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The wire ( May 24, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00543

Material Information

Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Creation Date: May 24, 2013
Publication Date: 05-24-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )

Notes

System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00568

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00543

Material Information

Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Creation Date: May 24, 2013
Publication Date: 05-24-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )

Notes

System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00568


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THE WIRE Volume 14, Issue 36 Friday, May 24, 2013 Branch Battle: Captains Cup GO ARMY! Trooper Focus brings the sound waves your way with Army Sgt. Brandon Davis STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS SPOCK, A BLUE FALCON...NO! Troopers Return as Champs!

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INDEXThe Wire May 24, 2013Movie review: Star Trek Spoken Word Islander Heritage Month Best Warrior Competition Captains Cup Trooper FocusThe WIRE is the official news magazine of Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is produced by the JTF Public Affairs Office to inform and educate the Troopers of JTF Guantanamo through news, features, command guidance, sports and entertainment. This DoD news magazine is an authorized publication for the members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The WIRE are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is printed by Defense Logistics Agency Document Services with a circulation of 1,250.4 5 6 8 10 12 NEWS FROM THE BAY JTF GuantanamoCommander Rear Adm. John W. Smith Jr. Deputy Commander Army Brig. Gen. James Lettko JTF Senior Enlisted Leader Marine Sgt. Maj. Juan Hidalgo Jr. Office of Public Affairs Director Navy Capt. Robert Durand: 9928 Deputy Director Army Lt. Col. Sam House: 9927 Operations Officer Army Maj. Alvin Phillips JTF PAO Senior Enlisted Leader Army Staff Sgt. Michael Davis Jr.: 3499The WireSenior Editor Army Sgt. Jonathan Monfiletto Assistant Editor Spc. Raechel Haynes Photo Editor Army Sgt. Ferdinand Thomas Layout Editor Spc. Cody Campana Webmaster/Copy Editor Spc. Chalon Hutson Photojournalist Spc. Jessica RandonContact usEditors Desk: 3651 Commercial: 011-5399-3651 DSN: 660-3651 E-mail: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Online: www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire/wire.html Joint Task Force Guantanamo Safe Humane Legal Transparent Cover: Army Staff Sgt. Jacob DiPietro, left, and Spc. Austin Hunsaker, both of the 193rd Military Police Company, pose with the trophy they brought back to Joint Task Force Guantanamo after winning Army South Nonof more than a dozen physical and mental challenges at Joint Base San Antonio. Photo by Spc. Cody CampanaWhat can I say to convince you to stay in the Army? I recall the unit reenlistment non-commissioned officer asking me that many years ago and my answer was simply, nothing. I was ready to depart the service, echo tango suitcase, FTA, ready for college I was also tired of my current unit, the general attitude of my leaders and their often apathetic attitude towards many Soldiers in the unit. I realized later that by the time the reenlistment NCO is seeking you out the work has already been done. Convincing a Soldier to stay in the service has nothing to do with the RE-UP NCO and everything to do with the units leaders; Team Leaders, Squad Leaders, Platoon Leaders, Commanders, Sergeants Major, NCOs, and Officers. Leaders are responsible for developing Soldiers careers and ensuring they have the opportunity for success by encourag ing and nurturing their growth. Investing time in our Soldiers is like building a house; it must be deliberate and attentive to the smallest details to yield a lasting result. One of the best investments in our Soldiers is through our own example be, know, do! It pains me to hear Soldiers say all they want from their unit is to get out of it clearly some leaders missed an opportunity to challenge and inspire. Often these missed opportunities begin with well-meaning leaders that say thats too much work, not enough time off, PT can wait, the minimum effort is acceptable for now, etc, etc. These statements come from leaders that misunderstand the meaning for challenge. Soldiers joined the military to be challenged not to be coddled no one wants to tell their mom how they did the minimum required push-ups or hit the minimum amount of targets. Everyone naturally wants to be the best, complete the hardest task, win any competition, be a part of the best unit but to get there they must be inspired to do so. If you expect me to WANT to reenlist in your unit and your Army then you need to be the kind of leader I would follow into hell. The kind of leader that shows me what right looks like and pushes me to reach my full potential. This doesnt happen in the last months of an enlistment contract, it happens every day. Whenever you take the time to teach, train, and demonstrate what it means to be the very best at everything and anything you do you become the leader that makes a difference in making not just one Soldier better but our entire Army better. You become the true reenlistment NCO; the groundwork is done COMMAND on page 3 Ccommand orner THE WIRE | PAGE 3 COMMAND CORNER THE WIRE | PAGE 2 From Command Corner on Page 2GTMO History TourThe Battle of Guantanamo Bay occurred on 10-14 June 1898. Marines of the First U.S. Navy for years to come. National Marina DaySaturday June 8 is National Marina Day. Volunteer scorekeepers wantedwhen you care. Im certain if you asked SPC Hunsaker or Staff Sergeant DiPetrio what drove them to be the Soldier and NCO of the Year it would involve their leaders and a desire to be the best. Todays Army is shrinking and only the best will be retained lead your units to excellence and leave your mark on the team. offered to someone else. as a days PT. GTMO JOE by Spc. David Marquis Col. John V. BogdanCommander, Joint Detention Group

