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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00399
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: 02-26-2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00399

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Volume 11, Issue 1 Friday, February 12, 2010 Volume 11, Issue 3 Friday, February 26, 2010 Prayer Breakfast Enlightenment for the Troops A JTF Journal THE Old wood gets new life JTF continues relief efforts

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Around the Danny Sheldon JTF N3 LCPO__________________________________ One recurring comment Ive consistently heard at one time or another from Joint Task Force Troopers is that they are anxious to move on from this assignment. This mission we are tasked to carry out is not an easy one. We are challenged every day by the demands put upon us as we carry out our responsibilities. In the midst of these challenges, it is easy to lose focus of whats important and allow our guard to fall to the side. Id like to challenge each of you to take this time to look at things in a different way and allow the time you spend here to be a time of staying the course. Use what is within you to begin to those things that you may have lost sight of and roles you have weathered at work, home or in your community. By being grounded in our values, we are able to shape our commitments and you value the type of Soldier, Sailor, Airman, Marine or Coast Guardsmen that you are, your actions should uphold the importance of that value. ethics, professionalism and ability to lead, as well as follow others. In others words, you should strive to succeed in activities that will show how well rounded you are and reinforce a level of commitment to your career. However, you may not be where you need to be in upholding your value of being the best Trooper. To know these values, you need to take time and honestly evaluate where you stand. Take into consideration any and all feedback you receive, both formally and informally. If you tend to hear repeatedly of an area where improvement is needed, you should make a plan to do better in that area. By setting goals, we improve or move best way to go about reaching them. By setting high standards for ourselves, we are able to see the progress we are making. Its been proven that writing down our goals and tracking your progress increases the probability for succeeding. Make sure and realistic. The goals we set for ourselves help build our roadmap, which helps us to stay the course. Finally, choosing someone, a mentor, to share your roadmap with will help keep you on track. You should pick someone who has a vested interest in seeing you grow to your full potential, thereby assisting you in staying the course. To all: One Team, One Fight, lets stay the course! Joint environment provides opportunity for developmentStaying the courseJTF-GTMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Mark H. Buzby Joint Task Force CMC: Navy Command Master Chief Brad LeVault Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Rick Haupt: 9928 Deputy: Army Lt. Col. Edward Bush: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. Patrick Sellen: 3649The WireEditor: Army Staff Sgt. Paul Meeker: 3651 Assistant Editor: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeff Johnstone: 3594 Layout and Design: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary Keen: 3594 Army Sgt. Scott Griffin: 3594 Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Web Design: Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Wolff: 8154 Staff Writers: Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Army Spc. Shanita Simmons: 3589 Army Spc. Daniel Welch: 3589Contact us:Base Information: 2000 Public Affairs Office: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651Cover Photo By:Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert ClowneyOnline:www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milJointTaskForce-Guantanamo, produces The Wire, which is printed under the provisions of Department of Defense Instruction 5120.4 The Public Affairs OfficeJTF GUANTANAMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. David M. Thomas, Jr. Joint Task Force Command Master Chief: Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Brian T. Schexnaydre Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Pauline Storum: 9928 Deputy Director: Army Capt. Kim Kleiman: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. James Venske: 3649The WireExecutive Editor: Army 1st Lt. Adam Bradley: 3596 Editor:Army Sgt. 1st Class Vaughn R. Larson: 3651Assistant Editors: Army Staff Sgt. Emily Russell: 3592 Army Staff Sgt. Gretel Sharpee: 3594 Staff Writers: Army Spc. Megan Burnham: 2171 Army Spc. Eric Liesse: 3499Contact usEditors Desk: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651 Email: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Online: www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milThe WIRE is the official news magazine of Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is produced by the JTF Public Affairs Office to inform and educate the Troopers of JTF Guantanamo through news, features, command guidance, sports and entertainment. The WIRE seeks to provide maximum disclosure with minimum delay with regards to security, accuracy, propriety and policy. This DoD news magazine is an authorized publication for the members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The WIRE are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is printed by the Document Automation & Production Service with a circulation of 1000. COVER: JTF-GTMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Mark H. Buzby Joint Task Force CMC: Navy Command Master Chief Brad LeVault Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Rick Haupt: 9928 Deputy: Army Lt. Col. Edward Bush: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. Patrick Sellen: 3649The WireEditor: Army Staff Sgt. Paul Meeker: 3651 Assistant Editor: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeff Johnstone: 3594 Layout and Design: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary Keen: 3594 Army Sgt. Scott Griffin: 3594 Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Web Design: Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Wolff: 8154 Staff Writers: Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Army Spc. Shanita Simmons: 3589 Army Spc. Daniel Welch: 3589Contact us:Base Information: 2000 Public Affairs Office: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651Cover Photo By:Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert ClowneyOnline:www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milJointTaskForce-Guantanamo, produces The Wire, which is printed under the provisions of Department of Defense Instruction 5120.4 The Public Affairs Office PAGE 2 | THE WIRETROO P ER-T O-TROO P ER | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010JTF-GTMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Mark H. Buzby Joint Task Force CMC: Navy Command Master Chief Brad LeVault Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Rick Haupt: 9928 Deputy: Army Lt. Col. Edward Bush: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. Patrick Sellen: 3649The WireEditor: Army Staff Sgt. Paul Meeker: 3651 Assistant Editor: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeff Johnstone: 3594 Layout and Design: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary Keen: 3594 Army Sgt. Scott Griffin: 3594 Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Web Design: Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Wolff: 8154 Staff Writers: Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Army Spc. Shanita Simmons: 3589 Army Spc. Daniel Welch: 3589Contact us:Base Information: 2000 Public Affairs Office: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651Cover Photo By:Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert ClowneyOnline:www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milJointTaskForce-Guantanamo, produces The Wire, which is printed under the provisions of Department of Defense Instruction 5120.4 The Public Affairs OfficeJTF GUANTANAMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. David M. Thomas, Jr. Joint Task Force Command Master Chief: Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Brian T. Schexnaydre Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Pauline Storum: 9928 Deputy Director: Army Capt. Kim Kleiman: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. James Venske: 3649The WireExecutive Editor: Army 1st Lt. Adam Bradley: 3596 Editor:Army Sgt. 1st Class Vaughn R. Larson: 3651Assistant Editors: Army Staff Sgt. Emily Russell: 3592 Army Staff Sgt. Gretel Sharpee: 3594 Staff Writers: Army Spc. Megan Burnham: 2171 Army Spc. Eric Liesse: 3499Contact usEditors Desk: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651 Email: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Online: www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milThe WIRE is the official news magazine of Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is produced by the JTF Public Affairs Office to inform and educate the Troopers of JTF Guantanamo through news, features, command guidance, sports and entertainment. The WIRE seeks to provide maximum disclosure with minimum delay with regards to security, accuracy, propriety and policy. This DoD news magazine is an authorized publication for the members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The WIRE are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is printed by the Document Automation & Production Service with a circulation of 1000. COVER: JTF-GTMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Mark H. Buzby Joint Task Force CMC: Navy Command Master Chief Brad LeVault Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Rick Haupt: 9928 Deputy: Army Lt. Col. Edward Bush: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. Patrick Sellen: 3649The WireEditor: Army Staff Sgt. Paul Meeker: 3651 Assistant Editor: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeff Johnstone: 3594 Layout and Design: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary Keen: 3594 Army Sgt. Scott Griffin: 3594 Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Web Design: Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Wolff: 8154 Staff Writers: Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Army Spc. Shanita Simmons: 3589 Army Spc. Daniel Welch: 3589Contact us:Base Information: 2000 Public Affairs Office: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651Cover Photo By:Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert ClowneyOnline:www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milJointTaskForce-Guantanamo, produces The Wire, which is printed under the provisions of Department of Defense Instruction 5120.4 The Public Affairs Office JTF GUANTANAMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Tom Copeman Command Master Chief: Navy Master Chief Petty Officer Scott A. Fleming: Office of Public Affairs Director: Navy Cmdr. Brook DeWalt: 9928 Deputy Director: Navy Lt. James Gonzales: 9927 Operations Officer: Army Capt. Robert Settles: 3596 Supervisor: Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Randy Dunham: 3649 The Wire Executive Editor, Command Information NCOIC, Photojournalist: Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Edward Flynn: 3592 Editor, Photojournalist: Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Marcos T. Hernandez: 3651 Photojournalists: Navy Lt. Jonathan Ryan Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Michael Watkins Navy Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Zachary Harris Navy Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Mathew Campbell Navy Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Shane Arrington Army Sgt. Derrol Fulghum Air Force Staff Sgt. Angela Ruiz Army Spc. Tiffany Addair Army Spc. Cody Black Marine Lance Cpl. Justin Wheeler Contact us Editors Desk: 3592 or 2171 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3592 DSN: 660-3592 E-mail: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Online: www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milThe WIRE is the official news magazine of Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is produced by the JTF Public Affairs Office to inform and educate the Troopers of JTF Guantanamo through news, features, command guidance, sports and entertainment. The WIRE seeks to provide maximum disclosure with minimum delay with regards to security, accuracy, propriety and policy. This DoD news magazine is an authorized publication for the members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The WIRE are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is printed by the Document Automation & Production Service with a circulation of 1,000. COVER:Reverend Darrell D. Morton, a Woodridge, Va. native, addresses Troopers during a prayer breakfast held at Camp Americas Seaside Galley, Feb. 24. Morton was a guest speaker and is a retired veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. Athneil Thomas BACK COVER: 24. Around Naval Station Guantanamo Bay many of natures creatures and plant life can be found. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Spc. Tiffany Addair

