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The wire ( June 14, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00543

Material Information

Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Creation Date: June 14, 2013
Publication Date: 06-14-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )

Notes

System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00571

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00543

Material Information

Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Creation Date: June 14, 2013
Publication Date: 06-14-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )

Notes

System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00571


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afarTroopers teed up in annual golf tournament Fostering families from a world away

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2http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html Life in BootsFire Department keeps GTMO safe 8 Trooper Focus 12 Sports FeedGolf tournament winners 15 AND IN OUR PAGES Around the BayOther StoriesCommand Corner and Trooper to Trooper4 7Reviews of the latest movies on base 14Americas Tall Ship ports at GTMO. PAGE 10 Cover photo by Staff Sgt. Lorne Neff Bay Wire Report Kayak the CaribbeanThere are only a few weeks left for Thursday Kayaking with the Liberty program! Call ext. 2010 to sign up for the Thursday events. Trips leave from the Marina at 6 p.m. Need Volunteer hours?The Hospital Cay Beach Brigade will clean up the Hospital Cay beach June 30, at 7 a.m. Call ext. 2010 to sign up. Play for Free!The Liberty Program offers FREE events throughout the week. Enjoy free bowling at the Marblehead Lanes, Wednesday from 6 p.m. 9 p.m.; Meet at the Ferry Landing June 30 and July 7 for a FREE History Hike. Meals with Monroe19 Every Wednesday from 5 p.m. to close, stop for the food, stay for the karaoke at OKellys Irish Pub. afarTroopers teed up in annual golf tournament Fostering families from a world away The WiresJoinTeamThe Wire is always looking for story ideas, writers, and photographers to help us bring JTF Guantanamo to life. Do you have a story that GTMO needs to hear? Did you snap a photo that you want to share? Drop us a line atthewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.miland let us know!

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The Wire June 143 Catholic Mass Mon.-Wed., Fri. 5:30 p.m. Saturday 5 p.m. Sunday 9 a.m. Spanish-language Mass Sunday 4:35 p.m. General Protestant Sunday 11 a.m. Gospel Service Sunday 1 p.m. Christian Fellowship Sunday 6 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 9 a.m. Bible Study Wednesday 6 p.m. Camp America :00, :20, :40 Gazebo :02, :22, :42 NEX trailer :03, :23, :43 Camp Delta 2 :06; :26, :46 KB 373 :10, :30, :50 TK 4 :12, :32, :52 JAS :13, :33, : 53 TK 3 :14, :34, :54 TK 2 :15, :35, :55 TK 1 :16, :36, :56 West Iguana :18, :38, :58 Windjammer/Gym :21, :41, :01 Gold Hill Galley :24, :44, :04 96 Man Camp :31, :51, :11 NEX :13 :16, :26, :33, :46, :53 Gold Hill Galley :37, :57, :17 Windjammer/Gym :36, :56, :16 West Iguana :39, :59, :19 TK 1 :40, :00, :20 TK 2 :43, :03, :23 TK 3:45, :05, :25 TK 4 :47, :07, :27 KB 373:50, :10, :30 Camp Delta 1 :54, :14, :32 IOF :54, :14, :34 NEX Trailer :57, :17, :37 Sat. and Sun. only Location #1-4 Winward Loop 0900, 1200, 1500, 1800 East Caravella SBOQ/Marina 0905, 1205, 1505 NEX 0908, 1208, 1508, 1808 Phillips Park 0914, 1214, 1514 Cable Beach 0917, 1217, 1517 Winward Loop 0930, 1230, 1530 NEX 0925, 1225, 1525, 1825 SBOQ/MARINA 0935, 1235, 1535 0940, 1240, 1540 Protestant Communion Sunday 9:30 a.m., Room B Pentecostal Gospel Sunday 8 a.m. & 5 p.m., Room D LDS Service Sunday 10 a.m., Room A Islamic Service Friday 1 p.m., Room C Command Corner and Trooper to Trooper Reviews of the latest movies on base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Commercial: 011-5399-3651 DSN: 660-3651 E-mail: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire/wire.htmlCommander Rear Adm. John W. Smith Jr. Deputy Commander Army Brig. Gen. James Lettko Sergeant Major Marine Sgt. Maj. Juan M. Hidalgo, Jr. Navy Capt. Robert Durand Deputy Director Army Lt. Col. Samuel House Army 1st Lt. Brian Pennington JTF PAO Senior Enlisted Leader Army 1st Sgt. Patricia Kishman Editor Army Sgt. 1st Class Gina Vaile-Nelson Copy Editor Army Sgt. David Bolton Graphic Designer/Webmaster Army Staff Sgt. Aaron Hiler Photo Editor Army Sgt. Daron Salzer Staff Writers Army Sgt. Cassandra Monroe Army Staff Sgt. Lorne Neff Army Spc. Lerone SimmonsStaff Command Staff The Wire is an authorized publication for members of the Joint Task Force Guantanamo and Department of Defense. It is produced by the JTF Public The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Joint Task assigned to the JTF and is published online. THE WIRE Look for us on your favorite Social Media: Meals with Monroe /jointtaskforceguantanamo /photos/jtf gtmo /jtf gtmo @jtf gtmo Joint Task ForceSafe Humane Legal TransparentGuantanamo

