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The wire ( July 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00543

Material Information

Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 07-26-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Notes

System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00577

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00543

Material Information

Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 07-26-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Notes

System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00577


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Cuzcos Keeping JTF Trooper housing supplied with the necessities MWR volleyball courts set for action

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2http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html Life in BootsMarine keeps Troopers stocked at Cuzcos 8 Trooper Focus 12 Slammin in the sandBeach Volleyball pit opens with tournament 14 AND IN OUR PAGES Around the BayOther StoriesCommand Corner4 6Reviews of the latest movies on base FOCUS: Teamwork makes surgeon successful13MWR oers aspiring photographers chance to improve skills with PGA Tour professional. PAGE 10 Cover photo by Stephen Prestesater Bay Wire Report Final chance to hike GTMO historyThe final history hike of 2013 is scheduled for Saturday July 27 at 8 a.m., at the Ferry Landing Gazebo. Learn more about the history of the first Marines who landed on Guantanamo Bay in 1898 through the words of Alan Adler. This seven mile tour will give you lay of the land and a historical overview of the battles at GTMO. For more information, call Alan Adler at ext. 8100 or alan.j.adler@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil. Meals with Monroe19Serving up sandwiches with a smileFeds Feed Families FridaysU.S. Naval Station Guantanamo is fundraising monetary donations in lieu of sending non-perishable food items back to the States, every Friday from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., at a table in the NEX Breezeway. Donations may also be dropped off at the chaplains office. All proceeds will go to the Regional Food Bank in Oklahoma City, Okla., to support hungry families affected by the May 2013 tornadoes. CORRECTIONSPage 4:

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The Wire July 263 Catholic Mass Tues.-Fri. 5:30 p.m. Saturday 5 p.m. Sunday 9 a.m. Spanish-language Mass Sunday 4:35 p.m. General Protestant Sunday 11 a.m. Gospel Service Sunday 1 p.m. Christian Fellowship Sunday 6 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 9 a.m. Sunday 7 p.m. Camp America :00, :20, :40 Gazebo :02, :22, :42 NEX trailer :03, :23, :43 Camp Delta :02; :06; :26, :46 KB 373 :10, :30, :50 TK 4 :12, :32, :52 JAS :13, :33, : 53 TK 3 :14, :34, :54 TK 2 :15, :35, :55 TK 1 :16, :36, :56 West Iguana :18, :38, :58 Windjammer/Gym :21, :41, :01 Gold Hill Galley :24, :44, :04 96 Man Camp :31, :51, :11 NEX :33, :53, :13 Gold Hill Galley :37, :57, :17 Windjammer/Gym :36, :56, :16 West Iguana :39, :59, :19 TK 1 :40, :00, :20 TK 2 :43, :03, :23 TK 3:45, :05, :25 TK 4 :47, :07, :27 KB 373:50, :10, :30 Camp Delta 1 :52, :12, :32 IOF :54, :14, :34 NEX Trailer :57, :17, :37 Sat. and Sun. only Location #1-4 Winward Loop 0900, 1200, 1500, 1800 East Caravella SBOQ/Marina 0905, 1205, 1505 NEX 0908, 1208, 1508, 1808 Phillips Park 0914, 1214, 1514 Cable Beach 0917, 1217, 1517 Winward Loop 0930, 1230, 1530 NEX 0925, 1225, 1525, 1825 SBOQ/MARINA 0935, 1235, 1535 Return to Oce 0940, 1240, 1540 Pentecostal Gospel Sunday 8 a.m. & 5 p.m., Room D LDS Service Sunday 10 a.m., Room A Islamic Service Friday 1 p.m., Room 2 Seventh Day Adventist Friday 7 p.m., Room 1 Sabbath SchoolSaturday 9:15 a.m., Room 1 Sabbath ServiceSaturday 11:15 a.m., Room 1 Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Commercial: 011-5399-3651 DSN: 660-3651 E-mail: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire/wire.htmlCommander Navy Rear Adm. Richard W. Butler Deputy Commander Army Col. Marion Garcia Sergeant Major Marine Sgt. Maj. Juan M. Hidalgo, Jr. Oce of Public Aairs Director Navy Capt. Robert Durand Deputy Director Army Lt. Col. Samuel House Command Information Ocer Army 1st Lt. Brian Pennington JTF PAO Senior Enlisted Leader Army 1st Sgt. Patricia Kishman Editor Army Sgt. 1st Class Gina Vaile-Nelson Copy Editor Army Sgt. David Bolton Graphic Designer/Webmaster Army Sta Sgt. Aaron Hiler Photo Editor Army Sgt. Darron Salzer Sta Writers Army Sta Sgt. Lorne Ne Army Sgt. Cassandra Monroe Army Spc. Lerone SimmonsStaff Command Staff The Wire is an authorized publication for members of the Department of the Troopers of JTF-GTMO. The contents of The Wire are not necessarily Guard. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Joint Task THE WIRE Joint Task ForceSafe Humane Legal TransparentGuantanamo Look for us on your favorite Social Media: /jointtaskforceguantanamo /photos/jtf gtmo /jtf gtmo @jtf gtmo Command Corner Reviews of the latest movies on base FOCUS: Teamwork makes surgeon successful Meals with Monroe IOF Building, Camp America