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NE W S & INF ORMA T IO N | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 PAGE 3 | THE WIRE Mechanics at sea Army Sgt. Derrol Fulghum JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs____________________________Without planes, the Air Force would be a land force. Likewise, without boats, the Coast Guard would be a shore-bound organization. Thats why its imperative to have a strong team of able mechanics to keep the boats in perfect working order for the Maritime Safety and Security Team 91103. The Los Angeles-based unit is deployed here to perform maritime antiterrorism and force protection duties for Joint Task Force Guantanamo. As part of the JTF mission, members of the Coast Guard work to keep Guantanamo Bay safe and secure, and have been doing so since 2002. To perform that mission, highly trained mechanics pull together to keep every water craft in tip-top condition. Coast Guard Machinery Technician 2nd Class Roxana Guerrero is one of those mechanics who plays an essential role in the MSST mission. I believe everyone is here for a reason, said Guerrero. No matter how small the Guerrero spends eight to 12 hours a day broken ones, but tuning up the working ones as part of a service check routine before any craft heads out to water. If we dont do our job, the safety of the base could be at stake, she said. Coast Guard Electricians Mate 2nd Class John Frangullie said the mission in Guantanamo Bay keeps him and his fellow mechanics very busy. I dont mind it, though, said Frangullie. Staying busy helps me keep my mind off being so far away from home. Frangullie has decided to take the time while hes here to learn as much as he can about different motors and boat systems, and to get into shape. Coast Guard Lt. Bryan Burkhalter, the performance of his Guardians. I appreciate the hard work our [Guardians] put in every day, said Burkhalter. Theyre out there on the boats and turning wrenches. Im proud of them. Burkhalter said he loves being deployed and helping everyone put their training to use in an operational environment. You know, were out there on the water every day, slaying the dragon, he said. We feel useful. (From left to right) Coast Guard Damage Controlman 3rd Class Kyle Thompson, Coast Guard Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Michael Walker and Coast Guard Boatswains Mate 1st Class Jason Dyer drop a boat into the waters of Guantanamo Bay, Feb, 22. JTF Guantanamo photo by Marine Lance Cpl. Justin R. Wheeler

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MISSION | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 PAGE 4 | THE WIREPAGE 4 | THE WIRE Combined Task Force 48: Leading the way, helping peoplest Class Edward Flynn JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs_________________________Saving lives, helping people and providing humanitarian relief during devastation has always been a cornerstone of the U.S. military. It is in that historic was organized by the U.S. government within days of the Jan. 12 devastating 7.0 earthquake in Haiti. This rapid deployment sent people, food, supplies and medical assistance to the crippled island nation. Due to its close proximity to Haiti, Naval Station Guantanamo Bay was selected to play an integral part in delivering humanitarian relief. Therefore, Combined Task Force 48 was established on Jan. 17, to be the parent organization owning the operation of a Joint Logistic Hub. The military personnel here are working non-stop, coordinating the air and sea assets to deliver immediate, lifesaving supplies to Haiti, said Navy Rear Adm. Patricia Wolfe, CTF 48 commander. Guantanamo Bay is a critical asset to meet the strategic needs in this region. Were using all conceivable means to get supplies to Haiti where they are needed. This small naval base, located in the heart of the Caribbean, has a long and proud tradition of using its strategic location to provide humanitarian assistance and support to the countries in this region. CTF 48 used both air and sea assets to provide the humanitarian relief in support of the citizens of Haiti. Joint Task Force Guantanamo partnered with the naval station to assist in this operation, providing expertise and local knowledge for the coordination and delivery of supplies and aid. Operations took place in every pocket and corner of the installation. The air terminal at Guantanamo Bay hosted a variety of aircraft. The sea port at the naval station accepted various military and international ships and allowed them to dock at the naval station to pick up, transfer and deliver supplies. I am proud to be here and part of this humanitarian relief effort, said Navy Aviation Boatswains Mate (Equipment) 1st Class Taiwo Samson, a passenger processing coordinator at the air terminal at the naval station. The people of Haiti need our help. This is why I enlisted in the Navy. To be part of helping people in need. This is an incredible experience and feeling. Samson, who is permanently assigned to USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), was temporarily assigned to CTF 48 to coordinate passenger and relief supplies to Haiti. Being part of this task force is something Ill always remember, said Navy Aviation Boatswains Mate (Equipment) Airman Claudia Losco, another crew member of Roosevelt temporarily attached to the task force. Although it was fast-paced in a demanding environment, everyone worked together as a team. Since the task force was established, the Logistics Hub has been the focal point for the receipt and transfer of more than 1,860,000 bottles of water, 962,000 individual meal medical supplies and equipment to the Haiti joint area of operations. Force 48 was established on Jan. 17, to rapidly use air and sea assets to provide humanitarian relief and support to the citizens of Haiti within days of the devastating 7.0 earthquake on Jan. 12. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specilaist 1 st Class Edward Flynn