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The United States military instills a set of core values in all Troopers. Each Service has a unique set; honor, courage, commitment, and integrity are common amongst them all. Regardless of your branch, there is an expectation that you will serve as a professional. As professionals, it is important to set goals that will help facilitate your success. Making sure you set personal goals is part of being a professional. I constantly try to set new personal goals in the realm of physical fitness. Keeping physically fit is important as a representative of the United States Military and the truth is that appearance is a direct representation of professionalism. Additionally, studies have shown that physical fitness is directly linked to your mental fitness. Since we must always stay in the fight mentally, staying physically fit is invaluable. Commitment to the fight means having the courage and integrity to tell yourself, I can always improve and set new goals. Professionalism is a key factor on how successful we are in our daily duties. Keeping and upholding the standard in the face of adversity, shows our strength that we will not be defeated. I have been told on many occasions by my leadership that everyone who serves should always have the integrity to do the right things even when you think no one is looking. It does not matter what task is being performed, you prove your dedication by always doing the right thing and not quitting until the mission is complete. A couple months ago, Troopers assigned to the Joint Task Force were invited to attend an FBI brief at Trooper Chapel. The lead case agent for the FBIs 9/11 task force presented an emotional and detailed overview of the 9/11 attacks. He discussed how everything had unfolded from the planning and execution stages to current day commissions and tribunals. At the end of the brief, the 525th Military Police Battalion (I/R) Command Sgt. Maj. Baker made a statement that really hit home for me. Our troops are being tested day in and day out by enemy combatants and many of those who committed terrorist acts, he said. Any lapse in professionalism gives the enemy an advantage and an opportunity to exploit our shortcomings. Once we give the enemy ammunition, we make a very difficult and heavily scrutinized mission, even more difficult. Once we advance in our fighting position, we cannot give that ground back to the enemy; we must constantly strive to improve our foxhole and advance our fighting position. To do this requires extreme mental toughness and our Troopers demonstrate the highest levels of professionalism every day. The resiliency of our Troopers in the face of such adversity is nothing short of amazing and truly represents the professionalism of our organization. This is why remaining true to our core values is so imperative. We must be professional and set new goals in every aspect of our lives. We can constantly improve and consistently train our bodies and minds. Always hold true to the core values, regardless of your branch. Always do the right thing, even when you think no one is looking. By Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Acosta 428th Military Police Company4http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html By Rear Adm. John W. Smith Joint Task Force Guantanamo CommanderommandCCorner Ttrooper to rooper June 14 is celebrated both as Flag Day and the Army Birth day, and it is a great honor to celebrate Soldiers, past and present, who have carried our flag, worn our flag and defended our flag. Throughout history, our flag has inspired heroism, patrio tism and hope. And while I find our flag to be beautiful and filled with symbolism, there is nothing magical or hypnotic about 13 red and white stripes, or 50 stars on a field of blue. Our response to the flag comes from what it represents the very idea of the United States of America, and the people who brought that idea to life. The idea of our American government is truly OUR government by the people, for the people. Our Constitution provides the executive, legislative and judicial branches a fine balance of checks and balances on their au thorities. And this idea was brought into reality by the United States Army. The United States Army was formed June 14, 1775, more than a year before the Declaration of Independence. The revolutionary forces in the colonies were determined and brave, but varied in skill, strength and ability. They op erated independently, with no unified chain of command. In the spring of 1775, this army confronted British troops near Boston, Mass. The revolutionaries had to re-orga nize their forces quickly if they were to stand a chance against Britains seasoned profession als. On June 14, the Second Continental Congress passed laws giving the legal authority, rules, regulations and resourc es to unify the colonial forces in New England and form ten companies of expert riflemen to support them. Two years later, in 1777, the Second Continental Congress passed the Flag Resolution and adopted the flag with 13 stripes and stars depicting a new constellation. With an Army, a flag and a Declaration of Independence, the colonies won our freedom from the British, and built a country with high ideals for life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. No system is perfect, and no person is perfect, but the genius of our government lies in the ability to recognize problems and right wrongs in the words of the preamble to the Constitution, to form a more perfect union, estab lish justice, ensure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare and ensure the blessings of liberty, for our selves and our posterity. Since then, our flag has travelled around the world and beyond. Six American flags are on the Moon. It has inspired hope to millions, here and abroad. And when worn on the shoulder of an American Soldier, it is carried in war and peace by those who helped bring America to life. Happy Birthday to the U.S. Army!

