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The wire ( 10-25-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The wire
Uniform Title:
Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher:
362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication:
Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Notes

System Details:
Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID:
UF00098620:00590

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wire
Uniform Title:
Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher:
362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication:
Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Notes

System Details:
Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID:
UF00098620:00590


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Focused on futureCoast Guardsman sets example in his community Baseball great graces GTMOVolume 15, Issue 21 October 25, 2013 Teed off for funMWR golf leagues championship match

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Oktoberfest in GTMO Contact LS2 King at ext. 84021, to volunteer support for the 1300 Gospel Service Spoken Word. Artists, singers, dancers, poets, actors, set-up and tear-down crews and cooks are needed for the Nov. 3 event. Volunteers needed MWR will bring a bit of Bavaria to GTMO Oct. 26. Head over to the Windjammer for traditional Bavarian food, German music and dance, and if you get there early, you may get one of the 500 custom Das Boots for your frosty beverage. Festivities start at 7 p.m. and all ages are welcome until 9 p.m. Womens fall fellowship The Women of Faith Bible Study Group will host a fall fellowship Tuesday Oct. 29, 6:30 p.m., at the Fellowship Hall of the Chapel Annex. Bring your favorite photos of you, your family or friends to share with others as we eat, visit and have fun in fellowship. Zombie 5k fun run, Oct. 31 Come celebrate Halloween at Cooper Field with the Zombie 5k Fun Run sponsored by Navy Fitness. If you need to get your zombie on, get there early at 6:15 p.m., for zombie face painting sponsored by MWR. Registration opens Oct. 24, and runs through Oct. 30. All runners must be registered. Call ext. 2113, or 77262, for more information. 2http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html 8 Trooper Focus AND IN OUR PAGES Around the BayGTMO welcomes baseball legend Randy Johnson with hand shakes and smiles. PAGE 6 Cover photo by Sgt. Darron Salzer Bay Wire Report CORRECTIONS Other StoriesCommand Corner & Trooper to Trooper4 10 115 9 of the week PV2 Andrew Brown591st Military Police CompanySSgt Vincent ManabatBase Emergency Engineer Force

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The Wire October 253 Catholic Mass Mon.-ur. 5:30 p.m. Saturday 5 p.m. Sunday 9 a.m. Protestant Services General Protestant Sunday 11 a.m. Gospel Worship Sunday 1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 6:40 a.m. Sunday 9 a.m. Sunday 7 p.m. Camp America :00, :20, :40 Gazebo :01, :21, :41 Camp America NEX :02, :22, :42 Camp Delta :04; :24, :44 Camp 6 :07, :27, :47 TK 4 :13, :33, :53 JAS :14, :34, : 54 TK 3 :15, :35, :55 TK 2 :16, :36, :56 TK 1 :17, :37, :57 CC :19, :39, :59 Windjammer/Gym :22, :42, :02 Gold Hill Galley :24, :44, :04 NEX :26, :46, :06 NEX Laundry :27, :47, :07 C Pool :30, :50, :10 Downtown Lyceum :31, :51, :11 NEX :33, :53, :13 Gold Hill Galley :35, :55, :15 Windjammer/Gym :37, :57, :17 CC :40, :00, :20 TK 1 :41, :01, :21 TK 2 :42, :02, :22 TK 3:43, :03, :23 TK 4 :44, :04, :24 Camp 6:50, :10, :30 Camp Delta :53, :13, :33 HQ Building :55, :15, :35 Camp America NEX :57, :17, :37 Gazebo :58, :18, :38 Camp America :00, :20, :40 Sat. and Sun. only Location #1-4 Windward Loop 9 a.m., 12 p.m., 3 p.m., 6 p.m. East Caravella SBOQ/Marina 9:05 a.m., 12:05 p.m., 3:05 p.m. NEX 9:08 a.m., 12:08 p.m., 3:08 p.m., 6:08 p.m. Phillips Park 9:14 a.m., 12:14 p.m. 3:14 p.m. Cable Beach 9:17 a.m., 12:17 p.m., 3:17 p.m. Windward Loop 9:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m. NEX 9:25 a.m., 12:25 p.m., 3:25 p.m., 6:25 p.m. SBOQ/MARINA 9:35 a.m., 12:35 p.m., 3:35 p.m. Return to Oce 9:40 a.m., 12:40 p.m., 3:40 p.m.Pentecostal Gospel Sunday 8 a.m. & 5 p.m., Room D LDS Service Sunday 10 a.m., Room 19 Islamic Service Friday, 1:15 p.m., Room 2 Seventh Day AdventistFriday, 7 p.m., Room 1 Sabbath School: Saturday 9:30 a.m., Room 1 Sabbath Service: Saturday 11:00 a.m., Room 1 Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Commercial: 011-5399-3651 DSN: 660-3651 E-mail: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire/wire.htmlCommander Navy Rear Adm. Richard W. Butler Deputy Commander Army Brig. Gen. Marion Garcia Sergeant Major Marine Sgt. Maj. Juan M. Hidalgo, Jr. Oce of Public Aairs Director Navy Cdr. John Filostrat Deputy Director Air Force Maj. Christian P. Hodge Command Information Ocer Army Capt. Brian Pennington JTF PAO Senior Enlisted Leader Army 1st Sgt. Patricia Kishman Editor Army Sgt. 1st Class Gina Vaile-Nelson Copy Editor Army Sgt. David Bolton Graphic Designer/Webmaster Army Sgt. 1st Class Aaron Hiler Photo Editor Army Sgt. Darron Salzer Sta Writers Army Sta Sgt. Lorne Ne Army Sgt. Cassandra Monroe Army Spc. Lerone SimmonsStaff Command Staff The Wire is an authorized publication for members of the Department of the Troopers of JTF-GTMO. The contents of The Wire are not necessarily Guard. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Joint Task assigned to the Joint Task Force and is published online. THE WIRE Joint Task ForceSafeHumaneLegalTransparentGuantanamo Look for us on your favorite Social Media: /jointtaskforceguantanamo /photos/jtf gtmo /jtf gtmo @jtf gtmo HQ Building, Camp America NEX Express Bus9:55 a.m. 7:55 p.m.Camp America :55, :48 TK 1 :05, :36 Denich Gym/Windjammer :11, :31 Gold Hill Galley :14, :29 NEX :16, :27 Downtown Lyceum :17, :25