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 | MISSIO N THE WIRE | PAGE 5nd Class Shane Arrington JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs____________________________ a tightly woven tapestry, Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen, work together daily to carry out the mission in one of the most highly scrutinized pieces of real estate on the planet. To conduct safe, humane, legal and transparent care and custody of detainees, thats the mission of Joint Task Force Guantanamo. Not only do the service members come in variety, so goes the variety of individual missions that work toward the total mission. Public Affairs, the Joint Medical Group and the Joint Detention Group are just a few of the key players that work with Troopers from multiple branches. From guarding and caring for detainees, to providing command information and media relations support, the different styles come together to accomplish the mission. Navy Intelligence Specialist 3rd Class Megan Rascoe from the Joint Intelligence Group, another key player in the JTF to things when you combine multiple services. Before coming here, I had only seen the Navy way of doing things, Rascoe said. But its interesting, learning how the other branches do things. When working with just all the Navy leadership, standards and styles are pretty much the same. Once you throw in multiple services, things change. It provides a unique challenge that myself, after I leave here. Being surrounded by people from every service doesnt necessarily mean one works with them on a regular basis. For those who work in specialized shops and spend most of their time inside, its easy to forget theyre in a joint environment. There are other people, however, whose very job means interacting with different Troopers on a daily basis. JTF Guantanamo chaplains know no one service, they only see the Trooper. From our perspective, people are people, said Air Force Maj. William Wiecher, a JTF chaplain. Although service branches seem to interact differently with their chaplains, in this joint environment that doesnt really matter. As a JTF chaplain, were available at all times for all Troopers. With the variety of uniforms, customs and courtesies and quirks of the different about working in a joint environment, at knowing who to salute. You see something shiny and your hand goes up, said Army Sgt. Daisy Glass, Joint Detention Group non-commissioned Working together at JTF Troopers from multiple services stand various watches throughout Joint Task Force Guantanamo. Photos by JTF Guantanamo youre saluting an enlisted Navy chief (an hurdles to overcome. Once youve moved on from that, it becomes [natural]. Sure we all have the same mission, but each of us does it a little differently. In the end we compromise and get the job done, Glass said. Working here has been an amazing experience. nd Class Trent (last name withheld due to the nature of his job), a guard of JTF Guantanamos Navy Expeditionary Guard Battalion, stands watch at a detention facility. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1 st Class Maria Blanchard

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FRIDAY, F EBRUARY 26, 2010 | LOCA L SP OR T S THE WIRE | PAGE 6 Hitting the lanes at GTMO Army Sgt. Jordan Wheeler, a 118 th Military Police Battalion soldier attached to Joint Task Force Guantanamo, prepares to release a curve ball while bowling at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Feb. 7 JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1 st Class Marcos T. Hernandezst Class JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs __________________________________________How do you take a routine game of bowling and make it crazy fun? Throw in black lights, heart-pumping music and good friends and the lanes come alive at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. Bowling is a great stress reliever, said Army Staff Sgt. Lee Trujillo, a JTF Trooper. Win or lose, you still have a great time. Joint Task Force Troopers can get a heavy dose of fun every Saturday night from 7-11 p.m. when the lights go down and the black lights go up at the bowling alley. In addition, Morale, Welfare and Recreation offers a free bowling night for Troopers each Wednesday, from 6-8:30 p.m. Keglers [bowlers] can indulge in pizza and two games of bowling, shoes included, for free. To participate in the free bowling you must be a military member and show your ID card when you sign in. An always-present activity on many military installations, bowling has been a part of popular culture for many years. Emerging on the sports scene in the 1950s for no other reason than to have some fun, bowling is now listed as an anaerobi c exercise, akin to that of walking with free weights. One of bowling is that its a sport for everyone, said Army Sgt. Jordan Wheeler, a JTF supply soldier with the 118th Military Police Battalion. For me, the best part is trying to beat my own record. If team sports arent appealing, bowling also provides a casual experience that lets individuality shine. Bowling is a sport you can participate in with a few people or even by yourself, Trujillo said. Preferably, its better when you play with a group of people. Whether it is strictly for the love of the Bowling is a great stress reliever. Win or lose, you still have a great time. game, exercise, conversation with friends or trying to beat someones record, bowling at the MWR is great place to spend your leisure time. For more information on the MWR bowling alley, call ext. 2118. A bowling ball slams against bowling pins at the MWRs bowling alley at Naval Station Guantanamo, Feb 7. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Marcos T. Hernandez