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The Wire June 14 5Effectively managing Troops can be an extremely difficult issue for a leader. As the American military continues to become more and more diverse the potential for miscommunication and misunderstanding grows accordingly. Any manager knows that being able to motivate and persuade are key components to leading. But motivating and persuading people almost requires you get in their heads a subtle piece of magic, or is it? Long before Professor Severus Snape uttered the word ligilimens to get inside the mind of Harry Potter, psychologists like Carl Jung, Isabel Myers and Katherine Briggs developed methods for categorizing personality types based on how they interacted with their environment. Personality testing is all about determining how you perceive the world, process information and make decisions based on those observations, said Kathy Selves, director, Fleet and Family Support Center at U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. It is a psychological method that has been very thoroughly developed and tested.Psychologist Carl Jung developed a system of types to categorize people according to their responses to personality questionnaires. Myers and Briggs expanded on Jungs types to create the widely-used Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) personality test. Now, its being used in resiliency programs across the Service branches, to assist Troopers with their ability to grow and thrive in the face of adversity. From the battlefield and beyond, the goal is to provide better leaders. Using personality testing, you can better understand why you act the way you do. You can better identify triggers that may cause reactions that for others may be normal, but for you are not. And vise versa. It helps you understand how coworkers could react to events and make the decisions they do in turn, this could assist with avoiding unnecessary conflict within your organization. In addition to being important for daily teamwork, said Selves, understanding personal ity types would also be very important in crisis management and decision-making. For more information about personality testing, please contact the Fleet and Family Sup port Center at ext. 4141. Story and graphic by Staff Sgt. Aaron Hiler Graphics Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milPIrofessional nsight

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Downtown Lyceum FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU 15 Call the movie hotline at 4880 or visit the MWR Facebook page for more information. 14 16 17 18 20 19Man of Steel (NEW) (PG-13) 8 p.m. Now You See me (PG-13) 10:45 p.m. Epic (PG) 8 p.m. The Hangover III (R) 10 p.m. Fast & Furious 6 (PG-13) 8 p.m. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 10 p.m. Man of Steel (NEW) (PG-13) 8 p.m. Now You See Me (PG-13) 10:45 p.m. Tyler Perrys Peeples (PG-13) 8 p.m. Star Trek: Into Darkness (PG-13) 8 p.m. Fast & Furious 6 (PG-13) 8 p.m. CLOSEDNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further noticed.Star Trek Into Darkness (PG-13) 8 p.m. CLOSEDNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further noticed.Pain and Gain (Last showing) (R) 8 p.m. The Big Wedding (Last showing) (R) 8 p.m. CLOSEDNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further noticed.Mud (PG-13) 8 p.m.Downtown LyceumCamp Bulkeley REMEMBER Hes done it again. The man who made and re-branded TBS with his multiple television shows has co-produced another film. In this latest edition, Tyler Perry brings together a group of somewhat wellknown actors and actresses as characters in Peeples. In this ill-fated attempt at amusing audiences, Perry has graciously removed himself from appearing on-screen as an entire cast unto himself and let others have a turn at acting. The movie, which is a title that I use in the loosest sense of the word, centers around the Peeples, a wellto-do, Hampton-dwelling New England family. Virgil Peeples (David Allen Grier) leads his household as the overbearing and stern father of three children: Grace (Kerry Washington), Gloria (Kali Hawk), Simon (Tyler James Williams) and his wife, Daphne (S. Epatha Merkerson). Everything is going well for his ordered and structured family until Graces boyfriend, Wade Walker (Craig Robinson) comes for a visit during the Moby Dick festi val. But youll never guess what happens when Wade decides to ask Grace for her hand in marriage. Oh wait, yes you will. The plot line of this movie is far from un predictable and it didnt fail to dis appoint. Wade plays the proverbial fish out of water and tries to prove himself worthy of Graces hand to Virgil. The staunch judge, who rules his house with the same authority and autocracy as his courtroom, obviously objects to Wade even coming near his daughter. The whole movie is about Wade trying to prove himself to his poten tial father-in-law and all the hijinks that would follow in typ ical Tyler Perry fash ion to include puns, slapstick and no shortage of innuendos. In the end Wade stands up to Virgil and makes a valiant attempt at a speech to change everyones opinion about him, which apparently worked. Wade gets Grace, Virgil turns out to have a wild side, the family divulges all their secrets and they all lived happily ever after. In the end, Peeples plays off its own title in an attempt to show the viewers that there are many kinds of people and there is a place for everyone if we can all just learn to live and love. All in all, this movie failed to fill seats and was just as predictable as every other film in the Tyler Perry saga. Thats why Im giving Peeples the same number of banana rats that I saw at Bulkeley Lyceum, one.Not another Perry Movie?!By Sgt. David Bolton Copy Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil 6http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html

