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The wire ( 08-02-2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00543

Material Information

Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: 08-02-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Notes

System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00578

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00543

Material Information

Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: 08-02-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Notes

System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00578


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Keep your feet off! Getting out there with the TroopersTierra Kay housing gets new furniture Seeing GTMO through the eyes of EO Former commander visits Camp X-RayVolume 15, Issue 9 August 2, 2013

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2http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html Life in BootsJTF-GTMO EO listens to Troopers 8 Trooper Focus 12 Dazed and Confused 18 AND IN OUR PAGES Around the BayOther Stories4 6 15Former GTMO Detention Facility Commander returns for visit. PAGE 10 Cover photo by Sgt. Cassandra Monroe Bay Wire Report Safe travels and a million thanksOn behalf of all Troopers stationed at Joint Task Force Guantanamo, thank you Brig. Gen. James C. Lettko for your tireless service and dedication to the mission here. We wish you and your family all the best in the future. A night of danceCapitol Movement, a professional dance group, will perform Aug. 6, at 6 p.m., at the Elementary School Lyceum. Everyone is welcome to this free event. For more information, contact Ted at ext. 55371. 19MWR Doggie MeetupsMissing your pooch? Head out to the MWR Dog Park Wednesdays from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Great way to meet people and get some K-9 love. CORRECTIONS Keep your feet off! Getting out there with the TroopersTierra Kay housing gets new furniture Seeing GTMO through the eyes of EO Former commander visits Camp X-RayVolume 15, Issue 9 August 2, 2013

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The Wire August 23 Catholic Mass Tues.-Fri. 5:30 p.m. Saturday 5 p.m. Sunday 9 a.m. Spanish-language Mass Sunday 4:35 p.m. General Protestant Sunday 11 a.m. Gospel Service Sunday 1 p.m. Catholic Mass Sunday 7:30 a.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 9 a.m. Sunday 7 p.m. Camp America :00, :20, :40 Gazebo :02, :22, :42 NEX trailer :03, :23, :43 Camp Delta :02; :06; :26, :46 KB 373 :10, :30, :50 TK 4 :12, :32, :52 JAS :13, :33, : 53 TK 3 :14, :34, :54 TK 2 :15, :35, :55 TK 1 :16, :36, :56 West Iguana :18, :38, :58 Windjammer/Gym :21, :41, :01 Gold Hill Galley :24, :44, :04 96 Man Camp :31, :51, :11 NEX :33, :53, :13 Gold Hill Galley :37, :57, :17 Windjammer/Gym :36, :56, :16 West Iguana :39, :59, :19 TK 1 :40, :00, :20 TK 2 :43, :03, :23 TK 3:45, :05, :25 TK 4 :47, :07, :27 KB 373:50, :10, :30 Camp Delta 1 :52, :12, :32 IOF :54, :14, :34 NEX Trailer :57, :17, :37 Sat. and Sun. only Location #1-4 Winward Loop 0900, 1200, 1500, 1800 East Caravella SBOQ/Marina 0905, 1205, 1505 NEX 0908, 1208, 1508, 1808 Phillips Park 0914, 1214, 1514 Cable Beach 0917, 1217, 1517 Winward Loop 0930, 1230, 1530 NEX 0925, 1225, 1525, 1825 SBOQ/MARINA 0935, 1235, 1535 Return to Oce 0940, 1240, 1540 Pentecostal Gospel Sunday 8 a.m. & 5 p.m., Room D LDS Service Sunday 10 a.m., Room A Islamic Service Friday 1:15 p.m., Room 2 Seventh Day Adventist Friday 7 p.m., Room 1 Sabbath SchoolSaturday 9:30 a.m., Room 1 Sabbath ServiceSaturday 11:00 a.m., Room 1 Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Commercial: 011-5399-3651 DSN: 660-3651 E-mail: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire/wire.htmlCommander Rear Adm. Richard W. Butler Deputy Commander Army Col. Marion Garcia Sergeant Major Marine Sgt. Maj. Juan M. Hidalgo, Jr. Oce of Public Aairs Director Navy Capt. Robert Durand Deputy Director Army Lt. Col. Samuel House Command Information Ocer Army Capt. Brian Pennington JTF PAO Senior Enlisted Leader Army 1st Sgt. Patricia Kishman Editor Army Sgt. 1st Class Gina Vaile-Nelson Copy Editor Army Sgt. David Bolton Graphic Designer/Webmaster Army Sta Sgt. Aaron Hiler Photo Editor Army Sgt. Darron Salzer Sta Writers Army Sta Sgt. Lorne Ne Army Sgt. Cassandra Monroe Spc. Lerone SimmonsStaff Command Staff The Wire is an authorized publication for members of the Department of the Troopers of JTF-GTMO. The contents of The Wire are not necessarily Guard. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Joint Task assigned to the Joint Task Force and is published online. THE WIRE Joint Task ForceSafe Humane Legal TransparentGuantanamo Look for us on your favorite Social Media: /jointtaskforceguantanamo /photos/jtf gtmo /jtf gtmo @jtf gtmo IOF Building, Camp America

