friends. Arrive together, watch out for each other and leave together. Be aware of your surroundings at all times. Do not allow yourself to be isolated with a person you do not know or trust. Travel with a friend or in a group. Walk only in lighted areas after dark. Keep the doors to homes, barracks, and cars locked. Know where the phone is located.

PAGE 6

6 FRIDAYDOWNTOWN CAMP BULKELEYSATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAYat the Downtown and Camp Bulkeley LyceumsStay classy, GTMO! No ALCOHOL or TOBACCO at the Lyceums!Call the Movie Hotline at ext. 4880 or visit the MWR Facebook page for more information Winter Soldier sizzles Having seen the first Captain America film a few years ago, the memory of a campy, poorly executed film that simply wasnt up to par with others put out by Marvel Studios came to mind when previews for Captain America: The Win ter Soldier were first released. The new sequel puts to ease the mixed feelings of skepticism and wary anticipation. Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), the real life name of Captain America, continues to work as an integral agent of S.H.I.E.L.D (Strategic Homeland Intervention, Enforcement, and Logistics Division) alongside Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and S.H.I.E.L.D. director, Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson). Rogers, however, struggles with adapting to modern life (seeing how he was frozen in a block of ice for over 50 years), and the invasive techniques the agency uses to reach its goals. As his personal issues grow on the matter, he and Black Widow work together to fight Hydra, an old and highly secretive terrorist group who has corrupted S.H.I.E.L.D and endeavors to kill millions of people on a global scale. While no movie is perfect, and comic book fans will always have something to complain about when it comes to Marvel movies, this recent addition to the superhero genre is one worth seeing. The fight sequences were often highly entertaining to watch, and in many cases (but not all) the acting was well invested behind A-list actors like Robert Redford, who plays the films villain. Like all the Marvel Studio productions, a clip hinting at future plots is played post-credits, speculating at who the next character focus will be. The movie receives four banana rats. Review by Sgt. Spencer Rhodes Copy Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Killing time There are worse ways to kill time than watching Kevin Costners most recent action movie where he plays an undercover CIA assassin with family problems. While Days to Kill almost feels like it takes three days to watch with its typical dialog and predictable plot, Kevin Costner proves that he can still compete for the top spots with his performance. You really want to like the movie based on his acting alone. Still, the film is entertaining as Costners character, Ethan, tries to reconnect with his estranged daughter and ex-wife after learning that he is dying. The scenes of him learning to be a father in between tracking down a terrorist are somewhat heartwarming. There is a lighthearted tone to the movie that shows when he elicits fatherly advice from a couple of bad guys. Even though the movie portrays him as being quasi-su perhuman in fistfights and shootouts; it keeps him human by showing him almost passing out a couple of times. The biggest issue I had with the film is his CIA handler Vivi (Amber Heard). Im a firm believer that she was apparently appearing in another movie completely as her clothes and hair change almost every time you see her. Her attitude doesnt seem to match the tone of the movie either, with her making short comments that apparently pass for dialog in whatever movie she thinks shes staring in. Her surreal, espionage world doesnt appear to have any connection with the movies family tie in. Days to Kill is successful in being a lighthearted action film though. The performances by Ethans daughter (Haliee Steinfeld), and his ex-wife (Connie Nielsen) are wonderful, even if predictable. Costner pulls this movie out of the fire but it may not be enough to make this a blockbuster. If you have time to kill, then by all means go for it. I give the movie three banana rats on Costners performance alone. Review by Staff Sgt. Kenneth Edel Media Relations, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Single Moms Club begins as five women of varying cul ture and background are hauled into the principals office and forced to plan a fundraiser together in order to bail out their troublemakers. There are a few notable ladies: Jan (Wendi-McLendon-Covey) is a workaholic type trying to balance mommyhood and a career. Tyler Perry couldnt help but throw in one too many awkward racial moments with this character, somewhat por traying all white women as tight-lipped snobs and buying into black women stereotypes, which ironically he exploits in the character of Lytia (Cocoa Brown). Shes large and boisterous, working as a waitress at Waffle House and tries to keep her youngest out of trouble, as her oldest two are serving time in jail. May (Nia Long) is an author and journalist, trying to pro vide for her son and protect him from his absent, drug-abuser of a father. In one touching moment, she watches painfully, as he doesnt show up for his scheduled visit. Her role is a stand out in the film. But the moment of raw emotion is short lived as the parade of eligible, kid-friendly bachelors seems to commence out of nowhere, completely halting any believability. They do add some hilarity, as is the case with Terry Crews (who can liven up any party), as he tries every wild and outlandish trick to woo Lytia. Despite the fact that the point was hammered home early on that single moms are strong and independent, the conflicting and half-hearted attempt at turning a strong com edy into a weak romantic one serves as the downfall. Since I genuinely became involved in the characters, and completely forgot that I was watching a Tyler Perry movie, I give this film three banana rats. Cant keep a good woman downReview by Staff Sgt. Carmen Steinbach Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Courtesy Photo Photo Courtesy Ignition