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Ever since J.J. Abrams rebooted the Star Trek series in 2009, he is quickly becoming known as the modern king of science fiction. He has produced shows such as Lost, Fringe, Revolution, and Person of Interest. He is also producer of films such as Cloverfield, Super 8, the latest Mission Impossible, and even the upcoming sequel to the Star Wars saga. So, with his reputation, there really isnt anybody else I would trust with the next segment of this generations Star Trek. And he didnt disappoint in the latest film he directed. Star Trek Into Darkness starts out fast and keeps up the pace throughout the movie. In the opening scene, James T. Kirk, played by Chris Pine, is once again captain of the USS Enterprise, and Spock is first officer, once again played by Zachary Quinto, on a planet populated with a primitive race. In order to save Spocks life, however, Kirk violates the Prime Directive and reveals the Enterprise to the native population. After this, instead of thanking him, Spock pulls a blue falcon and rats Kirk out to Admiral Pike. This leads toward a chain of events that allows them to meet the new bad guy, John Harrison, later revealed as Khan, played by Benedict Cumberbatch. Cumberbatch is a star quickly on the rise to greatness, playing roles in BBCs Sherlock, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and even upcoming parts two and three of The Hobbit, all despite having a weird looking face. In Into Darkness, he dominates the role of Khan, a 300-year-old genetically engineered superhuman, with an intellect surpassing Albert Einstein and the badass fighting ferocity of Chuck Norris times Jackie Chan. This makes him one of the scariest bad guys possible because he is unpredictable and practically unstoppable if he isnt on your side. Into Darkness features the match-up of Khan versus the Enterprise, making for another fantastic film. We also learn new things about the characters, like that Spock has a heart, and Kirk has a soul. As in the last film, there was intense action, humor, a good score and cinematography, everything a great film needs. J.J. Abrams definitely didnt miss with this film, and with a third Star Trek already slated in the future, his series will continue live long and prosper. Overall, the film seemed to lack something that would have made it near perfect, though, which is why I believe Star Trek Into Darkness deserves four banana rats.ATTENTION AMERICA:You are officially no longer a nerd just because you like Star Trek. Congratulations. Movie Review PG-13 132 min. Weekend Domestic Box Office (May 17-19) Star Trek Into Darkness Iron Man 3 The Great Gatsby $70.2 Million $35.8 Million $23.9 Million THE WIRE | PAGE 4 MOVIE REVIEW by Spc. Chalon HutsonStar Trek Into Darkness FEA TURE THE WIRE | PAGE 5 A nearly packed house at Naval Station Guantanamo Bays community center greeted the first-ever Spoken Word poetry night, as Troopers and civilians alike gathered for an evening of inspiring poems and songs on Saturday. The first-time event was sponsored by the 1300 Gospel service, and Navy Lt. Larry Jones, naval station chaplain and pastor at the service, said he hopes to make it a monthly happening, especially after seeing such a high turnout with 64 attendees and 14 performers. Though he had never been to a spoken word event before, Jones said he got the idea from the film Love Jones, in which the main character is a spoken word artist. I wanted to do it in an inspiring way here in GTMO, he said. Spoken word gives you a way to express whats on your heart. Performers came to the stage one by one to read a poem or sing a song, both original and published works. Jones got the event going by reading Robert Frosts poem Road Not Taken, while Army 2nd Lt. Dugan Turnbow followed by singing Matchbox 20s A.M. and playing guitar. Retired Sailor Chris Caton was up next, reciting poems he said he wrote while in the Navy and had put off for years reading to others. The first was called Night Star, and the second was called The Sunday That Never Was. Another retired Sailor, Darryl Lazezama, read a poem he wrote called If I Were, which he said he wrote about imagining himself in other career paths. Juanita Shaw also read a self-written poem called My Battle, My Temptations, which she said describes the struggles everyone goes through. Keeping with self-written poems, Air Force Staff Sgt. Brett Chapman read one he said he wrote while at home about people suffering around the world from. Spc. Dominque Clarke performed a song he wrote himself, singing and playing piano while Turbow accompanied him on guitar. Clarke said he wrote the song after meeting his father for the first time at age 16 but then realizing God is his true father. Im grateful for my life. Im grateful for everything hes [God] done for me, Clarke said. While the other performers recited songs and poems that already had been written down, Army Sgt. Brian Godette excited the crowd with a freestyle poem that he said he came up with as he went along on stage. Rounding out the night was Erica Hughes, who sang a self-written song about confidence. She said she got the idea when she thought about what she needed in her life. After the host asked if anyone from the audience wanted to perform, Petty Officer 3rd Class Rashad Beamon read a self-written poem called Why She Wont Love Me. It was a great event, Jones said. It was a great mix of poetry and songs. Spoken Word event inspires GTMO with songs and poems Army 2nd Lt. Dugan Turnbow, left, plays guitar while Spc. Domique Clarke sings and plays piano at the Spoken Word event at the Naval Station Guantanamo Bay community center on Saturday. The Juanita Shaw recites a poem called My Battle, My Temptations, which she said is about the struggles everyone goes through in their lives. Erica Hughes sings and plays guitar to a song about what she needed in her life. Army Sgt. Brian Godette tries a freestyle poem, exciting the crowd with the performance and coming up with the words as he goes along.