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By Command Sgt. Maj. Jeffery Credle 327th Military Police Battalion, command sergeant majorBrig. Gen. James C. Lettko Joint Task Force Guantanamo Deputy CommanderIts hard to believe that after 22 months as the Deputy Joint Task Force Commander it is now my time to depart. I have seen multiple rotations and waves of great Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, Coast Guardsmen and civilian employees all focused on the Joint Task Force mission. We, collectively, along with our predecessors, have strived to uphold our service values and perform our part of the mission. Our guard force, medical professionals and others who have daily contact with the detainees have a very challenging job. When new Troopers rotate into JTF GTMO I explain at the new comers brief that the detainees demonstrate daily that they are still in the fight. It is our Troopers and civilians who have daily contact with the detainees and remain professional, treating them humanely despite the taunting and assaults. The rest of the JTF team plays an important supporting role to the detention mission, as well as the intelligence collection and support to military commissions. At the JTF Command level, everyday is different; everyday brings a great example of how our team members strive to overcome challenges, whether in the Joint Detention Group, Joint Medical Group, J-codes, Special Staff or Coordinating staff, everyday there is a new challenge to solve. Every day you demonstrate your professionalism, creativity and commitment to the mission. Our partners who support us from NAVSTA GTMO continue to provide us exceptional services. From MWR, Fleet & Family Services, the NEX, PWD, port operations, the air terminal, galley staff, dependent schools and on-Island contractors all provide support to our operation that is very challenging. The Naval Hospital Commander performs exceptional as the Joint Medical Group Commander, ensuring all of our Troopers and detainees get the best health care available. The dive shop and dive club provide great services from equipment, classes and a place to socialize with other divers. I recommend newly arriving Troopers and civilians embrace the joint working environment and small-town attributes NAVSTA has to offer. You will have an opportunity to interact and learn from fellow Troopers from all of the services as well as our interagency partners and civilians. Learn from them. Get to know them. The diversity of our workforce brings out the best in all of us and contributes to the continued success of the team in performing the mission. I am proud to have served on the JTF-GTMO team, proud to have worked with so many professionals both past and present. My tour here at JTF-GTMO will be the most memorable military experience of my career. Honor Bound! This is Honor Eight signing off the NET.4http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html When you head to the NEX and you take a sip of that favorite energy drink that you think keeps you going throughout the day, do you actually read the label? Have you taken the time to do your research on energy drinks and the side effects they have on your body? Rapid heartbeat, irregular heart rhythms, increased blood pressure, seizures, chest pains and dehydration. Doesnt sound very energetic does it? What about the extreme case of heart attack or sudden death? The high amounts of caffeine (most energy drinks equal two cups of coffee or more), and taurine an amino acid known to boost your heart rate only gives you that energetic high for a bit. The sugars loaded in the can, some have more than 60 grams per can, usually max out your daily recommended intake of sugars as recommended by the FDA. All of the symptoms of your fast rapid high from the drinks could be exacerbated if you have a heart condition. Is this worth it to you? Apparently this craze has reached our Armed Forces, because recent articles published in Stars and Stripes noted that energy drinks are now the top-selling cold beverages at Army and Air Force bases worldwide. This, Troopers, is a problem that could impact our mission. If you are drinking these energy drinks, you are putting yourself at risk for caffeine overdose, reactions to the ingredients, dehydration, obesity and dental problems. Each of these health issues is preventable by simply not drinking energy drinks, getting more rest and staying hydrated with water. Here at Joint Task Force Guantanamo, many of you experience long days in the sun and heat working at gates, sally ports or on details. Some of you feel you need a burst of energy before your physical training. But this could be a devastating combination Troopers. Take warning that your moments of energy will come to an end, and your crash will be even worse than the tiredness you felt before. Make yourself knowledgeable about what is in the beverages you consume. And for more information visit www. hrpc-online.org. ommandCCorner Ttrooper to rooper