PAGE 7

7 FRIDAYDOWNTOWN CAMP BULKELEYSATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAYat the Downtown and Camp Bulkeley LyceumsStay classy, GTMO! No ALCOHOL or TOBACCO at the Lyceums!Call the Movie Hotline at ext. 4880 or visit the MWR Facebook page for more information Rio 2 (New)G, 8 p.m.3 Days to KillPG13, 10 p.m.Draft Day (New)PG13, 8 p.m.Captain America: The Winter SoldierPG13, 10:15 p.m.Tyler Perrys Single Moms Club PG13, 8 p.m.Pompeii (LS)PG13, 8 p.m.Need for SpeedPG13, 8 p.m.Son of God PG13, 8 p.m.Non-Stop (LS)PG13, 8 p.m.Draft Day (New) PG13, 8 p.m.Captain America: The Winter SoldierPG13, 10:15 p.m.3 Days to Kill PG13, 8 p.m.Need for Speed PG, 10:15 p.m.Son of GodPG13, 8 p.m.Non-Stop (LS)PG13, 8 p.m.Tyler Perrys Single Moms Club PG13, 8 p.m.Lyceum closedNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further notice.Lyceum closedNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further notice.Story by Sgt. Debra Cook Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milAbout 30 Soldiers from the 525th Military Police Battalion, along with spouses and friends, were gathered at Ferry Land ing with balloons and signs waiting to greet the five Soldiers returning home who represented Naval Station Guantanamo Bay in the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Death March held at White Sands Missile Range, N.M. The five Soldiers that represented the GTMO team, Vigilant Warriors, were: Sgt. Jay Linderman, 189th Military Police Company, Sgt. Ryan Padgett, Headquarters Company, 525th Military Police Battalion, Staff Sgt. Michael Ovalles, 491st Military Police Company, 2nd Lt. Cody Simula, 189th MP Company and Spc. Robert Silva, 491st Military Police Company. The Bataan Memorial Death March is held once a year to honor Service members who defended the Philippine Islands during World War II. There are two different courses to compete in: the light course is 14.2 miles and the heavy is 26.2 miles. There are 22 different divisions from ROTC, civilian, male, female or co-ed just to name a few. A previous team from the 525th placed first in the military co-ed heavy-weight (ruck) division. This year, GTMOs team, The Vigilant Warriors placed second in the military co-ed heavy category and third overall. I think the aspect of being able to compete as a team makes it a whole experience and makes it a lot better, said Simula. It makes the time go by faster just working with each other and trying to keep each other up and keep each other motivated moving through the challenges of the event. The Soldiers arrived at Ferry Landing, greeted by well-wishers. Clapping and congratulations filled the air as each Service member was greeted. The five-Soldier team stepped off the boat as one, and it was apparent that team work was the pinnacle of their success. Pretty much everybody came along to help each other out, said Army Sgt Jay Lenderman. Whether it was words of encouragement or Sgt. Padgetts music, we were able to push each other through it and talk the entire time. Each year survivors of the Bataan Death March attend the event, which is a part of the motivation too. It was a pretty awesome experience, said Simula. Just to see them and have them be there, just knowing what they went through and we did in honor of them.aer competing in Bataan Memorial Death March Vigilant Warriors return Photo by Sgt. Kenneth Tucceri/The Wire Courtesy Photo

