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The wire ( May 31, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00543

Material Information

Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Creation Date: May 31, 2013
Publication Date: 05-31-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )

Notes

System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00569

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00543

Material Information

Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Creation Date: May 31, 2013
Publication Date: 05-31-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )

Notes

System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00569


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Volume 14, Issue 37 Friday, May 31, 2013

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INDEXThe Wire May 31, 2013Movie review: The Hangover Part III and Fast and Furious 6 Hurricane preparation Streetball tournament Manatee capture Memorial Day Trooper FocusThe WIRE is the official news magazine of Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is produced by the JTF Public Affairs Office to inform and educate the Troopers of JTF Guantanamo through news, features, command guidance, sports and entertainment. This DoD news magazine is an authorized publication for the members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The WIRE are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is printed by Defense Logistics Agency Document Services with a circulation of 1,250.4 5 6 8 10 12 NEWS FROM THE BAY Joint Task Force Guantanamo Safe Humane Legal Transparent Cover: I am a newcomer to Guantanamo Bay. It has just been a few weeks since I assumed command of U.S. Naval Hospital Guantanamo Bay and the Joint Medical Group. During my transition here, I spent some time in duty-under-instruction at the Command Leadership School in Newport, R.I. While in New England, I had a chance to go back to my hometown of Newton, Mass., to visit friends and classmates. We spent one bright spring day in downtown Boston walking the streets and catching a game at Fenway Park. Two days later, the Boston Marathon would wind its way through the very streets we were walking. We all know what happened that day. Like many of you, I was struck by the citys immediate response to the tragedy. and civilian bystanders all did their duty and responded to the wounded and those in need with professionalism, skill and determination. As we grieved with the the streets the very streets where I used to live. The events in Boston reminded me of why we all serve. We are all responders helping to secure our families, our neighborhoods and our nation. And like the responders in Boston, I have been interact with all the Troopers who work with the Joint Task Force. You show your absolute professionalism, skill and steadfast determination every day, in everything that you do. the Joint Medical Group, I want to assure you that your medical team stands with you. We are ready to provide the best medical care possible to each and every one of you, making sure you are ready and able to carry out your mission. I am proud to serve and proud to be here with all of you. JTF GuantanamoCommander Deputy Commander JTF Senior Enlisted Leader Office of Public Affairs Director Deputy Director Operations Officer JTF PAO Senior Enlisted Leader The WireSenior Editor Assistant Editor Photo Editor Layout Editor Webmaster/Copy Editor Photojournalist Contact usEditors Desk: Commercial: DSN: E-mail: Online: Ccommand orner COMMAND CORNER THE WIRE | PAGE 2 THE WIRE | PAGE 3 GTMO History TourEach Sunday through July, Al Adler, from the National Museum of the Marine Corps, will conduct a hike of the Battle of Guantanamo Bay. He will discuss the Spanish American War and the Battle of Cuzco Wells. The hike will begin at 7:45 a.m. from the pavilion at Ferry Land and last approximately four hours, ending at Cable Beach. Volunteers are needed to stage vehicles at Cable Beach be fore the hike starts and provide rides back to Ferry Landing following the tour. The hike will occur at the same time of day and along the same general route that the Marines used during the battle from June 10-14, 1898. If you are interested in participating, please send an email to alan.j.adler@ jtfgtmo.southcom.mil. Space is limited to 15 cannot make it, please advise so your place can be offered to someone else. ALL SALE ITEMS WILL BE LOCATED IN THE MIDDLE K SPAN (ACROSS THE STREET FROM AUTO SKILLS, NEXT TO THE TENNIS COURTS) SPORTS EQUIPMENT: BATS, BALLS, GLOVES, RAQUET BALL RAQUETS, ROLLERBLADES, HOCKEY EQUIPMENT, ETC AUDIO EQUIPMENT: STAGE SPEAKERS, MIXBOARDS, AMPS, ETC ELECTRONICS: COMPUTER MONITORS, COMPUTERS, TVS, VIDEO GAMES, ETC RECREATION EQUIPMENT: MOUNTAIN BIKES, FISHING EQUIPMENT, ETC S A T U R D A Y J U N E 8 8 A M N O O N ( O R U N T I L G O N E ) FMI, CALL 74129 GTMO JOE Capt. Daryl DanielsCommander, Joint Medical Group The events in Boston reminded me of why we all serve. We are all responders helping to secure our families, our neighborhoods and our nation. And like the responders in Boston, I have been struck and Troopers who work with the Joint Task Force. You show your absolute professionalism, skill and steadfast determination in everything that you do.

