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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00398
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: 02-19-2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00398

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Volume 11, Issue 1 Friday, February 12, 2010 Volume 11, Issue 2 Friday, February 19, 2010 Coast Guard Reserve Birthday Semper Paratus A JTF Journal THE JTF Troopers on fire Fire warden program enhances mission

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Around the Army Master Sgt. Lee Markwell JTF 525th MP Battalion SGM ______________________________________________________________Nothing in life that is worth having is free; therefore, once we set our mind on where we intend on going in life, we have to lean forward and go after it. A college education is no different. In the beginning, it appears to be an unreachable far away goal, but when you look at it in the small picture, you can take it one class at a time and it will shortly be within reach of completion. Not everyone is blessed with the opportunities or the patience to attend college directly out of high school. That is why many of us have chosen the route we did with the military. The military provides you with ample opportunity to get ahead in life by offering tuition assistance for college. It is all too common for us to go through our military career, no matter how long or short it is and not take Here at GTMO, you have the opportunity to initiate or to continue your pursuit of a degree. Many of us will never have a better opportunity than now to provide a better future for ourselves. This is why it is imperative to look into options that are available and pursue a degree. Everyone within Joint Task Force Guantanamo has a skill to bring to the table and that makes them marketable to the civilian sector. Having a degree is what will open the door and allow you the opportunity that will never be available without one. In many cases, a degree is one of the prerequisites when applying for a job. Time management is the key to success. While stationed here at GTMO, many of us work long hours. Understandably, everyone needs the time to relax, but this is also an opportunity to get a grasp on your future by the Department of Defense offers. This is one of the points in life where we have to make a decision, and that decision is do I take advantage of the opportunities I have at hand or do I just let life pass me by? The bottom line is a degree will provide you with the ability to have full control of your life. If you one day wake up and the fun meter is pegged out, and you decide you have had enough of the military, a degree will assist you with opening doors for your future. The initial magnitude of what it takes to complete a degree can be overwhelming. Keep things in perspective. There are many ways to eat an elephant but in the end it comes down to one bite at a time. The sooner you start the quicker you Joint environment provides opportunity for developmentLeaning ForwardJTF-GTMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Mark H. Buzby Joint Task Force CMC: Navy Command Master Chief Brad LeVault Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Rick Haupt: 9928 Deputy: Army Lt. Col. Edward Bush: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. Patrick Sellen: 3649The WireEditor: Army Staff Sgt. Paul Meeker: 3651 Assistant Editor: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeff Johnstone: 3594 Layout and Design: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary Keen: 3594 Army Sgt. Scott Griffin: 3594 Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Web Design: Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Wolff: 8154 Staff Writers: Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Army Spc. Shanita Simmons: 3589 Army Spc. Daniel Welch: 3589Contact us:Base Information: 2000 Public Affairs Office: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651Cover Photo By:Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert ClowneyOnline:www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milJointTaskForce-Guantanamo, produces The Wire, which is printed under the provisions of Department of Defense Instruction 5120.4 The Public Affairs OfficeJTF GUANTANAMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. David M. Thomas, Jr. Joint Task Force Command Master Chief: Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Brian T. Schexnaydre Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Pauline Storum: 9928 Deputy Director: Army Capt. Kim Kleiman: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. James Venske: 3649The WireExecutive Editor: Army 1st Lt. Adam Bradley: 3596 Editor:Army Sgt. 1st Class Vaughn R. Larson: 3651Assistant Editors: Army Staff Sgt. Emily Russell: 3592 Army Staff Sgt. Gretel Sharpee: 3594 Staff Writers: Army Spc. Megan Burnham: 2171 Army Spc. Eric Liesse: 3499Contact usEditors Desk: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651 Email: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Online: www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milThe WIRE is the official news magazine of Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is produced by the JTF Public Affairs Office to inform and educate the Troopers of JTF Guantanamo through news, features, command guidance, sports and entertainment. The WIRE seeks to provide maximum disclosure with minimum delay with regards to security, accuracy, propriety and policy. This DoD news magazine is an authorized publication for the members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The WIRE are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is printed by the Document Automation & Production Service with a circulation of 1000. COVER: JTF-GTMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Mark H. Buzby Joint Task Force CMC: Navy Command Master Chief Brad LeVault Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Rick Haupt: 9928 Deputy: Army Lt. Col. Edward Bush: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. Patrick Sellen: 3649The WireEditor: Army Staff Sgt. Paul Meeker: 3651 Assistant Editor: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeff Johnstone: 3594 Layout and Design: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary Keen: 3594 Army Sgt. Scott Griffin: 3594 Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Web Design: Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Wolff: 8154 Staff Writers: Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Army Spc. Shanita Simmons: 3589 Army Spc. Daniel Welch: 3589Contact