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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00077
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: November 15, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00077

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PAGE 1

On Veterans Day, more than 90 ser vicemembers assembled at Camp Americas new chapel to recognize those who have given and risked their lives to defend the values and freedom of the United States of America. Present at this memorable event were Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller, the new commander of JTFGTMO and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey, the former commander of the joint task force. Invited by Army Chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill, Miller stepped up to the pulpit to share a few words of motivation and inspiration with the audience. Its great seeing all of you coming here to celebrate the fellowship of the military, and more importantly, com memmorate Veterans Day, said Miller. The veterans we honor tonight are like each one of us, men and women who came to answer the call of our nation to do the nations business and to guarantee our freedom and the freedom of so many other people around the world. Were military for one reason, he continued. That is to defend the free dom of this nation. The nation has called on our military, you, to fight, and when were called on well win. Thats what we are about. As you know, the nation is at war tonight. Our part of the war is here at Guantanamo Bay, making sure the detainees from the War on Terrorism are unable to further attack our nation, our country, our people. The good news is we have you here to ensure that its successful, said Miller. We are all grateful for what you do. Many of you have made a very difficult sacrifice to give up a part of your life in the last six months to ensure we are successful. I am proud to be the commander of this joint task force, and I am proud to have you as its members, said Miller. Before concluding his impromptu address, the general reiterated his appreciation for the servicemembers here. Thanks for making a difference Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-GTMO and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Veterans night at GTMO Friday, November 15, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 23 Story and photos by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire High command of JTF-GTMO gathers at Camp America to remember veterans See VETERANS, page 5 A look inside... Page 3 Page 4 Page 6 Dunlavey done, leaves Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey, the former commander of Joint Task Force-GTMO, says goodbye to GTMO before head ing to the Leeward side to catch his plane Tuesday morning. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Q: So, I hear you want to be The Wires lat est 15 Minutes of Fame? Your wish is granted! Tell GTMO all about DaJuan Glover. Thats an unusual name, by the way. A: My mom liked two names, Rashan and DaJuan. She went for DaJuan. Q: Tell me about you and the military. A: Ive been in the Navy for four years. I joined at 18. Im a PC3. Q: Whats that? That sounds like a com puter. Im not up on Navy terminology. A: Sorry! PC3 stands for Postal Clerk 3rd Class. Q: Gotcha. Have you always been a postal clerk? A: No, I started out as a deck seaman. Q: And what is that? A: A deck seaman takes care of the ship. They make sure the ship is painted. I also was a helmsman. I drove the ship when we pulled in and out of port. I guess you could say I was the main guy to drive the ship. I did that for about two years. Q: That sounds like a big responsibility. How did you make the switch to being a postal clerk? A: Being a deck seaman was a great job, but it was a lot of stress. You were one of the most important people. You have to pay atten tion to detail. When youre moving the ship, if youre off a degree or miss something... Q: I can imagine. A: Youve got the life of everyone on the ship in your hands. Q: Its a little ironic that someone would make a career change to being a postal clerk to reduce stress! Are you in the military for the long haul? A: Definitely! I love the Navy. Im a reservist now, but Ill stay in until Im eligible for retirement. Q: What do you see yourself doing 20 years from now? A: I want to open up a couple of busi nesses. I love clothing. I could see myself opening up a clothing store. Or a barbershop. As many businesses as I can get. Q: What is your job like down at the mail room? A: My job is beautiful. I work with great people. Q: Is it all Navy? A: No, its a true Joint Task Force in there. Ive worked with Army, Air Force and Navy servicemembers. We get all of the JTF mail from the main post office. Q: Wow! Thats a lot of cookies from home! A: Yep. We sort everything and the mail clerks from the different units or offices come and pick it up. If insured mail comes for you, we give your mail clerk an insured card and the mail has to be signed for. After a while you get to know peoples names. Like, if I see something for Sgt. Peso, I know Q: Its Pessoa, actually. A: Oh. Anyway, I know thats Public Affairs. Q: Thanks. So, what made you decide to join the Navy? A: When I was young I was pretty much a knucklehead with no sense of direction. I came from a rough neighborhood. I wanted to get off the street. I didnt want to do the Armys type of PT, and Im scared of airplanes and heights, so it was the Navy for me. Q: Oh, its not that bad! Where have you been with the Navy? A: Ive been to a lot of places in Latin America and Africa. Puerto Rico, Brazil, Chile, South Africa, Namibia, Nigeria, etc. Q: Thats a great variety. Which port was the most unusual? A: Id have to say Panama was the place I liked the most. It took eight hours to clear the canal, traveling east to west. But, despite all of the places Ive been, itll be great to go back home. Q: Whats the first thing youre going to do when you get there? A: Give my daughter a great big squeeze! Shes seven months old. Ive only seen her once, on leave. Q: What piece of wisdom would you pass on to your daughter? A: Dont take anything for granted. Like the guys out there in Camp America. Its tough for them. Some people in the Loop complain about how theyre living, but theyre not in SEAhuts. Q: True. Is there anything youd like to clear up about the mail room? A: We work hard! On average, we handle about 4,000 pounds of mail a week! Q: Im sure you do! Now, theres theres a let ter Ive been expecting for a few weeks, and... Navy PC3 DaJuan Glover, budding entrepreneur, devours books on finance and business for fun. The first thing Im going to do when I get back home is give my baby daughter a great big squeeze. Interview and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire 15 Minutes o f Fame... Page 8 Friday, November 15, 2002 with Navy PC3 DaJuan Glover Undercover Glover