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The Wire August 2 5 PIrofessional nsight Its summer and historically that means the number of vehicle fatalities, especially those occurring off duty, statistically will increase. Although the total numbers are down this year, the Army Combat Readiness Safety Center is reporting disturbing trends. My concerns are that 45 percent of the Armys fatal motorcycle accidents are indiscipline-based, that noncommissioned officers comprise a majority of those fatalities and that ATV fatalities are rising. These are all NCO leader issues. As of July 7, 2013, the Army has had 22 motorcycle Soldier fatalities this fiscal year. As previously noted, nearly half of those accidents were indiscipline-based and, of these, 68 percent occurred between Friday and Sunday. Most troubling to me, however, is the fact that 14 of the 22 motorcycle fatalities involved Soldiers in the ranks of E-5 to E-7. As NCOs, we are the standardbearers in our units. We look out for our Soldiers and their Families. We enforce regulations to ensure success and safety. But, we also ensure every NCO has someone to check his or her compliance with these responsibilities. Statistics show that over 60 percent of motorcycle fatalities are NCOs. That means the messages we NCOs deliver are not effectively reaching other NCOs who are directly influencing junior enlisted Soldiers. This is a poor example for young Soldiers to follow. To date in this fiscal year, we also have experienced five ATV fatalities, compared to none in FY12 and FY11. Two of these were on-duty accidents. One incident was a rollover during a training exercise, but the second was a staff sergeant not wearing an appropriate safety helmet another example of indiscipline. The NCO Creed states, My two basic responsibilities will always be uppermost in my mind accomplishment of my mission and the welfare of my Soldiers. We must teach our Soldiers, no matter what their rank, to do the right thing and to appropriately consider comprehensive risk management practices. By doing this, we mitigate safety concerns with activities both on and off duty. As an NCO and leader, I expect you to set, enforce, and abide by these standards. I also expect that you will ask a commander, battle buddy or peer to keep you honest in all these efforts. Remember, NCOs are the Backbone of the Army.Motorcycle and ATV safetyBy Sgt. Maj. of the Army Raymond Chandler Graphics by Staff Sgt. Aaron Hiler/The Wire

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The buddy-cop movie is a long-standing tradition, from Lethal Weapon to Jump Street. There are certain expectations built up around this sub-genre of film. The two cops have to be reluctant partners at first. They should be opposites, but bond for some common cause. They need to learn to trust each other while staring death in the face and overcome great odds to be successful in the end. The Heat does all this with one significant twist the buddy cops are women. Sarah Ashburn, played by Sandra Bullock, is a know-it-all FBI agent. Shes after a huge promotion in the bureau and the only way to get it is to catch the ruling drug lord of Boston. Shannon Mullins, played by Melissa McCarthy, is a trash-talking mess of a police officer who grew up in the community Ashburn is investigating. Needless to say, their investigations into the drug world of Boston intersect. They are forced to team-up and hilarity ensues. The device to use women as the buddy cop team works well in the hands of director Paul Feig, whose credits include Freaks and Geeks, The Office and Bridesmaids. The chemistry between Bullock and McCarthy is solid and their comedic talents shine with this wellwritten script. This film took on a formulaic buddy-cop plot and made it funny and fresh. For beating the odds, I give it four banana rats. Review by Spc. Christopher R. Bowser 357th MP Co., thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milThe Wolverine slices up some good times The film X-Men laid some great ground work for the character of Logan but never really allowed him or any of the team to move past the most basic information about them. This is understandable in an ensemble piece, but the character of Logan, on screen, always felt a little flat to me. Thanks to this movie, that is no longer the case. The Wolverine really explains the character of Logan well; giving us more insight on him and the aftermath of the San Francisco incident featured in X-Men 3. As it turns out the guy is kind of a softy when it comes to killing the love of his life. Logan (Hugh Jackman), haunted by dreams of Jean Grey, uses his free time to wander and get in touch with his pacifist side, swearing off violence. That is until an old friend from his past asks for a simple favor. He soon finds himself protecting his friends daughter, Mariko (Tao Okamoto) which makes him realize the soldier he has always been. This film has some great direction, a solid script that isnt bogged down by needless character cameos that previous X-Men films had and is a great summer film. If you have watched the previous films or just know about the character, give it a watch. Dont bother if you have no knowledge of Logan, this isnt a good jumping on point. Make sure you watch the credits for some extras. I give this film four out of five banana rats. Buddy-cops bring on Courtesy of 20th Century Fox Courtesy Marvel Entertainment and 20th Century Fox 6http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html Review by Sgt. Katherine Forbes JTF-PAO, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil

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FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY at the Downtown and Camp Bulkeley LyceumsStay classy, GTMO! No ALCOHOL or TOBACCO at the Lyceums!Call the Movie Hotline at 4880 or visit the MWR Facebook page for more information 02 03 04 05 06 07 08Smurfs 2 (New)PG, 8 p.m.The HeatR, 10 p.m.The WolverinePG13, 8 p.m.The Lone RangerPG13, 10:30 p.m.White House DownPG13, 8 p.m.Pacic RimPG13, 8 p.m.This Is The End (LS)R, 8 p.m.Man of Steel (LS)PG13, 8 p.m.Monsters UniversityG, 8 p.m.The HeatR, 8 p.m.The WolverinePG13, 10:30 p.m.Smurfs 2 (New)PG, 8 p.m.White House DownPG13, 10 p.m.Pacic RimPG13, 8 p.m.CLOSEDNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further notice.CLOSEDNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further notice.CLOSEDNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further notice.Despicable Me 2PG, 8 p.m. (LS) = Last Showing Leg Day Load OutSquats Dead lift Walking lunges Seated calf raises Leg extensions Leg curls 4x10 4x10 4x10 4x15 4x15 4x15 By Army 2nd Lt. John-Charles Bautista Contributing writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milto a buffer youIf you are one of those individuals trying to gain muscle mass, you are probably on a four or five day split. This means working different parts of the body on different days. Which one of the five days is most important to building a bigger upper body? As counter intuitive as it may seem, the leg day is the most important. Squatting and dead-lifting increases muscle growth throughout your body. These exercises are compound movements, and therefore, burn a tremendous amount of calories during the exercise. Approximately half of your body is made up of your legs. With all that added muscle from doing a hard leg work-out, your metabolism will increase and your body-fat percentage will significantly be lowered. Please keep in mind the decrease in body-fat percentage will only happen with a balanced diet. Due to the leg work out being a critical part in developing more mass, I would recommend squatting or deadlifting a second time on that fifth day of lifting. The more frequently you do a particular exercise, the faster your body will adapt to that particular load, creating a stronger and bigger body in a shorter amount of time. Warming-up and stretching out before any exercise, especially on a leg day, will assist with preventing injuries as well as an increased range of motion. With greater range of motion comes added stress on your muscles, which causes for greater results. If you use the example of a balanced leg day program, you will see results that make you feel better and stronger. The Wire August 27

