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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00076
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: November 8, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00076

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In January there were the Marines, and Camp X-Ray. In March came the Army reservists and Camp Delta, and the dividing of leadership and responsibilities between JTF160 and JTF-170, between detention and interrogation. And now, nearly 10 months after the first detainees from the War on Terrorism arrived on this well-guarded tropical isle, the two mis sions are officially one, consolidated under an active-duty, permanent-party commander with an eye toward the future. In a change-of-command ceremony held Monday afternoon outside the Pink Palace, under the American Flag marking the spot on which American soldiers first fought at GTMO over 100 years ago in the SpanishAmerican War, Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller and his wife Pam assumed leadership of the new Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay. Today's change of command is a particu larly special occasion, since it marks the end of an era, said Gen. James T. Hill, com manding general of United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). It affects not just these two officers but the entire command. It marks a change of leadership. It's time to rec ognize the accomplishments of the past and a time to renew our commitment to the chal lenges of the future, he said. It was also a time for ceremony, with the JTFs Senior Enlisted Person of the Quarter, Sgt. Fernando Martinez, and its Junior Enlisted Person of the Quarter, Airman 1st Class John L. Grant, presenting a bouquet of flowers to the incoming first lady of the com Story by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire JTF-GTMO era kicks off with new permanent-party, active-duty commander See MILLER, page 5 Page 8 Page 6 Page 15 Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-GTMO and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Miller takes JTF reins Friday, November 8, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 22 A look inside... Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano In a change-of-command ceremony Monday outside the Pink Palace, Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller took charge of the new JTF-GTMO from former JTF-160/170 commander Army Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey. Page 16 Friday, November 8, 2002 with Spc. Terrence J. Styles, JTF-GTMO finance Q: Welcome to 15 Minutes of Fame! Tell me who you are. A: Im Spc. Terrence Jamar Styles. I work in J8. I work in budgeting. Q: How long have you been in the Army? A: Three years. I turned 21 in July. Q: Is this your first overseas deployment? A: No, its my fourth! Ive been to Korea, Kuwait and Egypt. Q: Wow, thats a lot of travel! How long were these deployments? A: Korea was the longest. That was a year. Q: Tell me what you do in J-8? A: Im learning the finance part of J-8. Q: Thats not your original MOS? A: No, I was an Administrative Specialist. I normally did awards and NCOERs. Q: So how did you end up in Finance? A: When I got out of active duty, I reenlisted in the reserves to further my educa tion. I had just started my reserve duty when I got called up. Q: How long have you been in GTMO? A: About two and a half months. Almost three. Q: What were you doing in your civilian life when the call came? A: I was enrolled at Florida A&M Univer sity. Im studying Elementary Education. Q: Cool. You want to be a teacher. What particular subject? A: Id like to teach third grade math. I became interested in elementary education because I never had a male teacher in my early childhood years and I saw the need for a pos itive male role model that a lot of kids dont have growing up. Q: Wow! Thats a very positive message. Are you taking any classes down here? A: Yes. Speech and Child Development. Q: Thats great! Youre earning credits in your spare time on deployment. Tell me about you and the military. Why did you join? A: After I graduated from high school I was tired of school for awhile, so I decided to go into the Army. Q: What has your experience been like at GTMO? A: My roommates are really cool. I made a lot of new friends. Q: What else have you learned about your self down here? A: Ive become more patient down here. This is the first time Ive worked in a joint environment. Q: How has it been working with the other branches of service? A: Well, the work is the same, but the Navy talks kinda funny. They say deck and head. Q: Lets let the people know about some of your hobbies. What kind of music are you into? A: Right now Im into Sean Paul (Gimme The Light) and Pastor Troy (Are We Cut tin). Reggae and R&B. Q: Did you grow up listening to reggae? A: Oh, yes. My dad is Jamaican. Q: Hey, since youre so close to Jamaica, do you have any plans to visit? A: No, Im going home to Florida when I get leave. Im eligible for leave soon, but Ill wait. Q: Have you ever gone to Jamaica? A: No, but I have a lot of aunties and uncles and cousins that come to visit. Q: They consider you American, right? A: Oh, yes! They call me Yankee, but I'm proud to be from the South. Q: Whats your favorite movie? A: The Mack. Q: What? Youve got to be kidding me. A: Blaxploitation films were funny! Q: Uh... whats your favorite sport? A: Basketball. The Indiana Pacers are my team. Q: Wait a minute. You live in Florida and the Pacers are your team? Why? A: I fell in love with Reggie Miller. Q: Aw, man! Reggie Miller? A: Yeah. The first basketball game I remember seeing was with Reggie against the Knicks. Nothing like a skinny guy excelling in a big mans game. I have an autographed rookie card of his. Q: You bought that? A: No, he actually autographed it for me. I went to Indiana and went to the game. Q: It must be worth a lot to you! I hope its in a safe place. A: I didnt bring it down here! Q: Yeah, I hear you. What else are you into? A: I like to read. My favorite author is Eric Jerome Dickey. I like Liar's Game and Milk in My Coffee. Ive read all his books. I highly recommend him! Q: Ill check him out. Last question any advice for those new to GTMO? A: Just be patient. Dont count the days. Spc. Terrence J. Styles puts his skills to work on the phone and the computer so you get paid. Interview and photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire Patience, Pay and The Pacers 15 Minutes of Fame...

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Page 2 Friday, November 8, 2002 JTF-GTMO Command Commander: Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Air Force Lt. Col. Eduardo Villavicencio OIC: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5426 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detachment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-GTMO. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Depart ment of Defense or the personnel within. JTF-GTMO Commanding Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller Chaplains Corner Tomorrow morning, the surgeon told the boy, Ill open up your heart... Youll find Jesus there, the boy said. The surgeon looked up, annoyed. When I see how much damage has been done, Ill sew your heart and chest back up and Ill plan what to do next. But youll find Jesus in my heart said the boy. The Bible says he lives there. Youll find him in my heart. The surgeon had had enough. Ill tell you what Ill find in your heart. Ill find damaged muscle, low blood supply, and weakened vessels. And Ill find out if I can make you well. Youll find Jesus there too. He lives there. The surgeon sat in his office later, recording his notes from the surgery: ...damaged aorta, damaged pulmonary vein, widespread muscle degeneration. No hope for transplant, no hope for cure. Therapy: painkillers and bed rest. Prognosis here he paused Death within one year. He stopped. Why? he asked aloud. You created that boy, and that heart. Hell be dead in months. Why? The Lord answered and said, The boy, my lamb, was not meant for your flock for long, for he is a part of my flock, and will forever be. Here, in my flock, he will feel no pain, and will be comforted as you cannot imagine. Still the surgeon wept. Why? The boy, my lamb, has done his duty: I did not put My lamb with your flock to lose him, but to retrieve another. Later, the surgeon sat beside the boys bed. The boy awoke and whispered, Did you cut open my heart? Yes, said the surgeon. What did you find? asked the boy. I found Jesus there, said the surgeon. Author Unknown. Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR New classified waste disposal procedures To you from the J2 JTF-GTMO has acquired three High Secu rity Shredders capable of destroying classified materials the waste can be placed in the regular trash and does not require burning. New shredder locations are: Head Shed: Outside the J3 on the first floor Pink Palace: 1st floor copy room by J6 CDC: Break room 1. Classified papers will no longer be col lected by the J2 and destroyed at the NAVBASE Incinerator each week. Each sec tion must now take their classified waste to one of the shredders provided for destruction by close-of-business each day. 2. Materials that are not destroyed each day are to be safeguarded based on their security classification (i.e. locked in a safe if required) and should no longer be left out in burn bags. 3. All paperwork generated by the JTF must be destroyed when no longer of use, regardless of security classification. This includes unclassified notes, FOUO, etc. It does not include MWR-type flyers. 4. Commercial office-type crosscut shred ders do not meet the regulations to adequately destroy sensitive paper and prevent reassem bly, and must not be used to process JTFGTMO waste paper. Once processed in one of these devices, materials cannot be fed into the new high-security shredders, but must then be burned at the incinerator. 6. It is the responsibility of each section to coordinate and conduct future burns at the NAVBASE Incinerator for materials that are incompatible with the new shredders from this point forward. (i.e. Diskettes, CDs, Badges, ID card printer ribbons, etc.) POC: NAVBASE N2 at 4121 / 5111. Your cooperation is necessary for the safety of all personnel assigned to GTMO. Think OPSEC! Sgt. 1st Class Roger R. Brisson Youll Find Jesus There Upon taking command, I wrote a memo to the JTF staff regarding my lead ership philosophy. Id like to introduce myself to you, the troops of JTF-GTMO, by passing some of it along here. The most valuable commodity leaders exchange is unvarnished truth. Do not gloss over problems; they do not go away. Seek ways to be innovative, stretch yourself and your subordinates. Risk-tak ing is what high-performing organiza tions do to produce maximum readiness. As a leader under me, you are allowed to make honest mistakes Ill provide the top cover. My philosophy is that 95 percent of the time youll make the right decision; the other 5 percent we can fix. A senior leaders tasks are to set pri orities, provide guidance, delegate authority and hold his people account able to meet the standard. I believe in Power Down, but not Power Off. Power Down requires constant supervision and continual assessment to ensure the mis sion is being done right. Take time and have the leader integrity to tell a subordi nate where he or she needs to improve. Be a good listener to your subordi nates. The greatest compliment you can give is to listen to their thoughts and issues. Train them to be aggressive deci sion makers. Initiative builds confidence. I expect 100 percent loyalty. I respect people who ask questions; this rigs us for success. But when a decision is made, execute as if the decision was yours. Know that your welfare and the wel fare of JTF-GTMO will always be my top priority. I am pleased with the past per formance of this great team and feel for tunate to have the opportunity to lead you into the future. Together, we will make a difference in our nation every day. Page 15 Friday, November 8, 2002 W. T. Sampson spikes NAVSTA W. T. Sampson defeats NAVSTA in two sets 25-23 and 25-22 Tuesday night at G. J. Genich gym. The teams played hard and it was a very close game. Both teams fought to the end. Not only were they fighting for a win but for brag ging rights. The crowd didnt know whom to root for in the game. Most of the W. T. Sampsons play ers have ties to NAVSTA. Both teams were connected by blood or loyalty. Navy Cmdr. Michael L. Fair was playing against his youngest son Jared L. Fair (who scored 11 points) and Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn was in the stand cheering for his W.T. Sampson-enrolled son Tim Buehn (who scored 6 points) as well as for NAVSTA. We always enjoy playing against one another. said Fair. I have three boys and we play a lot of sports together. Jared is pretty good on the volleyball court. My sons take a lot of pleasure in beating me. I told Jared that W. T. Sampson was going down. That was easier said than done, but W. T. Sampson was up to the challenge. NAVSTA drew first blood in the contest, pulling away 8-2 until Jared Fair scored 4 points to bring the high-schoolers back 8-6. NAVSTA kep a thin lead almost through the whole first set, but could not seem to put W. T. Sampson away. The turning point was when the score was 23-18 and W. T. Sampson scored seven straight points to take the first set 25-23. After that set, W. T. Sampson seemed to have more confidence after coming from behind to take the first set. The second set started the same way; both teams going at it like two heavyweight boxers. Both were looking for an opening, a weakness in the defense. The score was 19-15, NAVSTA, when Tim Buehn scored six points to put his team back on top 21-19. The Pirates from W. T. Sampson were able to put NAVSTA away for good when Jared Fair scored match point to clinch the win over NAVSTA 25-22. The game was close because of the fatherand-son adversaries. They were a little nerv ous before the game. The kids didnt start out with the proper sequence. We didnt have our usual lineup, said W. T. Sampsons Coach Mike Haley. But W.T. Sampson overcame the nerves and played well enough to sweep NAVSTA. The teams hard work and communication with one another was the key to victory. They are a good team and played smart in the win against NAVSTA, said Haley. After the game was over, everyone shook hands and gave one another hugs. W. T. Sampson vs. NAVSTA was now over and the former opponents switched back to being family again. W. T. Sampson played hard and they played well. They have a lot of competition in the league. I am really proud of the high school and the way they have performed over all, said Fair. W. T. Sampsons work ethic and youthful legs looks like it will continue to pay off as the season progresses and the playoffs begin. They will be a team to reckon with as long as their fathers dont ground them. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Jared L. Fair of W. T. Sampson and Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark Thompson of NAVSTA meet at the top of the net as Fair goes for the block and denied the spike. W. T. Sampsons Adam Michalik who scored four points in the win against NAVSTA spikes the ball over Navy Cmdr. Michael L. Fair Tuesday night.