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capturing and committing him to an asylum in London. While in the asylum, we learn why Lawrence left for America when he was young. He is subjected to therapy that involves forms of mind-shattering torture. Unfortunately for the doctors of the asylum, Lawrence makes a rather bloody escape and heads back to Blackmoor. The end of the movie plays out in a very formulaic fashion that is both predictable and poorly executed. It leaves the viewer hoping the actors involved. and The Usual Suspects, fails to deliver a performance that is on par with his potential as an actor. Hopkins, who was absolutely terrifying as Dr. Hannibal Lecter, appears to have phoned in his performance, leaving the viewer wondering if he is a spot-on sociopath or just does not care. Emily Blunt delivers a solid performance, but, given her co-stars performance, its not a complicated task. The best performance of the movie is Hugo Weavings Inspector Abberline. It is unfortunate that the character is not on Wolfman simply do not care about the movie or if they rely on the current trend of rebooting movies to drive ticket sales. One thing is clear. Director Joe Johnston has failed to make an entertaining movie after being given Oscar-caliber actors to tell this story.FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 | MOVIE RECO N THE WIRE | PAGE 7 Not a howling good time nd Class JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs ____________________________________________The Wolfman, set in 1891 Blackmoor, England, attempts to reboot the story that was popularized in the 1940s. Unfortunately for moviegoers, this attempt fails to deliver. As the movie opens, we see Ben Talbot, played by Simon Merrells, murdered in a dark and eerie forest while out during a full moon. When his brother Lawrence, Benicio Del Toro, learns of this in a letter from Bens wife Gwen, played by Emily Blunt, he travels to his familys estate to investigate his brothers demise. Upon Lawrences arrival, we meet Sir John Talbot, Anthony Hopkins, and discover that Lawrences homecoming is unexpected and long overdue. He has not seen his family since leaving for America many years ago. His reunion with his father is awkward and After examining Bens remains, Lawrence sets off to discover the true cause of his brothers death. While in a tavern, he overhears the local patrons discussing the possibility of being involved with a band of gypsies on the outskirts of town and decides to investigate. It is in the gypsy camp that we get a glimpse of the beast in action. While questioning a woman about a medallion that was found in Bens personal items, the wolf attacks the camp. Lawrence pursues the animal into the woods and is attacked; receiving a near fatal wound but is saved when the creature is shot and scared away. His miraculous survival and recovery becomes the source of his persecution by the residents of Blackmoor. Inspector Francis Abberline, played by Hugo Weaving, comes to the town to investigate the occurrence and discover what is causing such havoc in the small community. He sets his sights on Lawrence and follows through with his investigation,

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PAGE 8 | THE WIRE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 THE WIRE | PAGE 9 JTF Guantanamo photos by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1 st Class Michael Watkins Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Michael WatkinsJTF Guantanamo Combat Camera________________________________________What started as a search for used equipment and sandbags for residents of Haiti. Excess lumber totaling more than 180,000 board feet wrapped in 60 bundles was discovered recently by Air Force Master Sgt. Robert Holt as he was poking through discarded The wood was repackaged and shipped Feb. 18 to Haiti for workers there to use to help with construction projects to rebuild the island nation devastated by a Jan. 12 earthquake. The DLA worked with Combined Task Force 48 to get the lumber in shipping condition and aboard a Navy vessel bound for Haiti. As it turns out, the wood had been purchased nearly eight years ago to be used for projects in and around Joint Task Force Guantanamo. When the projects were completed here, the excess was no longer needed. Because it couldnt be returned to the U.S., the lumber went to DRMO. it could be considered for return to the U.S. He said it wasnt worth the effort or money to do that inspection. Once something like this hits foreign soil, it cant go back to the states, Holt said. It could bring back unwanted agricultural parasites or possibly termites. Holt became the driving force behind giving the exiled wood a new home, all the while helping those in need. Its always good to think outside of the box when an opportunity like this presents itself, Holt said. I am glad to He said the transportation of the lumber would not have been possible without the help of CTF-48 assets. Loading the lumber onto the barge McCallister Boys by Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 13 provided the team with a chance to This opportunity provided a real-life operation for our Sailors to get invaluable training and to use the skills Response. said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Ronnie Garcia, CTF-48 battle watch captain. You just cant beat this type of training. The whole effort was a prime example of inter-service teamwork, according to Navy Cmdr. Caroline Tetschner, Air Force member, two other services joined the mission. This LCU on and off-load is a prime example of joint military operations being conducted during this Haiti relief effort, Tetschner said. We have a crew of Army members driving this ship while Navy folks use forklifts and MMVs (Millennia Military Vehicle) to load it with the lumber. The cargo will be received in Haiti by Amphibious for walkways and temporary shelter for the upcoming rainy season.