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Graphic by Staff Sgt. Aaron Hiler/The Wire The Wire June 147Editors Note: This column is intend ed to increase the cardiovascular fitness of the participant. Last week the focus was on pushup/sit-up improvement, this week we will center our attention on aerobic endurance. Some Troopers find the aerobic event, or running in general, troublesome. Gyms are full of guys and gals pushing and curling weights, but cardio equip ment rooms sometimes look like a ghost town. Troopers preparing for their phys ical training test rarely prepare for the running event as they would for push-ups, sit-ups, crutches or pull-ups. Why? Run ning can become tedious and bothersome; results dont come in the form of bigger biceps or a larger chest, and lets be honest, its just more difficult. This workout only requires a good running surface and a bicycle. I prefer a treadmill and stationary bike, but let preference be your guide. The key is continuous movement there is no resting period during this workout. Let your own level of condition be your guide. If thats strenuous try starting at a lower point. You can try a two mile run, 4 mile bike ride and mile sprint using the same percentages of your heart rate. If you want to throw in some variety try substitu tions. I sometimes replace the mile sprint with rope climbing. You might find the elliptical is more in-line with your fitness objectives. Bottom line is starting with what you feel comfortable with. Dont forget to hydrate, and if youre not accustomed to a rigorous plan, talk with a medical professional to make sure the workout is safe for you. Do you have an incredible workout that you would like to share? If so, email thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil. Keep it simple; try not to include weight vests, sleds or things that might be harder for the majority of Troopers to obtain. Triple Threat RUN: BIKE: SPRINT: By 1st Lt. Brian Pennington Command Information OIC, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Red Head Pin BowlingOn Thursday nights, roll a strike with a red head pin and get a free game.Cosmic BowlingFridays & Saturdays, 9:00-11:30 pm Take bowling to new heights with cosmic lights, a stellar sound system and videos by request on 4 big screens. Your cost is $13, including shoes and 2 1/2 hours of bowling.Marblehead LanesMonFri: 5:30-11:00 pm Sat: 1 pm to Midnight Sun: 1-11 pm ext 2118 MARBLEHEAD LANES

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http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html lbife in oots 8Turnout gear, boots and helmets line at atten tion, waiting for inspection. Chatter stops as a bell rings loudly three times signaling the end to one shift and start of a new at Station One. The morning roll call meeting has begun, and the men prepare to switch shifts by informing the incoming platoon what happened the previous day, including any emergency calls that were attended to. The possibility of new equipment on an incoming barge gets a few hoots from the crowd, and just like that the shift-change is over and its back to work. For the firefighters who serve at Naval Station Guanta namo Bay Fire Department Station One, this is a usual, emergency-less morning, one that means that no one on base is in need of assistance. After the shift change, the firefighters performed preventative maintenance checks and serviced all equipment and vehicles. Everyday, we come in and check the equipment, especially because the shift before may have used it and we have to make sure everything is up to par, said Capt. Steve Fearon, NAVSTA Fire Dept., Station One. We cant take risks and we cant take chances. Some of the items on their checklist: making sure the rescue tools, like shears and power-saws, are readily accessible; ensuring the medical supplies are stocked and radio batteries are charged. Its important to have all equipment ready, said Firefight er Dwayne Anderson. These steps are crucial and important because you can be called out at any time here, according to the crew. The Station One firefighters there are four stations on GTMO also train with the NAVSTA Hospital Emergency Medical Services monthly to keep their medical skills sharp. We are first respond ers, so if we do get to a scene first, theres a certain level of training that we have, which can help until the EMTs arrive, said Fearon. Whenever theres a medical situa tion and someone needs help, we are responding. Although the group aims to keep a routine schedule, the unexpected does happen. When it does, the team must respond quickly. Upon arriving to an incident, the team is prepared to handle any situation and must pass down information, such as what happened at the scene, what aid was given and if any conditions have changed, to the Ready for Code 3Story and photos by Sgt. Cassandra Monroe Staff writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil

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The Wire June 14 9 preventative maintenance checks and services during his shift. Andersons responsibilities include preparing all equipment so arriving EMTs. We pass down information because we are trained and certified as a first responders but they are the EMTs, and are the ones that will come and take over, said Fearon. This job can be unpredictable, said Firefighter Robert Graham. You have something planned for the day and an emergency happens. Your mind has to be ready for the unexpected. Although the job as a firefighter can be tough, an ap preciation for helping those stationed at GTMO proves to outweigh the hard parts. This job is dynamic and the team learns a lot while working on the job, said Anderson. Its really good to help people and you feel like you did something good, he said. Its all about safety in everything the team does. Saving lives, protecting property and preventing fires from spreading are the main concerns for the team. Just as fast as the team continued their checks and services on vehicles and equipment, the alarm sounded and someone yelled, emergency, emergency! The firefighters raced off into their vehicles, answering the call of duty to those stationed here.

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Cadets aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle sailed into Guantanamo Bay June 7, during an annual summer training exercise. The crew sailed from its homeport in New London, Conn., aboard the 295-foot barque dubbed Americas Tall Ship the only active-commissioned sailing vessel in the U.S. military. The Eagle is special, both for the Coast Guard and for the nation, said Capt. Wes Pulver, skipper of the Eagle. Working with the crew, the cadets, its such an exceptional training mission. The five-week training mission gives cadets from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy the understanding of running a sailing ship. We get paid to sail a modern-day pirate ship in the Caribbean, said Jake Carlton, cadet 3rd class. Its amazing how much I know now after just five weeks of sailing. This is a once-in-a-lifetime event. Not many people get to come on and do this, he said. The ship was built and commissioned in 1936 in Nazi Germany as the Horst Wessel. The U.S. took the vessel as war reparation after World War II and commissioned it into the U.S. Coast Guard in May 1946. It was the seventh vessel in the U.S. military to bear the name Eagle. Today, the Eagle serves as a training ship for the U.S. Coast Guard Academy with a standing crew of 57 personnel. During training missions, the Eagle can carry more than 100 cadets. Sailor Luis Escobosa works as a boatswains mate of the watch. He was assigned to the Eagle after basic training and instructs the cadets assigned to the Eagle for training missions. For most of them, its their first extended underway period, said Escobosa. A lot of them get seasick. They work through it, they work hard and we teach them everything we know about the ship, he said. Their lessons are heavy with teamwork, he said, because this ship takes a lot of teamwork to sail. According to Escobosa, a typical day includes four to eight hours of watch as well as training including use of the damage-control equipment to fight fires or taking the helm to steer the ship. The Eagle also serves as a good will ambassador wherever it goes. During its Guantanamo port, visitors were welcomed aboard for a self-guided tour and experienced first-hand accounts from the crew. The experience was a welcomed insight into Coast Guard history and life for North Dakota National Guard 1st Sgt. Dean Richter, 191st Military Police Company. Ive never seen a boat this size before, he said. We dont have anything that would support a boat this size. Interested in proper terminology, Richter asked the crew if the Eagle is a boat, or a ship. They said its kind of a small one, he said. Its amazing to me that it could even float in the water. The Eagles port was a big deal for families stationed at the Naval Station, offering a new weekend activity besides the typical beach or park trip. Petty Officer 3rd Class Anthony Martinez and his wife, Jessica, toured the Eagle and were thankful for the opportunity. I just love that we get to see this at Guantanamo Bay, Jessica said. Its such a different opportunity, she said. In the States, you may not even know its there, but this is such a small community, you get to see this kind of thing. Eagle The lands at GTMOBy Staff Sgt. Lorne Neff Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Eagle CPhoto by Christopher T.J. Sawyer/OMC10http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html