us:Base Information: 2000 Public Affairs Office: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651Cover Photo By:Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert ClowneyOnline:www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milJointTaskForce-Guantanamo, produces The Wire, which is printed under the provisions of Department of Defense Instruction 5120.4 The Public Affairs Office PAGE 2 | THE WIRETROO P ER-T O-TROO P ER | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010JTF-GTMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Mark H. Buzby Joint Task Force CMC: Navy Command Master Chief Brad LeVault Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Rick Haupt: 9928 Deputy: Army Lt. Col. Edward Bush: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. Patrick Sellen: 3649The WireEditor: Army Staff Sgt. Paul Meeker: 3651 Assistant Editor: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeff Johnstone: 3594 Layout and Design: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary Keen: 3594 Army Sgt. Scott Griffin: 3594 Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Web Design: Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Wolff: 8154 Staff Writers: Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Army Spc. Shanita Simmons: 3589 Army Spc. Daniel Welch: 3589Contact us:Base Information: 2000 Public Affairs Office: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651Cover Photo By:Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert ClowneyOnline:www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milJointTaskForce-Guantanamo, produces The Wire, which is printed under the provisions of Department of Defense Instruction 5120.4 The Public Affairs OfficeJTF GUANTANAMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. David M. Thomas, Jr. Joint Task Force Command Master Chief: Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Brian T. Schexnaydre Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Pauline Storum: 9928 Deputy Director: Army Capt. Kim Kleiman: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. James Venske: 3649The WireExecutive Editor: Army 1st Lt. Adam Bradley: 3596 Editor:Army Sgt. 1st Class Vaughn R. Larson: 3651Assistant Editors: Army Staff Sgt. Emily Russell: 3592 Army Staff Sgt. Gretel Sharpee: 3594 Staff Writers: Army Spc. Megan Burnham: 2171 Army Spc. Eric Liesse: 3499Contact usEditors Desk: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651 Email: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Online: www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milThe WIRE is the official news magazine of Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is produced by the JTF Public Affairs Office to inform and educate the Troopers of JTF Guantanamo through news, features, command guidance, sports and entertainment. The WIRE seeks to provide maximum disclosure with minimum delay with regards to security, accuracy, propriety and policy. This DoD news magazine is an authorized publication for the members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The WIRE are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is printed by the Document Automation & Production Service with a circulation of 1000. COVER: JTF-GTMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Mark H. Buzby Joint Task Force CMC: Navy Command Master Chief Brad LeVault Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Rick Haupt: 9928 Deputy: Army Lt. Col. Edward Bush: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. Patrick Sellen: 3649The WireEditor: Army Staff Sgt. Paul Meeker: 3651 Assistant Editor: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeff Johnstone: 3594 Layout and Design: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary Keen: 3594 Army Sgt. Scott Griffin: 3594 Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Web Design: Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Wolff: 8154 Staff Writers: Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Army Spc. Shanita Simmons: 3589 Army Spc. Daniel Welch: 3589Contact us:Base Information: 2000 Public Affairs Office: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651Cover Photo By:Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert ClowneyOnline:www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milJointTaskForce-Guantanamo, produces The Wire, which is printed under the provisions of Department of Defense Instruction 5120.4 The Public Affairs Office JTF GUANTANAMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Tom Copeman Command Master Chief: Navy Master Chief Petty Officer Scott A. Fleming: Office of Public Affairs Director: Navy Cmdr. Brook DeWalt: 9928 Deputy Director: Navy Lt. James Gonzales: 9927 Operations Officer: Army Capt. Robert Settles: 3596 Supervisor: Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Randy Dunham: 3649 The Wire Executive Editor, Command Information NCOIC, Photojournalist: Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Edward Flynn: 3592 Editor, Photojournalist: Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Marcos T. Hernandez: 3651 Photojournalists: Army Sgt. Derrol Fulghum Navy Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Zachary Harris Army Spc. Cody Black Army Spc. Juanita Phillip Army Spc. Tiffany Addair Marine Lance Cpl. Justin Wheeler Contact us Editors Desk: 3592 or 2171 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3592 DSN: 660-3592 Email: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.milThe WIRE is the official news magazine of Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is produced by the JTF Public Affairs Office to inform and educate the Troopers of JTF Guantanamo through news, features, command guidance, sports and entertainment. The WIRE seeks to provide maximum disclosure with minimum delay with regards to security, accuracy, propriety and policy. This DoD news magazine is an authorized publication for the members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The WIRE are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is printed by the Document Automation & Production Service with a circulation of 1,000. COVER:As we honor the proud military service of the Coast Guard, we Guard Reserve. We pay tribute to a proud military tradition of always keeping faith with their motto: Semper Paratus, Always Ready. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Edward Flynn BACK COVER:The Guantanamo Bay Express, a barge carrying supplies for Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, is docked while being unloaded, Feb. 12. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua Nistas