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 | MISSIO N THE WIRE | PAGE 10st Class Edward Flynn JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs_________________________With roots dating back more than two centuries, the Navy Supply Corps hit a celebrated its 215 birthday. That event was celebrated Feb. 23 at Naval Station Guantanamo Bays Gold Hill Galley when the commander of the Supply Corps hosted a cake cutting ceremony. The men and women of the Navy Supply Corps remain at the forefront of Americas Navy as champions of logistics excellence, said Navy Rear Adm. Michael Lyden, chief of Supply Corps and commander, Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP). The demand for the supply team and our services has never been stronger. People respect and value the Navy supply community and its professionalism. Our reputation remains second to none and the demand for our talent has never been greater. Lyden visited Guantanamo to celebrate the heritage and rich tradition of the Navy Supply Corps with the men and women of the Navy Supply Corps community. In his address prior to the cake-cutting ceremony, Lyden praised the active-reserve seamless integration in the supply corps community as a positive factor in the success of the community. His words sat well with local Navy Reservists. I was very pleased as a Reservist to hear how much the chief of supply corps personally appreciates the Reserves and our function, said Navy Lt. Nick Rizzuto, a Joint Task Force Guantanamo Trooper. It was also great to hear him state how other communities rely on and appreciate the Supply Corps community. The Navy Supply Corps began its long and proud journey when President George Washington appointed Tench Francis as the At that time, the supply corps was tasked and operational support for the Navys six frigates. With the passage of more than 200 years, these logistics professionals continue to provide supplies and services to ensure success. Lyden discussed the recent merger of the storekeeper (SK) and postal clerk (PC) enlisted ratings into the new logistics specialist (LS) rating. The merger provides a greater skill set for the individual Sailor, improves readiness and training and delivers a focus on enhancing career opportunities into one specialized rating, Lyden said. Additionally, Lyden provided an update on the relocation of the Navy Supply Corps School from Athens, Ga., to new facilities in Newport, R.I. In respecting Navy tradition that the oldest and youngest Sailors assigned to a cutting, Navy Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Austin Foster, a 20-year-old attached to Navy Supplys Fleet and Industrial Supply Center in Jacksonville, Fla., GTMO detachment, expressed his pride in being part of the supply corps community and its proud tradition. It is a privilege for me to work with community, Foster said. Im learning a a huge impact in world events. Navy Supply Corps continues to respect tradition while expanding its responsibilities and keeping pace with the expanding scope of the Navys mission. To all who wear or have worn the golden Oak Leaf, I thank you for your hard work and contributions, Lyden said. I am proud of where our supply corps has been and the direction in which we are headed. I am proud of each of you! Happy Birthday, Supply Corps! Michael Lyden, chief of Supply Corps and commander, Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP), Navy Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Austin Foster, a 20-year-old attached to Navy Supplys Fleet and Industrial Supply Center in Jacksonville, Fla., Navy Capt. William Brennan, JTF Guantanamo J-4 and Commissions Support Group director, and Navy Rear Adm. Patricia Wolfe, commander, Combined Task Force 48, slice a cake at Naval Station Guantanamo Bays Gold Hill Galley on Feb. 23 to celebrate the 215th birthday of the Navy Supply Corps. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Edward Flynn USN celebrates supply birthday