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THE WIRE | PAGE 6 FEA TURE Life in the military is a composition of opposites, specifically uniformity and diversity. Every service has their uniform their way of training, and their own ser vices history, yet everyone is still different. A look around a military unit shows a variety of differences different sizes, genders, and cultures. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay is no exception. Everywhere you look there is a variety of cultures. The GTMO Multicultural Observance Committee held its monthly Lunch and Learn event at the community center on May 16. This months theme was Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. It is designated every May of each year and has been since 1978, since President Jimmy Carter signed the proclamation to make it so, Multicultural Observance Committee president Navy Lt. Larry Jones said. It is in recognition of the first Japanese people to come to the United States on May 7, 1843, and it marks the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad on May 10, 1869. The Lunch and Learn event started with a reading of President Carters proclamation, and Navy Lt. Tung Tran, a naval station chaplain, shared his story about leaving Vietnam. Chaplain Tran was chosen to be the guest speaker because he is Vietnamese, and I wanted to put a spe cial touch on the program by allowing him to share his story, Jones said. He was a refugee. He was one of the millions who tried to escape communist Vietnam and did escape. He has been blessed with success by becoming an American citizen, a Catholic priest, and a commissioned officer in the chaplain corps. He is now able to give back. Next, attendees were invited to sample a variety of Asian and Pacific Island cuisine, which included spring rolls, japchae, and noodles. While attendees enjoyed their samples, Soldiers from the 525th Military Police Battalion performed traditional Samoan and Hawaiian dances for them. Its really neat to be a part of an organization that promotes cultural diversity and recognition, Jones said. It also incorporates the military because this is a right that we fight for, the freedom to celebrate diversity. It makes our organization flow better because we have that mutual understanding of cultural differences, and at the same time we can come together to accomplish the mission. And this was just so much fun to do. The final dance required the participation of the daughter of the greatest chief. In the absence of a chiefs daughter, the commanding officer of the 525th MP Battalion, Army Lt.Col. Darcy Overbey, was brought up to dance with the performers. Jones said the turnout for the Lunch and Learn event was great and that it showed the importance of this event to have so many people attend. It is important to have these observances because this is a right that we fight for. It helps to foster better work relations among the diverse cultures in the military, Jones said. It helps to lessen the prejudice and apprehension we can feel around people who are different. Its a way to say thank you to those who fought for freedom and to put a visual on a different culture, a different story. Everyones story is unique and develops them into who they are. Story and photos by Spc. Raechel Haynes GTMO celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month Army Lt.Col. Darcy Overbey (left) and Army Capt. Gregory Archbold (middle) perform traditional Hawaiian and Samoan dances with Soldiers of the 525th Soldiers from the 525th MP battalion perform traditional Hawaiian and Samoan dances for attendees at the Lunch and Learn event. Lunch and Leanr event. Attendees sampled dishes from several different countries.