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The chaplains in the military have one of the most demanding professions in the Armed Forces, serving the servicemembers 24/7. With the world as their office, the chaplain corps is tasked to spiritually enlighten the military. The Holy Bible is their tool of the trade; with this they convey the messages of faith and compassion. Chaplains are friends to the servicemember. We try to be there and help the individual get throw any crisis they can have in their lives, said Coast Guard Cmdr. Derek K. Ross. Being a chaplain is not a profession it is a voca tion, said Navy Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni. To fol low the footsteps of a chaplain one must have a bach elor's degree and a masters degree in divinity and have gone through an eight-week course in the mili tary. In the military, chaplains walk a fine line, because the military is an organization that is pre pared for war, but at the same time chaplains motivate and are leaders of faith, said Ross. They keep the humanity in the military. Page 3 Friday, November 8, 2002 Chaplains Navy Lt. Sharon A. Bush I am able to spend time with people and assist them with building relation ships with others and the Lord. I assist them in their spiritual walk. Basically, being a chaplain is a humanitarian effort, more so than many jobs in the military. My job helps me draw people to the Lord Army Maj. Michael S. Merrill What I like the best about being a chaplain is that I am in a position to make a positive impact on peoples lives and stand up for what is right in the military. Coast Guard Cmdr. Derek K. Ross There are so many things I love about being a chaplain. Its very excit ing because we go beyond the four walls of a church. As a chaplain we can make an impact on peoples lives, and we are a representantives of God and faith who are available to every one who needs our services. Navy Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni I consider this chaplaincy not simply as a profession, but rather as a voca tion that is a higher calling from the Lord. The profession could perhaps be seen as the human dimension, while the vocation is a spiritual one; the two could actually be seen as meshing together. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Air Force Capt. Hamza Al-Mubarak as he performs a Muslim service. Air Force Capt. Hamza Al-Mubarak I love being chaplain because of doing this for the sake of my Lord, for the same god who created the heaven and the earth. I do this for the sake of helping mankind. I facilitate the religious needs and the act of worship for the military members of the armed forces. Army Lt. Col. Raymond A. Tetreault What I like about being a chaplain is being present for the soldiers and helping with any issue they have, whether family, work or personal prob lems. It's a fulfilling job to have. Profession of the Week Page 14 Friday, November 8, 2002 The MWR/Right Spirit Night Fun Run 5K Race is scheduled for November 8th at 11p.m.. The race will begin from the Windward Ferry Landing and conclude at Phillips Park. Please contact Capt. Gormly at 5249 or Maj. Buchanan at 5255 for more information. Daily free daytime & evening lessons are available for sailing, kayaking, and motor boating at Pelican Pete's Marina, by appointment only. Aerobics Classes, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 6 a.m. 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., and 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.; Tues. and Thurs. 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Tae-Kwon Do, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., and 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. (one hour classes); Tues. and Thurs. 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. 1-on-1 Spinning Classes, G.J. Denich Gym, Mon.Thurs., 6:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Yoga Classes, Tues. Thurs. 5:15 p.m. 6:15 p.m., G.J. Denich GymYoga Center. Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, Mon. Fri., 11 a.m. Midnight. Pool Hours: Marine Hill Pool: Open Swim, 6 a.m. -6 p.m., daily; Windjammer Pool: Lap Swim, 6 a.m. 8 a.m., Mon. Sat., Open Swim, 10 a.m. 6 p.m. daily .; Deer Point Pool: Open Swim, 11 a.m. 7 p.m., Mon. Fri., 10 a.m. 6 p.m., Sat. & Sun. Friday, November 8th 11 a.m -1p.m., Free bowling, Marblehead Bowling Lanes. 7 p.m. Midnight, Friday Extreme Bowling, Marblehead Lanes. 11 p.m. 5K MWR/Right Spirit Night Fun Run, Windward Ferry Landing. Saturday, November 9th 6 p.m. MWR/YSGC Night Golf Tournament, GTMO Golf Course. Sunday, November 10th 1 6 p.m., Extreme Bowling, Marblehead Lanes 6:30 p.m., Bingo, Windjammer Club. 7p.m. Chess Tournament, Main CBQ Liberty Center. Monday, November 11th 6:30 a.m., MWR Boot and Unit (BDU bottoms) Formation Cadence Run, GJ Denich Gym. 8 a.m. Noon, Adult Ceramic Classes, Ceramic Shop. 6 p.m.-8 p.m., Nativity Painting Social, Ceramic Shop. Tuesday, November 12th 6:30 p.m., Bingo, Windjammer Club. 7 p.m., Table Tennis Tournament, Main CBQ Liberty Recreation Center. Wednesday, November 13th 9-11 a.m., Adult Advanced Pottery Classes, Ceramics Shop. 7 p.m. Bowling Party, Marblehead Lanes. 8 p.m., Karaoke, Windjammer Club. Thursday, November 14th 11 a.m. Midnight, Bowling, Marblehead Lanes. 6 p.m., Bowling League, Marblehead Lanes. Free exams for college credits When reservist servicemem bers are deployed outside of the United States, they usually have to discontinue their way of life, including their civililan job, edu cational activities and projects. Responding to the call of duty, they have to postpone college classes they were registered for and put their professional career on hold. For those deployed to Guan tanamo Bay, however, the Navy College Office offers an alterna tive that can help them keep pur suing higher education. In addition to providing edu cational resources at their cam pus located at Chapel Hill, the Navy College Office can help any military member obtain col lege credits through testing. Guiding servicemembers on the path of higher learning is Navy Petty Officer 1st Class James Ulfers, the new testing control officer for GTMO. As the control testing officer, I manage the different examina tion programs that are available to help servicemembers get col lege credits, he said. These college-level place ment programs are available free of charge, said Ulfers. Such standardized test pro grams are the Defense Activities for Non-traditional Educational Support (DANTES) and the College Level-Examination Pro gram, or (CLEP). Ulfers said servicemembers can take the general as well as the subject CLEP exams, adding to the credits theyve already earned from any college. Passing these exams can give you three to six credits toward a college degree, he said. This series of examinations enables individuals to earn col lege credits for what they know, regardless of where they may have learned it. Basically you can almost complete your first two years of college without ever setting foot in a college classroom, said Ulfers. The college credit-by-exami nation program was designed to assist people who attended some college to continue pursuing their degree. Many colleges give credit for the Navy Enlisted Classification, (NEC) or Military Occupational Specialty (MOS). Ulfers said hes available to help anybody navigating through the process. For more information, contact Petty Officer Ulfers at x3996. The majority of JTF person nel down here are most likely reservists or with the National Guard, Ulfers said. Chances are, most of these people were attending college or even plan ning to attend college prior to activation. Theres no reason why they cant continue on. The CLEP and DANTES exams might be the best thing for them to still main tain some resemblance of nor mality in their life, he said. By taking advantage of these programs, they can leave here saying they didnt lose a year of college, and they were able to obtain college credits, he said. Study materials are available from the Web and at the base library. The list of the exams is posted at the door of the Navy College Office on Chapel Hill. Other services offered by the staff include exam proctoring. If you are enrolled in a distance program, you may be required to obtain a proctor for your exams during the course of study, he said. Please contact the office to verify availability prior to your exam date(s). We also offer ACT and SAT exams free of charge for those who need scores to enter col lege, Ulfer said. As the main focus of the Navy College Office is off-duty education, military related exams (ASVAB, DLAB, Senior NCO Academy, etc.) are normally not available through the Navy Col lege Office, said Ulfers. Story and photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Navy Petty Officer 1st Class James Ulfers, the new testing control officer at the Navy College Office, explains to a servicemember the different exami nations that can be taken at GTMO for college credits. Resume Writing Class The Fleet and Family Support Center will be conducting a Resume Writing class on November 13, 2002. The class runs from 8a.m. to 11a.m. in the Fleet and Family Support Center's training classroom. Interested? Please call x4141 to have your name added to the roster.

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Page 4 Friday, November 8, 2002 This weeks question: What words of inspiration can you pass along? Coast Guard Petty Offi cer 2nd Class David Childress I used to be a Navy diver, and we would say bring it on strong or stay home. Army Spc. Reinol Guerrero, JTF-GTMO Two Army classics: Be all you can be and suck it up and drive on. Air Force Capt. Wes Manship, JTF-GTMO No matter what you do, be an asset and not a liability. Army Sgt. Leeroy Wil son, JTF-GTMO I try to live by always be true to yourself, no mat ter what. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Brian Reese No matter how menial the task may seem, everything that we do is important. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Man on the Street Theyre out there, listening. Our potential adversaries have the capability to intercept all unclassified e-mails such as AOL, Yahoo, us.army.mil, etc., as well as non-secure phone conversations going in and out of GTMO. With many troops leaving and arriving at GTMO on a regular basis, it is impor tant for us to remember that potential adversaries are con stantly monitoring all of our non-secure communications to gather information. When you are calling or writ ing e-mails home, you MUST remember not to discuss per sonal flight schedules and espe cially whole unit movements. It is critical that you do not inno cently leak information about when you or your unit will be flying out of GTMO. Do not talk about replacement units expected arrival dates. THIS CAN COST LIVES. THINK about what informa tion you may be giving our ene mies BEFORE you hit send. If you are speaking on the phone or writing e-mails, remember, we do NOT talk about: Anything to do with detainees. Anything to do with U.S. troop movements, key personnel or Distinguished Visitors. Anything to do with your unit, its mission, its morale, or its capabilities. Lets be OPSEC AWARE. We must all remember that POOR OPSEC can get people KILLED. Have a great OPSEC day! Think OPSEC! Photo courtesy of www.defendamerica.mil Page 13 Friday, November 8, 2002 DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, November 8 7 p.m. Swimfan, PG13 85 min 9 p.m. Stealing Harvard, PG13 83 min Saturday, November 9 7 p.m. Blue Crush, PG13 100 min 9 p.m. Simone, PG13 117 min Sunday, November 10 7 p.m. Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever, R 108 min 9 p.m. Swimfan, PG13 85 min Monday, November 11 7 p.m. City by the Sea, R 108 min Tuesday, November 12 7 p.m. Stealing Harvard, PG13 83 min Wednesday, November 13 7 p.m. Simone, PG13 117 min Thursday, November 14 7 p.m. Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever, R 108 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, November 8 7 p.m. R.P.M., R 91 min 9 p.m. Stranger than Fiction, R 90 min Saturday, November 9 7 p.m. Snatch, R 108 min 9 p.m. Jason X, R 93 min Sunday, November 10 7, 9 p.m. Traffic, R 147 min Monday, November 11 7 p.m. Next Friday, R 93 min Tuesday, November 12 7 p.m. Longest Yard, R 120 min Wednesday, November 13 7 p.m. True Lies, R 141 min Thursday, November 14 7, 9 p.m. Sniper, R 137 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Purity is the realness of the world. Reveal your true colors With all honesty. STAND UP WITH PRIDE If it makes you an individual, Dont let it hide. If along the ride, you slide, Youll end up on the wrong side; With little hope. With your only option in life To pretend and cope. Sometimes All things can be going fine, Then you hit the slope. BUT NOW, You can see the light. All the choices youve made Have proved to be right, And as hard as youve tried, You can finally take flight. So live each day like its your last Because you can never make up For time that passed. Across 1 Ship initials 4 Former magistrate of Venice 8 On top 12 Computer part 13 Voiced 14 Pouted 16 Of Lebanon 18 Slogans 20 Saying 21 Absent without leave 23 Time period 24 Downwind 25 Nervous system 26 Military unit 27 Meshes 29 Internet application 32 Snacked 33 Rip 34 Musical fast 38 Flushing 40 Prayer 41 Transgressed 42 Part of the eye 43 Bullfight cheer 44 Armory 46 Reserve Officers Training Corps. 47 Get together 50 Viper 51 Humor 52 Circle part 53 Big hairdo 55 Carrot cousin 58 Royals residence 60 The Sound and the Fury 63 Holy person 64 Peak 65 Emerald 66 Linden 67 Representatives 68 Resort hotel Down 1 Ca. University 2 Rushed 3 Secondary 4 Beneficiary 5 Unrefined metal 6 Fuel 7 FDRs spouse 8 Bullets 9 Pliers 10 Choose 11 Christs disciple 15 College living quarters 17 Gets older 19 Voice 22 West southwest 25 Cliff 26 Greek god of war 27 Dozes 28 Decorative needle case 29 Flexes 30 Pillage 31 Goofs 33 Grade 35 Killings 36 Shift 37 Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries 39 Annoying insect 40 Cover a present 42 To such an extent 45 Serving of corn 46 Skating area 47 Travelers aid 48 Times 49 Widely known 51 Part of the UK 53 Skin ailment 54 Lavish party 56 Flow out slowly 57 Writer Bombeck 59 Atmosphere 61 Whiz 62 Ref November 1