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Welcome to the land of unnecessary sequels. R 100 min. Movie Reviews PG-13 130 min. Fast & Furious 6JUST STOP. Seriously. Its time to just stop. The Fast and the Furious saga has overstayed its welcome more than useless news stories about Duchess Kate Middletons baby bump. And I am all about being able to separate myself from reality and live in movie-land where anything is possible for a limited amount of time, but Fast & Furious 6 goes way too far. In this movie, they resur rected people from the dead like it is the New Testament, had fight scenes on 50-mile long aircraft runways and created more predictable and shallow characters than a Meet the Press discussion panel. And the worst news is: there are going to be more. If this works for you, then good, but after the seventh or eighth pointless plot-turn, my eyes started to bleed. So, I am giving Fast & Furious 6 one and a half banana rats, solely because The Rock is awesome. Weekend Domestic Box Office (May 24-26) Fast & Furious 6 $97.4 Million The Hangover Part III $37.3 Million Star Trek Into Darkness $41.7 Million THE WIRE | PAGE 4 MOVIE REVIEW by Spc. Chalon HutsonThe Hangover Part IIITHE WOLFPACK W AS BACK this weekend for what is supposed to be the final installment of The Hangover franchise. Of course, science has proven that the first film in the trilogy was one of the funniest movies ever made, and the second one, while hilarious, mainly coasted on the back of the first. Part III does have several moments that are just as funny as ever, but in attempts to make it an epic finale, it included an almost equal amount of serious, and even heart-warming, moments. Overall, it was not a bad movie, but it just could not pro duce the results to match the previous films, with its funny moments few and far between in comparison. With the best part of the movie happening during the credits, they were able to at least end the series on a good note. Lets just hope they dont come back to ruin everyones day with a prequel film or something like that. Because it did make me laugh, I will give The Hangover Part III three banana rats. FEA TURE THE WIRE | PAGE 5 T is the season hurricane season, that is. With Naval Station Guantanamo Bay situated in the middle of the Caribbean Sea, the area is prone to the effects of tropical storms and hurricanes, so base officials and residents are making the necessary preparations as the potential for destructive weather approaches. On May 22, Troopers from all five branches and a variety of sections spent the day at Joint Task Force Guantanamo filling sandbags. The sandbags will eventually be used in for tifying buildings around the JTF side in the event of a tropical storm or hurricane. Air Force Master Sgt. Ryan Wilt, of the Base Engineer Emergency Force (BEEF) and lead for the sandbag-filling project, said the base is not only prone to destructive weather because of its location but is also prone to flooding as a result because it sits in a valley. Its all for hurricane preparation, Wilt said of the project. Its to prevent the flooding of the buildings. While Seabees and Troopers from the BEEF did the heavy lifting and operated the equipment for the project, 22 Troopers from a variety of sections, including J1, J4, Staff Judge Advocate, Public Affairs Office and others, dug up the sand and filled the bags. In the true sense of the JTF, Troopers came from every branch to assist with the project and make it a true joint effort. Wilt said Army Sgt. Maj. Catherine Farrell and Army Master Sgt. Cynthia Campbell, both of J3, developed a plan on how to fairly divide up the sections and branches to pull Troopers for the sandbag project. He said the day started with roll call at 7:45 a.m., and then Troopers began filling sandbags at 8 a.m. and kept going until 4 p.m. Troopers would use loaders to dig sand from a large pile and then dump the load in a sifter. Other Troopers would pull sand out of the sifter and fill the bags, while still others would tie the bags and organize them on pallets. Wilt said Troopers from the BEEF worked the day prior preparing sandbags for their headquarters at Camp Justice before bringing effort to the JTF side. We filled sandbags yesterday for Camp Justice, he said. Today, were doing the JTF side. In the event of a hurricane or tropical storm, and the subsequent threat of flooding, Wilt said one of the first responses will be to bring out the sandbags to safeguard buildings all around the base. The sandbags go around the buildings to prevent water from entering doors and leaking into buildings, Wilt said. We put the sandbags out to try to stop the flood waters. Around the middle portion of the day, the Troopers began taking turns going to lunch. Besides the joint effort, Wilt said he was most proud of the strong effort being shown by Troopers filling sandbags that day. I cant give enough credit to the people out here for their hard work, he said. I have to tell them to take a break. Theyre working too hard. Troopers help ll sandbags as GTMO preps for hurricanes Tech. Sgt. Clinton Stallard, of J1, shovels sand into a sifter at Joint Task Force Guantanamo on May 22, Station Guantanamo Bays preparation for the upcoming hurricane season. A Soldier pushes sand down into a sifter, while