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Spc. Austin Hunsaker (right), 525th Military Police Battalion, assembles a M249 machine gun as his grader looks on at the U.S. Army Souths Best Warrior Competition. (U.S. Army Photo by Master Sgt. Kevin Doheny, U.S. Army South Public Affairs) (U.S. Army Photo by Master Sgt. Kevin Doheny, U.S. Army South Public Affairs) What kind of events did you participate in?I think that being a joint base competition, you have five large divisions. So, they put their strong suits together and they built a competition, basically a super compe Hawk helicopter, another division provided [situation training exercise] lanes to where we had a Middle Eastern town that was really authentic. A lot of stuff like that was stuff that GTMO cant duplicate, stuff that made it feel like we were really on a mission. When we were there doing the STX lanes on day three, there was a full day of doing warrior tasks and drills. Youre in a Middle Eastern town, and they have everything going like its live. They had grenades going off and all sorts of stuff. I felt like I was in Iraq dur ing the medical lane. They have you running Army Staff Sgt. Jacob DiPietro and Spc. Austin Hunsaker, both military policemen with the 193rd Military Police Company, returned to Naval South against each other in a grueling four-day competition, May 13-17, where only two of the many would succeed. in there, they have a guy yelling at you saying, This guy is dying! They had real blood spurting out of the dummys leg. I wrecked them, that the Army will hopefully reimburse me for. That was the coolest thing in the whole competition.What would you say the tempo of the competition was?For all four days, we probably got a total of 10 hours of sleep.What would you say was the hardest event?On the fourth day, after being outside straight and you go out to do a ruck march thats 12 miles at high intensity. Its a lot different than just showing up and doing a 16-miler while youre still fresh. I probably went through the worst pain I have ever had in a competition during that ruck. It was just complete body destruction.Are you looking forward to going to the United States Army Forces Command?In my eyes, we are halfway there. This is a big and an ongoing competition. It starts at company level and eventually goes up to the Department of the Army, which is the end result in October.Is there anyone who was instrumental in your success that you would like to thank?Sergeant DiPietro helped me with the boards. He trained me for days and days and days, cramming the information in my head. Not just making me memorize it, but actually learning it and what the curriculum actually means. I just want to thank Master Sgt. cially, I would like to thank for my success. Spc. Cody Campana Spc. Cody CampanaWhat kind of events did you participate in?They had everything from just a basic PT test all the way to the [situation training exercise] lanes, obstacle course, combatives tournament, ruck march of 12 miles. It had 14 to 15 different things. What would you say the tempo of the competition was? There wasnt that much off time, and when you were off, you just wanted to relax. stress test. There were a few older gentle men, such as myself, there trying to compete against these younger guys, and it was a good test. It was good physical and mental test for a week.What would you say was the hardest event?For me, it was the 12-mile ruck march. I just hadnt done that in a long time. The last time I did that much was probably four years ago. It was rough.Was there any difference going into compared to the junior enlisted? NCOs as far as warrior tasks. Skill level two and three stuff we had to do on top of all the other stuff. It was good to get out there and brush up on things I already knew and do stuff that I have never done. NCOs had to adjust to indirect fire, where we call in mock artillery. Ive never done that before in my life. That was an awesome STX lane, and Soldiers didnt get to do that. It was a skill level two and three task. The competition was extremely stressful, but did you learn anything from participating?They made sure every day, if you failed to do something or if a group failed to do something, we would take the free time we would have had and trained in that. So what titles did you two win?We both won Army South NCO and Soldier of the Year. Thats what we went there for. Hunsaker won Army South and then beat every Soldier in the other divisions.What is the next step of the competitions for you two? States Army Forces Command] for both home that win, theres only one more level and thats NCO and Soldier of the year for the entire Army. Were a pretty good team. I trained him for all the mental stuff. Things that he lacks from not being in the Army that long and hes more of just a physical beast so he gets my old [butt] in shape.What would you say was the coolest event of the competition?The STX lanes were the most well organized day that Ive seen out of any coma helo, and as soon as you got there, youre tion, grenade throwing, all kinds of stuff. It Is there anything else you would like to say about the competition?It was a rough week for me and him [Hunsaker]. To come out on top just proves if you put forth the effort, you can get the result youre looking for. You just got to try.Spc. Austin Hunsaker, 193rd Military Police CompanyStaff Sgt. Jacob DiPietro, 193rd Military Police CompanyU.S. Army Souths best Warrior winner and Joint Base San Antonios Soldier of the Year U.S. Army Souths best Warrior Non-commissioned officer winner THE WIRE | PAGE 8 FEA TURE THE WIRE | PAGE 9 FEA TURE