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mand; JTF Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Ray mond Tetreault delivered his invocation; and Navy Senior Chief Petty Officer Mark J. Owens sang the National Anthem. Then, after Hills remarks, it was time to honor the outgoing commander of JTF160/170, Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey, with the Defense Superior Service Medal for exceptionally superior service while serving as commander Joint Task Force 160 and 170, United States Southern Command, from March 2002 to November 2002. Then it was Dunlaveys time to say farewell, and pass the mantle of command to his successor. Today is a bittersweet day for me, Dunlavey said. I leave a command that as of March 1, when I formally arrived here, we had 28 people, a folding table and a laptop computer. Today we are a robust task force of over 2,000 personnel representing all the serv ices as we contain over 600 detainees, many of whom are the most dangerous men in the world. We've completed over 4,000 interroga tions, produced over 1,000 intelligence reports, and provided tactical intelligence to our troops in the field in Afghanistan, all while continuing to march forward and ever contin uing to grow. We have had our bumps in the road, Dunlavey acknowledged, but due to the incredible professionalism of this truly joint command, we have a synergy and level of cooperation that I've never experienced in over 35 years in America's military. It's been a good-news story all the way. It's been tough to say goodbye to all of you, Dunlavey concluded, but I do it with the knowledge that I'm being replaced by Gen. Geoff Miller, a true soldier's general. I couldn't ask for anything better than that. Geoff, Task Force GTMO is all yours. With that, Miller strode up to the podium and officially assumed command. And if those standing ramrod-straight in the forma tion were inwardly looking for clues as to what life under this soldiers general might be like, Miller, in a Texan drawl, dropped a hint with his first words. Okay, everybody in this formation, g'head and flex your knees a little bit, and we'll get this ceremony over, Miller began, before get ting down to the official sentiments of the day. Gen. Hill, thank you for your confidence in selecting me to lead this Joint Task Force. I am proud and humbled to be given the oppor tunity to lead this effort to support the nation's campaign to win the war on terror ism, Miller said. Our mission to gain and provide essential intelligence and secure the detainees is a critical element in setting the conditions that will ensure our nation and coalition partners will triumph. The accom plishments of Joint Task Force 160 and 170 have made a dif ference. Leaders and warriors, thanks for your commitment to excellence and your willingness to set the standard in our tough demanding mission. I'd like to thank Maj. Gen Mike Dunlavey for his superb efforts to move our task force forward and lay the foundation for future suc cess. Your advice and expertise will be a key assist as we transition JTF-Guantanamo. Thanks for volunteering to spend some addi tional time sharing your recommendations with me as we shape the JTF's future. Again, thank you for your commitment to winning our critical portion of the war on terrorism. Then Miller again spoke directly to the ser vicemembers standing before him, the enlisted and officers and company command ers representing the 2,000-strong JTF-GTMO that he is slated to lead far into the future. Soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, Coast Guardsmen, make a difference every day, Miller said. That's our mission, that's our business. I look forward to leading you in this effort. For Miller, GTMO is the latest rung in a distinguished career that ranges from Ger many to Fort Ord, Ca., from Commanding General of XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery, at Fort Bragg to Deputy Commanding General Eighth Army United States Army, Korea. For JTF-GTMO, the arrival of a perma nent-party commander is the latest sign of SOUTHCOMs and Americas com mitment to this corner of the War on Terror ism, and the latest reminder of how much a long-term part of that war this place is. Page 5 Friday, November 8, 2002 MILLER, from page 1 Photo by Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg The old and new commanders stand side by side during Mondays change-of-command ceremony. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Incoming JTF-GTMO commander Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller says a few words to his new troops. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano A joint-service color guard performs while representatives of JTF-GTMO com mands salute at Mondays change-of-command ceremony. Page 12 Friday, November 8, 2002 Many people can relate to this old saying that a friend in need is a friend indeed. But there are many times when even the best of friends cant help in getting you through a dif ficult moment or financial situation, especially on such a deployment far away from home. To respond to these types of needs and emergency situations, relief societies have been established all across the armed forces. At Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the local chap ter of the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, a non-profit organization, has been providing financial assistance to all personnel assigned here, including those of Joint Task Force GTMO who are supporting Operation Endur ing Freedom. Many of the JTFs servicemembers have been taking advantage of the opportunities that the society offers. With the arrival of the JTF and the increase in personnel on base, more people have been coming to us for help, said Navy Chief Petty Officer Jose Monteiro, the com mand coordinator of the GTMO chapter of Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. Before the creation of the JTF, Monteiro said his office used to process about one case a month. In the past few months, this number has steadily increased to several cases per month. From January to now, we have helped 30 servicemembers attached to the Joint Task Force, said Monteiro. We are glad to help any servicemember, he said, by providing interest-free loans that are needed for emergencies. Such emergencies can be: funeral expenses, medical or dental bills, emergency transportation, food, rent and utilities, disaster relief assistance, essential vehicle repairs and other unforseen family emergencies. The interest-free loans vary from $600 to $800. The society has been coming to the aid of JTF servicemembers by paying their air fare and hotel expenses to reach home for family emergencies. Monteiro said he gives priority to applications from servicemembers who are in greatest need. We try to process the requests quickly, regardless of rank, said Monteiro. When you are in financial need, all you have to do is call my number, x4393, and Ill get back to you as soon as possible, he said. To expedite the process, Monteiro said he needs more volunteers to man the phones in the office on Mondays and Fridays when the number of requests is highest. Monteiro, who has been at GTMO since March 2001, works full time at the Navy Operational Maintenance Division. His involvement with the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is voluntary. Now, there are two volunteers with him in the office, but like Monteiro, they all have a permanent full-time position with the Navy. I like it. I think the society is very valu able, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Mark Chatfield, who has been flexing his schedule so that he can respond to the requests of the servicemembers in need of financial assis tance. I hope more people will share our desire to help by volunteering their time, he said. When we go on leave, someone has to con tinue providing the same services, said Chat field. Volunteering, even a few hours a day, will be appreciated, said Monteiro, who promises to make his time available to train anybody who is interested. All the servicemembers who are here on active duty status (even Army reservists) are eligible for these funds. If the servicemember who needs assistance is not in the Navy, NMCRS has to contact the relief society of the servicemembers branch of service to verify the submitted information before releasing the funds. The service remains confidential. However, Monteiro cautioned service members that the funds of the relief society cant be used to finance liberty and vacations, pay fines or legal expenses, pay taxes and finance recreational boats or vehicles. NMCRS obtains its funding from various fundraising drives that take place every year at its local chapters located all over the world. In the summer, a fundraising drive was conducted at GTMO to support the work of the non-profit organization. Monteiro said that GTMO exceeded its goal for the year, and he thanks all those who participated. NMCRS provides a needed service to the troops. Due to the importance of such an organization, Monteiro said that all the mili tary services should brief their personnel about its benefits before deployment. Story and photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Relief services provide financial assistance to servicemembers in need Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Navy Chief Petty Officer Jose Monteiro, right, stands behind Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Mark Chatfield as they go over applications they received from servicemembers who need financial assistance. Photo Courtesy of the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society The emblem of the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Soci ety, a non-profit organization serving servicemem bers since 1904.

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In the spirit of John the Baptist and the apostles who once baptized new Christian believers in the waters of the river Jordan, Army Chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill baptized five servicemembers in the waters of Windmill Beach, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on October 27. This was the first-ever Protestant baptism to be held for the members of Joint Task Force GTMO. The JTF servicemembers baptized were Army Pfc. BethAnn Martin, Spc. Blaire Win ner, Army Sgt. Benito Castillo, and Army Cpl. Heath D. McWilliams and Spc. Melissa Lantigua with the 239th MP Co. The service started at 6 p.m., but by 5:30 p.m. people were already gathering and set ting up chairs on the sandy beach. As people were getting settled with their digital cameras and video equipment, the beauti ful sunset quickly faded away. Then it was dark, with the much-awaited ceremony illuminated only by the lights of the video cameras. It was the chaplains first nighttime baptism, but the lighting conditions seemed to have no effect on the cere mony as the chaplain took the followers who wanted to be baptized one by one into the currents of the moonlit waters lapping against Wind mill Beach. Merrill seemed overjoyed and overpowered by the honor that was bestowed upon him. I never felt such a power ful overwhelming surge, he said. Words cant describe the peace and joy I felt helping these people that are committing themselves fully to Christ. The thing that overwhelmed me the most was to see the tremendous joy the soldiers had and how they testified one after another how God changed their life here at GTMO, added Merrill. There was such excitement, hunger and thirst for God from everyone, not only the people that got baptized, but the whole con gregation, he said. Most of the candidates for this unique bap tism had been awaiting this day for a long time, explained Army Pfc. BethAnn Martin. Ive been putting my baptism date on and off for the past four years, she said. But coming to GTMO, she said, brought her closer to God, and she wanted people to see that change in her. By getting baptized I felt I was making a statement in front of my leaders and my peers that I want to be an example and a faithful fol lower of Jesus, she said. She said she is proud of her accomplish ment, and she is looking forward to convey ing the good news to her mother, who led her to God when she was younger. My mom is going to be very happy, said Martin. My mom is the biggest role model in my life. I always wanted to follow her path. I am fully committed. I am going to give more of my time to the Lord by reading the Bible, praying and inviting my friends to do the same, said Martin. Like Martin, Castillo has been waiting for a long time for this opportunity to demon strate his faith in God. When I heard about the opportunity to be baptized at GTMO on a deployment, my heart was overflowing with joy. I had to take this step, he said. The reason I took this major step is because a lot of things have happened in my life while I am here, and God has been good to me. I truly wanted to give my heart and soul to His service, said Castillo. Its a blessing to be baptized. I am clean and reborn, he said. You know, in this world theres a lot of disappointments, hate and destruction, said Castillo. But I chose to follow God because He is the light, and there is peace, kindness, patience and love by his side. Im glad He brought me here, said Castillo. The chaplain and his assistants have helped me inspired me and cheered me up. Castillo said his goal was to continue giving more praises to God because he is forever merciful. To thank God for his mercy and blessings, Castillo said he plans to help out in the youth ministry when he goes back home. I will always be available to talk to anybody about Jesus and what he has done for me and my family, said Castillo. Castillo has been going to the Camp Americas Protes tant chapel for six weeks. Of all of the people who got baptized, Melissa Lan tigua was an exceptional case. She did two powerful things in one night, said Merrill. She accepted Jesus Christ as her personal savior and got baptized on the same night. God is really doing his work here tonight, said Merrill. Merrill said hes grateful because God has been using him to impact the lives of the ser vicemembers at GTMO. We have seen tremendous results in the past six months here, he said. Merrill vows to keep praying for the newly baptized as they go on fulfilling Gods will. I hope that God will help them carry his message in their hearts for the rest of their lives on earth, he said. Going to church is not a popular event out here, but these soldiers have demonstrated their commitment to serve God and have embarked on a road that few have chosen, said Merrill. Story and photos by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire First JTF Protestant baptism held at GTMO After reading a passage from the Bible, Chaplain Michael S. Merrill invites all of the participants to say a few words of prayer before proceeding into the water for baptism. Chaplain Merrill welcomes a newly baptized soldier into the flock. Army Maj. Michael S. Merrill, the Camp Americas chaplain, prepares to immerse Spc. Melissa Lan tigua, 239th MP Co., in the baptismal waters. Page 11 Friday, November 8, 2002 Page 6 Friday, November 8, 2002 Ryan Forakers roommates last saw him as he exited his SEAhut at approximately 1:30 a.m. September 24. By 9 a.m. his roommates with the 342nd Military Police Company became concerned that they did not see him in the area. Later that day, an extensive searchand-rescue effort from ground, land, air, and sea was launched all across Guantanamo Bay for the missing soldier. This Friday, after an exhausting, unsuccessful search the Depart ment of Defense declared Army Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Foraker, 31, soldier, husband and father of two, deceased. During the intense search, Forakers clothes and personal effects were found near the water's edge. This led the investigating officer, absent any evidence to the contrary, to determine that Foraker had died in the waters of Guantanamo Bay. An extensive criminal investigation uncovered no reason to suspect foul play. Foraker has been described by his military comrades and associates as a dedicated, solid non-commissioned officer, troop-oriented and mission-focused. The members of the 342nd, from lower enlisteds to senior leaders, have felt deeply the loss of such an individual on both a personal and professional levels. When I first heard he was missing I was at work. We had a formation and they informed us about what was going on. Everyone was deeply concerned and worried. We all went out to search for him, said Army Staff Sgt. Edward H. Heckathorn of the 342nd, who rose through the NCO corps with Foraker and has known him for years. He was a good soldier and squad leader. To lose somebody valuable like that affects things, especially the troops, said Spc. Shane L. Milburn, 342nd MP Co. And for us per sonally, well, Im a small town boy just like himI was shocked and saddened by it. It was hard for me, just to try to under stand that he wasn't going to be around any more, said Army Sgt. Kevin E. Day. Immediately following the announcement of Forakers disappearance, the Combat Stress Control team was on hand to speak to anyone in the 342nd who wanted to talk about the matter, and they are still available for anyone interested in talking with them. The entire unit is saddened by his loss, but at the same time we understand that the mis sion still goes on, said company commander Army Capt. Brent R. Haas. The soldiers of the 342nd have had to overcome their sadness, at least for the time being, to accomplish the mission. They accom plish it well, with integrity and profession alism. A lot of us felt a loss, but knew we had to keep focused on our mission here and drive on, said Heckathorn. That's what he would have wanted. Operation Enduring Freedom had struck a personal chord with Foraker. During a stopover at Fort Dix, N.J., he had had the opportunity to actually visit Ground Zero and see for himself why he and his fellow troops were all here as a part of the current War on Terrorism. This mission meant a lot to him. While we were at Fort Dix, we had a chance to visit Ground Zero, and I remember the way he looked at the names of the missing people. He was very touched and proud to be involved with our mission here, said Day. Although he is gone, this exceptional sol dier is not forgotten. Foraker has left an indeli ble mark on his comrades and co-workers due to his unrelenting professionalism and procliv ity toward personal attention. He was a hard worker with unquestion able integrity. He was respectful and always Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Remembering Staff Sgt. Ryan Soldiers of the 342nd carry Army Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Forakers American flag, which he had since his Saudi Arabia deployment, to Mrs. Foraker. Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey, former Commander of JTF-160/170, pre senting Mrs. Angela Foraker with her late husbands awards. Family photo of Army Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Foraker.