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By Master Sgt. Sean D. Conwell Senior Enlisted Advisor, J2Ttrooper to rooper By Cdr. Terry W. Eddinger Command Chaplain, Joint Task Force Guantanamo4http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html ommandCCorner Have you stood on Windmill or Pebble Beach and looked to the south, out and over the ocean? Of course you have. What did you see? Probably waves, white caps or a calm, serene surface. Have you gone snorkeling or diving out there? What did you see? The sea is full of coral, beautiful plants, exotic looking fish and some really strange looking creatures like sea urchins and jellyfish. However, the flat surface of the ocean you see from the beaches hides an ominous side. Currents and undertow mercilessly stir plants, animals and divers around like a rag in a washing machine. Winds push up waves that roll in and pound the shore. Ive been a victim of those waves and came out bloody on three occasions. The ocean hides extraordinary geographical features too. The next time you visit the MWR marina, look at the ocean depth chart on the wall to the right of the entrance. Just two miles off the coast is a deep trench running east-towest. This trench, a transform or strike-slip fault, is where the North American and Caribbean tectonic plates meet. There is a point out from the Guantanamo lighthouse that is 2,048-meters deep that converts to more than 1 1/4 miles! If you continue none miles out from shore, the ocean is more than three miles deep! Ive heard many divers talk about going to the edge of the abyss, the place where the bottom of the ocean drops off quickly. It is amazing what the Atlantic Ocean conceals near the beaches of GTMO. Have you ever wondered why a person acts or reacts the way they do? A persons actions or reactions are based upon the sum of their experiences and of what they have learned to be socially acceptable behavior. It is more complex than just how one feels at the moment. As humans, we hide much of what makes us tick. In that sense, people are much like the ocean here at GTMO. We project a persona that hides much of what is deep inside us. We hide scars, remnants of past experiences, failed relationships or things that have touched us or hurt us. When left suppressed, these can find their way to the surface at unexpected moments, when we are tired or under pressure. In short, peoples actions and behaviors are quite complex. When you see someone in an ill mood, being recluse, anti-social, or who is acting less than friendly, realize that it may be more than a bad day that is eating at them. Take time to offer a word of encouragement and show concern. Get them help from a chaplain or JSMART. It is our responsibility to look out for our fellow Warriors, and make sure they do not fall victim to the turbulent seas both surrounding this island and in our own lives. Not all leaders are created equal. Sometimes you get lucky and receive your guidance from a person who has a strange quality that makes the most absurd, dangerous, difficult or painful task seem somehow more important and rewarding. Other times, you get led by the guy whos just in charge because the organization cant find a more pleasant senior to fill the slot. So when I tell you there is distinct difference between a leader and an effective leader; and that understanding the nature of influence is a key factor to becoming the latter, it becomes a more valuable trait to you as a Service member. Im going to do my best to prove that to you in this article, starting first with a definition to provide some context to work with. The Army defines leadership as: Influencing people by providing purpose, direction and motivation   w hile operating to accomplish the mission and improving the organization. Leadership as a vocation is an act of influence by providing the intents, constraints and incentives that spur people to act. Something else Id like you to notice is that the definition not use rank or position as an aspect of leadership. This is because those terms are not requisites to being a leader. In my brief time in the military, Ive observed a plentitude of good, and well, frankly, terrible leaders. The worst leaders Ive seen always provided the most creative excuses for their shortcomings. My personal favorites among these include chalking inadequacies up to a leadership style. I dont blame them for being inept because I still havent actually met the person who wanted to be a failed leader. Leading others is not the natural vocation of an individual; its something we do out of necessity. Not everyone is comfortable being in charge and not every leader will make a determined effort to improve at it. However, an influential leader always has a plentitude of leadership styles available to him and is able to appropriately apply them to each situation or person they find themselves leading. In the military, we cultivate leadership. Developing leaders at an institutional level is a deliberate process, which takes a great deal of effort. We leave nothing to chance. Military leaders are never generated by accident, fate or destiny; they are the strict result of the scientific study of human behavior combined with the fortuitous environmental availability of the most virtuous character-defining opportunities mankind can produce. I tell you with utter certainty that good leaders are never simply born; we build them atom-by-atom with the positive and negative examples we deliver them everyday