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THE WIRE | PAGE 6 FEA TURE JTF Honor Bound Win 4-on-4 Streetball TournamentAlban Bonilla drives strong to the basket for a score during the one-day tournament. (Below) JTF Honor Bound, formally JTF PAO, pose for a photo after winning the championship in the 4-on-4 streetball tournament sponsored by Naval Station Guantanamo Bay MWR. Kyle King, Ray Campbell, Sean Dickinson, Jonathan Scott, Joshua Piper, Ferdinand Thomas and Jonathan Trusty make up JTF Honor Bound. Photos by Army Sgt. Ferdinand Thomas

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Naval Station Guantanamo Bay has a wide variety of residents, no matter where one looks from the wide variety of service members and civilians, to the iguanas and the banana rats. However, one of the residents of GTMO lives under the water: the Antillean manatee. Troopers, civilians and some visiting scientists spent the week of May 20-24 catching and tagging these unobtrusive residents. Planning for the capture began last year, but the team from the U.S. Geological Survey had been trying for years to set it up. During our research in the early 90s, people were talking about the manatees here in Guantanamo, and there was some interest in doing research here, wildlife biologist and team leader James Reid said. About to start a project here and it was initiated by the Navy. Unfortunately, all the players and the funding didnt come together. Finally, 15 years later, things fell into place. Putting these plans into action was an extensive process, including shipping a specialized capture boat and calling for community volunteers. In terms of resources, its expensive to bring a team down here, so we brought down some professionals to train volunteers here, Reid said. Its a great opportunity for awareness as well. Volunteers received their initial Friday, May 17. After another more teers had a dry run on Sunday, May 19. Volunteers learned how to set and pull the nets for both a land-based capture and a boat capture. In order to radio tag manatees and do the health assessments, we have to get them out of the water, Reid said. One way to do that is with a specialized manatee capture boat, a specialized net and some trained people in order to work with folks here to safely capture manatees and do this kind of research. Its been an evolving research technique thats been developed in Florida primar They have the motor mounted up in the front. The back is removable so Story and photos by Spc. Raechel Haynes we can drop the net and pull manatees right onto the back of the boat. Despite the number of volunteers, training and special equipment, catching manatees can be challenging. No manatee capture is really easy, Reid said. In this case these are really shy animals and there arent very many here. They dont overlap with humans and they dont use areas that facilitate an easy capture. Reid explained that thorough training for volunteers is crucial to the success of the capture. He was surprised by the great turnout of volunteers and the willingness to help. We have had a great response from folks here, Reid said. Weve had people sign up to be spotters, to be on the support boats, on the capture boat, wherever we needed them. A lot of people really want to get their hands on the manatees, and thats what we need. I didnt expect the 122 volunteers we have on our list. Thats certainly more than we need, but out of that well get a core group who will be a great help and will also be able to help raise awareness. And that is very important to the success of this mission. Volunteers who were unable to work the whole week would sign up There were many ways to participate in the capture process. There were spotter positions, a capture team, medical teams and support boat captains. Some volunteers opted to collect volunteer hours for the capture, while others just volunteered because they wanted to be involved. Capture team members helped to set the nets, and when an animal was caught they pulled in and bag the nets so the animal could be brought on the boat or beach. Spotters kept an eye out for manatees surfacing to breath or heading towards the net. The medical team took blood and tissue samples from the captured animal, girth and height measurements, estimated weight, and monitored breathing and response. Support boats watched for manatee sightings and helped to corral the manatees in one area. Reid said it was good for residents to be involved and develop an under standing of the creatures that share the base. The Navy is tasked with protecting the resources here, Reid said. So, the more you can know about how these animals are using the habitat, the more you can manage activities here, and that is always valuable. It is a win-win in both cases. The female calf is brought to the examination area on a stretch of vacant beach. The exam team took blood and tissue samples, girth and length measurements, and monitored her breathing. the calf without harming her or being harmed by her. Members of the exam team carefully hold the calf down to prevent her from harming herself or the volunteers. GTMO volunteers help to capture and tag manateesVolunteers and scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey lift a juvenile manatee onto the capture boat for transport to the examination area. The manatee capture was held from May 20-24, and more than 122 volunteers from all over Naval Station Guantanamo Bay participated throughout the event. lead teams. Float teams pulled in the top of the net while the lead team pulled in the bottom of the net. THE WIRE | PAGE 8 FEA TURE THE WIRE | PAGE 9 FEA TURE