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By Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Borlin Joint Detention Group, command sergeant major4http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html As proud serving members of the profession of arms, we always are held to high standards and are expected to meet those standards. However, with any standard, they have to be enforced. Our Armed Forces place the weight of enforcement of our day-to-day standards on its noncommissioned officers and petty officers. As a young NCO, I had many mentors and one in particular shared a story with me that was published in one of our earlier versions of Field Manuals on Military Leadership. Reading it, it still holds the same value as it did when it was a reality: The Rusty Rifles Incident While serving in the Republic of Vietnam, Sgt. 1st Class Jackson was transferred from platoon sergeant of one platoon to platoon leader of another platoon in the same company. His company commander watched him; was impressed with his competence and leadership, and felt he was the man for the job. Jackson quickly sized up the existing standards in the platoon and was not pleased. One problem he found was that Soldiers were not keeping their weapons cleaned properly; rifles were dirty and rusty. He knew he had to institute a system of checks to ensure weapons were cleaned daily. He put out the word--weapons will be clean to standard each day, each squad leader would inspect each day, and he would inspect a sample of weapons each day. He gave this order three days before the platoon was to go to the division R&R area on the South China Sea. The next day he checked several weapons in each squad. Most weapons were still unacceptable. He called the squad leaders together and explained the policy and his reasons for implementing it. Jackson checked again the following day and still found dirty and rusty weapons. He decided there were two causes for the problem. First, the squad leaders were not doing their jobs. Second, the squad leaders and troops were bucking him-testing him to see who would really make the rules in the platoon. He could feel the resistance to his leadership-probably because he was new and had been the platoon sergeant in another platoon. He knew he had a serious discipline problem and he had to handle it correctly. He called the squad leaders together again. Once again, he explained his standards clearly. He then said, tomorrow, we are due to go on R&R for three days, and Ill be inspecting rifles.We wont go on R&R until each weapon in this platoon meets the standard I have explained--rifles totally clean and rust free with a light coat of oil. The next morning Jackson inspected and found that most weapons in each squad were still below standard. His patience had reached its limit. His squad leaders and troops had to learn that his standards would be met. Although the platoon was to board a helicopter for R&R at 1300, Jackson received the company commanders permission to handle the situation as he saw fit. He called the squad leaders together.With a determined look and a firm voice, he told them he would hold a formal in-ranks inspection at 1300. If every weapon did not meet standards, he would conduct another in-ranks inspection for squad leaders and troops with substandard weapons. He would continue the inspections until all weapons met standards. At 1300, the platoon formed up, surly and angry with their new platoon leader who was taking their hard-earned R&R time. Jackson conducted a formal in-ranks rifle inspection. The Soldiers could hardly believe it, but his message was starting to sink in. This man meant what he said, and this time all weapons met standards. After the inspection, Jackson talked to his Soldiers and explained they had a mission to perform. As their leader, he was responsible for ensuring their weapons and equipment were combat-ready. Duty and readiness come first. He told them, When I put out an order, a standard, or a policy, your duty is to carry out, and I will hold you to that. I intend to carry out my duties as best I can. That includes accomplishing the mission while looking out for your well-being. Weapons that arent cleaned and properly maintained will jam in a firefight. That wont help carry out the mission or keep you alive. Part of my duty is to make you do certain things that are in your own interest. One of those things is to make sure you keep your weapons clean. Jackson did not have any more problems with dirty, rusty weapons. Also, his squad leaders followed his lead and learned to supervise and inspect systematically for those details that contribute to combat-readiness. Within a few weeks, he had a pretty fair platoon; in two months, it was outstanding. Holding Soldiers accountable for meeting standards was critical to producing this combat-effective platoon. This tidbit of a leader in action demonstrates that leadership and holding Troopers accountable for their actions is still as viable today as it was yesterday. All Service members want to be challenged with the task at hand while being provided strong leadership that holds them individually accountablethey do not want to be coddled. This is true regardless of the rank or position you hold. The individual accomplishments of a Service member develops and establishes the pride within that individual. The accomplishments of the team establishes the pride in being a member of the team, unit, organization, task force, etc. Here within JTF-GTMO we are all part of the collective team and our accomplishments are great. The only way the team comes together to accomplish so much is holding one another accountable for the collective and individual task at hand that supports the team, both on and off duty. We only do this with the most simplest of leadership charge, enforcement of standards.ommandCCorner