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The Wire June 1411 Navy and Coast Guard personnel assigned a tour of the ship. The tallest ship in America Photo by Staff Sgt. Lorne Neff/The Wire Photo by Staff Sgt. Lorne Neff/The Wire Photo by Staff Sgt. Lorne Neff/The Wire

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12TFrooper ocus http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html I will always place For many Troops, the opening line of the U.S. Armys Warrior Ethos is a group of words that inspire thoughts of duty, honor and service. Thoughts of working through adversity and achieving victory in the face of defeat. No matter what, the mission must always take priority. There is a mission out there that a select group of individuals take part in everyday; a no-fail mission, a must-win mission; a mission often obscured by life in a deployed setting. Fatherhood. For Army Sgt. James L. Enochs, a military policeman assigned to the 428th Military Police Company, his current deployment with Joint Task Force Guantanamo marks the third time he has been called to service. As the father of three girls, Enochs has had to face the reality that going to war is something that cannot be easily communicated or understood by children. I have a 10-year-old who doesnt understand where Im at or what Im doing, said Enochs. Its hard to explain over the phone what youre doing and why youre gone. The hardest part is the loneliness of my children always seeing me there, and then me leaving, and not understanding why. Being a father, or parent for that matter, who is deployed means that there will be moments in the childs life that are going to be missed. These moments will include birthdays, holidays and pivotal times of childhood progress. I have another daughter who is nine, Enochs said. I missed her going through the stages of her being a baby and walking. A month ago, my third daughter was born. Although his mission as a father has been stressful, as a leader, Enochs makes sure that he maintains a steady focus on the tasks at hand while on-duty. Being a leader, I have to keep my head in the game, said Enochs. I dont think about home when Im at work or dealing with army stuff because I dont want to make mistakes here. There isnt an easy way to cope but I cant let myself go as a leader. While he strives to stay on target for the mission at JTF-GTMO, Enochs realizes that the success of the mission on the homefront is equally dependent on the work of his most important battle buddy his wife. Together, they have made plans to ensure that their childrens needs are taken care of. A strong supportive spouse and wife is key, said Enochs. What they can do is keep themselves busy and be sure to take lots of pictures. I think about what itll be like when I get home and How one Trooper deals with being a father away from homeThe Other MissionStory and photos by Sgt. David Bolton Copy Editor, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil

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The Wire June 1413 how much fun Im going to have and I get overjoyed, said Enochs. I love my children every day like tomorrow isnt going to be there. Despite having to spend so much time focused on completing the mission of the U.S. Army, Enochs has made it his personal mission to make time for his family, focusing on their needs and how to meet them. Now, nearing the end of his deployment, Enochs is looking forward to going back home to his family and making up for all the time he was away. The thought of spending time with his family is one of the motivators that helps him push through to the end of his deployment. Keep in mind there will be an end to it, said Enochs. Youll meet your kids and move on with life. When Sunday rolls around and fathers back in the states enjoy a lunch or party with their kids, Enochs will have his own modified celebration. Ill call my wife and talk to my daughters this Fathers Day.

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nFews eed 14http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html This Fathers Day, The Wire knows that the fathers out there deserve a pat on the back. So go ahead and give yourself one. If youre a new Trooper just getting to GTMO, here are some tips to help you continue to be the Super Dad (or Mom) that you are from this little island. And if you want more information, Fleet and Family Support is just a phone call away at ext. 8127, 4153 or 4141.Parenting from aSend pictures and lettersSkypeSchedule a dinner over the phone Share pictures of a deployment friend such as a bear or trinketRead a book over the phoneStay involvedGraphic by Staff Sgt. Aaron Hiler and Sgt. David Bolton/The Wire