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NE W S & INF ORMA T IO N | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010 PAGE 3 | THE WIRE Keeping faith: Semper Paratus Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Edward Flynn JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs________________________________________________For almost 70 years, the men and women of the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve have answered the countrys call to service. As we honor the proud military service, we also celebrate Feb. 19, as the roots back to Aug. 4, 1790, when it was then known as the Revenue Cutter Service. Serving in harms way when a natural disaster hits or in times watch at home and abroad. The Coast Guard Reserve was created in 1941 when Congress amended the Coast Guard Auxiliary and Reserve Act that separated the Coast Guard into the reserve and auxiliary components. The Coast Guard is the nations oldest continuous seagoing service with responsibilities including search and rescue, maritime law enforcement, aid to navigation, ice breaking, environmental protection, port security and military readiness. While those on active duty often rely on formal educational programs, shipboard experience and on-the-job-training, reservists have their civilian experiences from which to draw. In the joint environment of Joint Task Force Guantanamo, Coast Guard Reserves are an important part of the total force team. Reservists bring an invaluable skill set to the table that greatly enhances the JTF mission, said Coast Guard Lt. Bryan Burkhalter, reservists are a tremendous resource. They are highly motivated and capable. force protection duties for JTF. While celebrating the Coast Guard Reserve birthday, we also celebrate and pay tribute to a proud tradition of always keeping faith with their motto: Semper Paratus, Always Ready. It is that spirit that members of the Coast Guard continue to answer the call to freedom on the sea and on land. Im proud to be a member of the Coast Guard Reserve, said Coast reservists have spent considerable time on active duty. We are valued and make an important contribution to this JTF mission. We are always ready and proud to do our job. A Coastguardsman with Maritime Safety and Security Team 91103 prepares a patrol boat before heading out in Guantanamo Bay, Feb. 15. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Edward Flynn