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On a day when the United States honors the service members who gave their lives in defense of the nation, Naval Station Guantanamo Bay paid tribute to those who 115 years ago Marines waged a battle to establish this naval station. The bases annual Memorial Day cer emony takes place in the Cuzco Well Cemetery, which serves as the resting place for service members and civilians alike who died at GTMO Americans, Cubans, Jamaicans and many other nationalities. Before the area became a cemetery, it was the scene of the Battle of Cuzco Well, in which Marines stormed the area around Guantanamo Bay and defeated the Spanish forces for control of the land during the Spanish-American War in 1898. On Monday, the Memorial Day tradition continued, as Troopers from all five branches and civilians from all walks of life packed rows of seats under a tent in the cemetery and gathered to remember those who died in service to the United States. The ceremony got under way just before the playing of the national anthem for morning colors. Navy Capt. John Dickens, naval station command chaplain, delivered the invocation to begin the ceremony. Following the invocation, Navy Capt. J.R. Nettleton, Then, a group of Sailors stood at attenor a hand salute during the anthem, while all the way up and then down to half-staff in accordance with the presidential proclahalf-staff until noon on Monday. Parsons, the naval stations assistant secupresidential proclamation for this years Memorial Day celebration. Since our Nations earliest days, America has been blessed with an unbroken chain of patriots who have served our country with honor and distinction, the proclamation reads. From Concord to the Korengal, generations of brave warriors have fought for freedom across sand and snow, over mud and mountains, into lonely deserts and through crowded streets. Today, we pay tribute to those patriots who never came back -who fought for a home to which they never returned, and died for a country whose gratitude they will always have. Scripture teaches us that greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends. On Memorial Day, we remember those we have lost not only for what they fought for, but who they were: proud Americans, often far too young, guided by deep and abiding love for their families, for each other, and for this country. Our debt to them is one we can never fully strive to be a Nation equal to their example. On this and every day, we must meet our obligations to families of the fallen; we must uphold our sacred trust with our veterans, our service members, and their loved ones. Above all, we can honor those we have lost by living up to the ideals they died defending. It is our charge to preserve liberty, to advance justice, and to sow the seeds of peace. With courage and devotion wor thy of the heroes we remember today, let us rededicate ourselves to those unending tasks, and prove once more that Americas best those who died in war rest in eternal peace, and let us keep them and their families close in our hearts, now and forever. After the reading of the proclamation, Nettleton gave remarks on Memorial Day and also took the time to thank those who participated in and attended the ceremony, pointing out that this years attendance was three times higher than last years showing. Today is the day we pause to remember those who gave their lives for our nation, Nettleton said. Nettleton also noted that his generation of service members started serving around the time of Operation Desert Storm and has since been involved in a constant series of engagements for the last 25 years. For Nettleton and his comrades, Memorial Day does not mean just honor ing unknown veterans passing by on parade flats, but it means even more remember ing shipmates and battle buddies who were killed in the line of duty while serving the United States. Memorial Day, when you serve long enough, begins to take on a much deeper meaning, Nettleton said. You were the lucky one. You came home, and they didnt. With that said, Nettleton told the audience that they should take time to remember the fallen on Memorial Day, though there is not necessarily a right way to celebrate the day as long as they remember the fallen. There is a right way to give them proper respect, he said. Weve done that this morning. I appreciate everyone showing up. It says a lot about our community. Not only that, its the right thing to do. Following Nettletons remarks, seven Marines from the Marine Corps Security Forces Company performed a 21-gun salute in three iterations. The salute was met with complete silence other than the sharp crack Then, Chief Master-at-Arms Brian Staercke read a poem called Memorial Day by C.W. Johnson. The last two stanzas of the poem read: Now the services are over / For this Memorial Day. / To the names upon these crosses / I just want to say / Thanks for what youve given. / No one could ask for more. / May you rest with God in heaven / From now through evermore. chaplain, closed the ceremony with the benediction, and then a Sailor honored the fallen with the playing of Taps. As with the 21-gun salute, there was complete silence for Taps other than the crisp notes of the trumpet. The silence hung in the air as the attendstuck around to look at the tombstones in the cemetery or chat with their comrades, while others headed out in buses and per sonal vehicles. On Memorial Day, GTMO remembered fallen already lay and where battle for free dom was previously fought. But, no doubt fallen with their own service to the nation. Seven Marines from the Marine Corps Security Force Company at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay stand at attention and prepare to march away after performing the 21-gun A bugler sounds Taps at the end of Naval Station Guantanamo Bays Memorial Day ceremony on Monday at the Cuzco Well Cemetery. The annual ceremony honored those who died in service to the United States. bsaes Memorial Day ceremony on Monday at the Cuzco Well Cemetery to honor fallen service members.Its the right thing to doGTMO honors the fallen with Memorial Day ceremony FEATURE THE WIRE | PAGE 11 FEATURETHE WIRE | PAGE 10