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Page 2 Friday, November 15, 2002 Chaplains Corner The sighting of the moon on the eve of November 6th marked the beginning of Ramadan, Islams holy month of fasting. Ramadan, the ninth lunar month of the Islamic calendar, is the month in which the first revelation of the Quran came to the Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him). During this blessed month, Muslims all over the world engage in fasting in order to train themselves in self-discipline and scrupulous obedience to Gods commands. A verse from the Glorious Quran reads: O you who believe, fasting is prescribed for you as it was prescribed for those before you in order that you may be conscious of God... (2:183). The month of Ramadan is a period of special religious significance and activity. The fasting that takes place each day is a means to learning discipline, self-restraint, and flexibility. It involves on a physical level, total abstinence from all food, drink, tobacco, and marital sexual relations dur ing the daylight hours. On a behavioral level, the fasting involves abstinence from falsehood, speaking ill of others, quarreling or engaging in angry talk, discussion of dis reputable matters, and wrong behavior of any sort. Ramadan is a time when Muslims engage in increased devotional activity. Besides the usual five daily prayers, the additional evening prayers observed during Ramadan called taraweeh are performed, and usually in congregation at the mosque. Another popular tradition is the reciting of the entire Quran during this month, as this was the practice of the Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him). Fasting instills discipline, and makes the Muslim steadfast and resilient like a soldier who forgoes or postpones the satisfaction of his/her normal needs at the order of his/her commander. This trains the Muslim to be flexible, capable of enduring hard ships, and not to take for granted the boun ties with which God has blessed him/her. Fasting enables the Muslim to feel with the poor who experience hunger daily, and thereby prompting him/her to respond with compassion and charity towards them. Islam recognizes that physical needs and appetites, particularly those of food, drink and sex, are powerful factors in human life; factors which tie man to dependence on and preoccupation with his/her bodily needs and desires. Hence, ending any indulgence in or imposing a clear limit to satisfying these needs and desires frees one to pursue spiritual goals and devotion to God. It also constitutes a purification of the soul and a sacrifice that leads to renewal and fresh strength. Fasting a month may sound difficult to those who have never attempted it, but actually in practice it is generally tolerable for most people, and even easy for some. Indeed within that month, Muslims become very accustomed to the altered routine of Ramadan and experience an intense level of spirituality. Thus when Ramadan ends, there is a poignant sense of loss which causes Muslims to wait eagerly for the arrival of next Ramadan, carrying the expe riences and applying the lessons learned throughout the coming year. The new moon is again sighted, this time indicating that Ramadan has concluded. It welcomes Eid Al-Fitr, the Festival of Breaking the Fast an occasion which celebrates that the fasting of Ramadan, one of Islams five pillars, has been fulfilled. Army Chaplain (Capt.) Yousef, JTF-GTMO Chaplain-Detainee Opera tions Ramadan: Spiritual Renewal JTF-GTMO Commander Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller JTF-GTMO Command Commander: Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Air Force Lt. Col. Eduardo Villavicencio OIC: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detachment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTFGTMO. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Since arriving here I have been impressed with the hard work, dedication and profes sionalism of all the servicemembers working here at JTF-GTMO. Leaders and warriors, I thank you for your service in this difficult and critical mission. But in this time of transition, we must resist the temptation to be satisfied with our accomplishments so far. I urge those of you who are leaving soon to keep your sights set, more than ever, on the here and now. My mission as commander is to make this operation leaner, stronger and more effective than ever before, to prepare JTFGTMO for the future; each of you now has the opportunity to do the same. As your replacements arrive, share your wisdom with them. Tell them what has gone wrong here in the past, as well as what has gone right. They will come here with the enthusiasm to work hard you must supply them with the direction to work smart. In your time here, you have served your country and Operation Enduring Freedom honorably and well; you have my thanks and best wishes. But do this vital mission one more service by redoubling your efforts to leave this operation better off than when you arrived. And to those of you now joining our team, listen to those whom you are replacing. I have sought input from the many staffs and com mands that are finishing up their service here. Do the same collect all the advice and information you can, and learn not just how to do your new job but how to do it better. This is JTF-GTMO, a task force in transi tion not only of personnel but of philosophy. Our difficult mission, however, remains the same, our role in fighting the global War on Terror remains critical, and so does its central truth: complacency costs lives. As Thomas Jefferson said, the price of freedom is eternal vigilance. So whether you are joining our team or preparing to leave it, dont stop working until the job is done. Each and every one of you is vital to our continued success, for you are Americas best. Across 1 Account (abbr.) 5 Flute 9 Express indifference 14 Oxford 15 Decorative needle case 16 Kooky 17 Bod 18 Floating ice 19 Atop (2 wds.) 20 Toothbrush brand 22 Punk hairdo 24 Disks 25 __ Years War 27 Appear 31 Canal name 32 Congressional vote 34 North northeast 35 Painter of melting clocks 38 Kittens cry 40 Whining speech 42 Warning 44 Distress call 46 Cease-fire 47 Person on horse 48 Single 50 Dole out 51 Stretch to make do 52 Body of water 55 One 57 Lairs 59 Fish hawk 61 Avail 64 Brand of sticky notes 66 Organic compound 68 Infras opposite 71 Vilify 73 Volcano 74 European ermine 75 Green Gables dweller 76 Fewer 77 Chompers 78 Company symbol 79 Gratis Down 1 Association (abbr.) 2 Musical sound 3 Unconscious states 4 Bluish green 5 Valentine mo. 6 Lists 7 Craze 8 A big number 9 Lento 10 Beeps like a car 11 Decay 12 Card game 13 Swindle 21 British thermal unit 23 Yes 26 Skirt edge 28 Result 29 Ordain 30 Disturbance 31 Beget 33 Picnic pest 35 Challenged 36 Resembling 37 Burdened 39 Date 41 Navys rival 43 Married woman 45 Breathing 49 Vane direction 53 Aurora 54 Stellar 56 Caustic substance 58 Small herring 60 Large instrument 61 Talk 62 Perceive 63 Efface 65 Swearword 67 Ego 68 Concord e.g. 69 Shoshonean 70 Raven author 72 MGMs Lion Page 7 Friday, November 15, 2002 November 8th: DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, November 15 7 p.m. Blue Crush, PG13 100 min 9 p.m. Ecks vs. Sever, R 91 min Saturday, November 16 7 p.m. Stealing Harvard, PG13 83 min 9 p.m. The Banger Sisters, R 97 min Sunday, November 17 7 p.m. The Four Feathers, PG13 130 min Monday, November 18 7 p.m. Swim Fan, PG13 85 min Tuesday, November 19 7 p.m. The Banger Sisters, R 97 min Wednesday, November 20 7 p.m. City By The Sea, R 108 min Thursday, November 21 7 p.m. The Four Feathers, PG13 130 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, November 15 8 p.m. Master of Disguise, PG 80 min 10 p.m. XXX, PG13 114 min Saturday, November 16 8 p.m. Eightlegged Freaks, R 103 min 10 p.m. Road to Perdition, R 119 min Sunday, November 17 8, 10 p.m. Goodfellas, R 147 min Monday, November 18 8 p.m. Conan the Barbarian, R 129 min Tuesday, November 19 8 p.m. Fargo, R 98 min Wednesday, November 20 8 p.m. Minority Report, R 140 min Thursday, November 21 8, 10 p.m. Reign of Fire, PG13 108 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris If my mind could only process As fast as my brain could think, Id be throwing out emotions As fast as a sad eyes blink. Id look God in his face, And throw him a wink... Confident in my decisions, My mind leads this body Along an unknown path. Im an innocent boy With the potential to wrath. Dark clouds follow wherever I go, Ill never give up and believe in the show. I always think positive And hope for the best; Ever since conception, Ive always been blessed... ITS THE WORLD AGAINST ME, And, I choose to be all I can be.