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Saturday afternoon. Story and photos by Spc. Cody Campana Naval Station Guantanamo Bays Morale, Welfare, and Recreation held its first Captains Cup Sports Challenge last Friday and Saturday. The challenge consisted of ten different events and pitted service against service in an ultimate showdown in celebra tion of Armed Forces Day. This was to put the military personnel here in the spotlight as it was active duty only. It was also a celebration of Armed Forces day, which was the 18th of May, and to show our appreciation for our troops not only here in GTMO but everywhere else, said Jim Holbert, the MWR sports coordinator. Overall, the amount of participants may have been one of the largest that GTMO has seen in years. Eighty-five teams [participated]. The Army had 20, the Navy had 20, the Coast Guard had 17, the Air Force had 11, and the Marines had 17, Holbert said. A lot of those teams were individuals competing with everyone else. [We] only had a total of 37 for the team events. Holbert noted that approximately 300 Troopers in total participated. Troopers began early Friday morning with a 5K, then later in the day, they competed in a home run derby, a punt-pass-kick competi a three versus three basketball tournament. Saturdays events included a nine-hole golf tournament, a softball tournament, a petition, and an all American favorite: the tug-of-war competition. Some of the tournaments had outcomes that were unexpected, such as the crippling defeat of the Marine Corps by the Navy Though they lost to one of their oldest ser vice rivals, the Marines seemed to keep their motivation up. We did pretty good. We could have done better, said Lance Cpl. Brandan Wilkerson, with the Marine Corps Security Force. It was all just competition and fun and games. Overall, we in the Marine Corps did pretty well. Even with the loss under their belt, some and continued on the inter-service bickering. Ill probably say we worked all week and they rehearsed all week, Wilkerson said. Keep it up. We are a department of the Navy, and we are good friends. Keep the competitions going, and we appreciate your service as well. dent in their standing, but at the end of the day, the Army nearly swept with a win of 82 overall points. Prizes were not given away, but a single trophy was given to the Army and another to MWR, which it will put on display to commemorate the landslide victory of the Army against the other services. The winning branch gets to keep one trophy, and MWR keeps one, Holbert said. For those who arent happy with the extraordinary win of the Army this year, you can train and bring youre A game next May in the second Captains Cup. like this, and it will happen once a year on Armed Forces Day, Holbert said. Cup Captains 2013 FEATURE THE WIRE | PAGE 11 FEATURETHE WIRE | PAGE 10