PAGE 8

8

PAGE 9

9 This April, we pause to observe the 10th annual Sexual Assault Awareness Month with the theme Live our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault, said Army Staff Sgt. Rigoberto Gomez with the 3rd Squadron, 89th Cavalry Regiment. Candles in hand, members of the 3-89th and other Joint Task Force Troopers walked solemnly down Windmill Beach Road for the sexual assault candlelight vigil that took place on Tuesday, April 1 as the first event of National Sexual Assault Awareness Month. The one-mile walk to raise awareness trailed from Pirates Cove to the JTF Headquarters and back. One of the many events scheduled for this month, the can dlelight vigil brought the very pertinent issue of sexual assault into light. By bringing up the problem, Gomez was able to address the steps needed to take to keep this inexcusable crime out of our profession. Each of us need to make a personal commitment to reduce risk, stop inappropriate behavior; do not ignore, tolerate or condone Sexual Assault, said Gomez. We must live our values every day, all year long and step up by intervening when appropriate, reporting crimes and supporting victims. In an environment where Troopers must rely on one an other for their safety and mission completion, anything that causes a lack of trust must be taken out of the equation. That is why, in the family of the military services, such acts are intolerable. We all are a family, and as a family we all have an important role on eliminating this heinous crime from our house, said Gomez. We recognize that this effects all of us, that one is one too many, but that all of us together are the solution to ultimately eliminating sexual assault in our family. Aside from striving to prevent further acts of this crime, the sexual assault candlelight vigil was a time to keep in mind those who have been affected while showing our commitment to support them. We want to take time to remember and honor our victims and survivors and all affected by sexual assault. We want to remind you that you are not alone, and that we are with you, said Gomez. I would do anything for her, Army Pfc. Dylan Janson confessed when speaking about a friend who committed sui cide following an act of sexual assault. As an advocate for the awareness and prevention of sexual assault at home and in our military services, Janson does his best to show his support at these events for those who have been affected by these acts. I dont appreciate anyone who would do it, and I will do anything I can to help stop it, said Janson. Story and photos by Pvt. Kourtney Grimes Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Candlelight VigilTroopers gather in recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month

PAGE 10

lbife in oots The hunt for GTMO sea cow Seven researchers with the United States Geological Survey returned to Naval Station Guantanamo Bay this week as part of Project Sirenia, to continue tagging local manatees found in Guantanamo Bay. As with previous visits, GTMO volunteers were trained on assisting with the capture process to safely bring manatees to shore to be tagged for tracking and given a health assessment. Were really trying to get a handle on what the manatees are doing here, how they use their resource, how many there may be and the health conditions of the manatees here, said Susan Butler, a researcher for USGS at the University of Florida, It is a tedious game of I spy, and it can be a long process. So spotting them is definitely one of the hardest parts of the capture process. Since general knowledge of manatees is not wide spread for those who dont live in an area where the species make their home, introducing Service members to the research USGS will be doing in Cuba started with two nights of informative lecture and instructions at Bulkeley Hall. This is where residents signed up to receive a better understand ing about the creatures and their life in the bay, prior to beginning their weeklong activities. A crucial learning point for those attending was Boot Camp, an entire Saturday morning dedicated to teach ing the proper handling of nets and what people should look out for while participating. Volunteer numbers were Story and photos by Sgt. Spencer Rhodes Copy Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil 10