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MISSION | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010 PAGE 4 | THE WIREPAGE 4 | THE WIRESee NCHB/12 Naval Reservists support OUR Navy Boatswains Mate 1 st Class Jose Martinez, from Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 13A, works on the front of a Millennium Military Vehichle at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Feb. 12. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 3 rd Class Joshua Nistas Throwing a strap over a spredder bar, Boatswains Mate 1 st Class Jose Martinez, from Navy Cargo Handling Battalion 13A, readies the cargo equipment for transportation at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Feb. 12. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 3 rd Class Joshua Nistas Army Spc. Juanita Philip JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs____________________________When Mother Nature knocked the Caribbean Island of Haiti to her knees, a proud group of Navy Reservists stepped up to help get her back on her feet. a reserve logistics unit headquartered in Gulfport, Miss., responded with virtually Response the organized relief effort that sent food, supplies and medical equipment earthquake. The reservists were activated to be a part of Combined Task Force 48, which was established on January 17 as a Joint Logistics Hub coordinated through Guantanamo Bay. The task force is providing humanitarian assistance and disaster response operations through interagency and international channels. Within days of the earthquake in Haiti, unit members were called to active duty from Navy Operations Support Centers out of Mississippi, Missouri and Texas to perform this mission. They asked for volunteers on Friday, nd Class AnnMarie Shy. On Sunday we were told to put our orders in. Later that night, they were which happened to be a federal holiday. For many of the unit members, this is worked on a humanitarian mission, Shy said. The work really is not a lot different since were trained to unload planes. And, thats what were doing. With the use of forklifts, including some called Millennia Military Vehicles, which are extended forklifts, the unit makes quick work of unloading the pallets of humanitarian supplies, which include food, water, meals ready to eat, bedding and dry good. They are repackaged and sent directly to Haiti. For some of the unit members, the mission here is personal and emotional, even though they dont physically see the supplies delivered on the ground in Haiti. To feel like youre doing something (to help) makes you feel good, Shy said. Everybody can do something in the states by giving money. But, were here doing our Navy jobs. The unit is also in charge of moving supplies not just from the U.S., but from other countries as well. We received a shipment from the Columbian Red Cross, with mattresses, cots and dry goods, said Logistics Specialist nd Class Yvonne Macias. There was even

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010 | MISSIO N THE WIRE | PAGE 5 Depression and suicide awarenessMarine Lance Cpl. Justin R. Wheeler JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs_____________________________Since the war in Iraq and Afghanistan began, numbers of suicides have increased in all branches of service. Suicide in the military has remained in the top three causes of death of U.S. service members worldwide, said Navy Capt. Robert Schlegel, clinical psychologist and and Restoration Team. To understand suicide, one must understand the illness leading to depression and suicide, he said. Depression is when someone goes into a state of illness that affects rational thinking eating, Schlegel said. [Depressed people believe] that things will not get better, said Schlegel. Schlegel said that those suffering from depression often become helpless and often look for a way to end the pain. However, depression is not basic sadness. It takes an understanding of a person to differentiate between them being sad or depressed. Recognizing when people are depressed is a key step in prevention, said Schlegel. Supervisors need to get to know their people, Schlegel said. There are no signs and symptoms that can be seen from a distance. Some symptoms to look for include withdrawal, poor sleeping, carelessness or no appetite. Approaching a depressed person and asking questions can reveal their situation. Its important to tell them that they can feel better, Schlegel said. [Tell them] Im not going to leave you until we get some help. Emphasizing hope to a suicidal person said Schlegel. There is some part of their brain hoping to get better, Schlegel said. In the military, suicide becomes an increased problem because of service member access to weapons and alcohol, he said. Alcohol abuse is implicated in a huge percentage of military suicides, Schlegel said. Chronic alcohol use leads to depression. With access to alcohol and lethal weapons, service members have more of an opportunity to make an irreversible decision, he said. Service members also have problems with depression due to deployments distancing them from loved ones, which in turn, deteriorates relationships. It is often determined that the winter holidays have an increase in suicides but that is a misconception. Suicides dip during the holidays and increase in the summer, he said. To combat these issues of depression and suicidal tendencies, Joint Task Force Guantanamo offers counseling at JSMART, Support or military health providers, Woodrow Scott, of JSMART. Support is also offered worldwide for service members by Military One Source or other prevention hotlines, or by a fellow Trooper. For more information, contact the Camp America. Depression is a leading factor in suicide. photo courtesy of Texas Southern University