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put the mission before himself, said Haas. "He was very comfortable with himself and what he stood for. As a soldier he was very determined, said Heckathorn. He tried his best at whatever he did, and he assisted any soldier regardless of rank, and had no problem being your friend and a soldier too. We met in 1997, and went up the ranks together. Our friendship developed throughout our squad and teamwork, said Heckathorn. We talked over the phone, and during our weekend drills. It was more than just a soldierto-soldier relationship. He was my friend. From the day we met, I noticed there was something unique about his personality," he said. Everything about him stood out. For instance, he had this southern accent. If he were to speak in a dark room you would know it was him he just stood out. Throughout the past several weeks, the 342nd has held periodic formations to dissem inate information to keep the troops informed on what was going on in regards to Staff Sgt. Foraker, said Haas. The Joint Task Force has been extremely supportive, Haas said, especially in coordi nating a visit to GTMO by Ryans wife, Angela, on October 23. During Mrs. Forakers visit she had the opportunity to see where her husband had spent the past six months where he worked, where he slept, where he was last seen There was a vigil held, she spoke to some of his unit members, and visited the site where his belongings were found. All our friends and families back home only can imagine GTMO as we describe it. When Angela visited, I think it allowed her a different perspective, said Heckathorn. Heckathorn himself now finds himself looking back on all of the good times he has shared with his friend. He was by the book. It was funny, because one day I was walking around in my PT's and I had a hat on, well, you know he sees me and asks me if I was authorized to wear my hat, he said. I said, well, of course not, but I can't see a darn thing with this sun out like this without it. We both laughed. And Foraker lives on in the memories of his friends and soldiers of the 342nd. Being on a deployment, some troops may not realize how affected they are by this loss, and some may be more impacted later, when they return home, said Haas. Just going back without him is a tremendous loss, said Milburn. Somebody won't be coming home. Wednesday at 3 p.m., an informal memorial service will be held for Staff Sgt. Foraker at the Camp America chapel. Any member of the JTF or Naval Base GTMO is welcome. Heckathorn will be there, to share some memories and offer some comfort, and to ensure that Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Foraker, NCO, husband and friend, will never be forgotten by the company he loved so well. In the past five years I have yet to develop the kind of bond and friendship that we shared, said Heckathorn. There are so many things I will miss about Ryan. He was just an unforgettable guy. Page 7 Friday, November 8, 2002 Foraker: NCO, husband, friend Mrs. Foraker tosses flowers into the waters of GTMO and remembers her husband. Mrs. Foraker speaking to Army Staff Sgt. Edward H. Heckathorn, 342nd MP Co. during her visit here. Members of the 342nd MP Co. stand in formation at the flag-lowering cer emony held for Army Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Foraker during his wifes visit. Soldiers of the 342nd MP co. lower Army Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Forakers flag for his wife. Page 10 Friday, November 8, 2002 Being that the U.S. doesnt trade with com munist Cuba, all of GTMOs food and sup plies must be directly transported here from the States. And the means of transportation for all of these goods are by a barge, pulled by a mighty tugboat named the TENNER C. The barge and that tugboat are the one and only way in which our goods are deliv ered. Most people of GTMO dont put much thought into the barge. The only question they might ask is when the next one will arrive to replenish supplies at the NEX. But, there is more to it than that. Not just anyone, or any crew, has what it takes to make this bold voyage from the ports of Jacksonville, Florida to the pier here at Guantanamo Bay. It is a long, tough journey, but it has to be accomplished by somebody. Submitted for your approval, the crew of the TENNER C., commanded by its mighty captain, Michael J. Smith. Our mission is of high importance, so we take our job very seriously, said Smith. We carry a big load, but we got what it takes to pull together and overcome. The valiant crew consists of six hardened and noble men, including the captain, a chief mate, three wheel-men and an engineer, said Smith. And while going out on the water for a day to fish is one thing, these guys spend the majority of their time trekking through the high seas delivering the goods, no matter what the conditions. We spend a lot of time out there on the water, far away from land, said Smith. Some times, when things get nasty, theres no turn ing back. Wintertime crosswinds in the Caribbean Sea commonly produce waves ranging from 20 to 25 feet. Even if they encounter The Perfect Storm, Smith will rise as high as the waves and see that the crew makes it through. I am a confident individual, said Smith. Im too good and too stubborn to be con quered by the sea. I might lose the barge, but there is no way Im going to die out there. The fear of getting stuck out in the ocean during the terrifying darkness and dreadful wrath of a storm is enough to keep most peo ple back on the shore, but it doesnt stop these guys. This is the profession these guys chose, and they have their heartfelt reasons to pursue their own form of happiness. Maybe loving the water is in my blood, said Smith. I can remember back to rowing boats and sailing when I was 5 years old. All I ever want to do is be in the water. Ive always enjoyed being out on the water since I was small, said Tarkus J. Pitre, crewmember of the TENNER C. And the idea of traveling around the world fascinated me. After dealing with tugboats for the past ten years, there arent too many places in the world I have not seen. Love for the water and a life out at sea is a dream adored by many, but does that mean anyone can handle this kind of lifestyle? One of the main issues with working a job like this is being able to leave home, said Pitre. You have to be able to get up and go without returning. Its like jail, once you are committed, you cant get away. The crew works shifts of 28 days on and 14 days off, which makes up two consecutive trips back and forth from GTMO to Jack sonville. And Smith, who has been running the route from Jacksonville to Guantanamo Bay since June for his company, TransAtlantic Lines, cant get enough of it. This route might be new to me, but work ing the water isnt, said Smith. Ive been working with boats for 28 years now. I started out as a fisherman in California, then switched over to tugboats in 1994. And I like it. Passion isnt all it takes to get the cargo delivered. Much professional experience is actually required to be successfully employed in the tugboat business. Each member of this highly trained crew has a boating license, and Captain Smith has a masters boating license that allows him to pull up to 500 tons of pre cious cargo. Even on their downtime, training is employed to ensure highly tuned skills. During our time off between trips, there isnt much time for us to accomplish any per sonal things, said Smith. It takes a lot of time and work to maintain our licenses, and there are always updated boating courses for us to attend. We have to keep up with all new and advanced training, said Pitre. We also have to keep our vessel up to standard. The crew is constantly busy while in route, performing thorough maintenance on the vessel, said Smith. The boat has to con sistently pass inspections for the American Bureau of shipping to be mission-ready. Being stuck within the confines of the TENNER C. for a period of time with the same group of guys who are all on the same mission can lead to good times. But as time proves, along with the good times will come the bad, and rainy days will always find you. This is our home, where we live, said Smith. We have no choice but to all become real close friends. After all the time we have spent together, we have become like a family out here, said Pitre. Everything is all good. So these guys have built strong enough bonds out on the water to feel as though they are a family. How sweet. But it has to be hard to handle a real family life back on the land. I just got married, said Pitre. Its hard having to leave, but its a routine. On the pos itive side, when Im not home to spend the money, it just builds up for her to spend, and that keeps her happy. It all makes perfect sense. Home life gets crazy sometimes, said Smith. But, stress is far away when you are out at sea. I love this stuff, so Ill stick around for the long run, said Pitre. Im 30 years old now, and I still got places to go and things to see. All my life, all I wanted to do was fool around with boats, said Smith. And now, they pay me to do what I always wanted. In the end, all it comes down to is what makes you happy. And it doesnt hurt that these seafaring types get to be patriotic too. Im proud to be able to contribute to Enduring Freedom, said Smith. Its the best of both worlds. Story and photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Because the barge doesnt sail itself Noble Captain Michael J. Smith, who is from Alabama, stands proudly on the stern of his majestic tug, the TENNER C., which was previously a sunken ship that lay beneath the sea for a year (and rolled a mile along the oceans bottom) before being lifted to the surface and reconditioned into its present and glorious form.

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The last month has been witness to many changes happening in and around the joint task force, with a change in command and an organizational realign ment to streamline operations with the merging of JTF-160 and JTF-170 into JTF-GTMO. But there have been some more, smaller changes that members of the Joint Task Force may not have noticed, made to the landscape around the Pink Palace and Headquar ters Building. For one, with JTF-GTMO now an officially branded entity with Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller now in charge, the old JTF-160 sign from the days of Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus that used to greet visitors outside of the head shed has been replaced to better reflect the current command climate. And thanks to volunteers from the Joint Task Force staff, all of the razor wire surrounding these two build ings was relocated to a new perimeter as a measure taken to increase force protection. With parking vehicles on the hill always becoming a somewhat tricky business, new parking spots were opened up and a new driving path established to help ease the flow of traffic up on cramped McCalla Hill. And of course more bright orange road barriers are strategically placed around the grounds to keep vehi cles where theyre wanted. Another change that some people may not have realized was the assigning of infantrymen to be the guards checking IDs round-the-clock at the entrances of the Pink Palace and Headquarters Building. All of these efforts show the evolution of a Joint Task Force as it continues on its way to establishing the standard in military operations. A lot of these changes were done because certain force protection issues had to be addressed, said Army 1st Sgt. Theodore Hebert.. Some of it was done because a real good clean-up was necessary. What it comes down to is that there is a new boss in town with a new staff, and we had to make sure that things were set up right. Page 8 Page 9 November 8, 2002 These big orange trafficstopping things are great. They might just seem to get in the way, but then again, thats what theyre there for. Behold: now a more appropriate sign at the entrance of the headquarters building featuring the JTF-GTMO name. To make traffic flow and parking easier for servicemembers, a new driv ing route was established near the Pink Palace. Theres something different... You may not notice it, but its still there -the razor wire that surrounds the Pink Palace and JTF-GTMO headquarters building was moved to increase force protection. Story and photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Army Pfc. Eric Durand stands guard now that infantrymen are manning the entrances to the Pink Palace and headquarters building.