PAGE 11

highest during the weekends, allowing for a greater spotting coverage in different locations across GTMO in the hopes of seeing a manatee that had not been tagged. Numbers began dwindling once the work week started, leaving the USGS team with smaller groups for all the different tasks. 2nd Lt. Kelsey Brewer, attached to the 189th Military Police Company, has only been a part of the Joint Task Force Guantanamo mission since the begin ning of spring. Volunteer events like this have allowed her to jump in to her new permanent change of station. Brewer says the few chances shes had to come close to manatees havent worked out in the past. Its a good way to relax, get out on the water, and also see a manatee up close, said Brewer. Dr. Bob Bonde, who is in charge of the health and genetics for all manatee research in the USGS, says that every time they bring in a manatee they do an all encompassing checkup, much like you would have done when going to a family physician at home. They draw blood and do blood-work, urinalysis, fat measurements and do their best to get a accurate overall picture of the animals current health. This place really is a safe haven for these manatees, and its a testament to GTMO how well theyve done, but were still trying to find out more about the differences between the manatees here and in other areas. We know what they look like in Puerto Rico, we know what they look like in Flori da, but what we want to know is what constitutes a healthy manatee here in GTMO, said Bonde. Its not just the USGS that has an inter est though. The U.S. Navy also wants to know how exactly the mana tees use the bay and how strong its population is, explained Butler. The team who is working at GTMO is made up of an eclectic group of people, each with a specific skill set or even from an entirely different organization. While most are USGS researchers, oth ers like Dr. Judd Kenworthy, bring a different expertise. Kenworthy, who is a retired scientist from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Ad ministration, is a subject matter expert in sea grass studies and a volunteer as sisting the USGS manatee researchers with Project Sirenia. Once the man atee capture portion is complete, the following week will focus on the habitat and resources, such as sea grass and other vegetation, to see how the manatees use their resources and where as well. For more information on manatee wildlife go to USGS.gov. for them in the bay. 11

PAGE 12

12Steppers bring rhythm to GTMO Story and photos by Sgt. Christopher Vann Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milResidents of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay were treated to a performance from the dance troupe Step Afrika! at the Downtown Lyceum, April 2. Founded 20 years ago, Step Af rika! was the worlds first professional dance company solely dedicated to the art of stepping. They promote the apprecia tion for stepping and use it as an educational tool for young people to help motivate and teach a healthy lifestyle. Jakari Sherman is a performer, percussionist and has also served as the artistic director since 2007. He subscribes to the message of furthering ones education. Everyone in Step Afrika! has gone to college and graduated, said Sherman. We believe it is vital to a persons success. Step Afrika! started out as an exchange program with the Soweto Dance Theatre of Johannesburg, South Africa, and has since expanded to become a national and international touring company offering residencies and giving performances and workshops worldwide. The group came to GTMO to help build esprit de corps and provide enter tainment to those stationed on base. I used to step in college, so to see them here was a nice treat, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Leah Perdue, a J4 housing noncommissioned officer. I really enjoyed the show. Stepping comes from a long and rich tradition in African-based communities that use movement, words and sounds to communicate allegiance to a group. It draws movements from African foot dances, such as Gumboot, originally conceived by miners in South Africa as an alternative to drumming, which was banned by authorities. The stepping tradition in the Unit ed States grew out of song and dance rituals predominately practiced by Afri can-American fraternities and sororities, beginning in the early 1900s. In addition to their performance, the team also held a workshop at W.T. Sampson School where students were able to learn the beginning moves of stepping. The students were taught a simple cadence and given an opportunity to practice and perform a whole routine. Step Afrika! incorporates dance with a military influence through angular movements and the idea of discipline to help ensure timing and structure. Like in the military, we focus on the mission, said Jacqueline Washing ton, a performer from Houston, Texas. Were here to entertain, uplift peoples spirits and teach the youth. Ultimately, that is our goal. motivate and teach a healthy lifestyle.