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From the streets of Harlem to the island of Cuba, Army Sgt. Brandon Davis walks us through his journey from an aspiring rapper to uniformed soldier and the passions between the two.Wire : Where are you from originally? Nova : Im from Harlem, N.Y. Wire : Were here to talk about your music and military Nova : Music. Wire: And how old were you when you got into music? Nova : Um, I was about 12 I think. Wire : And what was it that got you into the music scene? Nova: It was pretty much a followthe-leader kind of thing. My cousins used to rap, so I pretty much just fell in behind them. Wire: So, other than your cousins, who else was influential for you at such a young age? What other music Nova : I couldnt even begin to tell you. Wire: OK, so what about now? Nova : Oh, number one, Drake and Jay Z. Wire : Interesting selections. What is it about these artists that you dig so much? Nova: Well, I actually stopped rapping when I joined the Army. I started again after hearing Drakes like to write about relationships, so when he came out, he was good at talking about whatever he was feeling at that time. He didnt really care. Wire: So, what about Jay-Z? Nova: Jay-Z has always been a favor ite of mine. The first CD I ever bought was Jay-Zs Hard Knock Life album. I remember because my mother gave me $20 and told me I could either buy a hat or a CD, and I chose Jay-Zs CD. Wire: All right, so, when did you start recording? Nova: I began recording in 2011, and since then Ive put out three CDs or mix-tapes. Wire: And how would you describe the type of music you make? Nova: I would say that I make music for people who are not afraid to be themselves. I dont make music for the streets. Im not a hood kind of dude. I dont do gangster rap. I just like to talk about life, love, things that inspire me. Wire: So, I got a good feel for who you are musically, but lets talk military. When did you enlist? Nova: I enlisted in the Army back in 2007. Wire: I listened to one of your songs, and it mentioned giving the military a try but ultimately returning to music. So, can you tell me how long you think you will do the military life before devot ing yourself completely to your music? Nova: I plan on being in the Army until I cant do it anymore. Music right now is more of a side thing, mainly because I a hobby than anything. But, of course, if anyone would like to sign me to their label, I wouldnt be objecting to that either. Wire : OK, and now you have a few songs that youve done that are really geared towards the military. One of them that I am a personal fan of is When You Come Home. Tell me a little bit about that song. Nova : I had a real tight group of friends that were in Iraq with me, and they always told me to do a song about us, as in Soldiers, and so I did. And Im not just talking about the Army. Im talking about every branch of the military in this song. You know, at home, its like people have all of these perceptions of service members. Some people respect us, and some people dont. So, through the song, I pretty much touch on the trials and tribulations we face that others may not always understand. I really think that service mem bers will like it. Wire particular and a lot of your other songs as well. If people are interested in checking you out, how can they get in touch? Nova by searching Nova Sosa, Twitter is @ Nova_Sosa, Instagram is @Nova_ Sosa, and if youre on YouTube, you can just type in Nova Sosa and all of my videos will pop up. Photos by Army Sgt. Ferdinand ThomasInterview by Spc. Jessica Randon Trooper Focus Nova Sosa THE WIRE | PAGE 12 Trooper Focus THE WIRE | PAGE 13 Trooper Focus

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FEATURE Go! Go! Go!The month of May is definitely a busy month. Being highlighted for some significant holidays, such as Memorial Day and Mothers Day, as well as the variety of different things the month acknowledges, theres no reason for you to not get out and celebrate or raise awareness for a cause thats dear to your heart or that you may want to know more about. From Asian American/Pacific Islander Heritage Month, Better Sleep Month, and National Motorcycle Safety Month, to Modern Dance Month, National Bike Month and even National Salsa Month, there are endless options. Get out and get involved today! Only you can make your time worthwhile, so find what suits you and do it! Let your hair down, be free, and have some fun. Enjoying life means you have to live it. Spc. Jessica Randon THE WIRE | PAGE 15