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The last month has been witness to many changes happening in and around the joint task force, with a change in command and an organizational realign ment to streamline operations with the merging of JTF-160 and JTF-170 into JTF-GTMO. But there have been some more, smaller changes that members of the Joint Task Force may not have noticed, made to the landscape around the Pink Palace and Headquar ters Building. For one, with JTF-GTMO now an officially branded entity with Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller now in charge, the old JTF-160 sign from the days of Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus that used to greet visitors outside of the head shed has been replaced to better reflect the current command climate. And thanks to volunteers from the Joint Task Force staff, all of the razor wire surrounding these two build ings was relocated to a new perimeter as a measure taken to increase force protection. With parking vehicles on the hill always becoming a somewhat tricky business, new parking spots were opened up and a new driving path established to help ease the flow of traffic up on cramped McCalla Hill. And of course more bright orange road barriers are strategically placed around the grounds to keep vehi cles where theyre wanted. Another change that some people may not have realized was the assigning of infantrymen to be the guards checking IDs round-the-clock at the entrances of the Pink Palace and Headquarters Building. All of these efforts show the evolution of a Joint Task Force as it continues on its way to establishing the standard in military operations. A lot of these changes were done because certain force protection issues had to be addressed, said Army 1st Sgt. Theodore Hebert.. Some of it was done because a real good clean-up was necessary. What it comes down to is that there is a new boss in town with a new staff, and we had to make sure that things were set up right. Page 8 Page 9 November 8, 2002 These big orange trafficstopping things are great. They might just seem to get in the way, but then again, thats what theyre there for. Behold: now a more appropriate sign at the entrance of the headquarters building featuring the JTF-GTMO name. To make traffic flow and parking easier for servicemembers, a new driv ing route was established near the Pink Palace. Theres something different... You may not notice it, but its still there -the razor wire that surrounds the Pink Palace and JTF-GTMO headquarters building was moved to increase force protection. Story and photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Army Pfc. Eric Durand stands guard now that infantrymen are manning the entrances to the Pink Palace and headquarters building.

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put the mission before himself, said Haas. "He was very comfortable with himself and what he stood for. As a soldier he was very determined, said Heckathorn. He tried his best at whatever he did, and he assisted any soldier regardless of rank, and had no problem being your friend and a soldier too. We met in 1997, and went up the ranks together. Our friendship developed throughout our squad and teamwork, said Heckathorn. We talked over the phone, and during our weekend drills. It was more than just a soldierto-soldier relationship. He was my friend. From the day we met, I noticed there was something unique about his personality," he said. Everything about him stood out. For instance, he had this southern accent. If he were to speak in a dark room you would know it was him he just stood out. Throughout the past several weeks, the 342nd has held periodic formations to dissem inate information to keep the troops informed on what was going on in regards to Staff Sgt. Foraker, said Haas. The Joint Task Force has been extremely supportive, Haas said, especially in coordi nating a visit to GTMO by Ryans wife, Angela, on October 23. During Mrs. Forakers visit she had the opportunity to see where her husband had spent the past six months where he worked, where he slept, where he was last seen There was a vigil held, she spoke to some of his unit members, and visited the site where his belongings were found. All our friends and families back home only can imagine GTMO as we describe it. When Angela visited, I think it allowed her a different perspective, said Heckathorn. Heckathorn himself now finds himself looking back on all of the good times he has shared with his friend. He was by the book. It was funny, because one day I was walking around in my PT's and I had a hat on, well, you know he sees me and asks me if I was authorized to wear my hat, he said. I said, well, of course not, but I can't see a darn thing with this sun out like this without it. We both laughed. And Foraker lives on in the memories of his friends and soldiers of the 342nd. Being on a deployment, some troops may not realize how affected they are by this loss, and some may be more impacted later, when they return home, said Haas. Just going back without him is a tremendous loss, said Milburn. Somebody won't be coming home. Wednesday at 3 p.m., an informal memorial service will be held for Staff Sgt. Foraker at the Camp America chapel. Any member of the JTF or Naval Base GTMO is welcome. Heckathorn will be there, to share some memories and offer some comfort, and to ensure that Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Foraker, NCO, husband and friend, will never be forgotten by the company he loved so well. In the past five years I have yet to develop the kind of bond and friendship that we shared, said Heckathorn. There are so many things I will miss about Ryan. He was just an unforgettable guy. Page 7 Friday, November 8, 2002 Foraker: NCO, husband, friend Mrs. Foraker tosses flowers into the waters of GTMO and remembers her husband. Mrs. Foraker speaking to Army Staff Sgt. Edward H. Heckathorn, 342nd MP Co. during her visit here. Members of the 342nd MP Co. stand in formation at the flag-lowering cer emony held for Army Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Foraker during his wifes visit. Soldiers of the 342nd MP co. lower Army Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Forakers flag for his wife. Page 10 Friday, November 8, 2002 Being that the U.S. doesnt trade with com munist Cuba, all of GTMOs food and sup plies must be directly transported here from the States. And the means of transportation for all of these goods are by a barge, pulled by a mighty tugboat named the TENNER C. The barge and that tugboat are the one and only way in which our goods are deliv ered. Most people of GTMO dont put much thought into the barge. The only question they might ask is when the next one will arrive to replenish supplies at the NEX. But, there is more to it than that. Not just anyone, or any crew, has what it takes to make this bold voyage from the ports of Jacksonville, Florida to the pier here at Guantanamo Bay. It is a long, tough journey, but it has to be accomplished by somebody. Submitted for your approval, the crew of the TENNER C., commanded by its mighty captain, Michael J. Smith. Our mission is of high importance, so we take our job very seriously, said Smith. We carry a big load, but we got what it takes to pull together and overcome. The valiant crew consists of six hardened and noble men, including the captain, a chief mate, three wheel-men and an engineer, said Smith. And while going out on the water for a day to fish is one thing, these guys spend the majority of their time trekking through the high seas delivering the goods, no matter what the conditions. We spend a lot of time out there on the water, far away from land, said Smith. Some times, when things get nasty, theres no turn ing back. Wintertime crosswinds in the Caribbean Sea commonly produce waves ranging from 20 to 25 feet. Even if they encounter The Perfect Storm, Smith will rise as high as the waves and see that the crew makes it through. I am a confident individual, said Smith. Im too good and too stubborn to be con quered by the sea. I might lose the barge, but there is no way Im going to die out there. The fear of getting stuck out in the ocean during the terrifying darkness and dreadful wrath of a storm is enough to keep most peo ple back on the shore, but it doesnt stop these guys. This is the profession these guys chose, and they have their heartfelt reasons to pursue their own form of happiness. Maybe loving the water is in my blood, said Smith. I can remember back to rowing boats and sailing when I was 5 years old. All I ever want to do is be in the water. Ive always enjoyed being out on the water since I was small, said Tarkus J. Pitre, crewmember of the TENNER C. And the idea of traveling around the world fascinated me. After dealing with tugboats for the past ten years, there arent too many places in the world I have not seen. Love for the water and a life out at sea is a dream adored by many, but does that mean anyone can handle this kind of lifestyle? One of the main issues with working a job like this is being able to leave home, said Pitre. You have to be able to get up and go without returning. Its like jail, once you are committed, you cant get away. The crew works shifts of 28 days on and 14 days off, which makes up two consecutive trips back and forth from GTMO to Jack sonville. And Smith, who has been running the route from Jacksonville to Guantanamo Bay since June for his company, TransAtlantic Lines, cant get enough of it. This route might be new to me, but work ing the water isnt, said Smith. Ive been working with boats for 28 years now. I started out as a fisherman in California, then switched over to tugboats in 1994. And I like it. Passion isnt all it takes to get the cargo delivered. Much professional experience is actually required to be successfully employed in the tugboat business. Each member of this highly trained crew has a boating license, and Captain Smith has a masters boating license that allows him to pull up to 500 tons of pre cious cargo. Even on their downtime, training is employed to ensure highly tuned skills. During our time off between trips, there isnt much time for us to accomplish any per sonal things, said Smith. It takes a lot of time and work to maintain our licenses, and there are always updated boating courses for us to attend. We have to keep up with all new and advanced training, said Pitre. We also have to keep our vessel up to standard. The crew is constantly busy while in route, performing thorough maintenance on the vessel, said Smith. The boat has to con sistently pass inspections for the American Bureau of shipping to be mission-ready. Being stuck within the confines of the TENNER C. for a period of time with the same group of guys who are all on the same mission can lead to good times. But as time proves, along with the good times will come the bad, and rainy days will always find you. This is our home, where we live, said Smith. We have no choice but to all become real close friends. After all the time we have spent together, we have become like a family out here, said Pitre. Everything is all good. So these guys have built strong enough bonds out on the water to feel as though they are a family. How sweet. But it has to be hard to handle a real family life back on the land. I just got married, said Pitre. Its hard having to leave, but its a routine. On the pos itive side, when Im not home to spend the money, it just builds up for her to spend, and that keeps her happy. It all makes perfect sense. Home life gets crazy sometimes, said Smith. But, stress is far away when you are out at sea. I love this stuff, so Ill stick around for the long run, said Pitre. Im 30 years old now, and I still got places to go and things to see. All my life, all I wanted to do was fool around with boats, said Smith. And now, they pay me to do what I always wanted. In the end, all it comes down to is what makes you happy. And it doesnt hurt that these seafaring types get to be patriotic too. Im proud to be able to contribute to Enduring Freedom, said Smith. Its the best of both worlds. Story and photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Because the barge doesnt sail itself Noble Captain Michael J. Smith, who is from Alabama, stands proudly on the stern of his majestic tug, the TENNER C., which was previously a sunken ship that lay beneath the sea for a year (and rolled a mile along the oceans bottom) before being lifted to the surface and reconditioned into its present and glorious form.