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The Wire June 1415SFports eed Five teams hit the links at the Lateral Hazard Golf Course June 8, for the 2nd Annual Liberty Golf Tournament. With a shotgun start and best-ball scramble, it didnt matter if you were a pro or amateur at this competition. All that mattered was that you were having fun. Guantanamo Bay has the best Morale, Welfare and Recreation pro gram Ive ever seen, with tons of fun activities for Service members, said Lt. Col. Mike Shoen, Joint Detention Group, Joint Task Force Guantanamo. That is thanks in part to Liberty events coordinator, Katie Stanley. Money was a great issue with getting planning off the ground, she said, but it didnt stop us from getting things together. And though there was no Tiger on the course, the Troopers who par ticipated drove, chipped and putted their way using the best ball of the play. Playing the best ball turned out to be the fail-safe that prevented several teams from slipping back a place or two in the overall standings. At the end of play, Col. Timothy Barron, JTF, and Maj. Brandon Christensen, JTF, took home the 1st place trophy. Taking home the 2nd place trophy was Staff Sgt. Steven Jastrzembski, JDG, and his team mate Sgt. 1st Class Jeffrey Vernon, JDG. It was a great way to get out, get refreshed, and rejuvenated, said Shoen. Lovin the LinksStory and photos by Spc. Lerone Simmons Staff Writer, thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil

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Chaplains Word of the Week:SANITYSanity is the state of being in ones right mind. To keep to completing the mission. Drawing by Sgt. Darron Salzer/The Wire The Wire Ever wonder why a purple dragon is associated with OPSEC? Because of the success of the Purple Dragon team, President Ronald Regan issued Purple history of OPSEC LTife On he Bay16http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html Fleet & Family Support CenterThis week at theFleet & Family Support CenterStress Management Tues., June 18th, 2:00-4:00 p.m. Job Searching Weds., June 19th, 1:30-3:30 p.m.Call ext 4141

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by Sgt. Darron Salzer 17The Wire June 14 Cuban Stando

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There was a lawyer once; his name was Francis Scott Key. He penned a song that Im sure youre aware of youve seen it its in most hymnals throughout our churches. Its the National Anthem. It is our song as an American. We go ... to a ball game ... and we sing the words of that song. And they float over our minds and our lips, and we dont even realize what were singing. Most of us have memorized it as a child, but weve never really thought about what it means. Let me tell you a story. Francis Scott Key was a lawyer in Baltimore. The Colonies were engaged in vicious conflict with the mother country, Britain. Because of this conflict, and the protractedness of it, they had accumulated prisoners on both sides. ...They said, We want to send a man out to discuss this with you. They were holding the American prisoners in boats about a thousand yards offshore. And they said, We want to send a man by the name of Francis Scott Key. He will come out and negotiate to see if we can make a mutual exchange. On the appointed day September 12, 1814 ... in a rowboat he went out to this boat and he negotiated with the British officials. And they reached a conclusion that men could be exchanged on a one-for-one basis. Francis Scott Key, jubilant with the fact that hed been successful went down below in the boats and what he found was a cargo hold full of humanity; men. And he said, Men, Ive got news for you. Tonight you are free. He said, Tonight, I have negotiated successfully your return to the Colonies. He said, Youll be taken out of this boat; out of this filth; out of your chains. As he went back up on board to arrange for their passage to the shore, the Admiral came and he said, We have a slight problem. He said, We will still honor our commitment to release these men, but itll be merely academic after tonight. It wont matter. And ...Key said, What do you mean? And he said, Well, Mr. Key, he said, Tonight, we have laid an ultimatum upon the Colonies. Your people will either capitulate and lay down the colors of that flag that you think so much of, or you see that fort right over there Fort Henry? He said, Were gonna remove it from the face of the earth. He said, How are you gonna do that? He said, If you will, scan the horizon of the sea. And as he looked he could see hundreds of little boats and he said, Thats the entire British war fleet. He said, All of the gun power, all of the armament is being called upon to demolish that fort. It will be here within striking distance in a matter of about two and a half hours. He said, The war is over. These men would be free anyway. He said, You cant shell that fort. He said, Thats a large fort. He said, Its full of women and children. He said, Its predominantly not a military fort. ...The Admiral said, Do you see that flag way up on the rampart? ...We have told them that if they will lower that flag the shelling will stop immediately, and well know that theyve surrendered. And youll now be under British rule. ...Key went down below and told the men what was about to happen ... As twilight began to fall and as the haze hung over the ocean as it does at sunset, suddenly the British war fleet unleashed. Bam! Bam! The sound was deafening. There were so many guns that there were no reliefs. He said it was absolutely impossible to talk or hear. He said, Suddenly the sky, although dark, was suddenly lit. And he says from down below all he could hear the men, the prisoners, saying was, Tell us where the flag is. What have they done with the flag? Is the flag still flying over the rampart? Tell us. One hour, two hours, three hours into the shelling every time the bomb would explode and it would be close to the flag, they could see the flag in the illuminated red glare of that bomb. And ...Key would report down to the men below, Its still up. Its not down. The Admiral came and he said, Your people are insane. He said, Whats the matter with them? He said, Dont they understand this is an impossible situation? ...Key he remembered what George Washington had said. He said, The thing that sets the American Christian apart from all other people in the world is he will die on his feet before hell live on his knees. The Admiral said, We have now instructed all of the guns to focus on the rampart to take that flag down. He said, We dont understand something. Our reconnaissance tells us that flag has been hit directly again and again and again and yet its still flying. We dont understand that. But he said, Now, were about to bring every gun for the next three hours to bear on that point. ...Key said the barrage was unmerciful... Sunrise came. He said there was a heavy mist hanging over the land, but the rampart was tall enough. There stood the flag completely nondescript in shreds. The flagpole itself was at a crazy angle, but the flag was still at the top. Francis Scott key went ... into Fort Henry to see what had happened. He found ...that the flagpole and the flag had suffered repetitious direct hits and ...had fallen. But men...who knew what it meant for that flag to be on the ground although knowing that all of the British guns were trained on it walked over and held it up humanly until they died. Their bodies were removed and others took their place. ...Key said what held that flagpole in place at that unusual angle were patriots bodies. He penned the song, Oh, say can you see by the dawns early light, what so proudly we hailed at the twilights last gleaming. Oer rockets red glare, the bombs bursting in air, gave proof through the night that the flag was still there. Oh, say does that star-spangled banner yet fly and wave, oer the land of the free and the home of the brave? Editors Note: This is an excerpt printed at the request of Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Borlin, Joint Task Force Detention Group. This story tells the history of the Star Spangled Banner as we celebrate Flag Day. The true author is unknown. 18http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html Illustration by Staff Sgt. Aaron Hiler/The Wire