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By Sgt. 1st Class Gary McCline Joint Detention Group The Wire July 26 5Ttrooper to rooper Welfare and Recreation Softball Cooper Field. As an officer with the Bureau of Prisons at a United States Penitentiary located in Texas, I take the term family very seriously. When a co-worker is in duress or needs assistance, I will assist him or her when the time comes, no matter if I know the person well. I will come because that is a family member that needs assistance. In the Army we often use the term Battle Buddies for our family members. A Battle Buddy is someone you can look toward for guidance, motivation, and who can give good constructive criticism toward you. In this type of environment, taking care of each other should be a priority for all of us. We all know that the detention facilities are a challenging environment to work in and sometimes we get lulled in by being complacent. Sometimes we may think a shortcut is better than the SOPs. Thats when a Battle Buddy should come up and say what you are doing is wrong. Lets not do it like that because something may happen that may affect all of us directly or indirectly. Ive personally witnessed shortcuts going wrong in the prison environment. My federal prison co-worker, a family member, was stabbed 20 plus times with a homemade weapon by an inmate, because someone failed to do a proper search. I try to instill in Soldiers that they should follow the SOPs to the fullest. They should also understand to ask questions when they dont understand. I would hate to see one of my Soldiers getting themselves or their Battle Buddy injured for not following the SOPs. Battle Buddies are not rank specific. We all can encourage each other to drive on and finish the mission even if it seems difficult at the time. I think we all have experienced some difficult days here at GTMO. Spoken words of encouragement to someone may help them make it through a rough time. I recall receiving a call from an Army specialist, before I was deployed here. He had just lost his job and his girlfriend was leaving him. He stated he had nothing left in life and he had a gun in his lap. I talked to that Soldier for two hours reassuring everything would be alright and gave him the resources not to give up. To me he wasnt just a specialist in my company, but he was a family member of mine I was talking to. Finally, try to think of family when you used the term Battle Buddy. Family will go through many experiences over a course of time as will Battle Buddies. A good family member will not let you harm yourself or mess up the familys name. Neither should a good Battle Buddy allow that to happen. We should all be one strong family of Battle Buddies.

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FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY at the Downtown and Camp Bulkeley LyceumsStay classy, GTMO! No ALCOHOL or TOBACCO at the Lyceums!Call the Movie Hotline at 4880 or visit the MWR Facebook page for more information 26 27 28 29 30 31 01The Wolverine (New)PG13, 8 p.m.Pacic RimPG13, 10:30 p.m.The Wolverine (New)PG13, 8 p.m.The Purge (LS)R, 8 p.m.The Internship (LS)PG13, 8 p.m.The Heat (New)R, 8 p.m.This is The EndR, 10 p.m.Despicable Me 2PG, 8 p.m.The Lone RangerPG13, 8 p.m. (LS) = Last ShowingNaval Station Guantanamo Bays Morale, Welfare and Recreation team is working hard to return the Downtown Lyceum movie theater to operational status after a component failure this past weekend caused the cancellation of some film screenings. Currently what were facing is the same problem that we had at the Camp Bulkeley Lyceum that kept that down for a couple of weeks, said Michelle Maynard, Lyceum manager. We have troubleshooted everything we could possibly do here on island, in-house. The digital projector at the lyceum has critical failures in three of its components: the lamp, the ballast fan and the internal exhaust unit. Were doing everything we can to get a technician down here as soon as possible to fix the problem, said Maynard. In order to change out certain parts of the projector we actually have to have protective clothing because it can be dangerous. Trying to access cer tain parts within the projector can actually void our warranty, she said. The CP2220 digital motion picture projector is a state-of-the-art, commercial, high frame rate, multi-format capable, advanced precision unit. It generates more than 22,000 candle power in light, can display 35.2 trillion different colors, and can project an image of up to 70-feet tall. Therefore, the MWR team wanted to ensure that all repairs were done only by a fully-certified technician. We understand how important the movie program is to everyone on base, said Maynard. The movie program is very important to us as well, so we will be working diligently to get it fixed as soon as possible. Every effort at every level is being made to expedite getting the first available certified technician with the first available required parts on the first available flight to GTMO. Lyceum theater closed Radio GTMO News, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil The Downtown Lyceum is currently down due to electronic malfunctions. We are working diligently 6http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html