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In the spirit of John the Baptist and the apostles who once baptized new Christian believers in the waters of the river Jordan, Army Chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill baptized five servicemembers in the waters of Windmill Beach, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on October 27. This was the first-ever Protestant baptism to be held for the members of Joint Task Force GTMO. The JTF servicemembers baptized were Army Pfc. BethAnn Martin, Spc. Blaire Win ner, Army Sgt. Benito Castillo, and Army Cpl. Heath D. McWilliams and Spc. Melissa Lantigua with the 239th MP Co. The service started at 6 p.m., but by 5:30 p.m. people were already gathering and set ting up chairs on the sandy beach. As people were getting settled with their digital cameras and video equipment, the beauti ful sunset quickly faded away. Then it was dark, with the much-awaited ceremony illuminated only by the lights of the video cameras. It was the chaplains first nighttime baptism, but the lighting conditions seemed to have no effect on the cere mony as the chaplain took the followers who wanted to be baptized one by one into the currents of the moonlit waters lapping against Wind mill Beach. Merrill seemed overjoyed and overpowered by the honor that was bestowed upon him. I never felt such a power ful overwhelming surge, he said. Words cant describe the peace and joy I felt helping these people that are committing themselves fully to Christ. The thing that overwhelmed me the most was to see the tremendous joy the soldiers had and how they testified one after another how God changed their life here at GTMO, added Merrill. There was such excitement, hunger and thirst for God from everyone, not only the people that got baptized, but the whole con gregation, he said. Most of the candidates for this unique bap tism had been awaiting this day for a long time, explained Army Pfc. BethAnn Martin. Ive been putting my baptism date on and off for the past four years, she said. But coming to GTMO, she said, brought her closer to God, and she wanted people to see that change in her. By getting baptized I felt I was making a statement in front of my leaders and my peers that I want to be an example and a faithful fol lower of Jesus, she said. She said she is proud of her accomplish ment, and she is looking forward to convey ing the good news to her mother, who led her to God when she was younger. My mom is going to be very happy, said Martin. My mom is the biggest role model in my life. I always wanted to follow her path. I am fully committed. I am going to give more of my time to the Lord by reading the Bible, praying and inviting my friends to do the same, said Martin. Like Martin, Castillo has been waiting for a long time for this opportunity to demon strate his faith in God. When I heard about the opportunity to be baptized at GTMO on a deployment, my heart was overflowing with joy. I had to take this step, he said. The reason I took this major step is because a lot of things have happened in my life while I am here, and God has been good to me. I truly wanted to give my heart and soul to His service, said Castillo. Its a blessing to be baptized. I am clean and reborn, he said. You know, in this world theres a lot of disappointments, hate and destruction, said Castillo. But I chose to follow God because He is the light, and there is peace, kindness, patience and love by his side. Im glad He brought me here, said Castillo. The chaplain and his assistants have helped me inspired me and cheered me up. Castillo said his goal was to continue giving more praises to God because he is forever merciful. To thank God for his mercy and blessings, Castillo said he plans to help out in the youth ministry when he goes back home. I will always be available to talk to anybody about Jesus and what he has done for me and my family, said Castillo. Castillo has been going to the Camp Americas Protes tant chapel for six weeks. Of all of the people who got baptized, Melissa Lan tigua was an exceptional case. She did two powerful things in one night, said Merrill. She accepted Jesus Christ as her personal savior and got baptized on the same night. God is really doing his work here tonight, said Merrill. Merrill said hes grateful because God has been using him to impact the lives of the ser vicemembers at GTMO. We have seen tremendous results in the past six months here, he said. Merrill vows to keep praying for the newly baptized as they go on fulfilling Gods will. I hope that God will help them carry his message in their hearts for the rest of their lives on earth, he said. Going to church is not a popular event out here, but these soldiers have demonstrated their commitment to serve God and have embarked on a road that few have chosen, said Merrill. Story and photos by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire First JTF Protestant baptism held at GTMO After reading a passage from the Bible, Chaplain Michael S. Merrill invites all of the participants to say a few words of prayer before proceeding into the water for baptism. Chaplain Merrill welcomes a newly baptized soldier into the flock. Army Maj. Michael S. Merrill, the Camp Americas chaplain, prepares to immerse Spc. Melissa Lan tigua, 239th MP Co., in the baptismal waters. Page 11 Friday, November 8, 2002 Page 6 Friday, November 8, 2002 Ryan Forakers roommates last saw him as he exited his SEAhut at approximately 1:30 a.m. September 24. By 9 a.m. his roommates with the 342nd Military Police Company became concerned that they did not see him in the area. Later that day, an extensive searchand-rescue effort from ground, land, air, and sea was launched all across Guantanamo Bay for the missing soldier. This Friday, after an exhausting, unsuccessful search the Depart ment of Defense declared Army Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Foraker, 31, soldier, husband and father of two, deceased. During the intense search, Forakers clothes and personal effects were found near the water's edge. This led the investigating officer, absent any evidence to the contrary, to determine that Foraker had died in the waters of Guantanamo Bay. An extensive criminal investigation uncovered no reason to suspect foul play. Foraker has been described by his military comrades and associates as a dedicated, solid non-commissioned officer, troop-oriented and mission-focused. The members of the 342nd, from lower enlisteds to senior leaders, have felt deeply the loss of such an individual on both a personal and professional levels. When I first heard he was missing I was at work. We had a formation and they informed us about what was going on. Everyone was deeply concerned and worried. We all went out to search for him, said Army Staff Sgt. Edward H. Heckathorn of the 342nd, who rose through the NCO corps with Foraker and has known him for years. He was a good soldier and squad leader. To lose somebody valuable like that affects things, especially the troops, said Spc. Shane L. Milburn, 342nd MP Co. And for us per sonally, well, Im a small town boy just like himI was shocked and saddened by it. It was hard for me, just to try to under stand that he wasn't going to be around any more, said Army Sgt. Kevin E. Day. Immediately following the announcement of Forakers disappearance, the Combat Stress Control team was on hand to speak to anyone in the 342nd who wanted to talk about the matter, and they are still available for anyone interested in talking with them. The entire unit is saddened by his loss, but at the same time we understand that the mis sion still goes on, said company commander Army Capt. Brent R. Haas. The soldiers of the 342nd have had to overcome their sadness, at least for the time being, to accomplish the mission. They accom plish it well, with integrity and profession alism. A lot of us felt a loss, but knew we had to keep focused on our mission here and drive on, said Heckathorn. That's what he would have wanted. Operation Enduring Freedom had struck a personal chord with Foraker. During a stopover at Fort Dix, N.J., he had had the opportunity to actually visit Ground Zero and see for himself why he and his fellow troops were all here as a part of the current War on Terrorism. This mission meant a lot to him. While we were at Fort Dix, we had a chance to visit Ground Zero, and I remember the way he looked at the names of the missing people. He was very touched and proud to be involved with our mission here, said Day. Although he is gone, this exceptional sol dier is not forgotten. Foraker has left an indeli ble mark on his comrades and co-workers due to his unrelenting professionalism and procliv ity toward personal attention. He was a hard worker with unquestion able integrity. He was respectful and always Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Remembering Staff Sgt. Ryan Soldiers of the 342nd carry Army Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Forakers American flag, which he had since his Saudi Arabia deployment, to Mrs. Foraker. Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey, former Commander of JTF-160/170, pre senting Mrs. Angela Foraker with her late husbands awards. Family photo of Army Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Foraker.

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mand; JTF Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Ray mond Tetreault delivered his invocation; and Navy Senior Chief Petty Officer Mark J. Owens sang the National Anthem. Then, after Hills remarks, it was time to honor the outgoing commander of JTF160/170, Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey, with the Defense Superior Service Medal for exceptionally superior service while serving as commander Joint Task Force 160 and 170, United States Southern Command, from March 2002 to November 2002. Then it was Dunlaveys time to say farewell, and pass the mantle of command to his successor. Today is a bittersweet day for me, Dunlavey said. I leave a command that as of March 1, when I formally arrived here, we had 28 people, a folding table and a laptop computer. Today we are a robust task force of over 2,000 personnel representing all the serv ices as we contain over 600 detainees, many of whom are the most dangerous men in the world. We've completed over 4,000 interroga tions, produced over 1,000 intelligence reports, and provided tactical intelligence to our troops in the field in Afghanistan, all while continuing to march forward and ever contin uing to grow. We have had our bumps in the road, Dunlavey acknowledged, but due to the incredible professionalism of this truly joint command, we have a synergy and level of cooperation that I've never experienced in over 35 years in America's military. It's been a good-news story all the way. It's been tough to say goodbye to all of you, Dunlavey concluded, but I do it with the knowledge that I'm being replaced by Gen. Geoff Miller, a true soldier's general. I couldn't ask for anything better than that. Geoff, Task Force GTMO is all yours. With that, Miller strode up to the podium and officially assumed command. And if those standing ramrod-straight in the forma tion were inwardly looking for clues as to what life under this soldiers general might be like, Miller, in a Texan drawl, dropped a hint with his first words. Okay, everybody in this formation, g'head and flex your knees a little bit, and we'll get this ceremony over, Miller began, before get ting down to the official sentiments of the day. Gen. Hill, thank you for your confidence in selecting me to lead this Joint Task Force. I am proud and humbled to be given the oppor tunity to lead this effort to support the nation's campaign to win the war on terror ism, Miller said. Our mission to gain and provide essential intelligence and secure the detainees is a critical element in setting the conditions that will ensure our nation and coalition partners will triumph. The accom plishments of Joint Task Force 160 and 170 have made a dif ference. Leaders and warriors, thanks for your commitment to excellence and your willingness to set the standard in our tough demanding mission. I'd like to thank Maj. Gen Mike Dunlavey for his superb efforts to move our task force forward and lay the foundation for future suc cess. Your advice and expertise will be a key assist as we transition JTF-Guantanamo. Thanks for volunteering to spend some addi tional time sharing your recommendations with me as we shape the JTF's future. Again, thank you for your commitment to winning our critical portion of the war on terrorism. Then Miller again spoke directly to the ser vicemembers standing before him, the enlisted and officers and company command ers representing the 2,000-strong JTF-GTMO that he is slated to lead far into the future. Soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, Coast Guardsmen, make a difference every day, Miller said. That's our mission, that's our business. I look forward to leading you in this effort. For Miller, GTMO is the latest rung in a distinguished career that ranges from Ger many to Fort Ord, Ca., from Commanding General of XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery, at Fort Bragg to Deputy Commanding General Eighth Army United States Army, Korea. For JTF-GTMO, the arrival of a perma nent-party commander is the latest sign of SOUTHCOMs and Americas com mitment to this corner of the War on Terror ism, and the latest reminder of how much a long-term part of that war this place is. Page 5 Friday, November 8, 2002 MILLER, from page 1 Photo by Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg The old and new commanders stand side by side during Mondays change-of-command ceremony. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Incoming JTF-GTMO commander Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller says a few words to his new troops. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano A joint-service color guard performs while representatives of JTF-GTMO com mands salute at Mondays change-of-command ceremony. Page 12 Friday, November 8, 2002 Many people can relate to this old saying that a friend in need is a friend indeed. But there are many times when even the best of friends cant help in getting you through a dif ficult moment or financial situation, especially on such a deployment far away from home. To respond to these types of needs and emergency situations, relief societies have been established all across the armed forces. At Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the local chap ter of the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, a non-profit organization, has been providing financial assistance to all personnel assigned here, including those of Joint Task Force GTMO who are supporting Operation Endur ing Freedom. Many of the JTFs servicemembers have been taking advantage of the opportunities that the society offers. With the arrival of the JTF and the increase in personnel on base, more people have been coming to us for help, said Navy Chief Petty Officer Jose Monteiro, the com mand coordinator of the GTMO chapter of Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. Before the creation of the JTF, Monteiro said his office used to process about one case a month. In the past few months, this number has steadily increased to several cases per month. From January to now, we have helped 30 servicemembers attached to the Joint Task Force, said Monteiro. We are glad to help any servicemember, he said, by providing interest-free loans that are needed for emergencies. Such emergencies can be: funeral expenses, medical or dental bills, emergency transportation, food, rent and utilities, disaster relief assistance, essential vehicle repairs and other unforseen family emergencies. The interest-free loans vary from $600 to $800. The society has been coming to the aid of JTF servicemembers by paying their air fare and hotel expenses to reach home for family emergencies. Monteiro said he gives priority to applications from servicemembers who are in greatest need. We try to process the requests quickly, regardless of rank, said Monteiro. When you are in financial need, all you have to do is call my number, x4393, and Ill get back to you as soon as possible, he said. To expedite the process, Monteiro said he needs more volunteers to man the phones in the office on Mondays and Fridays when the number of requests is highest. Monteiro, who has been at GTMO since March 2001, works full time at the Navy Operational Maintenance Division. His involvement with the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is voluntary. Now, there are two volunteers with him in the office, but like Monteiro, they all have a permanent full-time position with the Navy. I like it. I think the society is very valu able, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Mark Chatfield, who has been flexing his schedule so that he can respond to the requests of the servicemembers in need of financial assis tance. I hope more people will share our desire to help by volunteering their time, he said. When we go on leave, someone has to con tinue providing the same services, said Chat field. Volunteering, even a few hours a day, will be appreciated, said Monteiro, who promises to make his time available to train anybody who is interested. All the servicemembers who are here on active duty status (even Army reservists) are eligible for these funds. If the servicemember who needs assistance is not in the Navy, NMCRS has to contact the relief society of the servicemembers branch of service to verify the submitted information before releasing the funds. The service remains confidential. However, Monteiro cautioned service members that the funds of the relief society cant be used to finance liberty and vacations, pay fines or legal expenses, pay taxes and finance recreational boats or vehicles. NMCRS obtains its funding from various fundraising drives that take place every year at its local chapters located all over the world. In the summer, a fundraising drive was conducted at GTMO to support the work of the non-profit organization. Monteiro said that GTMO exceeded its goal for the year, and he thanks all those who participated. NMCRS provides a needed service to the troops. Due to the importance of such an organization, Monteiro said that all the mili tary services should brief their personnel about its benefits before deployment. Story and photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Relief services provide financial assistance to servicemembers in need Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Navy Chief Petty Officer Jose Monteiro, right, stands behind Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Mark Chatfield as they go over applications they received from servicemembers who need financial assistance. Photo Courtesy of the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society The emblem of the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Soci ety, a non-profit organization serving servicemem bers since 1904.