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PI rofessional nsight JTF GTMO ALL HANDSJTF GTMO ALL HANDS An All Hands briefing is scheduled for Oct. 28-29 at the Downtown and Camp Bulkeley Lyceums. Attendance is required for all JTF personnel to include DOD civilians and contractors. Downtown LyceumCamp Bulkeley Lyceum 7:30-8:30 a.m. Oct. 28 7:00-8:00 p.m. 7:30-8:30 a.m. Oct. 29 7:00-8:00 p.m. The Wire October 25 5 as mentors. Influence is the first character trait we seek to instill in leaders, because it is the most practical and useful tool to arm our Service members with. It is a kind of power, much like authority. However, unlike authority, which always has tangible limitations, influence is conceptual and therefore by its very nature, more prolific. This is why we must meter this power with a morally sound sense of responsibility. Now I made an unsubstantiated statement about influence being the trait of leadership we focus on first in the military. Im going to resolve that by giving you an example from the Armys rank structure. For the other services clarification, in the Army, there are two ranks for the pay grade of E-4: specialist and corporal. Im certain this must be confusing at times. The most important and obvious difference is a corporal is a noncommissioned officer and has the duties and authority greater as such. That shouldnt suggest that there are less expectations from a specialist in the eyes of their leadership. After all, they are no longer a private and they wont be afforded the same level of patience and understanding if they in engage in the shenanigans and tomfoolery we typically see in those early probationary ranks. However, they arent yet NCOs either, so its somewhat difficult for senior leaders to assign responsibility with confidence because they simply do not wield significant general authority. You might wonder why we bother with the rank altogether. I personally believe that when the Army eliminated technical grades from the rank structure, it redesigned the specialist rank to become a transition in career responsibilities for the Soldier. The entire focus of that rank is now to acquire the tools youll need to become an NCO. We expect specialists to start performing at the level of the next rank and also behave like a sergeant. To train specialists how to do this appropriately, we often place them in charge of troops, and make them responsible for additional duties or details. If youve ever been a specialist, you recognize the punch line of this joke, because you realize that the specialist in charge doesnt actually wield much (if any) tangible general authority over his peers except the threat of the NCO they answer to. Yes specialists, we put you in that awful situation on purpose and we think its hilarious. Of course, it would be simpler to get things done if you could just order people around and make them follow your guidance, or else! However, that doesnt teach you anything about leadership and it wont get you promoted. Ill let you in on a secret though, one that will make it much more manageable if you can cope with the truth of it. Using the authority provided by rank is always the first inclination of a weak NCO and the last recourse of a strong one. You dont really need the rank to get things done; you just need to learn how to influence your peers to do what needs be accomplished. For your sake and theirs. I have a phobia about teaching those around me how to wield the awesome power of influence. Im obligated to do so as a trainer and mentor, but there are consequences to empowering the wrong person with this knowledge. In mastering its use, your organizational impact expands and you begin to do something very special you inspire. To inspire someone is a kind of magic. You can spin a spell that directs the desires of your peers, subordinates, and even superiors alike. Win their hearts and you can orchestrate change that elevates the very caliber of all those around you. However, with the same mastery, a leader who inspires can manipulate such change with poisonous intent that it ruins all those whom they come across. Its serious business and needs to be respected. So how do you learn how to use influence you ask? As it turns out, all the answers are in the books. Know your troops. Take that to another level, and make the effort to know your leaders and your peers too. When you understand the desires and aspirations of the men and women who surround you, you can put them on a path to it. When you know what they believe and how they rationalize it you can reach them and demonstrate how the mission is relevant to them. When you appreciate what they love and fear you gain insight to factors powerful enough to change their very nature. Thanks for your time everyone, and thank you all for your service. Its a privilege to be on this rock with you, and Im proud to be a part of your team.