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Page 6 Friday, November 15, 2002 Expecting the worst while hoping for the best is a necessary way of life for military members. When and if bad things happen, you can either be prepared, or you can be dead; the choice is yours. On Tuesday, members of the Coast Guards Port Security Unit 307 went through a block of instruction that covered chemical, biological and radiological weapons, and refreshed their skills on how to respond to an attack. This specific training is as important as having a weapon to fight with, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael R. Adams, security division, PSU 307 and instructor of the class. If you cant survive a chemical attack, it does nt matter how good you can shoot. War is a tricky game; sometimes a team may have to take a blow before delivering one. And if a troop gets killed, he can no longer help his team. That would be unfortunate if all it would have taken to survive and continue bat tling on was a little more combat training. And thats why training is vital. Weve been very proactive with our train ing since we arrived here at GTMO, said Ensign Thomas E. Adams. Any kind of equipment that an individual doesnt know how to use is worthless to them. We go through the same sets of training each year to keep us up to date, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Adams. Its very important to have a good understanding what to do, so you can just react during these situations. If it was an individuals decision, some would choose to just sit back and procrastinate, thinking such an occurrence would never really happen. Thats why some particularly critical areas of training are mandatory for all unit members to attend. Everyone in the 307th goes through a cycle of training that covers certain areas of work that we have to get signed off on, said Ensign Adams. It helps us to know where we fit into the Coast Guard organization as a whole, to make sure were up to speed. The training we do with our unit is very important, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan J. Tedford. Hopefully well never have to use this CBR train ing in real life, but if we do, well all be ready. When people realize, in fact, that their lives are at stake, and one false move could mean the whole difference; thats when ears are opened and attention to detail is greatest. But, listening to instructions and taking notes just isnt enough to give you that real-world feeling, so members of the 307th train as they would fight and gear up mentally to practice their techniques through the mock CBR condi tions as if they were real. The training included getting the individu als into their protec tive gear, then physical activities such as calisthenics, push-ups, the side straddle hop and even a 200-meter run, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Adams. Rea son being, so they know what it feels like out there during the real thing. They need to have a good understanding of the inevitable stress fac tor under any wartime situation. Its when you put on the chemical warfare outfit that reality sets in, said Petty Officer 1st Class Maudell S. Glenn, PSU 307. It prepares us by giving us experience under real world conditions. The heat really hits you under that protec tive gear. The mask is restrictive and causes claustrophobia, fast, she added. You have to fight your way through it. Strength and unity within a well-organized unit can take a group to endless reaches. The 307th is a very training-oriented unit with a demanding schedule, said Ensign Adams. But our members always come together to meet and surpass the standard. This crew is well-motivated and willing to learn, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Adams. Now, with more knowledge, each member is more of an asset to the unit. Being an asset, and being all you can be for your teammates, is a valuable attitude to carry. We will be sure that all members of the unit receive their proper training, said Ensign Adams. It may not be today or tomorrow, but someday this training may save a life. Everything has been going well for mem bers of the 307th, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Adams. Hopefully after all of this training, things will be even better. We keep accurate statistics on all training, said Ensign Adams. We know whos being naughty, and whos being nice. We appreci ate hard training, because this stuff really is a matter of life and death. Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire PSU 307 trains to survive gas attacks Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael R. Adams, PSU 307, gets his class warmed up during training on responding to a chemical, biological and/or radiological attack. During training on how to respond to a chemical attack, members of the PSU 307 got hot and sweaty while running a 200-meter course in MOPP suits. Proper fitting and usage of a protective mask could mean the difference between living and dying. Page 3 Friday, November 15, 2002 McDonalds: the name alone is synonomous with the fast food industry, and the legendary tastes of the var ious delights served here are all seasoned with years of tradition. This food chain stretches across the globe from Red Square in Moscow to the vast deserts of Eygpt, from the rain forests of Puerto Rico to here at GTMO. Keeping the food everyone knows up to peoples expectations isnt easy, but the crew here works hard to uphold the McDonalds legacy as the reigning fastfood chain on Earth. These proud workers enjoy their jobs as much as the customers enjoy devouring the mouth-watering food served here, and it shows in both their performance and their product. With a hearty, affordable menu, a clean environment and free smiles, even a slender wallet can buy a supreme meal. Its well worth a little extra PT. McDonalds workers Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris After a big order of 13 Big Macs comes in, the crew snaps into working mode in a hurry to get the burgers expertly prepared in a timely and efficent manner. Cheryl Parnell, crew chief I truly enjoy my job. When I serve somebody and see that beautiful smile stretch across their face, that means that theyre satisfied. Ray Montepio, crew worker My job is pretty fun. The best part is being able to work with such a great crew. And I get to meet good people, like those JTF guys. David Russell, general manager I really like the job that I do. I have a fantastic crew that makes it a great environment to work in. Plus, this is a great company to work for. Profession o f the Week Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Crew worker Ray Montepio works his magic at the fry station pouring fresh, hot, golden, crispy, salty, and delicious french fries into a large-sized container, much to the satisfaction of the hungry customer who awaits his order with bated breath. You think you can get fries like this at Subway? No chance. Rosa Mays, crew chief I love my job! The life here, the excitement, the happy people...Its so loud and fun! I just started to work on the grill, and its great.