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TROOPER T O TROOPER THE WIRE | PAGE 17 THE WIRE | PAGE 16 FEA TURE PSEC ALERT PROTECT YOUR INFO! What to do with old uniforms Is the glass half-empty or half-full? How you answer this age-old question may be a you are an optimist or a pessimist may even and you were probably surrounded by positive Maintaining a positive attitude doesnt A primary way to help promote a positive atmosphere is to surround yourself with supshould identify areas of your life that you Having a positive attitude just means that you approach issues in a more positive and productive way. Sgt. st Class Brian WhiteWatch Commander, th MP Company Positive attitudeTrooper to Trooper GTMO Says... As a service member, what does Memorial Day mean to you? Senior Airman Daniel Mack Marine Staff Sgt. Alfredo Hernandez Navy Religious Programs Specialist 3rd Class Tommy Trocino Coast Guard Machinery Technician 1st Class Humberto Medina Sgt. 1st Class John Troxell JTF-GTMO J2 JTF-GTMO J2 Remembering the past. Why were free and who made us that way, as in the service members who gave their lives for us. Just remembering all those who have gone before us. Making our selves to be more like them, learning from their mistakes but also from their successes. Its a time of remembrance where we really try to thank God and count our blessings and realize the sacrifices that a lot of service members made. We know the sacrifices we make, and we have people that made the ultimate sacrifice. To me, as a naturalized citizen, it has a more profound meaning, knowing that many [naturalized citizens] before us have sacrificed their lives to be a part of the United States. Its in memory of all of the fall en comrades of the past, as well as friends and family.