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Less paperwork, more people workStory and photos by Sgt. Cassandra Monroe Staff writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milIf an equal opportunity issue were to arise between co-workers, commands and individuals, most may not have a good action plan in place to assist with the correction of these issues, especially if the issues are within the command. For those serving with Joint Task Force Guantanamo, there is a voice listening here at U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. Air Force Master Sgt. James M. Bonner, the equal opportunity manager for JTFGTMO, is a representative that is here to help. Bonner handles cases involving discrimination and disparate treatment. He offers mediation, facilitation, and team building and communication sessions. He also visits Troopers throughout JTF and the Naval Station, interacting with them and asking about any concerns that may affect their quality of life. I like to go out and talk to the Troopers because it gives me a way to better gauge how they are doing here, he said. It also provides an opportunity for them to talk with me without having to come to my office, and they are more relaxed and the conversations are more open and honest. Topics discussed between himself and the Troopers range from the overall morale of Troopers during their shifts to issues between male and female Troopers at public areas, such as base gyms. Sgt. Jay Craycraft, an external security force noncommissioned officer with the 128th Military Police Company, Alabama National Guard, feels that the presence that Bonner brings to the JTF force is strengthening the morale and makes Troopers feel as if someone is listening to their concerns. It actually makes you feel pretty good http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html lbife in oots 8

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The Wire August 29knowing that your leadership actually cares about the Troopers he said. It makes it easier to bring issues up now that we know that theres someone we can talk to. If Troopers do have an equal opportunity issue, there are ways to handle them. Bonner recommends speaking with the alleged offender first because individuals sometimes dont realize their behavior is offensive. The next level would be your immediate supervisor and then your first sergeant. We prefer to give your leadership first opportunity to handle your concern within your unit before we take it to the next level of supervision, said Bonner. If leadership is the basis for their concern they can come directly to my office and we can discuss a plan of action and how we can rectify the situation. After the issues are brought up to his equal opportunity office, depending on the severity of the issue, the commander will personally take care of the issue or he will appoint an investigative officer. JAG will also get involved, and with the commander, will recommend further actions against the perpetrator. Although these processes may take time, Bonner wants Troopers to know that he does try to take the complaints further up the chain as quickly and swiftly as he can. I want the troops to know that they are being heard and I do bring their concerns to the proper level of leadership, said Bonner. The troops are our most valuable resource and I want them to know everything they do is important to leadership and to the mission. Bonner also urges Troopers to know their audience when joking with friends and with colleagues. Although the issue of equal opportunity may bring bad news, Bonner has reasons to find positives in his job every day. One of the things I like about my job is I get to see the results of my work and how it hopefully has improved that Troopers life, he said. I look forward to meeting troops from all the branches of service and learning how their jobs fit into the mission we do here in the JTF. This maybe the only time I will be in this type of setting where all branches are represented and are working together to accomplish the same goal. Air Force Master Sgt. James M. manager for Joint Task Force providing separate female

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http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html 10 A look at Camp X-Ray commander Story and photos by Sgt. Cassandra Monroe Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Former Joint Task Force Guantanamo Joint Detention Group Commander, retired Col. Terry Carrico, visited JTF-GTMO July 26, nearly 10 years after taking command of Camp X-Ray in 2002. He was one of the guys who was a part of growing the Military Police Corps from the early days, left his mark and made a difference in the whole corps of officers and noncommissioned officers, said Col. John Bogdan, JDG commander. Thats one of the reasons why were lucky to have him here. I hope that afterwards, Colonel Carricos visit generates some discussion. Listening to him speak is another point in professional development that continues conversations and discussions well after this is over. Carrico toured what remains of Camp X-Ray with a group of JTF-GTMO leadership, often pointing out key areas of the camp where the detainees arrived, where they were searched and where they were held at the temporary holding facilities. He described the detainees as docile, with no

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The Wire August 211 A look at Camp X-Ray Former Guantanamo Bay Joint Detention Group Military Police leadership of Joint Task Force Guantanamo invited Carrico to come back and provide a historical perspective from his time at problems or issues and wanted them to remain under positive control with firm and fair treatment. He also discussed his feelings toward jumping into the mission with such little notice. The base and the environment havent changed a whole lot . but from a mission standpoint, I think its night and day, Carrico said. The facilities that theyre operating out of and the processes and procedures are well developed and in place; while, back then, we were operating with the learn as you go mentality. Following the tour, Carrico spent separate time with the Joint Detention leadership and then went straight into the new facility camp tours. There, he had a chance to discuss past and present detainee operations with the current camp officers-in-charge. Once inside the camps, Carrico observed the newer facilities detainee cell blocks as well as the communal detainee wards; engaging with camp personnel and medical staff. The last major stop for Carrico was a group session at the Bayview Inn on base. Here, he addressed the group on his version of the history of Camp X-Ray and the Guantanamo Bay he knew, what life was like at the camp, as well as difficulties the senior leadership faced against the civilian media, especially with photographs taken out of context. Overall though, the retired colonel said he was happy to have the opportunity to come back to Guantanamo Bay and feels appreciative toward the Troops that are here now. When youre the first at anything and you see it evolve and mature, I think theres a satisfaction in seeing that process and the professionalism that continues to build something into what it is today, he said. Im very appreciative toward the Troops, they have a very tough job and dont get told thank you enough. I feel pride being a former Soldier and seeing Troops is always delightful, Carrico said. If I imparted anything on the people who were here today, if they learned one little tidbit, then I did my job.