PAGE 13

ocusTFrooper 13 Close up pictures render a version of what you might think is a new tiki bar here at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay or a new playground for the kids, but its a mini version of the house Army Sgt. Johnny Sabino, from the 613th Military Police Company, promised to buy his mother one day. What started out as a beverage carton slowly became a dream house. Troopers around the block came to watch Sabino gluing sticks together while he formed the dog house, swing set and other intricate parts of the model house. They doubted him at first but by the time he was finished he made believers out of everyone around him. My neighbor was like, yeah right when I told her I was gonna make a house, said Sabino. Then she got more inter ested as I went on. Sabino and his brother have always wanted to buy a house for their mom, but shortly after Sabinos arrival to GTMO his brother passed away from cancer, and he flew home for emergency leave. He returned to build a mini-version of the dream house they promised theyd buy his mother together one day. My moms been a little bit down lately, and I want to send this to her for Mothers Day, said Sabino. It took him two weeks to make it. He used shish kebob sticks, called pinchos sticks in Puerto Rico, and cut up con struction paper for the green grass. He spent an hour walking cable beach picking up sea glass to use for the walkways. He purchased wood chips for the foundation of the house and fashioned the porch, walkways and roof edges with bamboo he got from the tiki bar. The swings and other parts of the house are made from tongue depressors. The house is even complete with a Puerto Rican flag on top. I spent time asking for four or five people in the Joint Medical Group every day until I had about 20 to put towards building the house, said Sabino. He had to be creative to finish his project. He used fingernail files for the window, tape for the window panes and put it all together with wood glue purchased from the NEX. I had to eat four ice creams to do this window, said Sabino. He used 550 cord to make the hose on the side of the house, black spray paint for the roof and regular dirt from outside for the front yard. A lot of people say theyve wasted their time here, and I tell them to be creative and do something with their life, said Sabino. Thats what I do when Im bored. Im not a gym freak, and I dont like playing video games. So what do I have left? You have to be creative. The more I keep my mind busy the faster time goes by. Ive always said to make the best out of what youve got. At home he started making a boat from wood but never finished. Here at GTMO Ive finally had time to finish something, said Sabino smiling proudly as he held the house up for a picture to send his mom. Building a dream house Story and photos by Sgt. Debra Cook Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil version of the dream house he promised to buy his mother one day from materials he found around Guantanamo.

PAGE 14

14Story by Sgt. Debra Cook Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milConquer fearGrilled Lobster Fishing is Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Paul Coopers passion. If you cant find him on a boat youll find him at a barbecue somewhere cooking his catches. You dont always catch what you want though and to that Cooper said, If you cant catch it, you can usually buy it. Check out his simple grilled lobster recipe made from the scrumptious tails he purchased at the NEX. RecipeIngredients: 4 lobster tails shell on, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 cup milk, 1 tsp cayenne pepper, old bay to taste, 1/2 lemon juiced, 2 tablespoons butter for dipping. Directions: Cut tails down the center to expose meat. Marinade lobster tails in milk, butter and cayenne pepper for 1 hour in the refrigerator. Remove, sprinkle with more cayenne pepper, old bay. Wrap individually in foil. Barbecue for 10 minutes tails turn red when done. Sprinkle with lemon and melt butter for dipping. Story and photo by Sgt. Debra Cook Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milMmm, mmm, mmm. Said Drill Sergeant Scarpulla as he approached our formation in the dark, early morning hour of our 0400 physical training session. Wed been standing at parade rest for 10 minutes when he arrived late holding a popular coffee shop cup in his hand. Come, gather around me, he said as he motioned us out to a more casual for mation surrounding him and his coffee. Smell that? he asked as he walked up to certain individuals holding the coffee cup under our noses. He let the aroma of coffee we couldnt have rise and took a sip in front of us. Mmm, its caramel mocha, and its so good at four in the morning. We were confused. Whats he doing? One Soldier said, I wish I could have some of that. Another chimed in, Must be nice. Oh, you want some Pvt. Michaels? You know you want it. Go ahead, ask me. Its OK. But his taunting fell on a silent crowd. Not one of the new recruits wanted the repercussions of drinking the drill sergeants coffee. We waited and licked our lips in silence until one person did speak up. It was McFarland, a late entry, at least 34 years old. She said, Ill have some. We waited to see what would happen to this brave woman. We also wondered, what was in this coffee that would damage us if we did drink it? Did he spit in it? Did he pour hot sauce it in? He spun around and stared her down, What did you say? Ill have some, she shrugged. Why not? He smiled, nodded like a proud father and handed her the coffee. She took a sip and together they shared a conversation about how delightful it tasted. Then others spoke up saying they wanted some too. Nope, its too late, he said. You had your chance, and you passed it up. He turned back to her and they con tinued talking about the smooth caramel mocha flavor and how wonderful it was. The question I have for you Warriors is this: why didnt you take me up on my offer like McFarland did? You know you wanted some. What were you afraid of? None of us could offer an answer. He turned and asked her what made her go for it. She shrugged and said, because I wanted it. Hear that? Because she wanted it Warriors. No ones ever gonna give you anything in this life. If you really want something, you gotta take it. Robert Greene and 50 Cent collaborated on a book together called The 50th Law. Its about living a fearless life. It says, Your fears are a kind of prison that confines you within a limited range of action. The less you fear, the more power you will have and the more fully you will live. Your caramel mocha coffee awaits. Now go get it.