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I have peace of mind, I dont have to search anymore, I found a love thatss mine...Who is Spc. Dominique Clarke? Step foot into the Sunday 1 p.m. who he is. Stay a little longer, after the invoca tion prayer, and you will have an opportunity cal talents he has been blessed with. Here at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Spc. Dominique Clarke works for Joint Task Force Guantanamo at the detainee library, but his natural ability to sing allows him to give so much more to the GTMO community. I called Chaplain [Navy Lt. Larry] Jones and I asked, Do yall need any help with musicians? Clarke said, the 1 p.m. Sunday Gospel chorale. I play for my church back home and Im just looking to be a part, Clarke said he told Jones, continuing to talk about how his conversation went with the joyful naval station chaplain. When Clarke arrived at the Navsta chapel that Sunday, Jones called him out in the middle of a service and told him to speak to Spc. Ardel Henderson, the previous choir director, about how to get involved. I talked to him and became a part, Clarke said. And I love it. Clarkes course in his musical journey has led him to stop here at GTMO, but every note he sings and every tune he plays makes you wonder at what other places he has stopped and what kind of testimony he has. Clarke is originally from Queens, N.Y., but he now lives in Maryland. He is deployed here with the Washington, D.C. National Guard. I started out playing the drums. Thats from when I was one [year old] and then I went from there, Clarke said. At that age, Clarke didnt start off with an actual percussion instrument. He started out with a kitchen set of pots and pans to bang on. What would seem like noise and racket from a normal toddler, Clarke said his family quickly recognized rhythmic beats coming from the kitchen utensils. It didnt sound like I was just banging, so someone picked up a recorder and recorded it, Clarke said. And thats when they were like, this kid has some music in him thats hes trying to get out. As an adolescent, Clarke didnt have the opportunity to take music lessons, but he quickly learned how to enhance his skills. I think I was seven when I went to my pastor. I went to him and I was like, I want to play the drums. The pastor didnt take him seriously because of his age, but he still allowed Clarke to shadow the present drummer. I was passionate about hearing, Clarke said. I never feel like Im there I always want to get better so when I hear someone, I always want them to play so I can listen to them and take from them. Clarke said when he plays, you can hear a little bit of other musicians he previously listened to in his tunes. If another musician comes and they lis ten to me play anything, piano, drums, sing, they will be able to hear different people who have sown in my life, and thats just from me listening to them, Clarke said. I just absorb Clarke said he doesnt work hard for his musical talents they work for him. I really thank God because its a gift, Clarke said. Its a blessing. I didnt work hard for it. However, life wasnt always good and easy for Clarke. Yes, he eventu ally got a chance to play the drums at the age of nine and became the lead drumhardship in his personal and family life. He struggled as a teen searching for his father, who wasnt there for most of his life. One of the ways Clarke vented from his trials and tribulations was through singing. He said the first time he realized he could sing was at age 16 at a church service. When I sing, I sing words that minister to me, Clarke said, speaking about how he encourages himself to keep going forward. When I started singing, I just grabbed the mic one day and everyone sat there and half of the people were in tears, Clarke said. I went home, never thought anything of it, and my mother was like you could sing and there it goes, I started singing. Clarke said his family came from a musical background. My mother actually went platinum on the European side. My biological father is a drummer slash singer. That part of my family, they all sing, Clarke said. However, Clarke said he never got a chance to interact with those talented family members. Its like God set my talent, my gift, aside to be nurtured by him, Clarke said. Clarke said hes had some problems in his life, but God has brought him out of them all. He has also realized that when he thought he was going through hardship, God actually was protecting him the whole time. Im only here because of Gods grace, Clarke said. So, I have to do what I do for him for God at the 1 p.m. Sunday Gospel Service. Clarke has sung at many places and touched many people. And despite his trials, he thanks his mother, aspires to do right by his daughter and thanks God for the most part. My way of life is making sure my daughter is good, Clarke said. I want to always see a smile on her face. of time in his life, he recited a line from one of the many songs he has written I have peace of mind, dont have to search anymore, I found a love thats mine, yes Im sure, Clarke sang. The only love youre completely sure about is the love of Christ. You know, thats that love that will never leave you nor forsake you.Story and photos by Army Staff Sgt. Michael Davis Trooper Focus... ...with Dominique Clarke THE WIRE | PAGE 12 Trooper Focus THE WIRE | PAGE 13 Trooper Focus