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This is battle school, not nursery school, introduces Andrew Wiggin to the school that takes him at the age of 6 and turns him into the greatest commander of all humankind. The book Enders Game is a futuristic, military science fiction, young-adult novel. But, it is a book for any adult, especially those in the military. In fact, Wikipedia mentions that this short novel has been suggested reading for the Marine Corps. Orson Scott Card wrote Enders Game in the eighties, but the concepts of struggle, war and family are timeless. Andrew Wiggin was born a Third. He lives in a world where theres a limit to the number of children a family can have, only two. The first child his parents had was a boy, Peter, who is brilliant, but cruel. The second child, Valentine, a girl, was also brilliant but way too empathetic. The government, hoping for a perfect mixture of temperament and brilliance, allows a third to be born. Andrew, also called Ender, is the perfect mix. He is empathetic, but cruel when he feels his survival is threatened. The government, all of Earth, look to him in hope to defeat the buggers, an alien race that has already attacked Earth twice. Science fiction is a tricky genre. The best science fiction can transcend the genre by relating the fictional world to our real onedrawing parallels that let us see ourselves and our reality from new angles. Enders Game does this. At battle school Ender learns to become a commander, not just by playing simulations and computer games but by interacting with his schoolmates, gaining their trust, allegiance and obedience. He taught me how to be a better NCO! Cards writing is fluid. He keeps the action going from the time Ender is 6 and entering the battle school to the age of 11 when hes a commander. Although Ender is a child throughout, he thinks and acts much like an adult he has a wisdom and insight that I admire. Every battle he fights and every game he playswith bullies, with buggers and with himself he survives. Winning is surviving for Ender. For me, Enders story won my heart and respect. Courtesy of Tor Books Publishing JTF-PAO, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Do you want to gain strength and endurance simultane ously? Who doesnt? This weeks workout of the week focus es on increasing the en durance of the chest, triceps and leg muscles, and at the same time the muscular strength and endurance of the upper back muscles. The best part is that it can be completed in as little as 15 minutes depending on your level of fitness. There are only three exercises that make up this workout: pull-ups, pushups and lunges. The goal is to complete as many rounds as possible in 15 minutes. A round includes doing five pull-ups, ten push-ups and 20 lunges (10 each leg). During this workout rest is allowed, but attempt to keep completing repetitions. The bottom line is to strive for constant improvement every week. If you complete 11 rounds; try 13 rounds next week. As always, let condition be your guide. If, at the end of 15 minutes, you have more energy try five, ten or 15 more minutes. Dont forget to hydrate, and if youre not accustomed to a rigorous plan, talk with a medical professional to make sure the workout is safe for you. Do you have an incredible workout that you would like to share? If so, email mail me at thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom. mil. My only request is simplicity; try not to include weight vests, sleds or things that might be harder for the majority of Troopers to obtain. By 1st Lt. Brian Pennington Command Information OIC, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milGraphic by Staff Sgt. Aaron Hiler/The Wire FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY at the Downtown and Camp Bulkeley LyceumsStay classy, GTMO! No ALCOHOL or TOBACCO at the Lyceums!Call the Movie Hotline at 4880 or visit the MWR Facebook page for more information The Wire July 267

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You call it, we haul it Story and photos by Sgt. Cassandra Monroe Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milIts 6 oclock at night and your shift just ended at work. Its been a long 12 hours and the first thing you can think of is getting those boots off and relaxing, but you remind yourself that you must eat and conduct physical training. Once you finally get home for good, youre able to relax. For some, relaxation is turning on the television to catch-up on recent sitcom episodes or playing video games. For others, reading a book and resting in a comfortable bed is preferred. Something most Troopers may have in common is the need for housing necessities; items that make their living conditions more bearable. Luckily, Troopers can rely on the Joint Task Force Guantanamo Housing team to take care of these necessities. We do replacement of furniture fixtures and equipment, said Air Force Capt. Gina Schneider, the housing officer for JTF Housing. We also support all JTF Troopers with housing reservations when they arrive on island. The team supports more than 1,700 JTF personnel on both JTF and Naval Station Guantanamo Bay side, making life more comfortable for those serving here on deployment. Theres so much to do and so few of us, but its great to know that we get to help so many people, said Schneider. Marine Corps Cpl. Mark Daoud, the assistant facilities manager for the JTF Directorate of Logistics housing team starts his day by reviewing the work orders submitted by troops, then decides if an inspection is necessary prior http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html lbife in oots 8