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http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html6 Professional baseball legend Randy Johnson, who pitched 22 seasons in the majors, visited Joint Task Force Guantanamo Troopers Oct. 20. The visit was sponsored by USO and GTMOs Morale, Welfare and Recreation office. Johnson signed photos, baseballs and anything fans brought to him during meet and greets at JTF-GTMOs Seaside Galley and NAVSTAs Cooper Field Sports Complex. Many fans were appreciative of his time. It makes me feel great that people from the states, even people like Randy Johnson, take the time to show their support for what we are doing here, said Spc. Luis Torres, military police, 613th Military Police Company. Its an honor to know that he cares enough to donate his time for us, he said. Torres said he was a fan of the Big Unit, who measures in at 6-foot-10-inches tall, throughout his entire baseball career which spanned six teams over a decade. I am a big fan of his, and I remember watching him play with the Seattle Mariners and then the Yankees and the Arizona Diamondbacks, Torres said. To be able to meet him is a great feeling after watching him play for so many years in the majors. Johnson was the seventh left-handed pitcher to reach 300 wins, and at age 46, was the second oldest player in Major League Baseball in September 2009 when he played for the San Francisco Giants. He officially announced his retirement in 2010, and he told fans at the meet and greet, it was shortly after that announcement he was approached by USO to visit Service members deployed around the world. Im grateful to be able to give back to the men and women who serve our country and the families they often leave behind, said Johnson. The many fans that waited in line just to shake his hand were grateful as well. You dont really think that youll be able to see and meet famous people while stationed here at GTMO, said Army Sgt. Alvin Serrano, military police, 613th MP Co., but here he is signing autographs and taking photos with all of us. Several fans line up at Cooper Field Sports several autographs for fans and posed for GTMO meets baseball legend Story and photo by Sgt. Darron Salzer Photo Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil

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The Wire October 257 outside of Seaside Galley before they head off for their shifts. GTMO meets baseball legend

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Coast Guardsman turns to same time, affecting positive change in the life of a stranger can be one of the most rewarding vocations. Although it was rewarding, Taylor said social services didnt pay that well, and in order to be a true role model and make his community better, he needed to better himself too. Joining the Coast Guard however, allowed Taylor to put some money in the bank, round out his resume and broaden his expertise. Now, as a machinery technician with the Port Security Unit 301, there are similarities between the military environment and his experiences in social services. Being a mentor, sometimes you get frustrated and things dont go the way you want it to but in the end, the pros outweigh the cons, said Taylor. Taylor said the one thing that allows him to excel in his field of work, and in uniform, is patience. My personality makes me stronger in terms of what I can deal with, said Taylor. I feel like the military is refining all the traits that Ive acquired through my up-bringing so I can give more to my community. Taylor says he has plans for using his Post 9/11 GI Bill money for obtaining his masters degree in counseling. Story and photo by Sgt. David Bolton Copy Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil I want to do more, I want to be better.In high school, DeWayne Taylor, a Boston, Mass.-born, Brockton, Mass.-raised son of Jamaican immigrants, found his calling for service to his community by volunteering with social service programs. I worked in psych wards, I was a teacher, I helped people at detox programs, I worked with autistic children and adults, juvenile delinquents and such, said Taylor. I was also in the department of children and family. Growing up, Taylor saw a need in his community; a need for change in the lives of the community. That need for change was his opportunity and his compassion for the people in his neighborhood was his driving force. Ive always been very empathetic and very compassionate, said Taylor. I looked around at my surroundings and said ok, I want to do more, I want to be better. Following his initiative, Taylor began working as a teacher at a kindergarten his senior year of college. While working there, he was the only male teacher, which put him in a unique position. According to Taylor, many of the disciplinarian issues were brought to him and he acted as a kind of surrogate father figure, which made a positive change in lives of the children. Parents would come to me and say thank you for being there for my child, said Taylor. Thats the reward I got, seeing how much the kids grew. I can say yes, Im the one that was able affect a change in that environment. Throughout his work the social service fields, Taylor said he has also seen changes in himself in the areas of maturity level, not taking things for granted, and realizing that actions have consequences. The ultimate goals of the tasks he undertakes are to make sure children are provided with the best possible future. Going that extra mile to make a difference in life of a child or stranger can be tedious, unforgiving and thankless work. At the 8http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html TFROOPER OCUS