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THE WIRE | PAGE 11 FRIDAY, FEBRURARY 26, 2010 | NE W S & INF ORMA T IO Nassistant, 525th Military Police Battalion, Unit Ministry Team, Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It allowed people to praise their god in the masses. The breakfast was also a way to bring Troopers closer together. Having a public event helps them see that there are other people that believe what they believe, Ferrel said. They are not alone. Rev. Morton, a Woodridge, Va. native, who retired from the U.S. military after more than 30 years of service, praised the chaplain team for their work I appreciate what the chaplains are doing for these Troopers, he said. I know what its like to be away from home and away from my family. This is a great way to bring everyone together. The JTF National Prayer Breakfast is scheduled every year in Guantanamo and this year the chaplains worked hard to provide free meals for any E-6 and below who does not have a meal card. Following the event, Chaplain Ferrel distributed Valentines Day cards made by children from Mt. Vernon Elementary School in Gainesvile, Ga. Prayer with Breakfast (left) Navy Lt. Anthony Carr, Joint Detention Group chaplain, and (right) Air Force Lt. Col. William Ferrel, Joint Task Force command chaplain, perform Awesome God and Amazing Grace at the Prayer Breakfast, Feb. 24. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. Athneil Thomas Troopers from Joint Task Force Guantanamo gather at Camp Americas Seaside Galley as part of the Prayer Breakfast, Feb. 24. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. Athneil Thomasnd Class JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs _________________________________________Troopers from Joint Task Force Guantanamo came together under one JTF National Prayer Breakfast. The 2010 event, held at the Seaside Galley, featured The Reverend Darrell Morton as the keynote speaker and was sponsored by the JTF Chaplain Corps. The Prayer Breakfast was brought here to support the spiritual lives of the Troopers, said Air Force Lt. Col. William Ferrel, JTF command chaplain. It was a way to help Troopers focus on strengthening their relationship with God. While nearly 100 people looked on, Rev. Morton spoke of relationships, communication and spiritual growth. Without communication, you have no relationship and that is what prayer is, Morton said. And, not every prayer has to be a prayer of thanksgiving. There are all types of prayer and even some that come across as being upset. His message was heard loud and clear. It helps Troopers be more enlightened in their spiritual relationship with their god by improving their prayer, said Army Spc. Anthony Berkowitz, chaplains

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PAGE 12 | THE WIRE NE W S & INF ORMA T IO N | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 Reective Belts *Make sure it is worn properly, visible at all times *Wear it any time you are walking or running for exercise or leisure Leeward sides of the base *Safety belts increase your visibility and safety *For more information, contact your chain of command Season Closed Taking conchs from the ocean, for any purpose, is prohibited during the months of: -March -April -MayAdditional information can be found in the Outdoor Recreation Instruction 1710.10. 20. The class is held every Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 6-7 p.m. and Thursdays from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. JTF Guantanamo photo by Air Force Staff Sgt. Angela Ruiz

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 | VOICE O F T HE FORCE PAGE 13 THE WIRE | PAGE 13 Boots on the GroundWith extreme weather blasting the East Coast and Southeastern United States, do you prefer to live in a warm climate or a cold climate?by Marine Lance Cpl. Justin R. WheelerArmy Pvt. Victor Dunkelberger Coast Guard Martime Enforcement 2nd Class Emelino Angcaya Navy Religious Program Specialist 3rd Class Tania Gedeon Air Force Airman 1st Class Dustin Whittington Hot, because when its cold you stay inside all day. I like being outside. I prefer warm. Im glad Im not stuck in a Maryland snowstorm. A cold winter. I can keep putting clothes on to keep warm. Winter, because it reminds me of the holidays and when my family gets together. Air Force Tech Sgt. Carlos Wilson with the Mississippi Air National Guards 186th Civil Engineering Squadron, also known Feb. 23. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Matthew Campbell

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LI F E & SP IRI T | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 PAGE 14 | THE WIRE GTMO Religious ServicesDaily Catholic Mass Mon. Fri. 5:30 p.m. Main Chapel Mon. Fri. 12:30 p.m. Troopers Chapel Vigil Mass Saturday 5:00 p.m. Main Chapel Mass Sunday 9:00 a.m. Main Chapel Seventh Day Adventist Saturday 11:00 a.m. Room B Iglesia Ni Christo Sunday 5:30 a.m. Room A Pentecostal Gospel Sunday 8:00 a.m. Room D LDS Service Sunday 9:00 a.m. Room A Liturgical Service Sunday 10:00 a.m. Room B General Protestant Sunday 11:00 a.m. Main Chapel United Jamaican Fellowship Sunday 11:00 a.m. Building 1036 Gospel Service Sunday 1:00 p.m. Main Chapel GTMO Bay Christian Fellowship Sunday 6:00 p.m. Main Chapel Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Troopers Chapel The Truth Project Bible study Sunday 6:00 p.m. Troopers Chapel Protestant Worship Sunday 9:00 a.m. Troopers Chapel Islamic Service Friday 1:15 p.m. Room C Jewish Service FMI call 2628 LORIMI Gospel Sunday 8:00 a.m. Room D Spiritual famine JTF 525th MP Battalion Chaplain____________________________ This is not a movie review, but have you seen the movie Book of Eli? In the movie, there was a series of wars that prompted the destruction of all of the Bibles in the world, presumably because the Good Book was determined that it was the cause of all of mans problems. The result was a society that had no moral compass and everyone did what was right in their own eyes. Might made right and chaos ruled the land. In the Book of Eli there was a famine. Have you ever considered how terrible famine is? I think everyone knows something of what it means. Rain doesnt fall and crops fail. Rivers, lakes and aquifers run dry and soon there is no water altogether. It is a gradual process and because of seasonal changes, most people can never see it coming until it is too late to do anything about it. There have been times where it was foretold. Biblically it is an act of God. Usually, it is a form of judgment. Swarms of locust or disease are also agents of famine. The worst kind of famine, however, is the kind where the voice of the Lord is not heard -the kind portrayed in the movie. It is a spiritual famine. In the Old Testament, God predicted this kind of famine in the book of Amos. Amos was a shepherd that God called to go to the northern kingdom of Israel and prophesy against them because of their great unfaithfulness in keeping his laws and decrees. The nation had gotten to the point where it no longer wanted to hear the voice of the Lord. The people commanded the prophets to stop prophesying. It is a very sad thing when a person, group or nation gets to the point when it doesnt want to be right above all things and it hates correction. One concern is that we are at the beginning stages of such a spiritual famine. I was watching a video presentation of our national history and the point was being made how we have given up our Godly heritage. We have let people tinker with the past and they have affected what we now believe. compact. Current history books now have it saying, We whose names are underwritten having undertaken, a original document says, In the name of God, Amen. We whose names are underwritten having undertaken, for the glorie [sic] of God, and the advancemente [sic] of the Christian faith, a voyage to It is very clear that someone or something is trying to mess with the past and take God out of the picture. George Orwell said, He who controls the past, controls the future. And Karl Marx said, A people without a heritage are easily persuaded. It is already true that we cant pray in school or display the Ten Commandments on public property or teach the Bible to our youth. Educators are telling our children that our founding fathers were not men of faith. Prayer to God at sporting events is frowned upon. We are a nation built on sound Biblical principles. George Washington said to let no man call himself an American if he fails to guide and live his life by the Ten Commandments. We must nationally turn back to God, repent for our sins, obey His laws and precepts and seek His blessing. He is our only hope.