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FEATURETHE WIRE | PAGE 18 Hello, ladies and gentlemen, and welcome to another edition of Whits BBQ Pit. Throughout the week, I found myself thinking about those scenarios where the grill might not be an option. A rainy day, the time you forget the charcoal, or the rare inty are just a few examples of things that could ruin your weekend grilling adventure. So, loyal Pit followers, get your slow cookers ready because it is that time again! Today, Phils Grill makes its way to the kitchen and gives you BBQ Chicken Nachos. We have all been at the concession counter at a sport ing event craving the plastic bowl of stale chips and nacho cheese, but let me assure you that this craving will never happen again! Overall, the BBQ Chicken Nachos are easy to make. Slow cooking the chicken takes some time, but the rest of the recipe is quick and easy to prepare. BBQ Tip of the Week: Rest... I recently saw a website comparing meat that had been barbequed and then rested for varying amounts of time. The unrested sample had juices running out everywhere, whereas the sample that had sat for a while before being cut looked lovely and juicy on the inside without any juices on the plate. Its all about letting the meat relax and take back the juices after the intensity of the heat.Losing the opportunity to light the coals is never ideal, but there will always be other options for a great barbeque meal. Enjoy the BBQ Chicken Nachos, and until next time, GO, FIGHT, WIN! Green Onion (optional) Ranch Dressing BBQ Sauce Shredded Cheddar Cheese Tortilla Chips 1 Pack of Bacon (2) 1 lb. Chicken BreastsChicken Directions: Place chicken breasts in slow cooker Add 1 cup of BBQ sauce Set on Low setting and let cook for 3 hours Once 3 hours have passed, shred chicken in slow cooker and let set on Warm setting Nachos Directions: Pre-heat oven to 325 degrees Layer tortilla chips on a cookie sheet Distribute shredded cheese over the chips Add another layer of tortilla chips and cover with more cheese Distribute shredded chicken throughout the chips and drizzle BBQ sauce over entire tray Crumble bacon and spread over the whole tray Bake in oven for 10 minutes Blend ranch dressing and a small amount of BBQ sauce in a bowl and use as a cool dip for the As told by Spc. Phil Whitaker Photo by Spc. Chalon HutsonWhits BB PitSubmit your recipes & photos to phillip.r.whitaker@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil THE BACK PAGE THE WIRE | PAGE 19 Bus #1 #2 #3 Camp America :00 :20 :40 Gazebo :02 :22 :42 NEX Trailer :03 :23 :43 Camp Delta 2 :06 :26 :46 KB 373 :10 :30 :50 TK 4 :12 :32 :52 JAS :13 :33 :53 TK 3 :14 :34 :54 TK 2 :15 :35 :55 TK 1 :16 :36 :56 West Iguana :18 :38 :58 Windjammer/Gym :21 :41 :01 Gold Hill Galley :24 :44 :04 NEX :26 :46 :16 96 Man Camp :31 :51 :11 NEX :33 :53 :13 Gold Hill Galley :37 :57 :17 Windjammer/Gym :36 :56 :16 West Iguana :39 :59 :19 TK 1 :40 :00 :20 TK 2 :43 :03 :23 TK 3 :45 :05 :25 TK 4 :47 :07 :27 KB 373 :50 :10 :30 Camp Delta 1 :52 :12 :32 IOF :54 :14 :34 NEX Trailer :57 :17 :37 Gazebo :58 :18 :38 Camp America :00 :20 :40GTMO Bus ScheduleAll buses run on the hour, 7 days/week, from 5 a.m. to 1 a.m. GTMO Religious Services NAVSTA MAIN CHAPEL Daily Catholic Mass Tues.-Fri. 5:30 p.m. Vigil Mass Saturday 5 p.m. Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Spanish-language Mass Sunday 4:35 p.m. General Protestant Sunday 11 a.m. Gospel Service Sunday 1 p.m. Christian Fellowship Sunday 6 p.m. CHAPEL ANNEX Pentecostal Gospel Sunday 8 a.m. & 5 p.m. Room D LDS Service Sunday 10 a.m. Room A Seventh Day Adventist Services Friday 7 p.m. Room 1 Sabbath School Saturday 9:15 a.m. Room 1 Sabbath Service Saturday 11:15 a.m. Room 1 Islamic Service Friday 1 p.m. Room 2 JTF TROOPER CHAPEL Protestant Worship Sunday 9 a.m. Prayer Time Wednesday 12 p.m.Downtown LyceumCamp Bulkeley FRI SAT SUN MON TUE WED THU 25 Call the movie hotline at 4880 or visit the MWR Facebook page for more information. 24 26 27 28 30 29The Hangover III (NEW) (R) 8 p.m. Pain & Gain (NEW) (R) 10:30 p.m. Epic (NEW) (PG) 8 p.m. Fast & Furious 6 (NEW) (PG-13) 10 p.m. Fast & Furious 6 (NEW) (PG-13) 8 p.m. The Big Wedding (NEW) (R) 10 p.m. The Hangover III (NEW) (R) 8 p.m. Pain & Gain (NEW) (R) 10:30 p.m. The Big Wedding (NEW) (R) 8 p.m. Star Trek Into Darkneess (PG-13) 10 p.m. Epic (NEW) (PG) 8 p.m. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) 10 p.m. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 8 p.m. CLOSEDNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further noticed.G.I. Joe: Retaliation (Last showing) (PG-13) 8 p.m. CLOSEDNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further noticed.Evil Dead (R) 8 p.m. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) 8 p.m. CLOSEDNote: Concessions at Camp Bulkeley are also closed every night until further noticed.Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 8 p.m.Downtown LyceumCamp BulkeleyLocation Run #1 Run #2 Run #3 Run #4 Windward Loop/ 0900 1200 1500 1800 East Caravella SBOQ/Marina 0905 1205 1505 1805 NEX 0908 1208 1508 1808 Phillips Park 0914 1214 1514 1814 Cable Beach 0917 1217 1517 1817 NEX 0925 1225 1525 1825 Windward Loop/ 0930 1230 1530 1830 East Caravella SBOQ/Marina 0935 1235 1535 1835 Return to Oce 0940 1240 1540 1840GTMO Beach Bus ScheduleSaturdays and Sundays only SAFE RIDE 84781

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Register by Wednesday, May 22 at Denich Gym or on the day of the run. FMI, call 2113. Honor and Remember Free, Open to All Hands