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Photo by Staff Sgt. Rebecca Wood/JTF-PAO On Sept. 11, 2001, Peter Ellison was at his home recovering from knee surgery when he woke up like any other day, performed his morning routine and turned on his television. Terrorists had attacked U.S. soil and it was taking place in a city he called home his entire life. And his brothers with the New York City Police Department were in harms way. That day, he immediately made sure his family was safe and accounted for. He knew others were suffering and in need of his help. His knee could heal later, he thought, so he suited up and went back to work helping wherever he could. His dedication to service hasnt quit. Now, hes a member of the Buruea of Special Operations, also known as SWAT, for the Nassau Police Department. Working on the SWAT team is a very mature assignment, he said. It takes a lot of restraint and knowledge to differentiate when to sit back and wait, or when to act. His strong sense of duty comes Courage, Honor, CommitmentStory by Staff Sgt. Rebecca Wood JTF-PAO, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Photo courtesy Peter Ellison12TFrooper ocus http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html

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from a long lineage of policemen and firefighters a continuing tradition he can trace back to 1905. Two out of four of my children are now police officers, said Ellison. I have a son who works in Manhattan as one and a 22-year-old daughter who is in the academy. Im proud of all of my children, but it means something special to me that these two followed in my footsteps. After seven years in the Marine Corps, Ellison rejoined the Navy Reserves following the 9/11 attacks. With his masters degree in Criminal Justice and bachelors in management, his skills were put to use with the Navy Security Force, Naples, Italy, via his Reserve unit in Long Island, New York. I often trained Reservists about basic law enforcement, because base MAs need to know how to speak to people, how to react to situations, he said. You cant just keep throwing somebody on the deck all the time, he said. That knowledge and expertise he learned with the SWAT team is something that Ellison was able to bring with him to his military career. But lessons learned in the Navy and Marine uniforms are just as crucial to his civilian career. Restraint and discipline, Ellison said, is what hes learned from the military and applied to his street time with the police department. Especially after being in the Marine Corps and a MA, you learn to be very disciplined. You cant just jump out of your car, sometimes you have to sit there and just watch for hours, he said. In the SWAT world, if you dont have that discipline, you dont make it, he said. Today, as Petty Officer 1st Class Peter Ellison, master at arms and chief of security for the Commissions Liaison Office for Joint Task Force Guantanamo, is still learning lessons. My take-away from this deployment is that I helped Commissions run more smoothly and safely, he said. There is a lot of old, brokendown equipment here, but my goal is to leave this place better then when I found it. But also, there is sentimental value for this patriotic patrolman. Hes flown more than 250 flags since he arrived here, more than 100 of which were requested to be flown on 9/11. As a New Yorker, and man of the shield, Ellison is proud of this mission. I take a lot of pride in flying the flags for people on McCalla Hill,he said. As a former Marine serving in the Navy, I consider McCalla Hill sacred ground because of all the Marines who died there. Just like whats going on today, the events then shaped a lot of the history of our country, the Navy and the Marine Corps, he said. Its truly an honor, he said. The Wire August 213

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News eed 14http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html F The troopers at Joint Task Force Guantanamo are often used to sacri ficing a lot during their deployment; whether it be time, the comfort of home, or missing family. However, looking forward to an upcoming birth day can make all the difference. Sam Y. Scott, assistant project manager for the Pentad Corporation, a contracting company at the Seaside Galley, and her staff make sure that Troopers are able to enjoy their birth day by preparing a special meal for them during their birthday month. This is something we can do for the troops, she said. For a few minutes we can make that Service member feel special while celebrating their birthday with a nice meal. Lobster and steak are the prime choices for the birthday meal. The galley provides reserved seating, a birthday cake and a decorated birthday sign in the dining facility. For Maj. Gladys Lanier, a chaplain assigned to the Joint Detention Group JTF-GTMO, the birthday meal was appreciated. Troopers get a chance to offset their daily routine and get recognition for their special day, she said. There are many things that can distract people from celebrating life, but eating a good meal among friends is something that anyone can benefit from. Lanier celebrated her birthday July 15. Sign-up sheets are available in the dining facilities for upcoming birthdays and signing up in advance is the best way to guarantee a great free birthday meal. Story and photo by Spc. Lerone Simmons Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil birthday meal at Seaside Galley. Changes to rotator schedule Norfolk (KNGU) Jacksonville (KNIP) Beginning Oct. 1, GTMO (MUGM) Staff Report thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milIn order to ensure successful travel, Troopers must:Arrange all travel through the unit administrator leaving. Do not use this form for Space-A travel and paid by the Service member southcom.mil

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Battling mold has been an ongoing problem for residence of the Tierra Kay housing area. But on July 20, Soldiers from the 189th Military Police Company assisted housing officials with removing and replacing old moldy furntiure and bad appliances. It makes me feel like Im helping out, getting soldiers squared away, said Pvt. Matthew Martinez, an internment resettlement specialist for the 189th MP Co. Martinez knows the conditions in the TKs, he lived in an old unit before moving to a renovated one. Its much different, its much better, said Martinez. The mold is not as bad like it used to be. Its good for everyone, it helps morale and Im glad to help out to boost it up. The TKs are in the middle of a threephase project. We are doing this ultimately for the health and welfare of the troopers, said Petty Officer 1st Class Bobby Cast, Joint Task Force Guantanamo facilities manager. Whenever they did the inspections, they found the mold growing and that comes with some serious health consequences. We wanted to make sure that gets resolved now before everyone gets sick from it, he said. According to Cast, contractors replaced the HVAC systems to remove humidity in the air as well as dust particles. He said each housing unit will get a dehumidifier and the systems should be able to better cool the houses as well. Its moving fast, Im lucky to have a detail like today; many hands, extra help, less stress, I like it, said Marine Cpl. Mark Daoud, assistant noncommissioned officer facilities manager. Daoud directed the Troopers moving the furniture. The TKs have three and four bedrooms in each unit. My goal is to put one solder in each room, said Sgt. 1st Class Tracy Carter, housing NCO in charge for Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 525th MP Battalion. Before, they had two Soldiers in each room. This should be better. They will share a kitchen, laundry and bathrooms. Carter lived in the tents in Camp America during a previous tour for 15 months and wants to help alleviate the problem for others. My ultimate goal is to move some of the Soldiers from over there (Camp America) so J4 can have it as transient housing, said Carter. That would help morale at Camp America. This would give them privacy. Its a better opportunity for our Soldiers. Its good, everyone needs something better, nicer, and if Im part of the process to help out, Im cool with that, said Spc. Andrew Stark a corrections specialist for the 189th MP Co. Cast says they will complete renovations by summer of 2014. Tierra Kay upgrades welcomed Photos and story by Staff. Sgt. Lorne Neff Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil The Wire August 215 GTMO (MUGM)

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LTife On he Bay16http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html The Wire The Joint Task Force has a 100 percent shred policy both at work and in the housing areas. This means that all paper materials should be shredded. Nothing should reach the dumpster. No trashcan or dumpster is safe to discard FOUO, work related should never be taken to housing areas. Shred it or regret it

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17The Wire August 2 NARMY DaMarque8 Message from the command... Yeah, too long. NARMY DaMarque8The Reason you read the wire? Comics and movie showings NARMY DaMarque8The Reason you read the wire? Comics and movie showings Movie showings... Yeah, working that night. Comics... Heh heh heh, its funny cause its true. NARMY DaMarque8The Reason you read the wire? Comics and movie showings Photo by Marine Cpl. Jonathan G. Wright/ DVIDS by Sgt. Darron SalzerKind of a big deal around here ...