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THE WIRE | PAGE 15 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 | 15 MI N U T ES O F FAME with an open mind, said Adams. With my strong personal desire to be successful in the aviation community, I worked as hard as I could. Throughout her career, Adams has participated mostly in humanitarian missions. She piloted aircraft in St. Marteen and the island of Antigua as part of the relief efforts after Hurricane Luis. In Adams has earned her Airline Transport to Adams, has been a tremendous achievement. The ATP is the highest level of aircraft pilots license one can obtain, one step above Commercial Pilot License, Adams said. With any other license [less than ATP], you are limited in the aircraft you rotary]. Adams owes her long-term success friends and mentors; Army Chief Warrant Ken Webster. According to Adams, from a military perspective, Timmons and Foster and guidance. Webster provided me a civilian perspective and knowledge for how mechanical things work, Adams said. It was important for me to have both military and civilian points of view. But, she credits her overall success to God, her parents and extraordinary self-discipline. She also has high praise of the aviation community and its many interested in this community. I encourage young Troopers interested rewarding, Adams said. Its all about serving people. Adams wanted a career where she could help and interact with people. Throughout the past 30 years, she has accomplished aviation, personnel and protocol. Although this is a demanding job, she spends time each week to talking with her Troopers in a social setting. Adams is very caring of her Troopers, said Army Lt. Col. Gladys Turnbull, battalion commander, Col. Adams always rate by hosting command barbeques and recreation events on a quarterly basis. Army Col. Caroline Adams, director of Joint Task Force Guantanamos Joint Visitor Bureau, holds a framed photograph of a C-23 Sherpa this type of aircraft for 10 years as part of her career as an Army aviator. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1 st Class Marcos T. HernandezNavy Lt. Jonathan Ryan JTF Joint Visitor Bureau____________________________ American woman in space, but Joint Task Force Guantanamos own Army Col. Caroline Adams is a woman of many Consider this. She attended the very within the Virgin Islands National Guard. and serve the Virgin Islands National forces to pilot the C-23B Sherpa. Locally, Adams serves as director of Joint Task Force Guantanamos Joint Visitor Bureau, where she coordinates and executes all distinguished visits to JTF. For all of these achievements, Adams has earned her 15 Minutes of Fame. life changing journey and a rewarding goal. As an aviator, Adams has over 16 years also the UH-1 Huey helicopter.

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Around the AROU N D T HE JTF | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 Army Sgt. Kenneth Gengo, with Rhode Island Army National Guards 115 th Military Police Company deployed to Joint Task Force at a security checkpoint, Feb. 22. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. Athneil Thomas Around the Steve Simeone, comedian, performed for the naval station community at the Windjammer Ballroom, Feb. 20. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1 st Class Edward Flynn Army Pfc. Terrance M. Robinson, with the 525th Military Police Battalion deployed to Joint Task Force Guantanamo, reaches the turnaround point a top John Paul Jones Hill in a 14.4-mile try out from the upcoming Bataan Memorial Death March, Feb. 20. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Spc. Cody Black