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The Wire October 259 The top two teams of the first-ever Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Team Golf League teed-off with their best shots and hoped for no mulligans on the greens during the 18-hole championship round Oct. 20 at the Lateral Hazard golf course. Eleven teams began the season nearly three months ago, and each team met once. Based off of our scores during league play, we were placed into brackets as we advanced through the competition, said Army Lt. Col. Mike Shoen, deputy commander, Joint Detention Group, Joint Task Force Guantanamo. We had two ties, two losses and several wins this season. Shoens team won the championship round despite having a substitute stand in for his regular teammate, Army Sgt. Maj. Catherine Farrell, the J3 sergeant major. I wasnt expecting to win, so it feels pretty good, Shoen said. Today we did really well. We shot a 37, and the other team shot a 39. Shoen added that he and Farrell enjoy golf and were often at the course every weekend anyway, and as the league wore on, their skills improved. Golf is probably one of the cheapest MWR activities to do on-island, Shoen laughed. Its a great sport that is not as easy as everyone thinks it is. There is a lot of skill, and that skill diminishes if you are not playing consistently. Regular courses stateside could cost a golfer upwards of $65 or more, but here at GTMO, it is less than half that price and includes club use. The course is 9-holes with two sets of tee boxes for each hole. For the regular GTMO golfers, such as Shoen, he joked the best part of the Lateral Hazard is not knowing where your ball is going to land. For Army Sgt. Andrew Owad, JTF-GTMO, meeting people on the course is what he enjoys most. It was definitely a bonus to meet people from across Guantanamo who had many different skill levels, Owad said. Owad and teammate, Spc. Shawn Heatley, JTF guard force, finished second for the round, but their spirits remained high. There were a lot of good shots today, more for the other team and even though we came in second place, it was nice to lose to some great play, Owad said. They had a great chip-in on the 8th and we had some great tee shots as well, he said. Its nice to see that kind of play on a course like the one here. Shoen said, golf along with other MWR programs is a great way for Troopers to de-stress. Golf is my way of getting away from the office on weekends, he said. If Troopers are not taking advantage of the MWR programs here theyre crazy, because this is definitely one of the key ways to get away from everything and refocus your mind, he said. Owad praised all of the competitors for making the very first doubles golf league a success. Playing with so many different people made scheduling matches a challenge, Owad said, but it seemed like everyone did what they could to make it a very successful season. This was the first golf league of this type ever put on by MWR, and I think that as they do this more and more, youll see the play from competitors continue to get better and better, he said. Story and photo by Sgt. Darron Salzer Photo Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil

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FRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAY at the Downtown and Camp Bulkeley LyceumsStay classy, GTMO! No ALCOHOL or TOBACCO at the Lyceums!Call the Movie Hotline at 4880 or visit the MWR Facebook page for more information Courtesy Cross Creek Pictures 25 26 27 28 29 30 31Parkland (New)PG, 8 p.m.RushR, 10 p.m.Parkland (New)PG, 8 p.m.Riddick (LS)R,10 p.m.Puss in Boots (Trunk or Treat)PG, 7:30 p.m.Don Jon (New)R, 9:15 p.m.Don Jon (New)R, 8 p.m.RushR, 10 p.m.Captain PhillipsPG13, 8 p.m.The Worlds End (LS)R, 8 p.m.The Worlds End (LS)R, 8 p.m.PrisonersR, 8 p.m.RiddickR, 8 p.m.GravityPG13, 8 p.m.PrisonersR, 8 p.m.Rush, a sports drama, based on the true rivalry between English playboy James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) and Austrian Niki Lauda (Daniel Brhl) focuses on the s Formula One racing makeover and the need for speed. The cars are getting faster, lighter and more powerful, and the drivers match their cars momentum with genius talent, seductive chivalry and a foolish desire to outmatch their competition. Lauda and Hunt, who began their rivalry in the Formula Three circuit in the early 1970s, share their animosity through the progression of their Formula One careers. As polar opposites, Lauda relies on intellect, caution and consistency, while Hunt proves himself with a bold, unmatched talent for seeing just how far he can push the limits on and off the race track. Given the upcoming 1976 Formula One World Championship series, the stakes are high and there can be only one true champion. Will it be Lauda or Hunt? Directed by Academy Award-winner Ron Howard, this film delivers on exhilaration and acting performance. Hemsworth and Brhl embody their roles flawlessly, and the racing progressively raises the bar to bring you to the point of teetering on the edge of your seat for the final act. Overall, I am satisfied with the film, but the choice of periodic narration comes off awkward and the 1970s were filled with other songs that better represent that era. If you have a passion for racing like I do, I definitely recommend this film. I give it four banana rats. Prisoners will hold you captiveChildren are taken and their fathers are determined to do whatever it takes to get their loved ones back. Though the abduction plots have been done before, what sets this movie off is Prisoners takes us deeper into the psyches of the frantic parent, holding you captive. Keller Dover (Hugh Jackman) steals the show and shows us theres more to his range of rage than just metal claws and bad hair. When his daughter goes missing, the plot thickens more as Dovers patience wears thin with Detective Loki (played masterfully by Jake Gyllenhaal). Whether youre a parent or not, you will see why he takes matters into his own hands with extreme, desperate measures. While the overall acting is good, the power of the film comes from behind the scenes. Oscar-nominated director Denis Villeneuve (Incedies) unravels the plot in his typical methodical and chilling fashion. Not to be outdone, critically-acclaimed cinematographer Roger Deakins, (No Country for Old Men, Skyfall), creates striking, breathtaking images out of a tragedyladen suburban community. Prisoners should be on your To Do List this week and this Jersey guy gives it four fist-pumping banana rats. Review by Staff Sgt. Richard C. Garcia 812th MP Co., thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milReview by Sgt. Cody Stagner JTF-PAO, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Due to All Hands briengs, Lyceum is closedNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further notice. Courtesy Alcon Entertainment 6http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html

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FRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAY at the Downtown and Camp Bulkeley LyceumsStay classy, GTMO! No ALCOHOL or TOBACCO at the Lyceums!Call the Movie Hotline at 4880 or visit the MWR Facebook page for more information The Wire October 25 11 Information Assurance Youve been there. Pushing your cart in the NEX when all of a sudden you hear it. A Trooper talking about close-hold GTMO (NEX, McDonalds, Marblehead Lanes, Bayview or Tiki Bar) are not the place to conduct this business. at the gym, on the beach or at the galley. Remember that 24/7-365. hardware (eyes, hands, lungs and heart). Chaplains ext. 2218 Having the ability to assist those who need help, like our hero the Lone Ranger, is great. However, the person who is a lone ranger because they have become reclusive needs our help. This is one of the warning signs for a person who is troubled and may be suicidal. Be a hero, watch after your fellow warriors, and intervene when needed.Lone Ranger d Its true! You ARE a big unit!Photo by Marine Cpl. Jeff Drew/DVIDS The Camp America Post Office will be closed most Saturdays, except for the Saturdays before a unit's rotation off island. Normal M-F business hours still apply. The NAVSTA Post Office is also closed on Saturdays. The Saturday schedule is listed below. POC is LS1 Ponce, Brenda, at x2331 or brenda.l.ponce@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Oct. 19 Oct. 26 Nov. 2 Nov. 9 Nov. 16 Nov. 23 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. CLOSED 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. CLOSED CLOSED CLOSED Nov. 30 Dec. 7 Dec. 14 Dec. 21 Dec. 28 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. CLOSED CLOSED CLOSED

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GARAGE McCalla Field WarehouseSALESat. & Sun Oct. 26-27 8 a.m.-3 p.m. FRIGHT NIGHT RUN The First AnnualFCPOA and JEA PresentOctober 25 at 7 p.m. Cooper Field5K run for adults Fun run for children under 12 Spooky Houses along the route Costumes and face paint encouraged Free giveaways Best Costume Contest for kids under 10 12BB ack urnerhttp://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html