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LOCA L SP OR T S | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010 PAGE 6 | THE WIRE Practicing Running SafetyMarine Lance Cpl. Justin R. Wheeler JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs____________________________ It was dark when Bob, a runner, was running his usual course. He was playing his favorite rock song on maximum volume when a car was closing in on him. Bob and the car driver were both unaware of each other. The result was tragic. Bob didnt wear a refelective belt. Running can be dangerous on Guantanamo Bay roads, especially with people doing physical training at all hours of the day and night. Thus, maintaining safety precautions can decide whether the ending result is between avoiding injury or death. Karissa Sandstorm, Morale, Welfare advice for runners. drivers identify the runner on the road. In addition, by using the buddy system, runners have a backup plan in case there is an emergency. She said if you choose to run alone, it is good to have both emergency contact written emergency contact names and phone numbers or a cell phone with the information included. Sandstorm mentions that items that make carrying cell phones or ID cards while running more comfortable are available for purchase. Sandstorm also recommends running on lighted streets that are not busy. And, despite them being legal, she recommends not running with headphones on. While running with an Ipod, or other media device, you cant hear sounds that would make you aware of safety issues, Sandstorm said. Sounds like car horns or barking dogs are drowned out. Without headphones, the runner has an opportunity to move away or run faster. According to Sandstorm, overall running for running helps avoid pulling muscles or developing cramps. Stretching exercises for calve, hamstring and quad streches and ankle rolling enable running with less chance of injury. Weightlifting exercises like calf raises, squats, hamstring curls, hip exercises like abductor and adductor exercises can strengthen muscles to withstand the stress caused by distance running, she said. Durable running shoes with strong cushioning are especially recommended when running on paved roads because the hard surface can do damage to the feet and legs, she said. If Bob could have heard the sound of the car closing in on him or if the car would have seen the glimmer of a glow strap, a dangerous situation would have been less likely to happen. The cushioning from proper running shoes is a necessity when running on paved roads. Photo courtesy of www.ironann.wordpress.com

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010 | MOVIE RECO N THE WIRE | PAGE 7 Dont judge this book by its cover Navy Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Zachary Harris JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs____________________________Over the past few months, many movies have speculated how the world will end. The Book of Eli continues the trend but delivers a story that is more parable than cautionary tale. Denzel Washington, wandering a desolate wasteland where life has all but ceased to exist. There is a very noticeable lack of dialogue which helps reinforce the isolation of this new world. Cinematographer Don Burgess creates an eerie backdrop of washed-out color, enhancing the utter destruction of the surrounding landscape. We learn that Eli is a man not to be messed with in the opening moments of the contents of his backpack. When he enters a town run by Carnegie, the antagonist of the a turn for the worse. Eli is confronted by Carnegies henchmen in a bar while attempting to get some water. After a confrontation with an unassuming thug, it becomes apparent to Carnegie that Eli is a man of intrigue. He tries to coax him into joining his gang. When Eli refuses, Carnegie insists that he spend the night to think about his options. It is then that we meet Solara, played by Mila Kunis. She is forced to spend the night with Eli and notices him reading a book, the last remaining Bible on Earth. When Carnegie learns of its existence from Solara, he stops at nothing to take it from Eli. The rest of the movie follows Eli and Solara as they attempt to escape Carnegie and his gang. The events that lead up to the climax of the movie keep the viewer wondering if Elis abilities are superhuman or a gift from God for carrying the last Bible. The movies ending left jaws gaping wide open at the Lyceum. The twist that writer Gary Whitta penned is extraordinary it coming. While this movie does paint a dire picture of the future, what separates this from other post-apocalyptic movies is the lack of preaching or message being thrown in your face. Some might complain about a religious subtext given the fact that Elis book is the Bible, but again, it does not get in the way of an excellent story.

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PAGE 8 | THE WIRE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010 THE WIRE | PAGE 9 A Marine with Alpha Fast 5th Platoon Marine Corps Security Force Company Guantanamo Bay engages his target at Grenadillo Range, Feb. 17. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Justin S. Neel with Marine Corps Security Force Company Guantanamo Bay, peers off into the distance at Grenadillo Range, Feb. 17. Marine Corps Capt. Nathan T. McAndrews (back right), Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Christopher M. Sliva (front right) both prepare .556-caliber ammunition at Grenadillo Range, Feb. 17. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Mark T. Pearce loads rounds at Grenadillo Range, Feb. 17. JTF Guantanamo photos by Army Spc. Cody Black According to tradition in the Marine Corps, the title Devil Dogs was assigned by German soldiers to U.S. Marines who fought in the battle of Belleau Wood in 1918. The Marines fought with such ferocity that they appeared to be Dogs from Hell.

