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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00392
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: 01-08-2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00392

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Volume 10, Issue 46 Friday, January 8, 2010 A JTF Journal Coast Guards new rating USCGs maritime enforcement specialists Keeping the lights on Maintaining the ELC THE

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PAGE 2 | THE WIRETROO P ER-T O-TROO P ER | FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010Your military family Around the John SimpsonNEGB supply LCPO__________________________________During holiday periods, it is easy for us to begin to feel a little sorry for ourselves. Married or not, all of us have family or friends who are important to us, and people we would rather spend the holidays with. It would be easy to get a little depressed and let the little things that happen on a daily basis become bigger than they are. I would argue that we have a family right here at GTMO thats every bit as important as the one back home. The family I speak about is our fellow guards, staff members and support entities. Every day there are cases where a shipmate demonstrates our Navy core values and helps out another. This is something to take great pride in. No one can argue that the job we are asked to do here at GTMO is extremely challenging. We are asked to perform day in and day out in a zero defect environment. This means we cannot afford to have a single failure in our procedures without potentially catastrophic consequences. Even the most successful companies in the world do not operate under these conditions; most tolerate a few percent defect in their products. Yet every day our fellow Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen do just this, and do it well. For me, this is a great source of pride and it makes it a little easier to deal with all the little things that tend to get on our nerves. Dont ever forget, this is perhaps the most important job that our military is currently undertaking. Not to take anything away from our brothers and sisters serving in Afghanistan or Iraq, but a mistake here could have very far-reaching consequences for our country. There is constant attention to everything you do, if you need proof of this, simply turn on the news. Having said all of that, I would encourage each and every one of us to rely on our teammates for strength. Sitting down for a game of cards or grilling up a few burgers after shift can bring about a big change in attitude. I also suggest all of us take a look at the great events that MWR provides for us here. All of these things are outlets. Take pride in the work you are doing here. Watch out for your teammates and if you see someone that is a little down, step in and see if there is anything you can do to help them out. We need to rely on each other. Keep up the great work, and may the new year bring success and happiness to you and your families. JTF-GTMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Mark H. Buzby Joint Task Force CMC: Navy Command Master Chief Brad LeVault Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Rick Haupt: 9928 Deputy: Army Lt. Col. Edward Bush: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. Patrick Sellen: 3649The WireEditor: Army Staff Sgt. Paul Meeker: 3651 Assistant Editor: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeff Johnstone: 3594 Layout and Design: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary Keen: 3594 Army Sgt. Scott Griffin: 3594 Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Web Design: Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Wolff: 8154 Staff Writers: Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Army Spc. Shanita Simmons: 3589 Army Spc. Daniel Welch: 3589Contact us:Base Information: 2000 Public Affairs Office: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651Cover Photo By:Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert ClowneyOnline:www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milJointTaskForce-Guantanamo, produces The Wire, which is printed under the provisions of Department of Defense Instruction 5120.4 The Public Affairs OfficeJTF GUANTANAMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. David M. Thomas, Jr. Joint Task Force Command Master Chief: Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Brian T. Schexnaydre Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Pauline Storum: 9928 Deputy Director: Army Capt. Kim Kleiman: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. James Venske: 3649The WireExecutive Editor: Army 1st Lt. Adam Bradley: 3596 Editor:Army Sgt. 1st Class Vaughn R. Larson: 3651Assistant Editors: Army Staff Sgt. Emily Russell: 3592 Army Staff Sgt. Gretel Sharpee: 3594 Staff Writers: Army Spc. Megan Burnham: 2171 Army Spc. Eric Liesse: 3499Contact usEditors Desk: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651 Email: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Online: www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milThe WIRE is the official news magazine of Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is produced by the JTF Public Affairs Office to inform and educate the Troopers of JTF Guantanamo through news, features, command guidance, sports and entertainment. The WIRE seeks to provide maximum disclosure with minimum delay with regards to security, accuracy, propriety and policy. This DoD news magazine is an authorized publication for the members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The WIRE are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is printed by the Document Automation & Production Service with a circulation of 1000. COVER: JTF-GTMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Mark H. Buzby Joint Task Force CMC: Navy Command Master Chief Brad LeVault Office of Public Affairs: Director: Navy Cmdr. Rick Haupt: 9928 Deputy: Army Lt. Col. Edward Bush: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. Patrick Sellen: 3649The WireEditor: Army Staff Sgt. Paul Meeker: 3651 Assistant Editor: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeff Johnstone: 3594 Layout and Design: Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gary Keen: 3594 Army Sgt. Scott Griffin: 3594 Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Web Design: Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Wolff: 8154 Staff Writers: Army Sgt. Jody Metzger: 3592 Army Spc. Shanita Simmons: 3589 Army Spc. Daniel Welch: 3589Contact us:Base Information: 2000 Public Affairs Office: 3651 or 3596 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3651 DSN: 660-3651Cover Photo By:Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert ClowneyOnline:www.jtfgtmo.southcom.milJointTaskForce-Guantanamo, produces The Wire, which is printed under the provisions of Department of Defense Instruction 5120.4 The Public Affairs Office The WIRE is the official news magazine of Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is produced by the JTF Public Affairs Office to inform and educate the Troopers of JTF Guantanamo through news, features, command guidance, sports and entertainment. The WIRE seeks to provide maximum disclosure with minimum delay with regards to security, accuracy, propriety and policy. This DoD news magazine is an authorized publication for the members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The WIRE are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or Joint Task Force Guantanamo. It is printed by the Document Automation & Production Service with a circulation of 1,000. COVER:Five Coast Guardsmen from Maritime Safety and Security Team 91103 are promoted during a ceremony on a Coast Guard cutter docked at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Dec. 31. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. Emily Greene BACK COVER:A palm tree is lit with Christmas lights at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Staff Sgt. Emily Russell JTF GUANTANAMO Commander: Navy Rear Adm. Tom Copeman Command Master Chief: Navy Master Chief Petty Officer Scott A. Fleming Office of Public Affairs Director: Navy Cmdr. Brook DeWalt: 9928 Deputy Director: Army Maj. Diana Haynie: 9927 Supervisor: Army 1st Sgt. Shellie Lewis: 3649The WireExecutive Editor: Army Lt. Christopher Cudney: 2171 Command Information NCOIC:Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael Gholston: 3651Editor: Army Staff Sgt. Blair Heusdens: 3594 Assistant Editor: Army Sgt. Michael Baltz: 3589 Staff Writers: Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Edward Flynn Army Sgt. Carmen Gibson Army Sgt. David McLean Army Spc. Tiffany Addair Army Spc. April D. deArmas Army Spc. Christopher Vann Contact usEditors Desk: 3594 or 2171 From the continental United States: Commercial: 011-53-99-3594 DSN: 660-3594 E-mail: thewire@jtfgtmo.southcom.mil Online: www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010 | MISSION THE WIRE | PAGE 3Keeping the legal process going 474th Expeditionary Civil Engineering Squadron maintains Expeditionary Legal Complex for ongoing military commissionsst Class Edward FlynnJTF Guantanamo Public Affairs__________________________Although much is reported in the media about the uncertainty of Joint Task Force Guantanamo and the legal status of the detainees, Airmen with the Base Emergency Engineer Force assigned to the 474th Expeditionary Civil Engineering Squadron, consisting of Air National Guard units from several different states, continue to provide support to the Expeditionary Legal Complex. The 474th is responsible for construction and sustainment of Camp Justice and the ELC in support of military commissions at the naval station. This dedicated engineering squadron helped establish a tent city named Camp Justice. The 474th was instrumental in providing engineering support to the state-of-the-art ELC, erected to accommodate these military commissions. The courtroom protects highlystate of the art technology usually found in federal courts. For each commission, this highly-sensitive process must ensure that the courtroom and other utilized buildings on Camp while ensuring operational security issues are addressed. Used by the legal staff, judges and detainees, this environment is often witnessed by national and international media, complementing the JTF mission of legal and transparent care and custody of detainees. Additionally, a media center within the complex provides journalists with Internet access and closed circuit television viewing of the hearings. The 474th provides various engineering duties and general maintenance services, including maintaining generators and electricity, preventive maintenance to heating, ventilation and air conditioning and electrical units, pest control, carpentry skills and heavy equipment operation. Working in this joint environment has been an exceptional experience, said Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Tim McConnell, a member of the 474th ECES. We receive tremendous cooperation in getting the job done. Im proud of our team and their hard work and professionalism. Additionally, when commissions are not happening at Guantanamo, the 474th continues to work closely with Naval Station Guantanamo Bay on various public works projects throughout the base, improving conditions for service members and their families. The 474th was instrumental in the changeover from generators to shore power, ensuring that the legal staff has ability to work and conduct commissions and enhance the physical location at this facility, while reducing the chance of a power outage. I have learned a great deal about engineering and preventive maintenance, said Air Force Senior Airman Ryan Pinno. Additionally, this assignment has provided me the opportunity to work with such talented people during this historic time. made by the 474th includes the installation of trailer-style living units for attorneys and their staff. This allows the legal staff, when on the island for commissions, privacy and comfort while working and living in this environment. Joint Task Force Guantanamo will continue to provide services, enhancing detention facilities and improving quality of life for Troopers and detainees until the last detainee leaves the island. Air Force Senior Airman Ryan Pinno with the 474 th Expeditionary Civil Engineering Squadron conducts preventive maintenance on a generator at Camp Justice, Jan. 5. JTF Guantanamo photo st Class Edward Flynn Air Force Senior Airman Dominique Dagohoy with the 474 th Expeditionary Civil Engineering Squadron conducts maintenance on an air conditioning unit at Camp Justice, Jan. 5. st Class Edward Flynn

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MISSION | FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010 PAGE 4 | THE WIREAn Airman with the 190th Civil Engineering Squadron drills into the side of a building while conducting repairs, Jan. 6. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Spc. Christopher Vann Christopher VannJTF Guantanamo Public Affairs____________________________Airmen from the 190th Civil Engineering Squadron with the Kansas Air National Guard and the 106th Civil Engineering Squadron of the New York Air National Guard, are at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay to assist the Navy Mobile Construction Battalion, or Seabees, and the Base Emergency Engineering Force on various construction projects, gaining valuable training to meet their annual Deployment for Training requirements. The 190th CES and 106th CES are on a two-week training deployment in support of naval station and Joint Task Force Guantanamo construction projects. Air Force Master Sgt. Lori Cherry, project manager, describes the projects assigned to the units. This is a great opportunity for us to conduct our DFT, Cherry said, What provide quality work.Having the guardsmen help with operations at Guantanamo Bay provides and resources to ensure that all personnel are able to complete their respective missions.We have projects going on over on the leeward side of the base, in addition to the windward areas, as part of our mission requirements, Cherry said. We have all the personnel needed to get the jobs done everything from electricians, heavy equipment operators, heating, ventilation and air conditioning to plumbers and engineering assistants. The CES teams will also be working with the Seabees to help refurbish the cannon wheels, located on Sherman Avenue. Air Force Capt. Donald in-charge, sees this deployment as a way to positively evaluate and observe the lower enlisted with their development and New York and Kansas airmen lend support to JTF mission leadership skills. This is a win-win situation for us, Harper said. Its a great chance to train and gain experience.With work getting done on the leeward side of the island to the migrant operations facilities and areas being cleared for future operations, the training enables the jobs. From major construction to minor Columbia College building, where new air conditioning and heater units are being installed, and ventilation holes being added to the roof, the CES teams are hard at work. The training that we get here will assist us in future deployments to perform at a high level, Harper said. Air Force Master Sgt. Oscar Trevino and Air Force Senior Airman Matthew Lucht with the 190th Civil Engineering Squadron of the Kansas Air National Guard dig a trench outside of a detention facility, Jan. 7. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Spc. Cody Black

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THE WIRE | PAGE 5 FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010 | MISSION a decision that was reached lightly. Coast Guard Vice Adm. Jody BreckenridgeFive reserve maritime enforcement specialists with Maritime Safety and Security Team 91103 advanced from petty st Class Allyson E.T. Conroy st Class ____________________________With the ringing in of the New Year, the Coast Guard ushered in a brand new rating, while at the same time, they said good-bye to another. The maritime enforcement specialist rating became part of the Coast Guard family Jan. 1, while its reserve counterpart was disestablished. Joint Task Force Guantanamos Maritime Safety and Security Team 91103 recognized the special milestone during a ceremony at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Dec. 29, 2009. Each member symbolically transitioned from one side of the brow to the other. As they did so, each person shed his legacy rating and stepped into the boots of being a maritime enforcement specialist. Not many people can say they changed rates from their legacy to a brand new rate while being deployed to Guantanamo, Lee Conroy, with MSST 91103, which is out of Los Angeles. Conroy, previously a boatswains mate, is the senior enlisted member to be a plank owner of the maritime enforcement rate at the MSST. Being here makes it that much more special. It is important to recognize this new step in the Coast Guard. The service has been responsible for maritime law enforcement since its beginning days as the Revenue-Marine, and later named the Revenue Cutter Service, which was established in 1790. The idea behind creating a new law enforcementcentric rating is to be able to continue that ability with a better set of tools for the a decision that was reached lightly, said Coast Guard Vice Adm. Jody Breckenridge, The admiral was able to visit the MSST and pay tribute to the unit during the holidays, as well as participate in the ceremony of those who switched rates at the beginning of the year. In the post-9/11 environment, and the joint environments we are operating in, we have looked at how threats have changed, and the skills we really need have changed, Breckenridge said. This new rate will help the Coast Guard acquire those skills and maintain those maritime enforcement specialists will be the law enforcement instructors at the unit level, and will keep when it comes to enforcing the laws on the water and in the many different aspects of the Coast Guard mission. In the recent past, it has primarily been the boatswains mates, the gunners mates and the machinery technicians who have constituted the Coast Guards boarding teams. This will not change, according to Conroy. These teams will still be made up of a variety of other rates to do the job. However, it will be the units resident maritime enforcement specialist who will be responsible for training these team members and keeping them up to speed on their law enforcement skills. This, he says, will be a wonderful improvement because as the different rates rotate in and out of the different missions, there will always be a maritime enforcement specialist at the unit to make sure the members know what they need to know to get the job done and to stay safe Coast Guard ushers in New Year with new ratingSee

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LOCA L SP OR T S | FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010 PAGE 6 | THE WIRE JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs____________________________Naval Station Guantanamo Bays Morale, Welfare and Recreation department continues to support Troopers and personnel who are softball junkies by starting another season. While most of the teams remain from last season, there will be a few new names and faces, such as GTMO Intensity, which is comprised of Joint Task Force Guantanamo Troopers and civilians. was in the Turkey Gobbler [All Nighter] softball tournament where we went on catcher for GTMO Intensity. Now we have experience. After the tourney, we continued to practice a few nights a week, and we will continue to do so until the season starts. I feel that we are the team to beat. I expect to win it all, Close added. Close said he plays as a way for him to exercise and maintain camaraderie in the work environment. It is a great way to stay in shape, and it allows for us who work in the JTF, to come together, Close said. Other teammates agree, but Navy Chief JTF, has other reasons for being part of the team. I love it. I have been playing sports since I was little, especially baseball, Hirzel explained. This is just a way to keep my tradition and my love for sports going. According to Hirzel, he feels that the success of his team will be a result of We have really been able to come together over the past two months, said rd Class Jordan Grainger, GTMO Intensity is focused, ready and, of course, intense as the season nears. The league sign-up deadline is Jan. 8 at 5 p.m., the coaches meeting is Jan. 11 at 5:30 p.m. and the season starts Jan. 13 at 6:30 p.m. Games will be played on Complex. If you have any questions regarding MWRs softball league or other upcoming sports, call ext. 2113 or 77262. A Trooper with GTMO softball from the practice, Jan. 6. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. Michael Baltz 3 rd Class Jordan Grainger prepares to swing during a team batting pratice, Jan. 5. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. Michael Baltz

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JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs____________________________Set in the early to mid 90s, Clint of Nelson Mandelas presidency and how he pushed the nations rugby team, led by captain Francois Pienaar, to achieve World Cup glory. However, Mandelas backing of the rugby team split many hairs, as the Springboks were symbols of apartheid for millions of South Africans, making Mandela risk the very base that pushed security, his exhaustive schedule and the strains on his personal life. This movie was less about rugby and more about a struggling nation attempting to heal many years of division. Morgan Freeman delivers an impactful performance as South African leader Nelson Mandela. Freemans accent, mannerisms and tone were spot on, as he brought emotionally charged exploits to the screen. Matt Damon also excels as Pienaar, the solid rugby player who must do more than just lead by example for his team. This duo complemented each other perfectly on screen to bring about this true tale of determination and success, both on The screenplay, adapted from the John Carlin book Playing the Enemy, doesnt offer many narrative surprises, but it does do a good job examining not only the strife South Africa was in when Mandela was elected, but also the value of the team to the entire nation. Eastwood does not deviate from history, but there are a few Though the material may seem familiar, the performances by Damon, and especially Freeman, are what elevate this tale into a solid and even uplifting drama. The only things that really detracted were some inaccuracies that were very man who weighs nearly 260 pounds, while Damon may be 5 and tip the scales at just 200 pounds. Damon does bear a the rugby tests, he looks much smaller and out of place. The title of the movie is rather poem was not the inspiration Mandela had in Robben Island prison. The Man in the Arena, by Theodore Roosevelt, was the true inspirational piece, but the former does adapt very well for a Hollywood movie. moving story it represents, captures that period of time with amazing accuracy. The cinematography of the South African landscape shows beauty and barrenness, riches and poverty, while the actors move you to cheer for the Boks as the nation only family friendly, but an inspiring true story that will be an award-winner this year. Unconquered and unmatched FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010 | MOVIE RECON THE WIRE | PAGE 7

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Joint Task Force Guantanamo Troopers and Naval Station Guantanamo Bay residents rang in the new year with concerts by Bridge of Sighs and State of Man, who played at the Tiki Bar, Dec. 31. The two bands, who have visited Guantanamo on multiple occasions, entertained Troopers into the new year. Rocking in the new year JTF Guantanamo photos by Army Spc. Cody Black FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010 PAGE 8 | THE WIRE THE WIRE | PAGE 9

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NE W S & IN F OR M A T ION | FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010 PAGE 10 | THE WIRE Members of Joint Task Force Guantanamo prepare to greet passengers as they depart from a Bay. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Spc. Cody Black Going somewhere? JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs____________________________Travel, transportation and leave procedures can be confusing, depending on what service and status youre in at Joint Task Force Guantanamo. With the mixture of civilian and military personnel at JTF Guantanamo, it can be a big task keeping up with the comings and goings of so many people. travel for leave and emergency leave for JTF personnel. This includes arranging week and on other contracted aircraft that leave out of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. Were here to help JTF personnel get to where they need to go, said Air Force Capt. William Boyd. The most consistent and reliable means of transportation off-island is the Air U.S. Southern Command, the naval station and the FBI sometimes allow JTF Troopers There is no guarantee on the availability as their purpose is to support a particular mission at GTMO, Boyd said. JTF personnel who need to book a seat on the rotator should contact Air Force Staff Sgt. Rahsha Stowers in the SMO request can be submitted in electronic form cannot be booked more than 90 days in advance. Stowers says she makes approximately 200 reservations each week for JTF personnel. One of the most important things, Stowers says, is for Troopers to make sure their leave paperwork has the correct funding code on it before they arrive at the terminal the day they leave. Its a relatively simple process, but dont wait until the last minute, said Stowers. Active duty personnel and their family members, as well as other categories process can save money, but personnel should be aware that their seats may not be guaranteed. Space-A passengers should go directly to the AMC terminal to sign up to through the SMO. Passengers with Space-A travel is a convenient option for with their schedules. The SMO also works to coordinate the island. For JTF personnel who are on leave, but they will have to go through the Troopers who are preparing to check out of GTMO.As for any travel arrangements, early planning and preparation are important. Leaving enough time to ensure paperwork is in order and reservations are made can make your travel experience less stressful.Plan ahead and follow up, said Boyd. Air Force Staff Sgt. Rahsha Stowers at ext. 3011 or Air Force Capt. William Boyd at ext. 3359.

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THE WIRE | PAGE 11 FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010 | NE W S & IN F OR M A T ION JTF Guantanamo Public Affairs____________________________________________Whether it is on land, in the air or in the surrounding waters, all creatures big and small share the living space with Troopers and residents of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay this is also true of sea turtles. There are several species of sea turtles that can be found in the waters surrounding Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. They include the leatherback, loggerhead, green and hawksbill turtles. Because of the unique position the base is in, we can see these turtles spawn year round, said Mike McCord, Naval Station Guantanamo Bay environmental director. Troopers and residents who take advantage of snorkeling or diving can see sea turtles on a regular basis. Some may even happen upon a nest of eggs or newly-hatched turtles while on the beach. On Dec. 12, Jean Anderson, purchasing manager for Joint Task Force Guantanamo, walked up on some newly-hatched turtles before starting a night dive at Windmill Beach. said. We saw them heading to the basketball court and helped brightest horizon. They were thrown off course because the basketball court lights were on, Anderson said. When my dive partners and I started to follow it in. It was really awesome to see. Troopers and residents may not realize that all species of sea turtles are endangered and protected creatures. have regulations in place to protect sea turtles from catching them and harvesting their eggs, McCord said. Some of the biggest threats to the sea turtle population here in Guantanamo Bay, according to on the beaches. People go to the beach to dive or to hang out. When they do, they tend to track through the nesting areas which destroys eggs, McCord said. People also leave the lights on in the cabanas at the beach when they leave. Another problem affecting the turtle population is harvesting of the eggs in the nests. During the 90s, when we had a large population of migrants here, our turtle population was affected because the migrants would go to the beaches and get the eggs and eat them, McCord said. Troopers and residents may not realize they can help in the conservation of the sea turtle population here. The best way people can help is to keep a look out for turtle tracks on the beach and be aware of where they are traveling on the beach and to turn off all lights at the cabanas after using them, McCord said. We need to remember that most of us are visitors here and we want to protect the wildlife so others who come can enjoy it as well. Coexisting with sea turtles A sea turtle is seen during a dive off Windmill Beach. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Spc. James Cornwell Newly-hatched sea turtles make their way to the water at Windmill Beach. JTF Guantanamo contributed photo

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NE W S & IN F OR M A T ION | FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010 PAGE 12 | THE WIREfrom 5while doing it. With the establishment of this rate, there will be a core in the organization that will represent our new depth of experience, Breckenridge said. They will keep our deployable forces up and coming, with a bit stronger footprint, while at the same time keeping the rest of the Coast Guards skill sets up as they rotate through the different billets. As this new rating comes on line, the Coast Guard says farewell to another rate. The port security specialist was the only job that was strictly for the reserves, a job Putnam did for more than 13 years as a reservist. I am sad to see the PS rate go, Putnam said. Putnam is Conroys reserve counterpart, who also made the change to ME. He may be sad to see his legacy rate being disestablished, but he is excited to see the reservists have the opportunities the new rate will afford them. In the past, the reserve PS members did not have an active duty counterpart, said. Youd come in for your drill weekends and be working for a [boatswains mate] or another rate who really didnt know what your job consisted of.Now, Putnam said, a consistency will be maintained between the active-duty side USCG welcomes maritime enforcement specialistsand the reserve side, which will ensure his reserve members receive the proper training they need. When deployments come up, such as the one Conroy and Putnam are now on, there will be a better correlation within the one rate, making sure the mission his legacy rating of boatswains mate and becoming a maritime enforcement specialist during a ceremony, Dec. 29. JTF Guantanamo photo by Coast Guard st Class Allyson E.T. Conroy

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010 | VOICE O F T HE FORCE PAGE 13 THE WIRE | PAGE 13 Maintaining Trooper skillsMembers of the 193rd Mililtary Police Company of the 525th Military Police Battalion check their weapons back into the arms room after cleaning them at Joint Task Force Guantanamo, Jan. 7. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. Emily Greene Boots on the GroundWhere is your favorite place to eat on base? Why?by Army Spc. Tiffany AddairArmy Pfc. Jerome Perry Jr. nd Class Castonia Lee Air Force Master Sgt. James R. Frye 3rd Class Andrew Martin The galley, because it is free. Its not really a place, but Wednesday night Pizza at the bowling alley. I love the Triple C. Their sugar crazed shakes are amazing! Pizza Hut, because I like pizza.

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LI F E & SP IRI T | FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010 PAGE 14 | THE WIRE JTF Deputy Command Chaplain____________________________A new year has begun; a new year to grow in our spiritual lives. This new year enables us to forget the past that encumbers us and allows us to live a life in hope and anticipation. As part of the new year, the feast of the Epiphany January 6 plays an important role in the life of the Christian new year and it commemorates the visitation of the three wise men, or three kings, from the east who came to pay homage and offer gifts to the Christ Child. Epiphany means literally to show or reveal as well as illuminate. In this moment, Jesus Christ is revealed as the savior of the nations, symbolized by the three kings bowing before him. It is also a revealing, to which every person of faith is called. Through our lives of service and dedication to others, we embody and reveal the love of God to the world. The giving of gifts during Christmas and the Epiphany feasts remind us of the gift given for the sake of the world Jesus. In turn we are called to be gifts to others, to give of our time and talents. One of my favorite stories concerning this profound truth regarding the giving of oneself in service to others comes from the 20th century Indian Christian evangelist, Sundar Singh. Singh was a Sadhu, which is a term for a mystic or practitioner of yoga. Singh was an Indian Hindu who converted to Christianity and became an evangelist. What was unique about his ministry was his clothing, since he wore the saffron (yellow) robe of a Sadhu to make Christianity acceptable to others. As a Sadhu, he relied on the generosity of others, abandoned all possession and maintained celibacy. In this lifestyle, he was free to devote himself fully without distraction to the Lord. Dressed in his thin yellow robe, carrying no money or other possessions except a copy of the New Testament, Singh took to the road and began a life of spreading the simple message of love and peace and rebirth through Jesus as well as a life of service toward one another. He stressed the importance of giving to others, and the mutuality that is the essence of living in community with others. The following paraphrased selection comes from his book The Cross is Heaven. He writes: In a certain desert, where there was no sign of water, there was a tree with green leaves bearing fruit. The reason was that the long roots of the tree found a secret spring of water deep under the ground and was thus nourished by it. Prayer is the hidden root which goes to the hidden spring which is God. Through prayer we receive life from God and strength to bear fruit. In Palestine, I was standing near the River Jordan and thought: This water, this fresh, Dead Sea, but that sea still remains dead, because it is not sending out streams. So there are some Christians which are spiritually dead. The fresh water from Jesus they are still dead. Why? Because they are not giving out to others. in this way we are an Epiphany for those around us. I hope that in this new year, you will discover new ways of giving of yourself in service to others, and in doing so you will discover the joy that comes from such service, as well as improving the life of those we work and live with here in this community. The new year: a time to give GTMO Religious ServicesDaily Catholic Mass Mon. Fri. 5:30 p.m. Main Chapel Vigil Mass Saturday 5:00 p.m. Main Chapel Mass Sunday 9:00 a.m. Main Chapel Daily Catholic Mass Sun. Fri. 6:30 a.m. Troopers Chapel Seventh Day Adventist Saturday 11:00 a.m. Room B Iglesia Ni Christo Sunday 5:30 a.m. Room A Pentecostal Gospel Sunday 8:00 a.m. Room D LDS Service Sunday 9:00 a.m. Room A Liturgical Service Sunday 10:00 a.m. Room B General Protestant Sunday 11:00 a.m. Main Chapel United Jamaican Fellowship Sunday 11:00 a.m. Gospel Service Sunday 1:00 p.m. Main Chapel GTMO Bay Christian Fellowship Sunday 6:00 p.m. Main Chapel GTMO Christian Fellowship Sunday 8:00 p.m. Main Chapel Bible Studay Sunday 6:00 p.m. Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Troopers Chapel Protestant Worship Sunday 9:00 a.m. Troopers Chapel Islamic Service Friday 1:15 p.m. Room C Jewish Service Friday 7:00 p.m. LORIMI Gospel Sunday 1:00 p.m. Room D

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THE WIRE | PAGE 15 FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2010 | 15 MINU T ES O F FA M E Carmen GibsonJTF Guantanamo Public Affairs____________________________Anybody here ever ate a banana rat? The question may seem absurd as part of an average stand-up comedy routine, but here at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, the local Troopers simply chuckled knowingly and nodded in approval as they watched one of their own take the stage to lift their spirits. Army Sgt. Ryan Usher, a Joint Task Force Guantanamo Trooper assigned to the 189th Military Police Company and a moonlighting comedian, took an interest in the entertainment industry at an early age. He excelled in theater and show choir in high school, and after graduation, took gigs as a wedding singer. It was not until he signed up for improv nights, however, that he realized his talent for stand-up. [Entertaining people] is something I wanted to do my whole life, said Usher. I just love making people laugh. Back in his hometown of Duluth, Minn., a large audience by serving as master of ceremonies for a hometown tree lighting event. After being deployed to JTF Guantanamo in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, Usher took advantage of the Windjammers weekly Trooper-sponsored open mic night to try his act out away from home. In front of his seniors, peers and subordinates, Usher shimmied and shook without rhythm, all the while joking of his unfortunate dancing skills. Ive always seemed to put a funny twist on anything that happens, said Usher. Im not afraid to make myself an emotional whipping post. While he did poke fun of himself and his hometown, the young comedian also tried to relate to the other Troopers daily responsibilities as well as share in their feelings about being away from home in a funny way, of course. With someone being deployed here, they understand what were going through and can crack on it, said Navy Seaman Kaylie Gordon, an intelligence specialist with the Joint Intelligence Group. He actually understands what we all do and that makes the jokes easy to relate to. In addition to taking the stage at weekly open mic nights, Usher is scheduled to headline an upcoming comedy review for entertainment beginners sponsored by the Junior Service Members Association. With offers already being handed his way, Usher hopes to continue to entertain the masses as long as they continue to enjoy it, and judging by the laughter coming from the audience, his last act is nowhere in sight. Trooper brings laughs to GTMO Army Sgt. Ryan Usher with the 189 th Military Police Company puts on a comedy act at open mic night at the Windjammer, Jan. 3. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. David McLean A gathered crowd looks on as Army Sgt. Ryan Usher with the 189 th Military Police Company performs at open mic night at the Windjammer, Jan. 3. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. David McLean

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Around the AROUND T HE JTF | FRIDAY, JANUARYY 8, 2010 Around the Marines from the Naval Station Guantanamo Bay Marine Corps Security Force Company conduct physical training at Marine Hill Pool, Dec. 30. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Staff Sgt. Blair Heusdens Mary White and members of her country music band perform on New Years Eve at the Goat Locker. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Sgt. Emily Greene Navy Lt. Jonathan Charfauros for winning the all-military portion of the 2010 Seabee Fishin Challenge, Jan. 2. JTF Guantanamo photo by Army Staff Sgt. Blair Heusdens