PAGE 15

15 For more information about these and other religious ministries contact NAVSTA Chaplains office at x2323/ JTF at x2218 Holy WeekProtestant Orthodox Catholic ServicesNAVSTA Chapel April 13, 11:00 a.m. Palm Sunday/1:00 p.m. Gospel Service April 14, 5:30 p.m. Messianic Passover Seder Meal at Community Center (Reservations Required) April 18, 7:30 p.m. Good Friday Service April 20, 11:00 a.m. Easter Sunday/1:00 p.m. Gospel Service JTF Troopers Chapel April 13, 9:00 a.m. & 7:00 p.m. Palm Sunday Service April 18, 7:00 p.m. Good Friday Service April 20 9:00 a.m. & 7:00 p.m. Easter Sunday Service April 12, 5:30 p.m. Blessing of Palms April 13, 9:00 a.m. Palm Sunday Procession April 17, 5:30 p.m. Holy Thursday Mass April 18, 5:30 p.m. Good Friday Service April 19, 5:30 p.m. Holy Saturday Vigil Mass April 20, 9:00 a.m. Easter Sunday Mass LT William Butts, an Orthodox Christian Chaplain will be here 11-25 April to officiate the following Worship Services: April 13, 10:00 a.m. Palm Sunday Service April 16, 7:00 p.m. Holy Unction April 17, 7:00 p.m. 12 Gospels Service April 18, 7:00 p.m. Lamentation Matins April 19, 10:00 p.m. Pascha Service/Easter Service April 23, 7:00 p.m.Bright Wednesday Service JTF and NAVSTA Interdenominational Easter Sunrise Service April 20, 6:30 a.m. Easter morning at Windmil Beach. Breakfast following. NAVSTA ChapelServices ServicesNAVSTA Chapel ANNEX Room 14 UnfairMy five-year-old daughter wrote a note to the Tooth Fairy. Dear Tooth Fairy, why are you unfair? Some kids get coins, others get $2.00 and my friend R got $5.00? Even at a young age she perceives that life should be fair. Most people inherently believe that people should get what they deserve and deserve what they get. I totally get it. Ive been passed over for awards I thought I deserved, and Ive received awards I know I didnt earn. You know what though? I am glad I havent always gotten what I de served. I have made some terrible mistakes in my life, and I have received a second chance. We call that mercy. Mercy is not getting what you deserve. Its counterpart is grace. Grace is getting some thing you dont deserve, like forgiveness. Grace, and in particular mercy, are powerful weapons against injustice and inequity and ITS TOTALLY UNFAIR. Know someone that could use a second chance? As for the Tooth Fairy, it turns out she doesnt respond to kid pressure. She just gave her usual $.50 and left a nice note. Dont worry; Im sure my daughter will give her a second chance. he BayLTife On By Army Capt. Brady Frederick 525th MP Battalion Chaplain /jointtaskforceguantanamo Facebook GTMO sports standings Indoor VolleyballSmokin' Aces 12-1 The Ricans 12-2 Playmakers 12-2 Kill Seekers 10-3 Gold Diggers 10-3 W.T. Sampson 9-4 Boston Strong 7-6 War Eagle 7-7 BEEF 6-7 Side Out 5-9 Sierra 2 4-10 Cuba Libre 2-12

PAGE 16

Send your best photos to thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil gtmolighthouse@gmail.com phone: 4977 April 28 2:00 5:00 p.m. at the WindjammerTo audition, contact 1st Lt. John Mahood at John.A.Mahood@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil no later than April 21. Singers are resticted to JDG Army members only. The winner will sing at GTMOs Army Ball Saturday, June 7 BB ack urner By Sgt. Kenneth Tucceri