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members. Some of the students viewed the class as useful training and a great learning opportunity. The training was very informative and a great learning tool, said Army Sgt. William Lawrence, the non-commissioned also provided us with the basic instructions Prior to being deployed, Lawrence worked Islands Fire Department. Deida also cautioned to always be on guard. Always be vigilant. You dont FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010 | MISSIO N THE WIRE | PAGE 10 Fire wardens enhance JTF safety Assistant Chief Steven Deida of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay compliance with safety regulations. JTF Guantanamo photos by Army Spc. Juanita PhilipArmy Spc. Juanita Philip JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs_________________________Joint Task Force Guantanamo Troopers conducted by Naval Station Guantanamo Hall. JTF Troopers who assumed the duties of With the transition of JTF units from the Combat Support Sustainment Battalion of the Virgin Islands National Guard, new wardens, in addition to their other duties. This is mandatory training for chief of Naval Station Guantanamo Bays station. Fire wardens are a part of the safety community. Without them, our jobs would be that much harder. Deida also stressed the importance of being alert and aware of your surroundings at all times and that every building should touched on certain things to look for and to every month. good working order and has no visible corrosion. are policed daily and all materials properly extinguished and disposed of. be stored in an approved container. The students were taught the extinguishers and to keep the building in department. The training included pointers on how to keep the inside and the outside of the building in compliance with various conclusion of the two-hour class, each of achievement. Army Sgt. Delicia Henley, assigned to JTF Headquarters and Headquarters Company, was secure in her newly acquired training. more effectively with this training, Henley said. I have already spotted violations and pointed them out to my fellow unit

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While back home grilling burgers and hot dogs is a common thing to do, most Troopers in Guantanamo see it as a means to unwind after a full weeks work. Its the perfect thing to do on the weekends, said Navy Intelligence Specialist 1st Class Dean (who preferred to not use his last name). We usually grill rib eye steak seasoned with an all purpose special BBQ cajun blend and add Guantanamo, being a gated community, lends itself for a great camaraderie experience within the Troops. Grilling at GTMO is a part of the camaraderie we all share, said Navy nd Class Joy Wilson, a Sailor with Joint Stress Mitigation and Restoration Team. Here at GTMO, friendship and grilling go hand in hand. Remember that grilling must be conducted in approved areas, away from the wooden boardwalk and similar highrisk areas. THE WIRE | PAGE 11 FRIDAY, FEBRURARY 19, 2010 | NE W S & INF ORMA T IO N Grillin at GTMONavy Intelligence Specialist 1st Class Dean, a Sailor attached to Joint Task Force Guantanamo, prepares to place a JTF photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Marcos T. HernandezIts the perfect thing to do on the weekends,-Navy Intelligence Specialist 1st Class Dean Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Marcos T. Hernandez JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs__________________________ At Guantanamo Bay, all Troopers need is charcoal, a grill and a bunch of food to cook. Surrounded by cliffs that drop off into an open ocean and a landscape of rugged beauty, Join Task Force Guantanamo is located aboard a more than 100year-old naval station. This small corner in the Greater Antilles has been a for many years a haven for grilling warriors. block at the Camp America barracks, said Navy Interior Communications Electrician nd Class Gates, (who preferred not to use cook chicken, ribs, steak and pork. Walking near the Cuzco barracks boardwalks or driving past the Tierra Kay barracks, one can appreciate the sight of Troopers cooking out and sitting on their portable beach chairs in what seems to be a circle of food tasting and conversations. These get togethers last until late in the evening and sometimes early morning. When you grill with a group of people you get to know one another and come together as a family said Spc. Anthony th Military Police Battalion, attached to JTF. This matters, especially since a lot of us are away from our families back at home in the JTF, there is really no right time for throwing food on the grill. We grill anytime, said Saunders. Day or night.

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PAGE 12 | THE WIRENCHB from 4 NE W S & INF ORMA T IO N | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010 Reective Belts *Make sure it is worn properly, visible at all times *Wear it any time you are walking or running for exercise or leisure Leeward sides of the base *Safety belts increase your visibility and safety *For more information, contact your chain of command Navy Logistics Specialist 2 nd Class Yvonne Macias operates an extended forklift as part of her daily duties in the Joint Logistics Hub, Feb. 12. JTF Guantanamo photo by Navy Mass Communication Specialist 3 rd Class Joshua Nistas a pallet with a small bike. That was nice to see. The unit works quickly, especially when perishable supplies come in, to ensure that theyre unloaded, palletized and staged to ship out to the relief effort as soon as possible. A pallet of peanut butter came in and within hours of its arrival, it was ready to go on a ship for transport, said Macias. In the short amount of time the task force has been established, the Joint Logistics Hub has been the focal point for and equipment to the Haiti joint area of operations. Even though this operation is global, there is still a personal touch to what they are doing. Cases of baby food came in and while they were being palletized, the reservists were told that the Marines would be passing them out from the back of their vehicles directly to the people who needed it most. What Ive touched here will go directly into the hands of a Marine and then into the hands of a person in need, Shy said. That I can visualize. Although the unit has been working long hours to move the supplies, this side of the relief effort seems to be winding down a month after the earthquake. Chief Yeoman Tracey McDonald, who terminal ticket counter of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, foresees a resurgence of activity when it is time for the military to pull out of Haiti. There are a tremendous amount of people on the ground that will have to come back through, McDonald said of the personnel stationed in Haiti. That will become part of our mission as well to make sure they get through here as painlessly as possible. When the relief efforts have wrapped up, the Joint Logistics Hub will be seen as a prime example of the U.S. Navy carrying out its role as a Global Force for Good in the international community. I absolutely believe that this is an important mission, McDonald said. I am certain that in my time of need, that the Navy would be there for me as well.

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010 | VOICE O F T HE FORCE PAGE 13 THE WIRE | PAGE 13 Boots on the GroundWith Presidents Day being last week, who is your favorite president and why?by Marine Lance Cpl. Justin R. WheelerArmy Pfc. Christyal Murray Army Pvt. Ryan Johnson Navy Intelligence Specialist 3rd Class Anastasia Teres Army Spc. Barbara Guishard Obama, because he is an excellent leader. Abraham Lincoln. He was about equality and unity. Thats the most important thing. Bill Clinton, because the economy was up and everyone had jobs. Bill Clinton. A lot of positive things happened Navy Lt. Anthony Carr, Navy Expeditionary Guard Battalion chaplain, draws a cross with ashes on the forehead of Air Force Maj. William S. Wiecher, Joint Task Force Guantanamo deputy command chaplain, during an Ash Wednesday service at Troopers Chapel in Camp America, Feb. 17 JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. Athneil Thomas

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LI F E & SP IRI T | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010 PAGE 14 | THE WIRE GTMO Religious ServicesDaily Catholic Mass Mon. Fri. 5:30 p.m. Main Chapel Mon. Fri. 12:30 p.m. Troopers Chapel Vigil Mass Saturday 5:00 p.m. Main Chapel Mass Sunday 9:00 a.m. Main Chapel Seventh Day Adventist Saturday 11:00 a.m. Room B Iglesia Ni Christo Sunday 5:30 a.m. Room A Pentecostal Gospel Sunday 8:00 a.m. Room D LDS Service Sunday 9:00 a.m. Room A Liturgical Service Sunday 10:00 a.m. Room B General Protestant Sunday 11:00 a.m. Main Chapel United Jamaican Fellowship Sunday 11:00 a.m. Building 1036 Gospel Service Sunday 1:00 p.m. Main Chapel GTMO Bay Christian Fellowship Sunday 6:00 p.m. Main Chapel Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Troopers Chapel The Truth Project Bible study Sunday 6:00 p.m. Troopers Chapel Protestant Worship Sunday 9:00 a.m. Troopers Chapel Islamic Service Friday 1:15 p.m. Room C Jewish Service FMI call 2628 LORIMI Gospel Sunday 8:00 a.m. Room D The GTMO bluesNavy Lt. Anthony Carr JTF NEGB Command Chaplain____________________________ After a harsh break up with a girlfriend, I was a moping, self-pitying mess. A few weeks later, after the break up, I heard Bonnie Raitts song, I Cant Make You Love Me If You Dont on the radio. As I was listening to the words of that song, I could relate and, somehow by relating, I felt better. The sad words of that song had a positive impact on me. I knew I was not alone and started having a lifelong appreciation for the Blues. It being African-American History Month, I would be remiss not to mention the Blues Greats like Billie Holiday, B.B. King, Bessie Smith, Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, Etta James, John Lee Hooker and many others who had a great impact not only in the blues but in jazz, country, classic rock, and world music. Sometimes, you have to have life push you around before you can relate to blues music. A broken relationship, a betrayal of a friend, the loneliness of isolation, money problems and even bad news from home can all bring on the blues. Hannah got the blues when she couldnt Elijah got the blues after barely escaping from Queen Jezebel with his life (I Kings 19:1-4) and the Israelites gave Moses the blues for 40 years wandering in the wilderness (see Exodus). In the lyrics to the blues standard Trouble in Mind, it speaks both of life extinguishing sorrow and a profound hope for the future. When you have the blues, you have a sadness of your current situation and still have hope for the future. Weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning. If you think what you are experiencing is a little more than the blues, you might want to drop by and see one of your friendly neighborhood chaplains, Fleet and Family Support or the Joint Stress Mitigation and Restoration Team. Remember you wont be blue always, because the sun is going to shine on your back door someday.

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McClure receives racing stripesTHE WIRE | PAGE 15 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010 | 15 MI N U T ES O F FAMEArmy Sgt. Derrol Fulghum JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs____________________________An unabashed passion for auto racing has put a Joint Task Force Guantanamo medic in the national spotlight. Army Sgt. Lee McClure will make his TV debut this summer behind the wheel of series Pinks. Minutes of Fame. Clinic. Hes the Soldier who takes down basic information and checks patients in when arriving for sick call. Lee was in his third year of college at Pittsburg State University in Kansas when he enlisted, interrupting his aeronautical engineering degree. I always had a fascination for moving parts and anything mechanical, McClure said. I was the kid that took everything apart. That fascination lead to his pride been converted into a full-blown race car. Hearing from a friend about the car, has raced it in small circuit races, two years I used to go barnstorming, McClure said. Id throw the Nova in a trailer and drive all over Kansas. Id compete in one race after another and try to make it back in time for work. Pinks is a show on Speed TV, a channel dedicated solely to racing. The show derives its name from the colored slips of paper or car title denoting the owner of a vehicle. Some drivers put pink slips on the line when they race but this show takes a different track. Amateur drivers from around the country register online and the winner earns $10,000. Pinks producers select year-old combat medic enlisted in the Army rd Infantry Division invasion of Iraq. McClure leans back and looks at the ceiling as he recalls the day he went to see the recruiter. I wasnt looking for anything in rd ID combat patch catching the light in the small really interesting, so I said, Sure. For McClure, racing is just a hobby. But the Army is his life. Even though hes only been in for six years, he has plans to eventually retire from the military. For now, hes attending Columbia College and studying education. His post-military career plans include obtaining a teaching history. GTMO is a unique place and serving here has been an invaluable experience, McClure said. It is a nice change of pace something you can say youve done once in your life. After six months at Joint Task Force Guantanamo, McClure is in no hurry to leave. After all, he has to earn more money to put into his Nova. The car is never complete, Lee said. I could put another $100,000 in her and still not be done. Army Sgt. Lee McClure, combat medic with the 525 th Military Police Battalion,logs patient information at the Joint Troop Clinic, Feb. 17. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. Derrol Fulghum Sgt. Lee McClures 1962 Chevy Nova

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Around the AROU N D T HE JTF | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2010 Navy Logistics Specialist 2 nd Class Noel Galarza places inbound packages in their proper sections, Feb. 15. processes more than 9,000 pounds of mail each week, doing their part to keep the mission going strong. JTF Guantanamo photo by Air Force Staff Sgt. Angela Ruiz Around the Army Pfc. Joshua Davis, a Soldier with the 525 th Military Police Battalion, plays ping pong with another Trooper at the liberty center in Camp America, Feb. 11. JTF Guantanamo photo by Marine Lance Cpl. Justin R. Wheeler Troopers, assigned to Joint Task Force Guantanamo dine together at the chaplains Burger Bash in Camp America, Feb. 12. JTF Guantanamo photo by Marine Lance Cpl. Justin R. Wheeler JTF Troopers on fire Fire warden program enhances mission