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THE WIRE | PAGE 15 FEA TURE Column by Spc. Jessica Randon Everyones military career will eventually come to an end. Far too often, I hear prior-service individuals talk about how the military pretty much stood them up when they got out. That means the military, no matter the branch, didnt provide them with a proper exit didnt help them transition or find work and didnt help them situate their future. Dont get me wrong, I believe that if anyone should be catered to, it should be the service members who go to war and fight in combat and service members who dedicate 110 percent of them selves to serving a people who at the end of the day would not do the same for them. But, unfortunately that is not reality. Everyone has different experiences when serving in the military some good and some bad, but I think that you choose what you take from it and how you use it to build your future. Some people have career fields that transfer on to the civilian side easily and some dont. But, if you dont have that perfect military occupational specialty, then take what you do have experience. When I say experience, I dont necessarily mean within your career field but just different things you learn and grow from while serving. The biggest thing I will take from my service is the appreciation for diversity, which enhanced my ability to remain open-minded and patient. OK, OK, so Im not the most patient person in the world, but I acknowledge when Im not and try to fix it, you know, Woosah style. You have people from all over the United States of America making a decision to serve their country. Granted, the reason behind each persons choice to serve may be different, but you cant deny the fact that somewhere along their enlistment timeline, their reasons may have changed. I know mine did, from experience and education to pride and respect for those who are no longer here to serve with. I always try to remember that because we all come from differ ent walks of life. We all have different morals and beliefs, thus, who am I to judge? Sometimes you accept the fact that its not always about understanding someone elses beliefs or ways of doing things but accepting it for what it is. Not everything is meant to be seen through your eyes or how you envision it. Personally, I cant stand how some things are done. For example, instead of doing things the simple, common sense way, sometimes I feel like some people may do things the longest way possible. And its not about taking the easy way out, its about thinking smarter. Over my enlistment in the military, I have grown a lot. And I have had many unforgettable experiences with unforgettable people, even those I would like to forget. And I wouldnt change any of it, ever. I take the good with the bad, and I push on because another thing Ive learned in life thus far is that you can either let the things you go through break you down or build you up. You make that decision, no one else. So at the end of the day, you take your military career and experiences and YOU turn them into a future. No one else can do that for you, and quite frankly, shame on you if you thought they would. So, dont be that person dogging the armed forces because they let you down. Get up and go get it, whatever it is youre blaming the military for not providing you. Do the research, make the calls and ask the questions. You might not be able to control everything that occurs while youre in uniform, but when you hang up that uniform, you have full control over what happens next. Be your own fortune cookie, and if nothing else, be you, be true and be beautiful. Be Your Own Fortune Cookie SOLD OUT