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Sports eed F As the rain came to an end the evening of July 25, the Morale, Welfare and Recreation championship flag football game got started. On one side of the pigskin was Confusion, comprised of Troopers from the 189th Military Police Company, and on the other side were the Playmakers, from the 193rd MP Co. Through a series of passes, runs and switchbacks, the teams moved up and down the field. With time running out in the first half, Confusion threw a hail mary pass down the field which was caught by Staff Sgt. Patrick Gorman, an internment resettlement specialist with the 189th MP Co. I knew we needed that first down so I gave it all I had, said Gorman. The quarterback knows I like to run those corner routes and he normally put them right on the money so all I have to do is go out there and get it. At the end of the first half, the Playmakers led 9-12, but the game was just getting started. With both teams evenly matched for speed, strength and agility, it was impossible to guess who would come out on top. In the end, Confusion beat out the Playmakers with a final score of 24-18 and took home the title. Theyre always tough, said Sgt. 1st Class Travis Piatt, an internment resettlement specialist with the 193rd MP Co. I mean theyre one of those teams that are always recruiting so when you play them you know you are playing one of the toughest people on this island.Story and photo by Sgt. David Bolton Copy Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil For the captain of Confusion, Merton Gray, a contractor who works at the Naval Exchange, defense was key to this victory and championship. From day one I said if were going to win this, we need to play good defense, said Gray. Last year they beat us in the regular season and beat us by a touchdown. So we sat down and talked about it and said hey, were going to go back to our old-time defense and play real tight. One of the many events the Moral, Welfare and Recreation office offers every couple of weeks is the opportunity to go night fishing at almost no cost. Its a great way to come out and chill with your friends, said Staff Sgt. Nina Hamlette-Wells, 525th Military Police Battalion training noncommissioned officer. Its just relaxing and good way to get out of your room. You could say Hamlett-Wells is an old hand at fishing. She has been coming out to fish since she got here more than 21 months ago. On this trip, she caught more than a dozen fish. But it wasnt always that way. I was about to give up, said Hamlett-Wells. I went out and didnt catch anything the first two times, but then I caught an 11-pound snapper and it was really exciting. The trips are sponsored by MWR and anyone stationed here can sign up. Anyone with a captains license can take the boat out during the sponsored trips; they just have sign up through MWR. I know they are hurting for boat captains, said Sgt. 1st Class Bruce Smitty Smith, a corrections specialist with the 189th MP Company. I try to support MWR when I can. My job makes it hard sometimes but they know Im a pretty reliable skipper. Smitty says he goes out almost every weekend and has skippered more than 20 MWR night fishing trips. I make sure everyones line is prepared and my goal is for everyone catch at least one fish, said Smitty. All anyone has to do is bring bait and a fishing pole, thats it. During a recent fishing trip he skippered, Smittys passengers agreed. Fishing is fun, its something else to do since I dont dive, said Petty Officer 1st Class John Cid, a Navy Seebee and reservist deployed for the for the JTF engineering section. Cid has been going out fishing with Smitty since he got here eight months ago. During this trip, seven fishermen caught 49 fish, mostly snapper. It was a pretty good night, said Smitty. For more information on night fishing excursions, call MWR at ext. 2010 to sign up or captain a night fishing trip. Trips are offered twice a month on Friday nights starting at 6 p.m. By Staff Sgt. Lorne Neff Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Photo by Staff Sgt. Lorne Neff/The Wire18http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html

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The Wire August 219 This recipe is from marthastewart.com, and takes baking to a different level by using a slow cooker for those times you dont always have access to a kitchen (like a jail cell, Martha would know). For baking these in a slow cooker, I felt they turned out pretty well. Their consistency is a mix between thick, cakey and fudgey. You can add chocolate frosting on them if you wish, if not, the triple dose of chocolate should satisfy you. SLOW COOKER TRIPLE CHOCOLATE BROWNIES cassandra.l.monroe@jtfgtmo.south com.mil

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by Spc. Raul PachecoSend your best photos to thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil20BB ack urner http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html