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Page 4 Friday, November 8, 2002 This weeks question: What words of inspiration can you pass along? Coast Guard Petty Offi cer 2nd Class David Childress I used to be a Navy diver, and we would say bring it on strong or stay home. Army Spc. Reinol Guerrero, JTF-GTMO Two Army classics: Be all you can be and suck it up and drive on. Air Force Capt. Wes Manship, JTF-GTMO No matter what you do, be an asset and not a liability. Army Sgt. Leeroy Wil son, JTF-GTMO I try to live by always be true to yourself, no mat ter what. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Brian Reese No matter how menial the task may seem, everything that we do is important. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Man on the Street Theyre out there, listening. Our potential adversaries have the capability to intercept all unclassified e-mails such as AOL, Yahoo, us.army.mil, etc., as well as non-secure phone conversations going in and out of GTMO. With many troops leaving and arriving at GTMO on a regular basis, it is impor tant for us to remember that potential adversaries are con stantly monitoring all of our non-secure communications to gather information. When you are calling or writ ing e-mails home, you MUST remember not to discuss per sonal flight schedules and espe cially whole unit movements. It is critical that you do not inno cently leak information about when you or your unit will be flying out of GTMO. Do not talk about replacement units expected arrival dates. THIS CAN COST LIVES. THINK about what informa tion you may be giving our ene mies BEFORE you hit send. If you are speaking on the phone or writing e-mails, remember, we do NOT talk about: Anything to do with detainees. Anything to do with U.S. troop movements, key personnel or Distinguished Visitors. Anything to do with your unit, its mission, its morale, or its capabilities. Lets be OPSEC AWARE. We must all remember that POOR OPSEC can get people KILLED. Have a great OPSEC day! Think OPSEC! Photo courtesy of www.defendamerica.mil Page 13 Friday, November 8, 2002 DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, November 8 7 p.m. Swimfan, PG13 85 min 9 p.m. Stealing Harvard, PG13 83 min Saturday, November 9 7 p.m. Blue Crush, PG13 100 min 9 p.m. Simone, PG13 117 min Sunday, November 10 7 p.m. Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever, R 108 min 9 p.m. Swimfan, PG13 85 min Monday, November 11 7 p.m. City by the Sea, R 108 min Tuesday, November 12 7 p.m. Stealing Harvard, PG13 83 min Wednesday, November 13 7 p.m. Simone, PG13 117 min Thursday, November 14 7 p.m. Ballistic: Ecks vs. Sever, R 108 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, November 8 7 p.m. R.P.M., R 91 min 9 p.m. Stranger than Fiction, R 90 min Saturday, November 9 7 p.m. Snatch, R 108 min 9 p.m. Jason X, R 93 min Sunday, November 10 7, 9 p.m. Traffic, R 147 min Monday, November 11 7 p.m. Next Friday, R 93 min Tuesday, November 12 7 p.m. Longest Yard, R 120 min Wednesday, November 13 7 p.m. True Lies, R 141 min Thursday, November 14 7, 9 p.m. Sniper, R 137 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Purity is the realness of the world. Reveal your true colors With all honesty. STAND UP WITH PRIDE If it makes you an individual, Dont let it hide. If along the ride, you slide, Youll end up on the wrong side; With little hope. With your only option in life To pretend and cope. Sometimes All things can be going fine, Then you hit the slope. BUT NOW, You can see the light. All the choices youve made Have proved to be right, And as hard as youve tried, You can finally take flight. So live each day like its your last Because you can never make up For time that passed. Across 1 Ship initials 4 Former magistrate of Venice 8 On top 12 Computer part 13 Voiced 14 Pouted 16 Of Lebanon 18 Slogans 20 Saying 21 Absent without leave 23 Time period 24 Downwind 25 Nervous system 26 Military unit 27 Meshes 29 Internet application 32 Snacked 33 Rip 34 Musical fast 38 Flushing 40 Prayer 41 Transgressed 42 Part of the eye 43 Bullfight cheer 44 Armory 46 Reserve Officers Training Corps. 47 Get together 50 Viper 51 Humor 52 Circle part 53 Big hairdo 55 Carrot cousin 58 Royals residence 60 The Sound and the Fury 63 Holy person 64 Peak 65 Emerald 66 Linden 67 Representatives 68 Resort hotel Down 1 Ca. University 2 Rushed 3 Secondary 4 Beneficiary 5 Unrefined metal 6 Fuel 7 FDRs spouse 8 Bullets 9 Pliers 10 Choose 11 Christs disciple 15 College living quarters 17 Gets older 19 Voice 22 West southwest 25 Cliff 26 Greek god of war 27 Dozes 28 Decorative needle case 29 Flexes 30 Pillage 31 Goofs 33 Grade 35 Killings 36 Shift 37 Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries 39 Annoying insect 40 Cover a present 42 To such an extent 45 Serving of corn 46 Skating area 47 Travelers aid 48 Times 49 Widely known 51 Part of the UK 53 Skin ailment 54 Lavish party 56 Flow out slowly 57 Writer Bombeck 59 Atmosphere 61 Whiz 62 Ref November 1

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The chaplains in the military have one of the most demanding professions in the Armed Forces, serving the servicemembers 24/7. With the world as their office, the chaplain corps is tasked to spiritually enlighten the military. The Holy Bible is their tool of the trade; with this they convey the messages of faith and compassion. Chaplains are friends to the servicemember. We try to be there and help the individual get throw any crisis they can have in their lives, said Coast Guard Cmdr. Derek K. Ross. Being a chaplain is not a profession it is a voca tion, said Navy Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni. To fol low the footsteps of a chaplain one must have a bach elor's degree and a masters degree in divinity and have gone through an eight-week course in the mili tary. In the military, chaplains walk a fine line, because the military is an organization that is pre pared for war, but at the same time chaplains motivate and are leaders of faith, said Ross. They keep the humanity in the military. Page 3 Friday, November 8, 2002 Chaplains Navy Lt. Sharon A. Bush I am able to spend time with people and assist them with building relation ships with others and the Lord. I assist them in their spiritual walk. Basically, being a chaplain is a humanitarian effort, more so than many jobs in the military. My job helps me draw people to the Lord Army Maj. Michael S. Merrill What I like the best about being a chaplain is that I am in a position to make a positive impact on peoples lives and stand up for what is right in the military. Coast Guard Cmdr. Derek K. Ross There are so many things I love about being a chaplain. Its very excit ing because we go beyond the four walls of a church. As a chaplain we can make an impact on peoples lives, and we are a representantives of God and faith who are available to every one who needs our services. Navy Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni I consider this chaplaincy not simply as a profession, but rather as a voca tion that is a higher calling from the Lord. The profession could perhaps be seen as the human dimension, while the vocation is a spiritual one; the two could actually be seen as meshing together. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Air Force Capt. Hamza Al-Mubarak as he performs a Muslim service. Air Force Capt. Hamza Al-Mubarak I love being chaplain because of doing this for the sake of my Lord, for the same god who created the heaven and the earth. I do this for the sake of helping mankind. I facilitate the religious needs and the act of worship for the military members of the armed forces. Army Lt. Col. Raymond A. Tetreault What I like about being a chaplain is being present for the soldiers and helping with any issue they have, whether family, work or personal prob lems. It's a fulfilling job to have. Profession of the Week Page 14 Friday, November 8, 2002 The MWR/Right Spirit Night Fun Run 5K Race is scheduled for November 8th at 11p.m.. The race will begin from the Windward Ferry Landing and conclude at Phillips Park. Please contact Capt. Gormly at 5249 or Maj. Buchanan at 5255 for more information. Daily free daytime & evening lessons are available for sailing, kayaking, and motor boating at Pelican Pete's Marina, by appointment only. Aerobics Classes, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 6 a.m. 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., and 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.; Tues. and Thurs. 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Tae-Kwon Do, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., and 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. (one hour classes); Tues. and Thurs. 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. 1-on-1 Spinning Classes, G.J. Denich Gym, Mon.Thurs., 6:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Yoga Classes, Tues. Thurs. 5:15 p.m. 6:15 p.m., G.J. Denich GymYoga Center. Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, Mon. Fri., 11 a.m. Midnight. Pool Hours: Marine Hill Pool: Open Swim, 6 a.m. -6 p.m., daily; Windjammer Pool: Lap Swim, 6 a.m. 8 a.m., Mon. Sat., Open Swim, 10 a.m. 6 p.m. daily .; Deer Point Pool: Open Swim, 11 a.m. 7 p.m., Mon. Fri., 10 a.m. 6 p.m., Sat. & Sun. Friday, November 8th 11 a.m -1p.m., Free bowling, Marblehead Bowling Lanes. 7 p.m. Midnight, Friday Extreme Bowling, Marblehead Lanes. 11 p.m. 5K MWR/Right Spirit Night Fun Run, Windward Ferry Landing. Saturday, November 9th 6 p.m. MWR/YSGC Night Golf Tournament, GTMO Golf Course. Sunday, November 10th 1 6 p.m., Extreme Bowling, Marblehead Lanes 6:30 p.m., Bingo, Windjammer Club. 7p.m. Chess Tournament, Main CBQ Liberty Center. Monday, November 11th 6:30 a.m., MWR Boot and Unit (BDU bottoms) Formation Cadence Run, GJ Denich Gym. 8 a.m. Noon, Adult Ceramic Classes, Ceramic Shop. 6 p.m.-8 p.m., Nativity Painting Social, Ceramic Shop. Tuesday, November 12th 6:30 p.m., Bingo, Windjammer Club. 7 p.m., Table Tennis Tournament, Main CBQ Liberty Recreation Center. Wednesday, November 13th 9-11 a.m., Adult Advanced Pottery Classes, Ceramics Shop. 7 p.m. Bowling Party, Marblehead Lanes. 8 p.m., Karaoke, Windjammer Club. Thursday, November 14th 11 a.m. Midnight, Bowling, Marblehead Lanes. 6 p.m., Bowling League, Marblehead Lanes. Free exams for college credits When reservist servicemem bers are deployed outside of the United States, they usually have to discontinue their way of life, including their civililan job, edu cational activities and projects. Responding to the call of duty, they have to postpone college classes they were registered for and put their professional career on hold. For those deployed to Guan tanamo Bay, however, the Navy College Office offers an alterna tive that can help them keep pur suing higher education. In addition to providing edu cational resources at their cam pus located at Chapel Hill, the Navy College Office can help any military member obtain col lege credits through testing. Guiding servicemembers on the path of higher learning is Navy Petty Officer 1st Class James Ulfers, the new testing control officer for GTMO. As the control testing officer, I manage the different examina tion programs that are available to help servicemembers get col lege credits, he said. These college-level place ment programs are available free of charge, said Ulfers. Such standardized test pro grams are the Defense Activities for Non-traditional Educational Support (DANTES) and the College Level-Examination Pro gram, or (CLEP). Ulfers said servicemembers can take the general as well as the subject CLEP exams, adding to the credits theyve already earned from any college. Passing these exams can give you three to six credits toward a college degree, he said. This series of examinations enables individuals to earn col lege credits for what they know, regardless of where they may have learned it. Basically you can almost complete your first two years of college without ever setting foot in a college classroom, said Ulfers. The college credit-by-exami nation program was designed to assist people who attended some college to continue pursuing their degree. Many colleges give credit for the Navy Enlisted Classification, (NEC) or Military Occupational Specialty (MOS). Ulfers said hes available to help anybody navigating through the process. For more information, contact Petty Officer Ulfers at x3996. The majority of JTF person nel down here are most likely reservists or with the National Guard, Ulfers said. Chances are, most of these people were attending college or even plan ning to attend college prior to activation. Theres no reason why they cant continue on. The CLEP and DANTES exams might be the best thing for them to still main tain some resemblance of nor mality in their life, he said. By taking advantage of these programs, they can leave here saying they didnt lose a year of college, and they were able to obtain college credits, he said. Study materials are available from the Web and at the base library. The list of the exams is posted at the door of the Navy College Office on Chapel Hill. Other services offered by the staff include exam proctoring. If you are enrolled in a distance program, you may be required to obtain a proctor for your exams during the course of study, he said. Please contact the office to verify availability prior to your exam date(s). We also offer ACT and SAT exams free of charge for those who need scores to enter col lege, Ulfer said. As the main focus of the Navy College Office is off-duty education, military related exams (ASVAB, DLAB, Senior NCO Academy, etc.) are normally not available through the Navy Col lege Office, said Ulfers. Story and photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Navy Petty Officer 1st Class James Ulfers, the new testing control officer at the Navy College Office, explains to a servicemember the different exami nations that can be taken at GTMO for college credits. Resume Writing Class The Fleet and Family Support Center will be conducting a Resume Writing class on November 13, 2002. The class runs from 8a.m. to 11a.m. in the Fleet and Family Support Center's training classroom. Interested? Please call x4141 to have your name added to the roster.