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The Wire June 1419 Ingredients: 16 ounces elbow macaroni, cooked and drained 2 1/4 cups skim milk 1-1/4 cups of heavy cream 2 tsp kosher salt 1 tsp ground black pepper one half tsp dry mustard 2 tsp Worcestershire 1 pound smoked Gouda cheese, shredded one half pound sharp cheddar cheese, shredded 5 slices bread 3 Tbsp butter, melted one half cup bacon, cooked and crumbled Directions: Preheat oven at 375-degrees and prepare macaroni according to package directions; set aside. In large pot, melt butter over medium-high heat. Add skim milk and bring to near boiling. Reduce heat to medium and for 1-2 minutes. Mixture should be thick and boiling. Slowly add cream, while whisking. Add in salt, pepper, mustard and Worcestershire sauce. Reduce heat to low In a food processor, shred Gouda and cheddar cheese. (I just used a knife to shred the Gouda, and I bought pre-shredded sharp cheddar.) Add to pot, stir until thoroughly combined. Add cooked macaroni to cheese mixture. Pour into 13x9 dish. In same food processor bowl (no need to wash it after crumb. Add melted butter. Sprinkle over macaroni. Top with crumbled bacon. Bake, uncovered in the 375-degree oven for 25 to 30 minutes. Serve and Enjoy! A recipe guide to easy eats and tasty treatsI want to hear from you! Did you try my recipe and loved it? Did you try my recipe and hated it? Well... thats too bad but email me anyways! If you have a recipe youd like for me to try, contact me! cassandra.l.monroe@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil If youre a fan of comfort food like I am, a good ol baked macaroni menu. Most may think of mac and cheese as a popular side dish, but for me, its perfect as the main meal. This recipe, adapted from Aimee (Shugarysweets.com), calls for Gouda cheese however, the Navy Exchange does not carry Gouda. Instead, I used Muenster cheese, which still provided a creamy tang and worked nicely with the bacon pieces. (Also, I may or may not have added more than a half cup of bacon...) Gouda Bacon Macaroni and CheeseMeals with Monroe

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Photo of the WeekThe best snapshot from around Guantanamo Bay Saturday, June 15thTRACK MEETRegister at Denich GymCooper Field, 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, June 18thCALL OF DUTY TOURNAMENTDeer Point Liberty Center, 7:00 p.m.LIBERTYGuantanamo Bay, Cuba 20BB ack urner http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/xwebsite/index.html