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to delivering equipment to a room. With designated work orders ready for fulfillment, Daoud loads the equipment into his large truck and sets off for delivery. Although the housing team primarily supports JTF, Daoud must still deliver equipment to individual rooms on the Naval Station side of the island. If there wasnt a housing side that the people needed, they would be a little uncomfortable and their morale and troop welfare would go down, said Daoud. By making sure that the Troopers get the equipment and supplies that they want and need, it makes their jobs and day-to-day lives a little easier. A good portion of equipment that the housing team maintains ranges from beds, wall lockers and armoires, to electronics and appliances like televisions, microwaves and refrigerators. If Troopers come across problems with these items, they are encouraged to fill out a work order at their housing units maintenance office. According to Daoud, when filling out the work order, it is essential for the Troopers to annotate the model of electronic equipment as well as the specific deficiency. Troopers are also encouraged to prepare their rooms for entry prior to equipment delivery, ensuring a fast turnaround in new equipment delivery for both themselves and Daoud. The small things go a long way, said Daoud. If you know youre ordering a fridge, make sure the food isnt perishable, so that way I can replace it quickly and get rid of the old one. Be prepared if youre going to request something. Hauling around heavy equipment and making multiple deliveries, which often leads to working longer than normal hours, is all in a days work for Daoud. He said his job provides a positive presence to the JTF Troopers. Were making a name for the housing team here, he said. The deliveries are faster and people can actually feel comfortable asking for different things knowing that their calls will be answered. To me, what makes the job worthwhile is making sure the Troopers are taken care of. Their wants become my wants, their needs become my needs. Thats what makes me work a little harder and faster. The Wire July 269

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http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html 10Dream Radio GTMO, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milA photographers If you have the eye for it, and you know where to look, U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay is full of beautiful scenes to capture forever. All you need is a camera. It doesnt matter if you have an expensive DSLR, a point and shoot or an iPhone, if you know the basics, you can take pictures anywhere, said PGA Tour photographer Chris Condon. July 21, the GTMO Morale, Welfare and Recreation program hosted a photo safari, led by Condon and members of the Joint Task Force Guantanamo Public Affairs Office. With more than 20 years experience, Condon provided base residents and JTF-GTMO Troopers with basic photography skills before turning them loose on an outdoor photo shoot. We went over a lot of the rules of photography like what makes a good photograph versus a bad photograph and how to use your flash, Condon said. Then we had some question and answer sessions and went over some peoples equipment. For the JTF-PAO, the day was a way to meet people from the base and to share their own knowledge on photography, keeping their own skills fresh. I love interacting with people and sharing my knowledge, said Army Staff Sgt. Lasima Packett, media relations team assistant noncommissioned officer in charge. It was a pretty great opportunity for us to share our skills. It makes us stop and think, so its like a review for us also. With 50 participants seeking insider knowledge of picture taking, the volunteers from the PAO team made oneon-one sessions feasible for those base residents eager to learn. In the afternoon, the participants converged on the lighthouse and beach areas to apply the technical aspects they learned in the morning during the session. For Elsie Alexander, a photo safari participant, the on-location shooting was enjoyable as well as informational. My favorite part was actually going out in the field and taking pictures, applying what we sat down in the class and learned. Whether participants were there to learn how to take better pictures on vacations or simply use their equipment, Condon was able to give each person knowledge about photography to improve their shots. We talked about composition and getting up high and getting down low and Im looking around and seeing people laying on the ground and crawling up on top of things and looking at things from a different perspective, said Condon. That means they were actually listening and they got something out of what I was saying.

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The Wire July 2611 Photo by Lt. Col. Jerome Hurtgen Photo by Lt. Col. Jerome Hurtgen Photo by Stephen Prestesater/MWR

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Story and photos by Staff Sgt. Aaron Hiler Graphics Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil12TFrooper ocus http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html SandwichesIf you venture over to Camp America and go to the Seaside Galley, not only will you see deep-blue, rolling waves but you will also experience true hospitality. Philip Dela Vega otherwise known as Phil the Sandwich Guy, is just one of the friendly faces youll see. But for the regulars who come through his line, they know one thing is constant; Vega will serve that sandwich with a smile. I really enjoy his sandwiches, said Army Capt. Todd Taylor, Joint Task Force Guantanamo, Joint Visitors Bureau. They are constantly well-made and I always see a smile on his face. Originally from the Philippines, Vega came to Guantanamo Bay nearly five years ago to work in the galleys. Formerly a grocer, he jumped at the opportunity to learn skills that would provide a career and a better income to support his family. I have an eight month old son, Vega said, and this helps me provide for him better. While family ties helped him find this opportunity, it has been his own dedication to quality and his desire to make a positive impression on the Troopers of JTF that earned him a place at Seaside Galley. In addition to his good people skills, Vega knows a thing or two about eating healthy. With all the options available at the Seaside Galley, its important to know what to eat if you are watching your weight. I would tell people, if youre trying to stay slim dont choose the roast beef, Vega advised, it has high calories and high fat. Try the turkey instead. No matter what the sandwich, as custom ers walk away from the deli cart, one thing is always certain -the parting phrase that Vega leaves Troopers with. Youre welcome, he said. Have a nice day! Smile with a America.