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Page 2 Friday, November 8, 2002 JTF-GTMO Command Commander: Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Air Force Lt. Col. Eduardo Villavicencio OIC: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5426 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detachment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-GTMO. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Depart ment of Defense or the personnel within. JTF-GTMO Commanding Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller Chaplains Corner Tomorrow morning, the surgeon told the boy, Ill open up your heart... Youll find Jesus there, the boy said. The surgeon looked up, annoyed. When I see how much damage has been done, Ill sew your heart and chest back up and Ill plan what to do next. But youll find Jesus in my heart said the boy. The Bible says he lives there. Youll find him in my heart. The surgeon had had enough. Ill tell you what Ill find in your heart. Ill find damaged muscle, low blood supply, and weakened vessels. And Ill find out if I can make you well. Youll find Jesus there too. He lives there. The surgeon sat in his office later, recording his notes from the surgery: ...damaged aorta, damaged pulmonary vein, widespread muscle degeneration. No hope for transplant, no hope for cure. Therapy: painkillers and bed rest. Prognosis here he paused Death within one year. He stopped. Why? he asked aloud. You created that boy, and that heart. Hell be dead in months. Why? The Lord answered and said, The boy, my lamb, was not meant for your flock for long, for he is a part of my flock, and will forever be. Here, in my flock, he will feel no pain, and will be comforted as you cannot imagine. Still the surgeon wept. Why? The boy, my lamb, has done his duty: I did not put My lamb with your flock to lose him, but to retrieve another. Later, the surgeon sat beside the boys bed. The boy awoke and whispered, Did you cut open my heart? Yes, said the surgeon. What did you find? asked the boy. I found Jesus there, said the surgeon. Author Unknown. Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR New classified waste disposal procedures To you from the J2 JTF-GTMO has acquired three High Secu rity Shredders capable of destroying classified materials the waste can be placed in the regular trash and does not require burning. New shredder locations are: Head Shed: Outside the J3 on the first floor Pink Palace: 1st floor copy room by J6 CDC: Break room 1. Classified papers will no longer be col lected by the J2 and destroyed at the NAVBASE Incinerator each week. Each sec tion must now take their classified waste to one of the shredders provided for destruction by close-of-business each day. 2. Materials that are not destroyed each day are to be safeguarded based on their security classification (i.e. locked in a safe if required) and should no longer be left out in burn bags. 3. All paperwork generated by the JTF must be destroyed when no longer of use, regardless of security classification. This includes unclassified notes, FOUO, etc. It does not include MWR-type flyers. 4. Commercial office-type crosscut shred ders do not meet the regulations to adequately destroy sensitive paper and prevent reassem bly, and must not be used to process JTFGTMO waste paper. Once processed in one of these devices, materials cannot be fed into the new high-security shredders, but must then be burned at the incinerator. 6. It is the responsibility of each section to coordinate and conduct future burns at the NAVBASE Incinerator for materials that are incompatible with the new shredders from this point forward. (i.e. Diskettes, CDs, Badges, ID card printer ribbons, etc.) POC: NAVBASE N2 at 4121 / 5111. Your cooperation is necessary for the safety of all personnel assigned to GTMO. Think OPSEC! Sgt. 1st Class Roger R. Brisson Youll Find Jesus There Upon taking command, I wrote a memo to the JTF staff regarding my lead ership philosophy. Id like to introduce myself to you, the troops of JTF-GTMO, by passing some of it along here. The most valuable commodity leaders exchange is unvarnished truth. Do not gloss over problems; they do not go away. Seek ways to be innovative, stretch yourself and your subordinates. Risk-tak ing is what high-performing organiza tions do to produce maximum readiness. As a leader under me, you are allowed to make honest mistakes Ill provide the top cover. My philosophy is that 95 percent of the time youll make the right decision; the other 5 percent we can fix. A senior leaders tasks are to set pri orities, provide guidance, delegate authority and hold his people account able to meet the standard. I believe in Power Down, but not Power Off. Power Down requires constant supervision and continual assessment to ensure the mis sion is being done right. Take time and have the leader integrity to tell a subordi nate where he or she needs to improve. Be a good listener to your subordi nates. The greatest compliment you can give is to listen to their thoughts and issues. Train them to be aggressive deci sion makers. Initiative builds confidence. I expect 100 percent loyalty. I respect people who ask questions; this rigs us for success. But when a decision is made, execute as if the decision was yours. Know that your welfare and the wel fare of JTF-GTMO will always be my top priority. I am pleased with the past per formance of this great team and feel for tunate to have the opportunity to lead you into the future. Together, we will make a difference in our nation every day. Page 15 Friday, November 8, 2002 W. T. Sampson spikes NAVSTA W. T. Sampson defeats NAVSTA in two sets 25-23 and 25-22 Tuesday night at G. J. Genich gym. The teams played hard and it was a very close game. Both teams fought to the end. Not only were they fighting for a win but for brag ging rights. The crowd didnt know whom to root for in the game. Most of the W. T. Sampsons play ers have ties to NAVSTA. Both teams were connected by blood or loyalty. Navy Cmdr. Michael L. Fair was playing against his youngest son Jared L. Fair (who scored 11 points) and Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn was in the stand cheering for his W.T. Sampson-enrolled son Tim Buehn (who scored 6 points) as well as for NAVSTA. We always enjoy playing against one another. said Fair. I have three boys and we play a lot of sports together. Jared is pretty good on the volleyball court. My sons take a lot of pleasure in beating me. I told Jared that W. T. Sampson was going down. That was easier said than done, but W. T. Sampson was up to the challenge. NAVSTA drew first blood in the contest, pulling away 8-2 until Jared Fair scored 4 points to bring the high-schoolers back 8-6. NAVSTA kep a thin lead almost through the whole first set, but could not seem to put W. T. Sampson away. The turning point was when the score was 23-18 and W. T. Sampson scored seven straight points to take the first set 25-23. After that set, W. T. Sampson seemed to have more confidence after coming from behind to take the first set. The second set started the same way; both teams going at it like two heavyweight boxers. Both were looking for an opening, a weakness in the defense. The score was 19-15, NAVSTA, when Tim Buehn scored six points to put his team back on top 21-19. The Pirates from W. T. Sampson were able to put NAVSTA away for good when Jared Fair scored match point to clinch the win over NAVSTA 25-22. The game was close because of the fatherand-son adversaries. They were a little nerv ous before the game. The kids didnt start out with the proper sequence. We didnt have our usual lineup, said W. T. Sampsons Coach Mike Haley. But W.T. Sampson overcame the nerves and played well enough to sweep NAVSTA. The teams hard work and communication with one another was the key to victory. They are a good team and played smart in the win against NAVSTA, said Haley. After the game was over, everyone shook hands and gave one another hugs. W. T. Sampson vs. NAVSTA was now over and the former opponents switched back to being family again. W. T. Sampson played hard and they played well. They have a lot of competition in the league. I am really proud of the high school and the way they have performed over all, said Fair. W. T. Sampsons work ethic and youthful legs looks like it will continue to pay off as the season progresses and the playoffs begin. They will be a team to reckon with as long as their fathers dont ground them. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Jared L. Fair of W. T. Sampson and Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark Thompson of NAVSTA meet at the top of the net as Fair goes for the block and denied the spike. W. T. Sampsons Adam Michalik who scored four points in the win against NAVSTA spikes the ball over Navy Cmdr. Michael L. Fair Tuesday night.

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In January there were the Marines, and Camp X-Ray. In March came the Army reservists and Camp Delta, and the dividing of leadership and responsibilities between JTF160 and JTF-170, between detention and interrogation. And now, nearly 10 months after the first detainees from the War on Terrorism arrived on this well-guarded tropical isle, the two mis sions are officially one, consolidated under an active-duty, permanent-party commander with an eye toward the future. In a change-of-command ceremony held Monday afternoon outside the Pink Palace, under the American Flag marking the spot on which American soldiers first fought at GTMO over 100 years ago in the SpanishAmerican War, Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller and his wife Pam assumed leadership of the new Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay. Today's change of command is a particu larly special occasion, since it marks the end of an era, said Gen. James T. Hill, com manding general of United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). It affects not just these two officers but the entire command. It marks a change of leadership. It's time to rec ognize the accomplishments of the past and a time to renew our commitment to the chal lenges of the future, he said. It was also a time for ceremony, with the JTFs Senior Enlisted Person of the Quarter, Sgt. Fernando Martinez, and its Junior Enlisted Person of the Quarter, Airman 1st Class John L. Grant, presenting a bouquet of flowers to the incoming first lady of the com Story by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire JTF-GTMO era kicks off with new permanent-party, active-duty commander See MILLER, page 5 Page 8 Page 6 Page 15 Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-GTMO and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Miller takes JTF reins Friday, November 8, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 22 A look inside... Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano In a change-of-command ceremony Monday outside the Pink Palace, Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey D. Miller took charge of the new JTF-GTMO from former JTF-160/170 commander Army Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey. Page 16 Friday, November 8, 2002 with Spc. Terrence J. Styles, JTF-GTMO finance Q: Welcome to 15 Minutes of Fame! Tell me who you are. A: Im Spc. Terrence Jamar Styles. I work in J8. I work in budgeting. Q: How long have you been in the Army? A: Three years. I turned 21 in July. Q: Is this your first overseas deployment? A: No, its my fourth! Ive been to Korea, Kuwait and Egypt. Q: Wow, thats a lot of travel! How long were these deployments? A: Korea was the longest. That was a year. Q: Tell me what you do in J-8? A: Im learning the finance part of J-8. Q: Thats not your original MOS? A: No, I was an Administrative Specialist. I normally did awards and NCOERs. Q: So how did you end up in Finance? A: When I got out of active duty, I reenlisted in the reserves to further my educa tion. I had just started my reserve duty when I got called up. Q: How long have you been in GTMO? A: About two and a half months. Almost three. Q: What were you doing in your civilian life when the call came? A: I was enrolled at Florida A&M Univer sity. Im studying Elementary Education. Q: Cool. You want to be a teacher. What particular subject? A: Id like to teach third grade math. I became interested in elementary education because I never had a male teacher in my early childhood years and I saw the need for a pos itive male role model that a lot of kids dont have growing up. Q: Wow! Thats a very positive message. Are you taking any classes down here? A: Yes. Speech and Child Development. Q: Thats great! Youre earning credits in your spare time on deployment. Tell me about you and the military. Why did you join? A: After I graduated from high school I was tired of school for awhile, so I decided to go into the Army. Q: What has your experience been like at GTMO? A: My roommates are really cool. I made a lot of new friends. Q: What else have you learned about your self down here? A: Ive become more patient down here. This is the first time Ive worked in a joint environment. Q: How has it been working with the other branches of service? A: Well, the work is the same, but the Navy talks kinda funny. They say deck and head. Q: Lets let the people know about some of your hobbies. What kind of music are you into? A: Right now Im into Sean Paul (Gimme The Light) and Pastor Troy (Are We Cut tin). Reggae and R&B. Q: Did you grow up listening to reggae? A: Oh, yes. My dad is Jamaican. Q: Hey, since youre so close to Jamaica, do you have any plans to visit? A: No, Im going home to Florida when I get leave. Im eligible for leave soon, but Ill wait. Q: Have you ever gone to Jamaica? A: No, but I have a lot of aunties and uncles and cousins that come to visit. Q: They consider you American, right? A: Oh, yes! They call me Yankee, but I'm proud to be from the South. Q: Whats your favorite movie? A: The Mack. Q: What? Youve got to be kidding me. A: Blaxploitation films were funny! Q: Uh... whats your favorite sport? A: Basketball. The Indiana Pacers are my team. Q: Wait a minute. You live in Florida and the Pacers are your team? Why? A: I fell in love with Reggie Miller. Q: Aw, man! Reggie Miller? A: Yeah. The first basketball game I remember seeing was with Reggie against the Knicks. Nothing like a skinny guy excelling in a big mans game. I have an autographed rookie card of his. Q: You bought that? A: No, he actually autographed it for me. I went to Indiana and went to the game. Q: It must be worth a lot to you! I hope its in a safe place. A: I didnt bring it down here! Q: Yeah, I hear you. What else are you into? A: I like to read. My favorite author is Eric Jerome Dickey. I like Liar's Game and Milk in My Coffee. Ive read all his books. I highly recommend him! Q: Ill check him out. Last question any advice for those new to GTMO? A: Just be patient. Dont count the days. Spc. Terrence J. Styles puts his skills to work on the phone and the computer so you get paid. Interview and photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire Patience, Pay and The Pacers 15 Minutes of Fame...