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THE WIRE | PAGE 16 FEA TURETROOPER T O TROOPER THE WIRE | PAGE 17 PSEC ALERT PROTECT YOUR INFO! What is social engineering? Preparing for retirement is something that many Troopers may not think is a priority during their initial entry to the armed forces. Instead of considering whether or not they should deposit money into the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) or Individual Retirement Account (IRA), many Troopers would much rather think about that new car, TV, or video game console they want to buy. I challenge leaders to go out and ask a young Trooper if he even knows what the acronyms TSP or IRA stand for. I would imagine many Troopers will not know the answer. Even as a Trooper advances through the ranks, financial planning is not something that is typically discussed nor at the forefront of conversations. Occasionally, you may see the public service announcements on Armed Forces Network (AFN) or hear one on the GTMO radio that encourages Troopers to get more information. Most of us would like to think that programs such as social security and pension programs will be there to take care of us during retirement that is, if we even think about it. Just ask yourself this question: Do I have a plan in place for my future? I asked that same question to my platoon a few months ago. While a few of my Troopers had started planning and saving, the vast majority had not and did not know where to start. Many did not even know about the TSP or that it now has a ROTH component. Currently, Im an activated Army Reservist performing my duties as a military police ing people prepare for retirement is what I do. I have had many experiences on the civilian side that have not gone particularly well due to a lack of planning by the individual. It is hard to tell someone that they dont have any money left. They ask me what to do, and I dont have an answer for them because it is often much too late. Fortunately for our Troopers, the military provides a lot of great resources to help prepare and educate them. Troopers just need to know where to go. That is where we, as leaders, come into play. We need to encourage our Troopers to start preparing now. As it stands now, many sources cite that the Social Security Administration could start running out of at the Department of Defense level dont take place. There are also discussions in Congress about overhauling the current military retire ment system. The proposed solutions include reductions or cuts to the military pension program that could affect current and future Troopers. savvy. That is why there are professionals out there to assist Troopers and point them in the right direction, which helps them make an educated decision. While the responsibility primarily is on the individual Trooper, leaders share that responsibility and therefore must be informed to care for the Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen in our formations. We must have a basic knowledge of what is out there and where we can send our Troopers to get help. Look back to when you initially entered military service. Be honest, did you think about retirement? If your answer was no, like mine, there is a good chance that your Troopers are not thinking about it either. Educate yourself and ensure your Troopers Look back to when you initially entered military service. Be honest, did you think about retirement? If your answer was no, like mine, there is a good chance that your Troopers are not thinking about it either. Sgt. st Class Thomas CollinsWatch Commander, th MP Company Preparing for retirementTrooper to Trooper GTMO Says... What is the best thing to bring to a barbecue? Sgt. Christian Hiner Spc. Anthony AadlandCoast Guard Petty Ocer 2nd ClassFilomeno Pumaren a.k.a. PumaPort Security Unit 311 Tactical EngineerSteak seasoning and awesomenessNavy Petty Ocer 2nd Class Timothy FrogueStaff Judge Advocate Red Cross Message Non-commissioned OfficerChips! No one ever brings chips.177th Military Police Brigade JVB Junior Driver and Protocol Clerk 191st Military Police CompanyMilitary PolicemanMontreal Steak Seasoning. I put that [stuff] on everything. Also, no barbecue is complete without Sam Adams or GuinnessBesides friends and family, brats