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Story and photos by Spc. Lerone Simmons Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milArriving for work at 6:30 a.m. every morning, to begin caring for troops is a job that Capt. Abigail Vargo does Monday to Friday. As the Joint Trooper Clinic battalion surgeon for Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay, she spends her days on the move, working alongside Navy Corpsmen and Army medics to ensure proper medical care of all Troopers stationed at the JTFGTMO. Aside from seeing patients, she oversees medical evacuation, offisland MRIs, completes Line of Duty paperwork for Army National Guard and Reservists, keeps commands updated on medical issues and helps with planning and preparation of medical assistance at weather evacuation sites. Since Vargo came to GTMO in July, 2012, the clinic has transitioned from 100 percent walk-ins, to more scheduled sick call appointments. She attributes her officer in charge of the JTC and Physician Assistant Maj. Erin Drivers forward thinking of preparing for the worst and hoping for the best to staying ahead of the game when it comes to mission specific tasks. Luckily for her as a provider, the combination of new appointment schedules and mentor motivation has given Vargo a little more time to expand her own physically active lifestyle, and given her the opportunity to add triathlon winner to her resume. Vargo won the individual female championship medal for the Morale, Welfare and Recreation programs Guantanamo Olympic Triathlon with a time of 2:56:09 on June 29. Finishing, for me, was more important than winning, she said. I felt good about the race overall and had no expectations on what my times would be for each event. Maj. Driver is one of the main reasons that I was able to compete, because she picked up my shift the day of the triathlon and also encouraged me to do it, said Vargo. Her athletic feats go as far back as competing on her hometown high school swim team in Littleton, Colo. Later, she would compete at Wheaton College in Illinois. Capt. Elizabeth Johnson, commander for the 189th Military Police Company, offered up her bicycle to Vargo to save her from using her own mountain bike on the paved roads. Vargo trained during the month of March and also managed to train after work, either going on a bike ride or for a swim; one of her favorite stress relievers. Even though Vargo completed the triathlon as an individual, colleagues made adjustments that helped her along the way, proving that everything is relatable and teamwork can also help someone run their own race. The Wire July 2613 Sandwicheswith a

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MWR celebrates grand re-opening of sand court with tournamentStory and photo by Staff Sgt. Lorne Neff Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milBeach volleyball officially returned to Guantanamo with a nine team, all-day, double elimination tournament held on the newly renovated court July 20, 2013. This is our inaugural event, our grand re-opening. Hopefully all these people will start utilizing it because its very nice, said Jim Holbert, the Morale, Welfare and Recreation sports coordinator. MWR workers constructed the court, which sits between the batting cages, and basketball court next to Denich Gym. This court underwent major renovation, said Holbert. We dug it out and put down a whole new foundation including drainage pipes. Before, when it would rain, it would puddle up on the surface. All the concrete got poured to hold the sand in. MWR has done a great job putting this together, its a vast improvement over what they had out here, said Art Torley, a civilian contractor for MWR, volleyball commissioner and referee during the tournament. Torley has worked at GTMO on and off since 1987 and says its been over a decade since they opened the last court. The sand is amazing, we came out here and we rocked it, said Amber Ledman, an Air Force supply sergeant and one of the team captains for the Base Engineer Emergency Force. Our whole squadron came out together and had three separate teams, but we supported each other and had fun. Its a nice court, its one of the nicer ones I have played on, Said Holbert. You dont feel trapped in it. There is a lot of space to run around and dive for balls and just kind of let loose. The Gold Diggers won the tournament, made up of contractors and others, who came back from the losers bracket to defeat LBC, a team of Coast Guard reservists from Long Beach California in two straight matches to take the title. It was a tough challenge, we just played them in the indoor volleyball final, Said Sikender Rai, civilian contractor and team captain. Its always a pleasure to play these guys, we had to comeback from the losers bracket and that made it all the sweeter as well, said Kenneth Arhur, a contractor on the team. The wind made it really tough, but everyone had a good time and it was well worth it, he said. Holbert said he was really appreciative of all the volunteers who helped out. They do a great job, said Holbert. They sign up and usually bring a couple of friends and theyve been great. Some do it for the volunteer medal but whatever the reason, its a great way to get out of your rooms, and its a great unit activity. I just really appreciate them. Holbert also added that the court is available to play any time. You can come to Denich Gym to reserve it, said Holbert. If youre driving by and there is no one on it, help yourself, thats what its there for; if you just want to practice or play a game. Sports eed 14http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html F

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A good workout at the gym typically elicits thoughts of fat burned, muscles toned and satisfaction. The last thing on any fitness buffs mind is Strep, MRSA or bacterial infections. You dont know whose sweat that is on the bench press, said Hospital Corpsman Nathan Tate, behavioral health technician for Joint Task Force Guantanamo, Joint Medical Group. There are at least six germs frequently found in the gym: Human Papillomavirus, Klebsiella, Staphylococcus Aureus, Streptococcal Bacteria and Influenza. (Yes, there is a test at the end of this article.) Here is what you need to know about each of them: theyre gross, they thrive in warm moist environments and you can protect yourself without wearing MOPP level four to the gym. Always wipe down equipment before and after use, Tate said. The base facilities provide antibacterial wipes for this reason alone. Weve all been there, walk in and hop right on the machine. But if the person who used it before you didnt wipe it down, youre now host to the millions of microbes he just left for you. And while some infections are only spread through skin-to-skin contact, others can be absorbed through skin-to-surface contact. The gym is a great breeding ground for bacteria and infections, from the squat rack all the way to the shower, Tate said. In addition to the wipes, towels placed on benches or seats provide an extra layer of protection against the pesky bacteria you cant see. And if youre that Trooper who is always touching your face to wipe the sweat away, or brush the hair out of your eyes, you may want to think twice. Tate recommends using a different towel or avoiding touching your face all together, and ensuring your feet are covered. Wash your hands often, and avoid touching your mouth and nose, he said. Never walk anywhere with bare feet. If you need to take showers at the locker room or a communal shower, Tate said an investment in shower shoes is necessary. It will ultimately prevent you from investing in athletes-foot spray. And speaking of showers, its important to change your clothes and conduct hygiene quickly after your workout to prevent the bacteria from multiplying or spreading to other areas of your housing unit. Shower after you exercise because its important that you wash your entire body to rid yourself of any germs you may have picked up while working out, he said. Tate also said its important to eat well and get plenty of sleep in order to allow your muscles and immune system time to recover. While youre sleeping, your immune system goes into high gear to ward off possible infection, he said. But lets say that after a few good workouts, youre feeling a little run-down. You may have picked something up other than that 35-pound kettle ball. Most illness you can contract at the gym can be simply treated with the right antibiotic or anti-fungal cream, Tate said. Between the Joint Trooper Clinic and the Naval Hospital, Troopers have access to the medical care they need. How to make sure muscle is all you get from the gym Editors Note: This is the third your health while deployed to Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil CANDIDA What is it? Symptoms: Whered it come from? How to get rid of it: HPV What is it? Symptoms: Warts the Planter kindWhered it come from? How to get rid of it: can treat outbreaksINFLUENZA What is it? crabby Symptoms: daysWhered it come from? How to get rid of it: KLEBSIELLA What is it? Bacteria found in healthy human intestinesSymptoms: Whered it come from? locker benchesHow to get rid of it: STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS What is it? Symptoms: is rareWhered it come from? How to get rid of it: Get to the TMC for antibioticsSTREPTOCOCCAL BACTERIA What is it? Symptoms: Whered it come from? How to get rid of it: Graphic by Staff Sgt. Aaron Hiler/The Wire The Wire July 2615

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The Wire Complacency ... OPSEC!Fight Complacency LTife On he Bay16http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html The WiresJoinTeamThe Wire is always looking for story ideas, writers, and photographers to help us bring JTF Guantanamo to life. Do you have a story that GTMO needs to hear? Did you snap a photo that you want to share? Drop us a line atthewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.miland let us know!

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The Wire Fight Complacency 17The Wire July 26 NARMY DaMarque8 Hurry! It stopped! NARMYDaMarque8 GO! GO! GO! NARMYDaMarque8 Chaplains Word of the week: Red Head Pin BowlingOn Thursday nights, roll a strike with a red head pin and get a free game.Cosmic BowlingFridays & Saturdays, 9:00-11:30 pm Take bowling to new heights with cosmic lights, a stellar sound system and videos by request on 4 big screens. Your cost is $13, including shoes and 2 1/2 hours of bowling.Marblehead LanesMonFri: 5:30-11:00 pm Sat: 1 pm to Midnight Sun: 1-11 pm ext 2118 MARBLEHEAD LANES

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The Army will soon require noncommissioned officers to complete online training prior to promotion eligibility. Additionally, NCO schools will no longer be waived. Beginning Jan. 1, 2014, the Army will formally link completion of Structured Self Development, or SSD training, with professional military education courses for promotion eligibility. The changes are outlined in Army Directive 2013-15, dated July 1. Gerald Purcell, Army personnel policy integrator for NCO Professional Development, G-1, said the goal is to shape a new career timeline for NCOs that includes all the tenets of leader development, including education, training and experiences. Over the last 10 years, we were really an Army out of balance in terms of those three tenets of developing leaders, Purcell said. The accumulation of experiences alone does not equate to a fully-developed leader. The change is part of an initiative to select, train and promote Soldiers who are best qualified in their current grade, and who show the greatest potential to serve in positions of increased responsibility, Purcell said. Our NCOs are charged with the training and care of our Soldiers while enforcing standards, so it is imperative we equip them with the best tools we can to help them do their job, said Sgt. Maj. of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III. Connecting the NCO Education System and promotions in a deliberate, continuous, sequential and progressive manner produces the best NCO Corps possible. It gives us the competent and committed leaders of character our Army needs and deserves. The effort, according to Purcell, will foster a balance of training, education and experience, while encouraging life-long learning and development of broadly-skilled NCOs. Another important aspect is to sustain an all-volunteer force by providing viable career paths. He said that while the Army is an efficient organization that is effective operationally, the other aspects of leader development must not be overlooked. Weve really paid the price because while operational experience is great, it in and of itself doesnt make great leaders because you still need the education and the training to round it all out, said Purcell. NCOs had been allowed to serve 30 years, and then would have to retire. Purcell said the NCO timeline was extended to 32 years to allow for the completion of those three tenets and to foster the development of the worlds most professional NCO Corps. This timeline facilitates an environment where Army Professionals can meet the Armys certification criteria of competence, character, and commitment. The Army is an up or out organization, Purcell said. The policies support a fundamental baseline by which professionals remain technically and tactically proficient with continued opportunities for development and advancement. The directive says Soldiers should be considered for promotion when they achieve competency in their current rank and exhibit the potential to serve successfully at the next higher rank, which entails an increased level of responsibility. The areas Soldiers must excel in to advance include professional competence, team building, adaptability, lifelong learning, and comprehensive fitness. The directive states waivers for the Warrior Leader Course, known as WLC, will no longer allow sergeants to be considered for promotion. Soldiers who had been previously granted WLC waivers must graduate from the course no later than Sept. 30, 2014. Soldiers who are deployed when the changes go into effect, Jan. 1, will have up to 270 days after redeployment to complete the course. Reserve-component Soldiers will have up to 270 days after release from active duty to complete the WLC. The directive says Soldiers who do not complete the required WLC training will be removed from the promotion list for staff sergeant or reduced to sergeant. Army changes promotion eligibilityBy Lisa Ferdinando PIrofessional nsight Graphic by Staff Sgt. Aaron Hiler/The Wire18http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html

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Army changes promotion eligibility The Wire July 2619I love this dish! If youre looking for a semi-homemade, easy dish to bring to your block party or to a unit get-together, try this Mexican Fiesta Lasagna. I promise, you will have no leftovers. A great thing about this dish is that you can alter it to your liking! Try it with chicken, try it spicier, or make it into a burrito. This recipe was sent in by Sgt. 1st Class Gina Vaile-Nelson. Chop one large onion and one yellow or red pepper and saut in a pan with some garlic, salt and pepper. Chop cilantro and in a separate pot, boil a bag or a box of Spanish rice, and add cilantro. Once veggies have begun to brown, add about two pounds of ground beef. Sprinkle garlic, salt and pepper to taste on top of the meat (if you like spicy, you can also add crushed red peppers while the meat is browning). Brown meat and drain. Spray a large baking pan with Pam. Cover the bottom of the pan with one can of refried beans, one can of black beans, on can of corn, one can of rotel tomato with green chilies, some of the cooked rice, the ground beef, Mexican shredded cheese (about half a bag.) You can add jalapeno peppers if you like a little heat. tortilla and repeat the process, (so youll need to buy a total of two of the canned ingredients.) Top your lasagna with one favorite taco or enchilada sauce and cheese. Bake in the oven at 375 F for 15 minutes or until cheese melts. Garnish with cilantro and sour cream. Serve with chips. MEXICAN FIESTA LASAGNA I want to hear from you! Did you try my recipe and loved it? Did you try my recipe and hated it? Well... thats too bad, but email me anyways! If you have a recipe youd like for me to try, contact me! cassandra.l.monroe@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil

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Strong work!Send your best photos to thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil 20BB ack urner http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html