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to your nation. Thanks for carry ing out to make sure that free doms light will always shine. Life is good on the first team, and thats what we have right here. God bless you! After the generals speech Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Ray mond Tetreault led the audience in a prayer remembering the vet erans for the sacrifices theyve made for the flag. Afterward, he said to all the participants to enjoy the night, because this was also a social event for people to share food, drinks and conver sation on a special occasion. It seemed that everybody was moved and blended into the spirit of the veterans night. I think this is a good opportu nity to really think about the peo ple that have given their lives for us, said Coast Guard Capt. Paul Crissy of PSU 307. I think the general put it very appropriately when he said everybody gave something, but some gave it all, said Crissy. It was a nice time to get together and to say goodbye to a lot of people and have some fel lowship on Veterans Day, said Army Maj. Gen. Dunlavey, who after seven months as com mander of JTF-160/170 was due Tuesday to board the ferry, leave the GTMO sun shine and return home to his civil ian life. C.G. had a great thing to say: were all veterans, and were still fight ing this war, said Dunlavey. Were trying to protect every thing we need and hold dear. We were there praying together, and ironically the enemy were fighting in the current global War on Terror ism is trying to rely on his ver sion of what God said to destroy the world. What a contrast! Chaplain Merrill, the lead organizer of the event, was content with the turnout. We had a house. Tonight we have seen that the leaders of Joint Task Force-GTMO support the soldiers, he said. We wanted to do something from the leadership perspective to let every soldier, sailor, Marine, airman and Coast Guardsman know they are important, and that they are appreciated, and that we respect everyone who is down here making a sacrifice of their time and their lives and serving our country, said Merrill. What happened tonight was actually a testimony that people of the different branches of serv ice can work together for the same common goal. We may wear different uniforms, but when push comes to shove we have the same goal, which is to stand for whats right and stand up for freedom. I think it was a tremendous success, a testament to the coop eration of the forces here and a testament to the Lord, said Sgt. Mark Winters of the 342nd Mili tary Police Co. It shows every body in Camp America we can work together, and people are looking out for them. I think one of the most impor tant things we can do is remember our veterans, because if it wasnt for them and their sacrifices we would not be here. Certainly we would not be here as free as we are, said Winters. Like Merrill, the organizers of Camp Americas Protestant serv ices called the night a success. This just started out as a small conversation about organizing, for the soldiers here at Camp America, a social night in remem brance of the veterans, and amaz ingly we got more. The whole JTF-GTMO command came, said Army Staff Sgt. John Sain. I wasnt expecting to see two gen erals in one night. Its unbeliev able and really gratifying. When we try to do some thing, and God is in it, it just gets bigger. Hes totally awesome, said Sain. Tonight was an excellent gathering. I was very impressed by the night whole setup, the whole format, said Spc. Hollister Robinson of the 342nd MPs. I think we have achieved the purpose of the night, he said. Fellowship is always a great thing. It was nice to have a com memoration of Veterans Day. On Monday night, I saw many veter ans from Vietnam and the gulf war, said Army Chaplain Tetreault. Its important to pass on the tradition. The reason behind these holi days is to not forget the sacrifices that were and are now being made for this country. I was pleased to see Gen. Miller com ing up and showing his support for the servicemembers here, said Tetreault. We always have to remember those who gave their tomorrow so we can have our tomorrow, he added. A special thank you to the Navy Exchange for the refresh ments, and the warehouse that provided all the paper product for the celebration of Veterans Day at GTMO, said Chaplain Merrill at the end of the gathering. Page 5 Friday, November 15, 2002 VETERANS, from page 1 Servicemembers talking and reaching to a table filled with refreshments and fin ger food especially prepared for the veterans night at Camp America. Army Chaplain Michael Merrill stands with GTMO s top brass as the national anthem is played at Camp Americas chapel Monday night. Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller addressing servicemem bers at the special gathering for Veterans Day at the Camp America chapel Monday night. Page 4 Friday, November 15, 2002 Subway doors open at last GTMO base commander Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn, center, does the honors with the scissors at the grand opening of GTMOs new Subway store Wednesday. Buehn is flanked by, from left to right, GTMO NEX general manager Jack Crotty, store owners Lyle and Cyndi Swanson, Navy Capt. Dick Thornbridge, Vice Commander, NEXcom, and Gene Bowers, NEXcoms southern regional services operations manager. Subway is always the mostrequested food establishment in surveys of military bases, and when the company asked me to come here four months ago, it looked feasible, said Swanson, who owns 46 stores. Ever since, the base has been acco modating in every way. The store serves breakfast (and pizza) and will be open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Enjoy! Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini This weeks question: Whats the greatest fast food restaurant in the world? Rizalino Ladiero I would prefer a good Oriental restaurant, but Subway will have to do. Those roast beef sand wiches they make really hit the spot. Dave Robertson I say Kentucky Fried Chicken. I love that orginal recipe with some cole slaw, mashed pota toes and gravy. I hope they bring one here. Fernando Zacarias McDonalds is the place to go. You cant beat that dollar menu that they have. I just wish that they sold cappuccinos. Robert Catapang I love Subway. That stuff can get me through the day. Ill eat this stuff for breakfast, lunch and din ner if I have to. Tom Thompson I dont like the greasy fast food, so Im going to go with the Subway. Ive been waiting here for over three years to get me one of those roast beef sandwiches. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Man on the Street

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to your nation. Thanks for carry ing out to make sure that free doms light will always shine. Life is good on the first team, and thats what we have right here. God bless you! After the generals speech Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Ray mond Tetreault led the audience in a prayer remembering the vet erans for the sacrifices theyve made for the flag. Afterward, he said to all the participants to enjoy the night, because this was also a social event for people to share food, drinks and conver sation on a special occasion. It seemed that everybody was moved and blended into the spirit of the veterans night. I think this is a good opportu nity to really think about the peo ple that have given their lives for us, said Coast Guard Capt. Paul Crissy of PSU 307. I think the general put it very appropriately when he said everybody gave something, but some gave it all, said Crissy. It was a nice time to get together and to say goodbye to a lot of people and have some fel lowship on Veterans Day, said Army Maj. Gen. Dunlavey, who after seven months as com mander of JTF-160/170 was due Tuesday to board the ferry, leave the GTMO sun shine and return home to his civil ian life. C.G. had a great thing to say: were all veterans, and were still fight ing this war, said Dunlavey. Were trying to protect every thing we need and hold dear. We were there praying together, and ironically the enemy were fighting in the current global War on Terror ism is trying to rely on his ver sion of what God said to destroy the world. What a contrast! Chaplain Merrill, the lead organizer of the event, was content with the turnout. We had a house. Tonight we have seen that the leaders of Joint Task Force-GTMO support the soldiers, he said. We wanted to do something from the leadership perspective to let every soldier, sailor, Marine, airman and Coast Guardsman know they are important, and that they are appreciated, and that we respect everyone who is down here making a sacrifice of their time and their lives and serving our country, said Merrill. What happened tonight was actually a testimony that people of the different branches of serv ice can work together for the same common goal. We may wear different uniforms, but when push comes to shove we have the same goal, which is to stand for whats right and stand up for freedom. I think it was a tremendous success, a testament to the coop eration of the forces here and a testament to the Lord, said Sgt. Mark Winters of the 342nd Mili tary Police Co. It shows every body in Camp America we can work together, and people are looking out for them. I think one of the most impor tant things we can do is remember our veterans, because if it wasnt for them and their sacrifices we would not be here. Certainly we would not be here as free as we are, said Winters. Like Merrill, the organizers of Camp Americas Protestant serv ices called the night a success. This just started out as a small conversation about organizing, for the soldiers here at Camp America, a social night in remem brance of the veterans, and amaz ingly we got more. The whole JTF-GTMO command came, said Army Staff Sgt. John Sain. I wasnt expecting to see two gen erals in one night. Its unbeliev able and really gratifying. When we try to do some thing, and God is in it, it just gets bigger. Hes totally awesome, said Sain. Tonight was an excellent gathering. I was very impressed by the night whole setup, the whole format, said Spc. Hollister Robinson of the 342nd MPs. I think we have achieved the purpose of the night, he said. Fellowship is always a great thing. It was nice to have a com memoration of Veterans Day. On Monday night, I saw many veter ans from Vietnam and the gulf war, said Army Chaplain Tetreault. Its important to pass on the tradition. The reason behind these holi days is to not forget the sacrifices that were and are now being made for this country. I was pleased to see Gen. Miller com ing up and showing his support for the servicemembers here, said Tetreault. We always have to remember those who gave their tomorrow so we can have our tomorrow, he added. A special thank you to the Navy Exchange for the refresh ments, and the warehouse that provided all the paper product for the celebration of Veterans Day at GTMO, said Chaplain Merrill at the end of the gathering. Page 5 Friday, November 15, 2002 VETERANS, from page 1 Servicemembers talking and reaching to a table filled with refreshments and fin ger food especially prepared for the veterans night at Camp America. Army Chaplain Michael Merrill stands with GTMO s top brass as the national anthem is played at Camp Americas chapel Monday night. Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller addressing servicemem bers at the special gathering for Veterans Day at the Camp America chapel Monday night. Page 4 Friday, November 15, 2002 Subway doors open at last GTMO base commander Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn, center, does the honors with the scissors at the grand opening of GTMOs new Subway store Wednesday. Buehn is flanked by, from left to right, GTMO NEX general manager Jack Crotty, store owners Lyle and Cyndi Swanson, Navy Capt. Dick Thornbridge, Vice Commander, NEXcom, and Gene Bowers, NEXcoms southern regional services operations manager. Subway is always the mostrequested food establishment in surveys of military bases, and when the company asked me to come here four months ago, it looked feasible, said Swanson, who owns 46 stores. Ever since, the base has been acco modating in every way. The store serves breakfast (and pizza) and will be open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Enjoy! Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini This weeks question: Whats the greatest fast food restaurant in the world? Rizalino Ladiero I would prefer a good Oriental restaurant, but Subway will have to do. Those roast beef sand wiches they make really hit the spot. Dave Robertson I say Kentucky Fried Chicken. I love that orginal recipe with some cole slaw, mashed pota toes and gravy. I hope they bring one here. Fernando Zacarias McDonalds is the place to go. You cant beat that dollar menu that they have. I just wish that they sold cappuccinos. Robert Catapang I love Subway. That stuff can get me through the day. Ill eat this stuff for breakfast, lunch and din ner if I have to. Tom Thompson I dont like the greasy fast food, so Im going to go with the Subway. Ive been waiting here for over three years to get me one of those roast beef sandwiches. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Man on the Street

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Page 6 Friday, November 15, 2002 Expecting the worst while hoping for the best is a necessary way of life for military members. When and if bad things happen, you can either be prepared, or you can be dead; the choice is yours. On Tuesday, members of the Coast Guards Port Security Unit 307 went through a block of instruction that covered chemical, biological and radiological weapons, and refreshed their skills on how to respond to an attack. This specific training is as important as having a weapon to fight with, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael R. Adams, security division, PSU 307 and instructor of the class. If you cant survive a chemical attack, it does nt matter how good you can shoot. War is a tricky game; sometimes a team may have to take a blow before delivering one. And if a troop gets killed, he can no longer help his team. That would be unfortunate if all it would have taken to survive and continue bat tling on was a little more combat training. And thats why training is vital. Weve been very proactive with our train ing since we arrived here at GTMO, said Ensign Thomas E. Adams. Any kind of equipment that an individual doesnt know how to use is worthless to them. We go through the same sets of training each year to keep us up to date, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Adams. Its very important to have a good understanding what to do, so you can just react during these situations. If it was an individuals decision, some would choose to just sit back and procrastinate, thinking such an occurrence would never really happen. Thats why some particularly critical areas of training are mandatory for all unit members to attend. Everyone in the 307th goes through a cycle of training that covers certain areas of work that we have to get signed off on, said Ensign Adams. It helps us to know where we fit into the Coast Guard organization as a whole, to make sure were up to speed. The training we do with our unit is very important, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan J. Tedford. Hopefully well never have to use this CBR train ing in real life, but if we do, well all be ready. When people realize, in fact, that their lives are at stake, and one false move could mean the whole difference; thats when ears are opened and attention to detail is greatest. But, listening to instructions and taking notes just isnt enough to give you that real-world feeling, so members of the 307th train as they would fight and gear up mentally to practice their techniques through the mock CBR condi tions as if they were real. The training included getting the individu als into their protec tive gear, then physical activities such as calisthenics, push-ups, the side straddle hop and even a 200-meter run, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Adams. Rea son being, so they know what it feels like out there during the real thing. They need to have a good understanding of the inevitable stress fac tor under any wartime situation. Its when you put on the chemical warfare outfit that reality sets in, said Petty Officer 1st Class Maudell S. Glenn, PSU 307. It prepares us by giving us experience under real world conditions. The heat really hits you under that protec tive gear. The mask is restrictive and causes claustrophobia, fast, she added. You have to fight your way through it. Strength and unity within a well-organized unit can take a group to endless reaches. The 307th is a very training-oriented unit with a demanding schedule, said Ensign Adams. But our members always come together to meet and surpass the standard. This crew is well-motivated and willing to learn, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Adams. Now, with more knowledge, each member is more of an asset to the unit. Being an asset, and being all you can be for your teammates, is a valuable attitude to carry. We will be sure that all members of the unit receive their proper training, said Ensign Adams. It may not be today or tomorrow, but someday this training may save a life. Everything has been going well for mem bers of the 307th, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Adams. Hopefully after all of this training, things will be even better. We keep accurate statistics on all training, said Ensign Adams. We know whos being naughty, and whos being nice. We appreci ate hard training, because this stuff really is a matter of life and death. Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire PSU 307 trains to survive gas attacks Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael R. Adams, PSU 307, gets his class warmed up during training on responding to a chemical, biological and/or radiological attack. During training on how to respond to a chemical attack, members of the PSU 307 got hot and sweaty while running a 200-meter course in MOPP suits. Proper fitting and usage of a protective mask could mean the difference between living and dying. Page 3 Friday, November 15, 2002 McDonalds: the name alone is synonomous with the fast food industry, and the legendary tastes of the var ious delights served here are all seasoned with years of tradition. This food chain stretches across the globe from Red Square in Moscow to the vast deserts of Eygpt, from the rain forests of Puerto Rico to here at GTMO. Keeping the food everyone knows up to peoples expectations isnt easy, but the crew here works hard to uphold the McDonalds legacy as the reigning fastfood chain on Earth. These proud workers enjoy their jobs as much as the customers enjoy devouring the mouth-watering food served here, and it shows in both their performance and their product. With a hearty, affordable menu, a clean environment and free smiles, even a slender wallet can buy a supreme meal. Its well worth a little extra PT. McDonalds workers Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris After a big order of 13 Big Macs comes in, the crew snaps into working mode in a hurry to get the burgers expertly prepared in a timely and efficent manner. Cheryl Parnell, crew chief I truly enjoy my job. When I serve somebody and see that beautiful smile stretch across their face, that means that theyre satisfied. Ray Montepio, crew worker My job is pretty fun. The best part is being able to work with such a great crew. And I get to meet good people, like those JTF guys. David Russell, general manager I really like the job that I do. I have a fantastic crew that makes it a great environment to work in. Plus, this is a great company to work for. Profession o f the Week Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Crew worker Ray Montepio works his magic at the fry station pouring fresh, hot, golden, crispy, salty, and delicious french fries into a large-sized container, much to the satisfaction of the hungry customer who awaits his order with bated breath. You think you can get fries like this at Subway? No chance. Rosa Mays, crew chief I love my job! The life here, the excitement, the happy people...Its so loud and fun! I just started to work on the grill, and its great.

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Page 2 Friday, November 15, 2002 Chaplains Corner The sighting of the moon on the eve of November 6th marked the beginning of Ramadan, Islams holy month of fasting. Ramadan, the ninth lunar month of the Islamic calendar, is the month in which the first revelation of the Quran came to the Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him). During this blessed month, Muslims all over the world engage in fasting in order to train themselves in self-discipline and scrupulous obedience to Gods commands. A verse from the Glorious Quran reads: O you who believe, fasting is prescribed for you as it was prescribed for those before you in order that you may be conscious of God... (2:183). The month of Ramadan is a period of special religious significance and activity. The fasting that takes place each day is a means to learning discipline, self-restraint, and flexibility. It involves on a physical level, total abstinence from all food, drink, tobacco, and marital sexual relations dur ing the daylight hours. On a behavioral level, the fasting involves abstinence from falsehood, speaking ill of others, quarreling or engaging in angry talk, discussion of dis reputable matters, and wrong behavior of any sort. Ramadan is a time when Muslims engage in increased devotional activity. Besides the usual five daily prayers, the additional evening prayers observed during Ramadan called taraweeh are performed, and usually in congregation at the mosque. Another popular tradition is the reciting of the entire Quran during this month, as this was the practice of the Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him). Fasting instills discipline, and makes the Muslim steadfast and resilient like a soldier who forgoes or postpones the satisfaction of his/her normal needs at the order of his/her commander. This trains the Muslim to be flexible, capable of enduring hard ships, and not to take for granted the boun ties with which God has blessed him/her. Fasting enables the Muslim to feel with the poor who experience hunger daily, and thereby prompting him/her to respond with compassion and charity towards them. Islam recognizes that physical needs and appetites, particularly those of food, drink and sex, are powerful factors in human life; factors which tie man to dependence on and preoccupation with his/her bodily needs and desires. Hence, ending any indulgence in or imposing a clear limit to satisfying these needs and desires frees one to pursue spiritual goals and devotion to God. It also constitutes a purification of the soul and a sacrifice that leads to renewal and fresh strength. Fasting a month may sound difficult to those who have never attempted it, but actually in practice it is generally tolerable for most people, and even easy for some. Indeed within that month, Muslims become very accustomed to the altered routine of Ramadan and experience an intense level of spirituality. Thus when Ramadan ends, there is a poignant sense of loss which causes Muslims to wait eagerly for the arrival of next Ramadan, carrying the expe riences and applying the lessons learned throughout the coming year. The new moon is again sighted, this time indicating that Ramadan has concluded. It welcomes Eid Al-Fitr, the Festival of Breaking the Fast an occasion which celebrates that the fasting of Ramadan, one of Islams five pillars, has been fulfilled. Army Chaplain (Capt.) Yousef, JTF-GTMO Chaplain-Detainee Opera tions Ramadan: Spiritual Renewal JTF-GTMO Commander Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller JTF-GTMO Command Commander: Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Air Force Lt. Col. Eduardo Villavicencio OIC: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detachment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTFGTMO. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Since arriving here I have been impressed with the hard work, dedication and profes sionalism of all the servicemembers working here at JTF-GTMO. Leaders and warriors, I thank you for your service in this difficult and critical mission. But in this time of transition, we must resist the temptation to be satisfied with our accomplishments so far. I urge those of you who are leaving soon to keep your sights set, more than ever, on the here and now. My mission as commander is to make this operation leaner, stronger and more effective than ever before, to prepare JTFGTMO for the future; each of you now has the opportunity to do the same. As your replacements arrive, share your wisdom with them. Tell them what has gone wrong here in the past, as well as what has gone right. They will come here with the enthusiasm to work hard you must supply them with the direction to work smart. In your time here, you have served your country and Operation Enduring Freedom honorably and well; you have my thanks and best wishes. But do this vital mission one more service by redoubling your efforts to leave this operation better off than when you arrived. And to those of you now joining our team, listen to those whom you are replacing. I have sought input from the many staffs and com mands that are finishing up their service here. Do the same collect all the advice and information you can, and learn not just how to do your new job but how to do it better. This is JTF-GTMO, a task force in transi tion not only of personnel but of philosophy. Our difficult mission, however, remains the same, our role in fighting the global War on Terror remains critical, and so does its central truth: complacency costs lives. As Thomas Jefferson said, the price of freedom is eternal vigilance. So whether you are joining our team or preparing to leave it, dont stop working until the job is done. Each and every one of you is vital to our continued success, for you are Americas best. Across 1 Account (abbr.) 5 Flute 9 Express indifference 14 Oxford 15 Decorative needle case 16 Kooky 17 Bod 18 Floating ice 19 Atop (2 wds.) 20 Toothbrush brand 22 Punk hairdo 24 Disks 25 __ Years War 27 Appear 31 Canal name 32 Congressional vote 34 North northeast 35 Painter of melting clocks 38 Kittens cry 40 Whining speech 42 Warning 44 Distress call 46 Cease-fire 47 Person on horse 48 Single 50 Dole out 51 Stretch to make do 52 Body of water 55 One 57 Lairs 59 Fish hawk 61 Avail 64 Brand of sticky notes 66 Organic compound 68 Infras opposite 71 Vilify 73 Volcano 74 European ermine 75 Green Gables dweller 76 Fewer 77 Chompers 78 Company symbol 79 Gratis Down 1 Association (abbr.) 2 Musical sound 3 Unconscious states 4 Bluish green 5 Valentine mo. 6 Lists 7 Craze 8 A big number 9 Lento 10 Beeps like a car 11 Decay 12 Card game 13 Swindle 21 British thermal unit 23 Yes 26 Skirt edge 28 Result 29 Ordain 30 Disturbance 31 Beget 33 Picnic pest 35 Challenged 36 Resembling 37 Burdened 39 Date 41 Navys rival 43 Married woman 45 Breathing 49 Vane direction 53 Aurora 54 Stellar 56 Caustic substance 58 Small herring 60 Large instrument 61 Talk 62 Perceive 63 Efface 65 Swearword 67 Ego 68 Concord e.g. 69 Shoshonean 70 Raven author 72 MGMs Lion Page 7 Friday, November 15, 2002 November 8th: DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, November 15 7 p.m. Blue Crush, PG13 100 min 9 p.m. Ecks vs. Sever, R 91 min Saturday, November 16 7 p.m. Stealing Harvard, PG13 83 min 9 p.m. The Banger Sisters, R 97 min Sunday, November 17 7 p.m. The Four Feathers, PG13 130 min Monday, November 18 7 p.m. Swim Fan, PG13 85 min Tuesday, November 19 7 p.m. The Banger Sisters, R 97 min Wednesday, November 20 7 p.m. City By The Sea, R 108 min Thursday, November 21 7 p.m. The Four Feathers, PG13 130 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, November 15 8 p.m. Master of Disguise, PG 80 min 10 p.m. XXX, PG13 114 min Saturday, November 16 8 p.m. Eightlegged Freaks, R 103 min 10 p.m. Road to Perdition, R 119 min Sunday, November 17 8, 10 p.m. Goodfellas, R 147 min Monday, November 18 8 p.m. Conan the Barbarian, R 129 min Tuesday, November 19 8 p.m. Fargo, R 98 min Wednesday, November 20 8 p.m. Minority Report, R 140 min Thursday, November 21 8, 10 p.m. Reign of Fire, PG13 108 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris If my mind could only process As fast as my brain could think, Id be throwing out emotions As fast as a sad eyes blink. Id look God in his face, And throw him a wink... Confident in my decisions, My mind leads this body Along an unknown path. Im an innocent boy With the potential to wrath. Dark clouds follow wherever I go, Ill never give up and believe in the show. I always think positive And hope for the best; Ever since conception, Ive always been blessed... ITS THE WORLD AGAINST ME, And, I choose to be all I can be.

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On Veterans Day, more than 90 ser vicemembers assembled at Camp Americas new chapel to recognize those who have given and risked their lives to defend the values and freedom of the United States of America. Present at this memorable event were Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller, the new commander of JTFGTMO and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey, the former commander of the joint task force. Invited by Army Chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill, Miller stepped up to the pulpit to share a few words of motivation and inspiration with the audience. Its great seeing all of you coming here to celebrate the fellowship of the military, and more importantly, com memmorate Veterans Day, said Miller. The veterans we honor tonight are like each one of us, men and women who came to answer the call of our nation to do the nations business and to guarantee our freedom and the freedom of so many other people around the world. Were military for one reason, he continued. That is to defend the free dom of this nation. The nation has called on our military, you, to fight, and when were called on well win. Thats what we are about. As you know, the nation is at war tonight. Our part of the war is here at Guantanamo Bay, making sure the detainees from the War on Terrorism are unable to further attack our nation, our country, our people. The good news is we have you here to ensure that its successful, said Miller. We are all grateful for what you do. Many of you have made a very difficult sacrifice to give up a part of your life in the last six months to ensure we are successful. I am proud to be the commander of this joint task force, and I am proud to have you as its members, said Miller. Before concluding his impromptu address, the general reiterated his appreciation for the servicemembers here. Thanks for making a difference Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-GTMO and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Veterans night at GTMO Friday, November 15, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 23 Story and photos by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire High command of JTF-GTMO gathers at Camp America to remember veterans See VETERANS, page 5 A look inside... Page 3 Page 4 Page 6 Dunlavey done, leaves Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey, the former commander of Joint Task Force-GTMO, says goodbye to GTMO before head ing to the Leeward side to catch his plane Tuesday morning. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Q: So, I hear you want to be The Wires lat est 15 Minutes of Fame? Your wish is granted! Tell GTMO all about DaJuan Glover. Thats an unusual name, by the way. A: My mom liked two names, Rashan and DaJuan. She went for DaJuan. Q: Tell me about you and the military. A: Ive been in the Navy for four years. I joined at 18. Im a PC3. Q: Whats that? That sounds like a com puter. Im not up on Navy terminology. A: Sorry! PC3 stands for Postal Clerk 3rd Class. Q: Gotcha. Have you always been a postal clerk? A: No, I started out as a deck seaman. Q: And what is that? A: A deck seaman takes care of the ship. They make sure the ship is painted. I also was a helmsman. I drove the ship when we pulled in and out of port. I guess you could say I was the main guy to drive the ship. I did that for about two years. Q: That sounds like a big responsibility. How did you make the switch to being a postal clerk? A: Being a deck seaman was a great job, but it was a lot of stress. You were one of the most important people. You have to pay atten tion to detail. When youre moving the ship, if youre off a degree or miss something... Q: I can imagine. A: Youve got the life of everyone on the ship in your hands. Q: Its a little ironic that someone would make a career change to being a postal clerk to reduce stress! Are you in the military for the long haul? A: Definitely! I love the Navy. Im a reservist now, but Ill stay in until Im eligible for retirement. Q: What do you see yourself doing 20 years from now? A: I want to open up a couple of busi nesses. I love clothing. I could see myself opening up a clothing store. Or a barbershop. As many businesses as I can get. Q: What is your job like down at the mail room? A: My job is beautiful. I work with great people. Q: Is it all Navy? A: No, its a true Joint Task Force in there. Ive worked with Army, Air Force and Navy servicemembers. We get all of the JTF mail from the main post office. Q: Wow! Thats a lot of cookies from home! A: Yep. We sort everything and the mail clerks from the different units or offices come and pick it up. If insured mail comes for you, we give your mail clerk an insured card and the mail has to be signed for. After a while you get to know peoples names. Like, if I see something for Sgt. Peso, I know Q: Its Pessoa, actually. A: Oh. Anyway, I know thats Public Affairs. Q: Thanks. So, what made you decide to join the Navy? A: When I was young I was pretty much a knucklehead with no sense of direction. I came from a rough neighborhood. I wanted to get off the street. I didnt want to do the Armys type of PT, and Im scared of airplanes and heights, so it was the Navy for me. Q: Oh, its not that bad! Where have you been with the Navy? A: Ive been to a lot of places in Latin America and Africa. Puerto Rico, Brazil, Chile, South Africa, Namibia, Nigeria, etc. Q: Thats a great variety. Which port was the most unusual? A: Id have to say Panama was the place I liked the most. It took eight hours to clear the canal, traveling east to west. But, despite all of the places Ive been, itll be great to go back home. Q: Whats the first thing youre going to do when you get there? A: Give my daughter a great big squeeze! Shes seven months old. Ive only seen her once, on leave. Q: What piece of wisdom would you pass on to your daughter? A: Dont take anything for granted. Like the guys out there in Camp America. Its tough for them. Some people in the Loop complain about how theyre living, but theyre not in SEAhuts. Q: True. Is there anything youd like to clear up about the mail room? A: We work hard! On average, we handle about 4,000 pounds of mail a week! Q: Im sure you do! Now, theres theres a let ter Ive been expecting for a few weeks, and... Navy PC3 DaJuan Glover, budding entrepreneur, devours books on finance and business for fun. The first thing Im going to do when I get back home is give my baby daughter a great big squeeze. Interview and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire 15 Minutes o f Fame... Page 8 Friday, November 15, 2002 with Navy PC3 DaJuan Glover Undercover Glover