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THE BACK PAGE THE WIRE | PAGE 19 Bus #1 #2 #3 Camp America :00 :20 :40 Gazebo :02 :22 :42 NEX Trailer :03 :23 :43 Camp Delta 2 :06 :26 :46 KB 373 :10 :30 :50 TK 4 :12 :32 :52 JAS :13 :33 :53 TK 3 :14 :34 :54 TK 2 :15 :35 :55 TK 1 :16 :36 :56 West Iguana :18 :38 :58 Windjammer/Gym :21 :41 :01 Gold Hill Galley :24 :44 :04 NEX :26 :46 :16 96 Man Camp :31 :51 :11 NEX :33 :53 :13 Gold Hill Galley :37 :57 :17 Windjammer/Gym :36 :56 :16 West Iguana :39 :59 :19 TK 1 :40 :00 :20 TK 2 :43 :03 :23 TK 3 :45 :05 :25 TK 4 :47 :07 :27 KB 373 :50 :10 :30 Camp Delta 1 :52 :12 :32 IOF :54 :14 :34 NEX Trailer :57 :17 :37 Gazebo :58 :18 :38 Camp America :00 :20 :40GTMO Bus ScheduleAll buses run on the hour, 7 days/week, from 5 a.m. to 1 a.m. GTMO Religious Services NAVSTA MAIN CHAPEL Daily Catholic Mass Tues.-Fri. 5:30 p.m. Vigil Mass Saturday 5 p.m. Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Spanish-language Mass Sunday 4:35 p.m. General Protestant Sunday 11 a.m. Gospel Service Sunday 1 p.m. Christian Fellowship Sunday 6 p.m. CHAPEL ANNEX Pentecostal Gospel Sunday 8 a.m. & 5 p.m. Room D LDS Service Sunday 10 a.m. Room A Seventh Day Adventist Services Friday 7 p.m. Room 1 Sabbath School Saturday 9:15 a.m. Room 1 Sabbath Service Saturday 11:15 a.m. Room 1 Islamic Service Friday 1 p.m. Room 2 JTF TROOPER CHAPEL Protestant Worship Sunday 9 a.m. Prayer Time Wednesday 12 p.m.Downtown LyceumCamp Bulkeley FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU 1 Call the movie hotline at 4880 or visit the MWR Facebook page for more information. 31 2 3 4 6 5Now You See Me (NEW) (PG-13) 8 p.m. Fast & Furious 6 (PG-13) 10 p.m. Mud (NEW) (PG-13) 8 p.m. The Hangover III (R) 10:30 p.m. Mud (NEW) (PG-13) 8 p.m. Star Trek Into Darkness (PG-13) 10:30 p.m. Now You See Me (NEW) (PG-13) 8 p.m. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) 10 p.m. Pain & Gain (R) 8 p.m. The Hangover III (R) 8 p.m. The Big Wedding (R) 8 p.m. CLOSEDNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further noticed.Star Trek Into Darkness (PG-13) 8 p.m. CLOSEDNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further noticed.Evil Dead (Last showing) (R) 8 p.m. 42 (Last showing) (PG-13) 8 p.m. CLOSEDNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further noticed.Pain & Gain (R) 8 p.m.Downtown LyceumCamp BulkeleyLocation Run #1 Run #2 Run #3 Run #4 Windward Loop/ 0900 1200 1500 1800 East Caravella SBOQ/Marina 0905 1205 1505 1805 NEX 0908 1208 1508 1808 Phillips Park 0914 1214 1514 1814 Cable Beach 0917 1217 1517 1817 NEX 0925 1225 1525 1825 Windward Loop/ 0930 1230 1530 1830 East Caravella SBOQ/Marina 0935 1235 1535 1835 Return to Oce 0940 1240 1540 1840GTMO Beach Bus ScheduleSaturdays and Sundays only SAFE RIDE 84781 FEA TURETHE WIRE | PAGE 18 Its Friday in GTMO, and that means its grilling time! As we all know, May is Asian and this weeks BBQ Pit will give May a proper Barbecuing is always a good time, but when that much better. With that being said, I give you Kamikaze Burgers. BBQ Tip of the Week: with it. The best barbecue recipe is the one you IT!I truly enjoy writing this piece every week, and I hope you enjoy the recipes your own that you would recipe, please send them to the email listed below. UnGO, FIGHT, WIN! Pineapple Slices Lettuce Cheddar Cheese Slices BBQ Sauce Marinate the ground beef in teriyaki for at least four hours. After marinating, form beef into half inch thick patties. Press a thumb sized dimple into the center of each patty to prevent the meat from balling up. Grill the burgers over medium high heat for four to six minutes on each side. Add cheese before or after removing from grill your choice. minutes before assembling the burgers. This allows the meat to reabsorb the juices it lost during grilling. Assemble the burgers and top with pineapple and BBQ sauce. Enjoy!As told by Spc. Phil Whitaker Photo by Spc. Chalon HutsonWhits BB PitSubmit your recipes & photos to phillip.r.whitaker@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil