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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00075
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: November 1, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00075

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PAGE 1

Finally! The day has come when youre going back home, returning to those you left behind so many moons ago. Yes, this is the day youve been waiting for, reuniting with spouses, children, and loved ones. But brace yourself, servicemember, there may be some unexpected changes in the life you left when you departed and landed on GTMO. Troops deployed to Guantanamo Bay in support of operation Enduring Freedom left behind friends, loved ones, and careers to self lessly fulfill their obligation to defend our nation in these chaotic and unstable times. As the days of their service go by here on the island where time seems to stand still, its easy to forget that the world outside has been mov ing at a business-as-usual pace. Although the men and women serving in GTMO have not waged war and carried fallen comrades off the field, they may still find that returning to the real world leaves them feeling out of place. Just because GTMO is not a hot zone and troops stationed here arent dodging bul lets doesnt mean that they will return home unaffected by their time here or smoothly adjust to the changes at home, said Army Maj. Sharon M. Newton, OIC 85th Combat Stress Control, Fort Hood, Texas. Weve found that redeploying back home is actually more stressful than deploying from home. Some soldiers feel the anxiety of not knowing what to expect upon their return, or they expect to go back and pick up where they left off they hope to resume their normal rou tine, when things may have changed quite a bit, she said. Story by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire How to deal with the stress of redeploying back to the life you left behind See GOING HOME, page 5 Page 6 Page 3 Page 11 Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-GTMO and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. So youre going home... Friday, November 1, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 21 A look inside... Beat Who ? Army Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey, center, is outnumbered but not outranked Thursday as Cheryl L. Lewis, left, and Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn help the JTF-GTMO commander get into the fighting spirit as they each pull for their branch of service in the upcoming Army-Navy football game. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Page 12 Friday, November 1, 2002 with Spc. Mario Lozoya 346th MP Company Q: Spc. Mario Lozoya, wel come to 15 Minutes of Fame! Tell us a little about yourself. A: Well, I am 22, and a stu dent. I study theatre back in Kansas and I am down here with the 346th MP Co. I am also a selfproclaimed computer nerd. Q: What classifies you as a computer nerd? A: I dunno. I guess because I immerse myself into the charac ters in my computer games. Q: Okay, so you told me once upon a time that you are loud and boisterous. What is a good exam ple of this? A: Wednesday night mayhem at the Windjammer, otherwise known as Karaoke Night. The loud part usually happens after I warm up and lose my inhibitions. Q: Interesting. So how do the Karaoke King and his faithful crew entertain themselves on just a regular day? A: Theres a little brotherly war going on between us and the other hooch next to us. Its pretty crazy. They throw pebbles at us...we throw bigger ones back. Its been going on for weeks now. Q: It seems to me that you never get bored, Spc. Lozoya. A: Believe it. Sometimes I try to entertain myself by speaking to my bunk pillow. Like the vol leyball in Cast Away. And no, I havent named the pillow yet. Q: So, I know you probably want to be a rock star, right? If you formed a band here, what would the name be? A: Nothing to do with GTMO, fa-sure. But I would probably give the members cool names like Iguana Steve on bass and Banana Rat Danny on drums. And my DJ would be Hoochmaster Mike. Q: Cool. So, are you a lean, mean MP-ing machine? A: Nah, more like a supply machine. Im a supply clerk. Q: Whats your motto; Leaping through toilet paper rolls in one single bound? A: Yo, thats messed up! But I can take it, though. Everyones got jokes! Q: Whats the best part about GTMO? A: Cheap entertainment. Period. Q: If you had to describe your self as a musical instrument, what would it be and why? A: Thats a tough one. Um...got it. A kazoo. And why? Because when you play one, they are lots of fun, full of hot air and you really never know what is gonna come out till its over. Sorta like me. I never know whats coming outta my mouth until its already out. Q: Is there anyone you idol ize? A: Yeah, sort of a cross between Kurt Cobain and Richard Pryor. Q: Wow, thats a freaky combo. Why a cross between those two? A: Well, Kurt was very tal ented and Mr. Pryor was a funny brother. Id sorta like to end up somewhere in the middle. Q: If you ran the world, what would you do differently? I for one would say kids around the world can have JELL-O Pudding Pops for breakfast. How about you? A: Free pizza for all. I would do away with the soup kitchens and start handing out free pies. You just go in and say to the fat guy in the dirty apron, No soup for me today, Joey, Ill take a meat-loving pan. Q: Huh? A: Hey, its a start. Q: If you could market your self as Mario the Rock Star, what would be the first item you would want mass-produced? A: Id like to package Marios Annoying Noise maker. You know those little things with the balls on them that go up and down that you win from Chuck E. Cheeses? You always see that one kid who cant grasp the concept to make it work. I would LOVE to see my face on one of those! Q: Hmm. What do you do to beat the routine here? A: Well, the hooch war, of course. And I like to play the gui tar, call home, listen to the ocean breezes, take long walks on the beach... Q: Dude, this is not an ad for a dating service! Any last words for new people coming to GTMO? A: Dont go insane from the routine here try to have a vari ety. There is more here than meets the eye. Spc. Mario Lozoya strikes up a tune to entertain himself and his hooch buddies in his Camp America SEAhut. Interview and photo by Spc. Ivey N. Hodges Special to The Wire The King of Karaoke 15 Minutes of Fame...

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Page 2 Friday, November 1, 2002 JTF-GTMO Command Commander: Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Air Force Lt. Col. Eduardo Villavicencio OIC, 361st Public Affairs Detachment: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5426 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detachment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-GTMO. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Depart ment of Defense or the personnel within. As the interim Command Sgt. Maj. of JTF-GTMO, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of our servicemembers for their hard work and dedication to the vital mission that we perform here. I would like to remind all service members that each one of us is a men tor at one time or another knowingly or not. Therefore, it is imperative that we always try to do our best to set a positive example for others to follow, because you never know whom you may be mentoring. As some of us prepare for rede ployment, be reminded that it takes a team effort to keep all of us safe. Although this will be a time that more tasks may be added, remember that the rule is mission first, but safety always. Always use the buddy system. Thank you. JTF-GTMO Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony D. Clayton Chaplains Corner Navigators speak of a three point fix in order to be able to plot a reliable posi tion on a chart. A principle of discernment is spiri tual triangulation. Like navigation, if the distances from 3 different points intersect one another, we can be sure that we have discerned correctly. Its some thing like taking a navigational fix or lining up three dots on a plank to cut it straight. Spiritually, the three points needed together are: 1. Gods objective moral law, revealed in Sacred Scripture, apostolic Tradition and the present day Churchs authoritative interpretation of it; 2. The situation God providentially arranges for you; 3. The testimony of your own informed conscience, especially the inner peace that is a mark of the Spirits presence. To discern alone by: 1. Objective law is to run aground on legalism; 2. Situations is to drift aimlessly into relativism; 3. Individual conscience alone is to sink into subjectivism. To discern by lining up all three points at the same time is to be prudent. It is the only way to stay as close to the track as we can. The ancient Argonauts said: To navigate is precise; to live is not pre cise. We need all the help we can get, so spiritual triangulation is a great navi gational aid in the voyage of life. Submitted by Navy Lt. Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, USNR Reporting Motor Vehicle Accidents Provost Marshals Office All accidents or collisions involving motor vehicles need to be reported to the Guantanamo Bay Naval Station Police in a timely manner. In case of major accidents, the police will be notified immediately to insure that proper medical care is afforded to the injured. Except when it is necessary to notify the police or treat the injured, no person or vehicle may leave the scene of an accident or collision involving the fol lowing: -Death or personal injury -When damage to government prop erty is estimated to be in excess of $100.00 -When damage to personal property is estimated to be in excess of $500.00. In case of minor accidents, the police will be notified within 24 hours. Remember that overtaking or passing vehicles traveling in the same direction is prohibited at Guantanamo Bay. You may pass slow-moving vehicles or heavy equipment only when they have moved to the extreme right shoulder of the roadway. Follow all traffic regulations and always buckle up for your safety. Army Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-GTMO Spiritual Navigation Credit Management Class The Fleet and Family Support Center will be conducting a Credit Management class on November 6, 2002. The class runs from 11a.m. to noon in the Fleet and Family Support Center's training classroom. Interested? Please call 4141 to have your name added to the roster. Page 11 Friday, November 1, 2002 Hospital wins v-ball season opener Naval Hospital took the opening match of the GTMO volleyball season, sinking Port Security Unit 307 in two sets, 25-21 and 2515. Tuesday night at G.J. Denich gym. The highly anticipated volleyball season started off with a bang. The two teams both played well, but in the end, Naval Hospital was the stronger team. The first set started out evenly matched. They were tied at four until Navy Petty Offi cer 3rd Class Tommie Crumedy scored six straight points with his powerful serve. This put Naval Hospital in a comfortable position. They led the set 9-4. After that the two teams exchanged a few points. PSU 307s weakness in the game was returning the serve. Naval Hospital saw that and took advantage. PSU 307 was not able to stop Navy Hospi tal contract worker Hughleslie Skyer who scored the last eight points of the first set. Skyers awesome serve was unstoppable in the first set. PSU 307 didnt have an answer for it. PSU 307 fought and clawed back, but they were too far behind in the set. Hospital took the first set by a score of 25-21. The teams switched sides and were ready to do battle once again. It was do or die for PSU 307. They didnt want to lose. They had to match the intensity Naval Hospital had in the game. But it seemed every bounce was going go Naval Hospitals way. We were playing too tentatively and we were hoping things would go our way, said Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Brad T. Starks. We had to make things happen. We needed to be more aggressive on the court. We had to fight and really want to win. PSU 307 scored the first point in the set, but soon it became clear that wanting wasnt enough. Navy Hospital came back with three points on Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jahleel Browns serve, and this set the tone of the game. PSU 307 wouldnt give up they kept on fighting. The teams exchanged points on the next couple of serves until the streaky Naval Hospital put four more points on the score board. This worried PSU 307. Starks came up to serve and took matters into his own hands. He scored three points to make it 9-8. This was a momentum builder for the PSU team, which was able to tie the set at 10. The look on some of the Naval Hospitals players was one of concern. But Naval Hospital regained their compo sure. Brown looked confident and was ready to serve. He threw the ball up and slapped the volleyball to the middle of the defense. PSU 307 wasnt able to return the serve. Brown scored two more points to lead PSU 307 14-11. I was able to pick out the weakest link in the defense, so I would serve it there. Once you pick out the weakest link, you keep on drilling it there, said Brown. Naval Hospital continued with their highpowered offense. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Mark Hammel scored eight straight points to put the nail in the coffin for PSU 307. That onslaught destroyed any chance of PSU 307s coming back in the match. Crumedy scored the last three to seal the victory over PSU 307, 25-15. We started kind of slow, but we are work ing on our game, said Brown. We are going to have a strong team by the end of the sea son. We are just tuning up. Wait and see: Naval Hospital will be a team to be reckoned with in the league. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jahleel Brown goes up for the volleyball and spikes it for one of his eight points in the victory over PSU 307 in the season opener Tuesday night at G. J. Denich Gym. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jahleel Brown and Eugene S. Alexander almost collide returning a serve.

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Page 10 Friday, November 1, 2002 Please contact Capt. Gormly at 5249 or Maj. Buchanan at 5255 for more information. Daily free daytime & evening lessons are available for sailing, kayaking, and motor boating at Pelican Pete's Marina, by appointment only. Aerobics Classes, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 6 a.m. 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., and 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.; Tues. and Thurs. 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Tae-Kwon Do, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., and 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. (one hour classes); Tues. and Thurs. 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. 1-on-1 Spinning Classes, G.J. Denich Gym, Mon.Thurs., 6:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Yoga Classes, Tues. Thurs. 5:15 p.m. 6:15 p.m., G.J. Denich GymYoga Center. Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, Mon. Fri., 11 a.m. Midnight. Pool Hours: Marine Hill Pool: Open Swim, 6 a.m. -6 p.m., daily; Windjammer Pool: Lap Swim, 6 a.m. 8 a.m., Mon. Sat., Open Swim, 10 a.m. 6 p.m. daily .; Deer Point Pool: Open Swim, 11 a.m. 7 p.m., Mon. Fri., 10 a.m. 6 p.m., Sat. & Sun. Friday, November 1st 11 a.m -1p.m., Free bowling, Marblehead Bowling Lanes. 7 p.m. Midnight, Friday Extreme Bowling, Marble head Lanes. Saturday, November 2nd 6:30a.m., 10K NEX Appreciation Day Run GJ Denich Gymnasium. 9:30 a.m. 6p.m. NEX, Appreciation Day; prize drawings throughout the Day. 1 p.m., Chili Cook-Off, NEX. 5:30 p.m., Grand Prize Drawing (Orlando, Fla. Trip), NEX. 6 p.m., Oktoberfest, MWR Sailing Center. Sunday, November 3rd 12 6 p.m., JTF-GTMO Social Gathering, Windmill Beach. 1 6 p.m., Extreme Bowling, Marblehead Lanes 6:30 p.m., Bingo, Windjammer Club. 7p.m. Chess Tournament, Main CBQ Liberty Center. Monday, November 4th 8 a.m. Noon, Adult Ceramic Classes, Ceramic Shop. Tuesday, November 5th Open swims. Wednesday, November 6th 9 11 a.m., Adult Advanced Pottery Classes, Ceram ics Shop. 7 p.m. Bowling Party, Marblehead Lanes. 8 p.m., Karaoke, Windjammer Club. Thursday, November 7th 11 a.m. Midnight, Bowling, Marblehead Lanes. 6 p.m., Bowling League, Marblehead Lanes. A little more than a month ago, I came to Guantanamo Bay for the first time, and saw that the military and civilians living and work ing on this base were using privately owned vehicles (POVs), Navy Exchange (NEX) rental vehicles, government-owned vehicles (GOV), and the bus system to move around the Naval Base. People who ride the bus know that much time can be spent waiting for the next sched uled bus to rotate to your stop. But it doesnt always have to be this way. As most people who ride the bus or walk have seen there are a large number of govern ment-owned vehicles moving around the base with one or two people in them. And, for some reason, the occupants of these vehicles do not feel the need to show a little courtesy and ask either the people without vehicles if they need a ride, despite the fact that often, the persons in the vehicles and those walking or waiting for the bus stop are going to the same general location. Common courtesy goes a long way to mak ing life better for everyone. Offering someone a ride, even if they decline that offer, shows that those who have the privilege to drive a vehicle care about those who do not have the same privilege. It also reinforces the mindset that we are all part of one joint task force, accomplish ing one mission one team, one fight. The bottom line is that everyone needs to be willing to help out the next guy. And those who have, help out the have-nots. So show a little courtesy. If youre traveling in a empty vehicle, and see someone walking like they have somewhere they have to be, or someone is at a bus top looking at each vehicle passing by as if theyd like a ride, stop. Its as simple as leaning toward the window and ask ing if they are going in the same direction as you and if they need a ride. They might say no, but at least you asked. After all, the person to whom you offer that ride might just be the person who helps you work an issue or project tomorrow, next week or a month or two from now. Thats my viewpoint. It wont change the world, but it could make life better for a few people, and in the end, it is the right thing to do. Think about it! Submitted by Army Sgt. Maj. Ruben Maestas Keep rising to the top Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Melissa Steinman of Port Security Unit 307 gives a young climber the encouragement needed to make it to the top of the rock-climbing wall at the Halloween festivities held at the Paintball Range on Saturday. The event brought together young members of the GTMO community and JTF volunteers for a costume contest, hayride, pumpkin-patch scavenger hunt, food and fun. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Common courtesy on wheels Page 3 Friday, November 1, 2002 Dental Technicians Navy Seaman Jimiel B. Simmons I have been a dental techni cian for about three years. Being at GTMO is great because you get to meet everyone on the island. Sooner or later, everyone has to go through the dental office. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jaymie Brinkmeier I really love being a dental technician, but the most excit ing part of my job is working in the operating room. It feels great helping people and mak ing them feel better. That is what drives me. Navy Seaman Nader I. Warah Being a technician is a step ping stone for me I want to become a dentist. I love this job because I like to see beau tiful, healthy smiles. I want to be the tech that is going to revolutionize the dental field. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tommie Crumedy Being a dental technician at GTMO has changed my life. Even though we are short of technicians right now, this has forced us to depend even more on one another. There is great teamwork at the office. The dental technicians at the Navy Hospital keep big, bright smiles on the faces of the Guantanamo Bay community. Its their job to take care of all of the Defense Department civilians, contract workers, ser vicemembers and family members on the island. This is not an easy task, but the eight-man crew of dental technicians work hard and work together to complete their mission. We are short on dental technicians right now, but because we work together we are able to get the job done, said Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tommie Crumedy. These hard-charging dental technicians want patients take steps to prevent cavities. Dental health care is an every day thing. Brush and floss every day to prevent cavities, or let the dental technicians fix you up its your choice! Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy Seaman Nader I. Warah looks at a patient's pearly whites and inspects his job after putting in a tooth filling. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tommie Crumedy gets a patient ready for a panoramic X-ray on the 2002 CC Proline machine. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Pamella O. Mason I work with the gums and the supporting structure of the mouth. I love my job and I love taking care of people. I want people to make sure they floss daily so they can preserve their beautiful smiles.

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Page 4 Friday, November 1, 2002 This weeks question: If you could read the diary of anyone in the world, whom would you choose? Coast Guard Ensign Maura Kolarcik, USCGC Dependable Id like to read what Julia Roberts thinks in private. She is my favorite actress. Army Pvt. Eddward Fitzgerald, 342nd MP Company Id like to read the diary of Jim Morrison. His music has greatly influ enced me. Coast Guard PO1 Joanne Kurek, 307PSU Walter Mondale. I want to know who or what made him choose to run for the Senate. Navy PO3 Dajuan Glover, JTF-GTMO mail room Id like to know the secrets of Deion Sanders. Hes flashy, cocky, and people still love him. Coast Guard PO3 Jason Spaulding, USCGC Dependable Id definitely like to read about the younger years of former President Bill Clinton. Compiled by Army Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin and Spc. Jose A. Martinez Celebrating diversity in all its forms Filipino contract workers nimbly leap over bamboo poles as they execute the intricate moves of the Tinikling, the national dance of the Philippines, during GTMOs first annual Multi-Cultural Day Cele bration at Phillips Park last Sunday. The program, a com bined effort of Morale, Wel fare and Recreation, JTF-GTMO, Naval Station, and the Naval Hospital, featured food, music and dancing from Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, Asia, the Middle East and Europe. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Man on the Street Page 9 Friday, November 1, 2002 DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, November 1 7 p.m. Spy Kids 2, PG 99 min 9 p.m. The Ring, PG13 99 min Saturday, November 2 7 p.m. Serving Sara, PG13-100min 9 p.m. Swim Fan, PG13-85min Sunday, November 3 7 p.m. City By The Sea, R-108min Monday, November 4 7 p.m. Blue Crush, PG13-104min Tuesday, November 5 7 p.m. Swim Fan, PG13-85min Wednesday, November 6 7 p.m. City By The Sea, R-108min Thursday, November 7 7 p.m. The Ring, PG13 99 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, November 1 7 p.m. Blackheart, R-95min 9 p.m. 15 Minutes, R-120min Saturday, November 2 7 p.m. Last of the Mohicans, R-120min 9 p.m. Free Money, R-97min Sunday, November 3 7, 9 p.m. Braveheart, R-177min Monday, November 4 7 p.m. Light It Up, R-99min Tuesday, November 5 7 p.m. A Murder of Crows, R-101min Wednesday, November 6 7 p.m. Legend of Drunken Master, R-101min Thursday, November 7 7, 9 p.m. Play It To The Bone, R-125min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Grit your teeth, suck it up. Walk like a man, laugh it up. I can sit back and relax And feel as though I am standing Tall and proud. I can whisper powerful words And have them heard real loud. Days go by, and they always will. Things have to be said, And hearts gotta spill. LEARN FROM LIFE. Not all knowledge Comes from a book. Stretch your mind to the outer limits Now take a look. Life ain't a fact. Life, in fact, is filled with fiction. Digging deep past the core Of reality is an everyday addiction. TRY TO SEE What imagination can find. You want to flip the switch, Go back and rewind. Across 1 In __ (together) 5 Parlay 9 Not who 13 Christmas song 14 Deck 15 Juno 16 __ Minor (Little Dipper) 17 Dickens __ of Two Cities (2 wds.) 18 Asian nation 19 Defame 21 Quickly 23 Deluxe 24 Pots 25 Peaceful 28 A large three-headed muscle 31 Poisonous metal 32 Christmas song 34 Christmas 36 Sphere 37 Aurora 38 Fiddle 39 Prejudice 41 Tiny island 43 Manage 44 Alcohol 46 Repents 48 Please respond 49 Snare 50 Type of probation 53 Chinese pooch 57 Thousand (abbr.) 58 Harriet Beecher __ 60 Location 61 Hawked 62 Grabber 63 Slope 64 Tints 65 Rushed 66 Snaky fish Down 1 Rebuff 2 Past 3 Loch __ Monster 4 Restrained 5 Piece together 6 Beehive State 7 Nothing 8 Toe surface 9 Fanciful idea 10 Natural cure 11 Voiced 12 Opp. of few 14 3.26 light-years 20 Charged particle 22 Business abbr. 24 Writing style 25 Pig 26 Spooky 27 National capital 28 Mythical monster 29 Don (2 wds.) 30 Tip 33 Fable writer 35 Potato sprouts 40 Winding sheets 41 Endows with authority 42 Cargo vessel 43 Related by blood 45 American sign language 47 Thai 49 Put pieces of cloth together 50 Posttraumatic stress disorder 51 Sailors hey 52 Persona 53 Dawdle 54 Canal 55 Scalp 56 Grub 59 Spigot October 25

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Adjusting to the changes at home might initially be challenging for servicemembers. Roles in the household may have changed to manage the basic household chores; children may have grown and may be different in many ways, and spouses may have become more independent and learned new coping skills. This can leave a servicemember won dering if they still fit into the family. Adjusting back into the hustle and bustle of everyday life can also come as a bit of a cul ture shock. Just the 25-mile-per-hour speed limit here at GTMO is a big difference from multi-lane traffic speeding down the highway at 70 mph. Communication is the key! said Army Staff Sgt. Richard B. Howard, NCOIC CSC, Fort Hood, Texas. Servicemembers must talk to their loved ones about how they feel and what they are thinking. Keeping emotions bottled up will do nobody any good. It will only cause more tension and frustration. Some possible expectations for soldiers about to depart and head home are: they may want to talk about what they saw or did, and others may seem not to want to listen. Or per haps they may not want to talk and others will keep asking. Soldiers may miss the excitement of a deployment for a while, and may have changed their outlook and priori ties in life. Addi tionally, face-to-face com munication with your loved ones may be hard at first, as well as sexual intimacy. Soldiers have to understand that although things have changed somewhat, its okay and they have to learn to accept it. From changes at work to their children grow ing up a bit, in time, all will fit into place, said Howard. Sometimes young children dont recognize their returning parent. They may cry or may hide or hesitate when asked to come to the ser vicemember at first. Older children may seem not to care, and children ranging from ages six to 12-years-of-age may want a lot of attention. All of which affects the servicemember. Often, servicemembers want to jump in and do it all. But, they must remember to take it slow and ease back into their lives, said Spc. Kathryne S. Hernandez, 85th CSC, Fort Hood, Texas. They want to do everything at once. Rebuild relationships, make up for time missed with their children, which becomes overwhelming for them, said Newton. Some tips for troops about to make the transition back to their normal lives after departing GTMO are: support good things your family has done while youve been gone, take time to talk with your spouse and children, make indi vidual time for each child and your spouse, go slowly when re-establish ing your place in the family, be prepared to make some adjustments, take time to listen and to talk to loved ones, and last, but cer tainly not least, go easy on partying. Whats recom mended more so for Reserve and National Guard ser vicemembers upon their arrival home is that there is a family day in which everyone and their families get together and kind of wrap things up, Newton said. A similar tactic may work with the ser vicemembers with which youve spent so much time here keep in touch a little, talk a little, and help each other regain your lives back home. After living and working together with your unit members every day for the last however-many months, transi tioning to no contact at all can be a little bit of a shock for the servicemember, she said. A gradual weaning may be helpful. Most importantly, all servicemembers must remember that there is no shame in ask ing for help with coping with feelings after returning home from a deployment. The help is available. May it be speaking to a chaplain or seeking counseling, there are outlets for soldiers to help them deal. Service members must know that seeking help does nt mean that they are weak and it will not jeopardize their military careers. Lots of sol diers are going through the same things they are, said Army Capt. Douglas W. Lane, 85th CSC, Fort Hood, Texas. Some of the greatest military minds, such as George Washington and Ulysses S. Grant struggled, faced depression, and needed help now and again. There is no reason for soldiers to feel ashamed, he said. Page 5 Friday, November 1, 2002 GOING HOME, from page 1 Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Army Sgt. Romina Fusaro sadly waves goodbye to a friend who is heading back home to the United States. Sooner or later, Fusaro will be making the same trip. Image courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration. Famous photo of a sailor greeting a loved one in New Yorks Times Square after coming home from WWII. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The ferry pulls into the Windward side landing once again to pick up departing troops heading home. Page 8 Friday, November 1, 2002 When the USS Bulkeley (DDG-84), a ship named after one of this nations most deco rated naval heroes, Vice Adm. John Duncan Bulkeley, made history this week by anchor ing at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, it was another historic event in the amazing life story of the Bulkeleys commander, Navy Cmdr. Carlos Del Toro. Born in Havana, Cuba on Christmas Day, 1961, Del Toro spent his first year living under the revolutionary government of Fidel Castro before immigrating to the United States in October of 1962. His father was involved with, and impris oned for, counter-revolutionary activities dur ing this early part of Cubas post-revolutionary period. In a stroke of luck, Del Toros father was out on parole when the familys exit visas, which they had requested a year earlier, finally arrived. Within 48 hours, the family fled the country together, and young Del Toro, with his father, mother and grandmother, headed for Miami, Fla. After a short while, the Del Toro moved with his parents to New York, where he received his elementary and high school edu cation. Early in 1979, Del Toro was accepted at the United States Naval Academy. I went to the Naval Academy because, having emigrated from Cuba, I had this very strong desire to serve my [new] country, said Del Toro. I was so grateful for the opportunities that this country has provided my family. Not mate rial opportunities; we were quite poor, he said, but certainly the freedom that my family did not enjoy under Castro the ability to do as we pleased, being able to work as much as we could, and, most importantly, being able to achieve success through education. And success he indeed found. He gradu ated from the Naval Academy in June 1983 with a degree in Electrical Engineering and a commission as an ensign in the Navy. Thus did Del Toro become the first member of his family to receive a college education. Del Toro began his professional training at the Surface Warfare Officers School in New port, R.I. After six months, he was ordered to his first ship, USS Koelsch (FF-1049) in May port, Fla. While onboard, he served in numer ous jobs before becoming assistant navigator. After completing his tour, he went to the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., and earned a masters degree in Electri cal Engineering. Then he reported to USS Pre ble (DDG-46) as chief engineer. It was in this role that he was responsible for making USS Preble ready to deploy seven months early in support of Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. After the war, Del Toro returned to the U.S. and went back to school to earn a second mas ters degree in Legislative Affairs, and later after a third one in National Security Strategy. After serving aboard the USS Vincennes (CG-49), Del Toro was selected as a White House Fellow. As such, he served for one year at the highest levels of government, assisting cabinet secretaries and other ranking adminis tration officials. He also traveled extensively throughout the U.S. and abroad, meeting with a vast spectrum of domestic and international leaders. The White House Fellowship was an opportunity unlike any other I have had in my life, said Del Toro. It opened doors that were unimaginable to a young Hispanic kid. It was while assigned to the White House that Del Toro received orders to be the com missioning commanding officer of the USS Bulkeley, the newest and most technologically advanced warship in the U.S. fleet. Commanding a ship has been a dream of mine since I first joined the Navy, said Del Toro. Its a combination of a life-long series of qualifications and hard work. Like many Hispanic-Americans before him, Del Toro is living the American dream. At GTMO conducting testing for the readi ness of Bulkeley for overseas deployment, Del Toro said he expects that one day, democ racy will be established in Cuba. I think its only a matter of time, he said. I am very excited to be here meeting with the commander of the Joint Task Force, the base commander and his family and, of course, the Bulkeley daughters, sponsors of the ship, he said. As a personal witness to the terrible events of Sept.11th, I cant begin to thank GTMO civilians and military personnel for their unselfish dedication to the principles for which this country stands: freedom, justice and democracy, Del Toro said. All Ameri cans should be proud of the work that the JTF is doing at GTMO. Story and photos by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Cuban exile at helm on USS Bulkeley Army Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey, left, commander of JTF-GTMO, listens as Navy Cmdr. Carlos Del Toro tells the story behind a porcelain dish adorned with the ships emblem at the breakfast table Tuesday. Navy Capt. Robert Buehn, Diana & Regina Bulkeley, Army Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey, Navy Cmdr. Car los Del Toro and Navy Capt. Albert Shimkus pose after exchanging gifts and awards at Ricks on Monday.

PAGE 6

Residents of Guantanamo Bay were treated to the sight of the Navys newest and most sophisticated destroyer when the USS Bulkeley (DDG-84) pulled into port here Monday. GTMO was one of the many bases the guided-missle destroyer has visited since it was christened June 24, 2001, but the visit to Cuba had special significance for several reasons. Vice Adm. John Duncan Bulkeley, for whom the vessel was named, was once the commander of Naval Station Guan tanamo Bay, and two of the late admirals daughters, Regina Bulkeley Day and Diana Bulkeley Lindsay, were back in GTMO for the first time since 1965. In addition, the commander of the Bulkeley, Navy Cmdr. Carlos Del Toro, was born in Havana, Cuba. Del Toro escaped with his family to the U.S. in 1962. A special soiree was held for the ships commander and the Bulkeley daughters Tuesday at Ricks. Army Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey, commander of JTF GTMO and Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn, the base commander, went to Ricks to wel come the distinguished visitors to GTMO. Many awards and gifts were exchanged. The mission of the USS Bulkeley is to be prepared to conduct prompt, sustained combat operations at sea. The ship is equipped to operate in a high density, multithreat environment, either independently or as an integral member of a Carrier Battle Group or a Surface Action Group. In addi tion to self-defense capabilities in Air War fare (AW), Surface Warfare (SUW), and Undersea Warfare (USW), the Bulkeley can effectively provide local area protection to other ships in a battle group. The ship was commissioned on Decem ber 8, 2001 at a ceremony in New York Harbor where the crew paid respects to those lost in New York City during the ter rorist attacks on September 11th, 2001. The ship departed GTMO Tuesday afternoon. Page 6 Page 7 November 1, 2002 Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The USS Bulkeley is named for Vice Adm. John Duncan Bulkeley. Bulkeley commanded the Navys PT Boat squadrons in the Philippines during World War II. He was the commander of the GTMO Naval Station at the height of the Cold War. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The crew of the USS Bulkeley musters on deck and awaits the arrival of Distinguished Visitors from the shore. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Navy Cmdr. Carlos Del Toro, commander of the USS Bulkeley, applies a ceremonial new tile with the ships emblem to the ceiling of Ricks on Monday night. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Officers of the Bulkeley welcome JTF-GTMO Commander Army Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey on board for a visit. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin JTF servicemembers from outside the Navy took advantage of the opportunity to get a glimpse of life onboard the destroyer by taking part in escorted tours of the ship. USS Bulkeley in GTMO Compiled by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa, Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin and Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn, commander of Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, welcomes Regina Bulkeley Day, daugh ter of the late Vice Adm. Bulkeley, back to her old home.

PAGE 7

Residents of Guantanamo Bay were treated to the sight of the Navys newest and most sophisticated destroyer when the USS Bulkeley (DDG-84) pulled into port here Monday. GTMO was one of the many bases the guided-missle destroyer has visited since it was christened June 24, 2001, but the visit to Cuba had special significance for several reasons. Vice Adm. John Duncan Bulkeley, for whom the vessel was named, was once the commander of Naval Station Guan tanamo Bay, and two of the late admirals daughters, Regina Bulkeley Day and Diana Bulkeley Lindsay, were back in GTMO for the first time since 1965. In addition, the commander of the Bulkeley, Navy Cmdr. Carlos Del Toro, was born in Havana, Cuba. Del Toro escaped with his family to the U.S. in 1962. A special soiree was held for the ships commander and the Bulkeley daughters Tuesday at Ricks. Army Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey, commander of JTF GTMO and Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn, the base commander, went to Ricks to wel come the distinguished visitors to GTMO. Many awards and gifts were exchanged. The mission of the USS Bulkeley is to be prepared to conduct prompt, sustained combat operations at sea. The ship is equipped to operate in a high density, multithreat environment, either independently or as an integral member of a Carrier Battle Group or a Surface Action Group. In addi tion to self-defense capabilities in Air War fare (AW), Surface Warfare (SUW), and Undersea Warfare (USW), the Bulkeley can effectively provide local area protection to other ships in a battle group. The ship was commissioned on Decem ber 8, 2001 at a ceremony in New York Harbor where the crew paid respects to those lost in New York City during the ter rorist attacks on September 11th, 2001. The ship departed GTMO Tuesday afternoon. Page 6 Page 7 November 1, 2002 Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The USS Bulkeley is named for Vice Adm. John Duncan Bulkeley. Bulkeley commanded the Navys PT Boat squadrons in the Philippines during World War II. He was the commander of the GTMO Naval Station at the height of the Cold War. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The crew of the USS Bulkeley musters on deck and awaits the arrival of Distinguished Visitors from the shore. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Navy Cmdr. Carlos Del Toro, commander of the USS Bulkeley, applies a ceremonial new tile with the ships emblem to the ceiling of Ricks on Monday night. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Officers of the Bulkeley welcome JTF-GTMO Commander Army Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey on board for a visit. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin JTF servicemembers from outside the Navy took advantage of the opportunity to get a glimpse of life onboard the destroyer by taking part in escorted tours of the ship. USS Bulkeley in GTMO Compiled by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa, Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin and Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn, commander of Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, welcomes Regina Bulkeley Day, daugh ter of the late Vice Adm. Bulkeley, back to her old home.

PAGE 8

Adjusting to the changes at home might initially be challenging for servicemembers. Roles in the household may have changed to manage the basic household chores; children may have grown and may be different in many ways, and spouses may have become more independent and learned new coping skills. This can leave a servicemember won dering if they still fit into the family. Adjusting back into the hustle and bustle of everyday life can also come as a bit of a cul ture shock. Just the 25-mile-per-hour speed limit here at GTMO is a big difference from multi-lane traffic speeding down the highway at 70 mph. Communication is the key! said Army Staff Sgt. Richard B. Howard, NCOIC CSC, Fort Hood, Texas. Servicemembers must talk to their loved ones about how they feel and what they are thinking. Keeping emotions bottled up will do nobody any good. It will only cause more tension and frustration. Some possible expectations for soldiers about to depart and head home are: they may want to talk about what they saw or did, and others may seem not to want to listen. Or per haps they may not want to talk and others will keep asking. Soldiers may miss the excitement of a deployment for a while, and may have changed their outlook and priori ties in life. Addi tionally, face-to-face com munication with your loved ones may be hard at first, as well as sexual intimacy. Soldiers have to understand that although things have changed somewhat, its okay and they have to learn to accept it. From changes at work to their children grow ing up a bit, in time, all will fit into place, said Howard. Sometimes young children dont recognize their returning parent. They may cry or may hide or hesitate when asked to come to the ser vicemember at first. Older children may seem not to care, and children ranging from ages six to 12-years-of-age may want a lot of attention. All of which affects the servicemember. Often, servicemembers want to jump in and do it all. But, they must remember to take it slow and ease back into their lives, said Spc. Kathryne S. Hernandez, 85th CSC, Fort Hood, Texas. They want to do everything at once. Rebuild relationships, make up for time missed with their children, which becomes overwhelming for them, said Newton. Some tips for troops about to make the transition back to their normal lives after departing GTMO are: support good things your family has done while youve been gone, take time to talk with your spouse and children, make indi vidual time for each child and your spouse, go slowly when re-establish ing your place in the family, be prepared to make some adjustments, take time to listen and to talk to loved ones, and last, but cer tainly not least, go easy on partying. Whats recom mended more so for Reserve and National Guard ser vicemembers upon their arrival home is that there is a family day in which everyone and their families get together and kind of wrap things up, Newton said. A similar tactic may work with the ser vicemembers with which youve spent so much time here keep in touch a little, talk a little, and help each other regain your lives back home. After living and working together with your unit members every day for the last however-many months, transi tioning to no contact at all can be a little bit of a shock for the servicemember, she said. A gradual weaning may be helpful. Most importantly, all servicemembers must remember that there is no shame in ask ing for help with coping with feelings after returning home from a deployment. The help is available. May it be speaking to a chaplain or seeking counseling, there are outlets for soldiers to help them deal. Service members must know that seeking help does nt mean that they are weak and it will not jeopardize their military careers. Lots of sol diers are going through the same things they are, said Army Capt. Douglas W. Lane, 85th CSC, Fort Hood, Texas. Some of the greatest military minds, such as George Washington and Ulysses S. Grant struggled, faced depression, and needed help now and again. There is no reason for soldiers to feel ashamed, he said. Page 5 Friday, November 1, 2002 GOING HOME, from page 1 Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Army Sgt. Romina Fusaro sadly waves goodbye to a friend who is heading back home to the United States. Sooner or later, Fusaro will be making the same trip. Image courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration. Famous photo of a sailor greeting a loved one in New Yorks Times Square after coming home from WWII. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The ferry pulls into the Windward side landing once again to pick up departing troops heading home. Page 8 Friday, November 1, 2002 When the USS Bulkeley (DDG-84), a ship named after one of this nations most deco rated naval heroes, Vice Adm. John Duncan Bulkeley, made history this week by anchor ing at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, it was another historic event in the amazing life story of the Bulkeleys commander, Navy Cmdr. Carlos Del Toro. Born in Havana, Cuba on Christmas Day, 1961, Del Toro spent his first year living under the revolutionary government of Fidel Castro before immigrating to the United States in October of 1962. His father was involved with, and impris oned for, counter-revolutionary activities dur ing this early part of Cubas post-revolutionary period. In a stroke of luck, Del Toros father was out on parole when the familys exit visas, which they had requested a year earlier, finally arrived. Within 48 hours, the family fled the country together, and young Del Toro, with his father, mother and grandmother, headed for Miami, Fla. After a short while, the Del Toro moved with his parents to New York, where he received his elementary and high school edu cation. Early in 1979, Del Toro was accepted at the United States Naval Academy. I went to the Naval Academy because, having emigrated from Cuba, I had this very strong desire to serve my [new] country, said Del Toro. I was so grateful for the opportunities that this country has provided my family. Not mate rial opportunities; we were quite poor, he said, but certainly the freedom that my family did not enjoy under Castro the ability to do as we pleased, being able to work as much as we could, and, most importantly, being able to achieve success through education. And success he indeed found. He gradu ated from the Naval Academy in June 1983 with a degree in Electrical Engineering and a commission as an ensign in the Navy. Thus did Del Toro become the first member of his family to receive a college education. Del Toro began his professional training at the Surface Warfare Officers School in New port, R.I. After six months, he was ordered to his first ship, USS Koelsch (FF-1049) in May port, Fla. While onboard, he served in numer ous jobs before becoming assistant navigator. After completing his tour, he went to the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., and earned a masters degree in Electri cal Engineering. Then he reported to USS Pre ble (DDG-46) as chief engineer. It was in this role that he was responsible for making USS Preble ready to deploy seven months early in support of Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. After the war, Del Toro returned to the U.S. and went back to school to earn a second mas ters degree in Legislative Affairs, and later after a third one in National Security Strategy. After serving aboard the USS Vincennes (CG-49), Del Toro was selected as a White House Fellow. As such, he served for one year at the highest levels of government, assisting cabinet secretaries and other ranking adminis tration officials. He also traveled extensively throughout the U.S. and abroad, meeting with a vast spectrum of domestic and international leaders. The White House Fellowship was an opportunity unlike any other I have had in my life, said Del Toro. It opened doors that were unimaginable to a young Hispanic kid. It was while assigned to the White House that Del Toro received orders to be the com missioning commanding officer of the USS Bulkeley, the newest and most technologically advanced warship in the U.S. fleet. Commanding a ship has been a dream of mine since I first joined the Navy, said Del Toro. Its a combination of a life-long series of qualifications and hard work. Like many Hispanic-Americans before him, Del Toro is living the American dream. At GTMO conducting testing for the readi ness of Bulkeley for overseas deployment, Del Toro said he expects that one day, democ racy will be established in Cuba. I think its only a matter of time, he said. I am very excited to be here meeting with the commander of the Joint Task Force, the base commander and his family and, of course, the Bulkeley daughters, sponsors of the ship, he said. As a personal witness to the terrible events of Sept.11th, I cant begin to thank GTMO civilians and military personnel for their unselfish dedication to the principles for which this country stands: freedom, justice and democracy, Del Toro said. All Ameri cans should be proud of the work that the JTF is doing at GTMO. Story and photos by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Cuban exile at helm on USS Bulkeley Army Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey, left, commander of JTF-GTMO, listens as Navy Cmdr. Carlos Del Toro tells the story behind a porcelain dish adorned with the ships emblem at the breakfast table Tuesday. Navy Capt. Robert Buehn, Diana & Regina Bulkeley, Army Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey, Navy Cmdr. Car los Del Toro and Navy Capt. Albert Shimkus pose after exchanging gifts and awards at Ricks on Monday.

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Page 4 Friday, November 1, 2002 This weeks question: If you could read the diary of anyone in the world, whom would you choose? Coast Guard Ensign Maura Kolarcik, USCGC Dependable Id like to read what Julia Roberts thinks in private. She is my favorite actress. Army Pvt. Eddward Fitzgerald, 342nd MP Company Id like to read the diary of Jim Morrison. His music has greatly influ enced me. Coast Guard PO1 Joanne Kurek, 307PSU Walter Mondale. I want to know who or what made him choose to run for the Senate. Navy PO3 Dajuan Glover, JTF-GTMO mail room Id like to know the secrets of Deion Sanders. Hes flashy, cocky, and people still love him. Coast Guard PO3 Jason Spaulding, USCGC Dependable Id definitely like to read about the younger years of former President Bill Clinton. Compiled by Army Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin and Spc. Jose A. Martinez Celebrating diversity in all its forms Filipino contract workers nimbly leap over bamboo poles as they execute the intricate moves of the Tinikling, the national dance of the Philippines, during GTMOs first annual Multi-Cultural Day Cele bration at Phillips Park last Sunday. The program, a com bined effort of Morale, Wel fare and Recreation, JTF-GTMO, Naval Station, and the Naval Hospital, featured food, music and dancing from Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, Asia, the Middle East and Europe. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Man on the Street Page 9 Friday, November 1, 2002 DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, November 1 7 p.m. Spy Kids 2, PG 99 min 9 p.m. The Ring, PG13 99 min Saturday, November 2 7 p.m. Serving Sara, PG13-100min 9 p.m. Swim Fan, PG13-85min Sunday, November 3 7 p.m. City By The Sea, R-108min Monday, November 4 7 p.m. Blue Crush, PG13-104min Tuesday, November 5 7 p.m. Swim Fan, PG13-85min Wednesday, November 6 7 p.m. City By The Sea, R-108min Thursday, November 7 7 p.m. The Ring, PG13 99 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, November 1 7 p.m. Blackheart, R-95min 9 p.m. 15 Minutes, R-120min Saturday, November 2 7 p.m. Last of the Mohicans, R-120min 9 p.m. Free Money, R-97min Sunday, November 3 7, 9 p.m. Braveheart, R-177min Monday, November 4 7 p.m. Light It Up, R-99min Tuesday, November 5 7 p.m. A Murder of Crows, R-101min Wednesday, November 6 7 p.m. Legend of Drunken Master, R-101min Thursday, November 7 7, 9 p.m. Play It To The Bone, R-125min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Grit your teeth, suck it up. Walk like a man, laugh it up. I can sit back and relax And feel as though I am standing Tall and proud. I can whisper powerful words And have them heard real loud. Days go by, and they always will. Things have to be said, And hearts gotta spill. LEARN FROM LIFE. Not all knowledge Comes from a book. Stretch your mind to the outer limits Now take a look. Life ain't a fact. Life, in fact, is filled with fiction. Digging deep past the core Of reality is an everyday addiction. TRY TO SEE What imagination can find. You want to flip the switch, Go back and rewind. Across 1 In __ (together) 5 Parlay 9 Not who 13 Christmas song 14 Deck 15 Juno 16 __ Minor (Little Dipper) 17 Dickens __ of Two Cities (2 wds.) 18 Asian nation 19 Defame 21 Quickly 23 Deluxe 24 Pots 25 Peaceful 28 A large three-headed muscle 31 Poisonous metal 32 Christmas song 34 Christmas 36 Sphere 37 Aurora 38 Fiddle 39 Prejudice 41 Tiny island 43 Manage 44 Alcohol 46 Repents 48 Please respond 49 Snare 50 Type of probation 53 Chinese pooch 57 Thousand (abbr.) 58 Harriet Beecher __ 60 Location 61 Hawked 62 Grabber 63 Slope 64 Tints 65 Rushed 66 Snaky fish Down 1 Rebuff 2 Past 3 Loch __ Monster 4 Restrained 5 Piece together 6 Beehive State 7 Nothing 8 Toe surface 9 Fanciful idea 10 Natural cure 11 Voiced 12 Opp. of few 14 3.26 light-years 20 Charged particle 22 Business abbr. 24 Writing style 25 Pig 26 Spooky 27 National capital 28 Mythical monster 29 Don (2 wds.) 30 Tip 33 Fable writer 35 Potato sprouts 40 Winding sheets 41 Endows with authority 42 Cargo vessel 43 Related by blood 45 American sign language 47 Thai 49 Put pieces of cloth together 50 Posttraumatic stress disorder 51 Sailors hey 52 Persona 53 Dawdle 54 Canal 55 Scalp 56 Grub 59 Spigot October 25

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Page 10 Friday, November 1, 2002 Please contact Capt. Gormly at 5249 or Maj. Buchanan at 5255 for more information. Daily free daytime & evening lessons are available for sailing, kayaking, and motor boating at Pelican Pete's Marina, by appointment only. Aerobics Classes, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 6 a.m. 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., and 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.; Tues. and Thurs. 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Tae-Kwon Do, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., and 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. (one hour classes); Tues. and Thurs. 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. 1-on-1 Spinning Classes, G.J. Denich Gym, Mon.Thurs., 6:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Yoga Classes, Tues. Thurs. 5:15 p.m. 6:15 p.m., G.J. Denich GymYoga Center. Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, Mon. Fri., 11 a.m. Midnight. Pool Hours: Marine Hill Pool: Open Swim, 6 a.m. -6 p.m., daily; Windjammer Pool: Lap Swim, 6 a.m. 8 a.m., Mon. Sat., Open Swim, 10 a.m. 6 p.m. daily .; Deer Point Pool: Open Swim, 11 a.m. 7 p.m., Mon. Fri., 10 a.m. 6 p.m., Sat. & Sun. Friday, November 1st 11 a.m -1p.m., Free bowling, Marblehead Bowling Lanes. 7 p.m. Midnight, Friday Extreme Bowling, Marble head Lanes. Saturday, November 2nd 6:30a.m., 10K NEX Appreciation Day Run GJ Denich Gymnasium. 9:30 a.m. 6p.m. NEX, Appreciation Day; prize drawings throughout the Day. 1 p.m., Chili Cook-Off, NEX. 5:30 p.m., Grand Prize Drawing (Orlando, Fla. Trip), NEX. 6 p.m., Oktoberfest, MWR Sailing Center. Sunday, November 3rd 12 6 p.m., JTF-GTMO Social Gathering, Windmill Beach. 1 6 p.m., Extreme Bowling, Marblehead Lanes 6:30 p.m., Bingo, Windjammer Club. 7p.m. Chess Tournament, Main CBQ Liberty Center. Monday, November 4th 8 a.m. Noon, Adult Ceramic Classes, Ceramic Shop. Tuesday, November 5th Open swims. Wednesday, November 6th 9 11 a.m., Adult Advanced Pottery Classes, Ceram ics Shop. 7 p.m. Bowling Party, Marblehead Lanes. 8 p.m., Karaoke, Windjammer Club. Thursday, November 7th 11 a.m. Midnight, Bowling, Marblehead Lanes. 6 p.m., Bowling League, Marblehead Lanes. A little more than a month ago, I came to Guantanamo Bay for the first time, and saw that the military and civilians living and work ing on this base were using privately owned vehicles (POVs), Navy Exchange (NEX) rental vehicles, government-owned vehicles (GOV), and the bus system to move around the Naval Base. People who ride the bus know that much time can be spent waiting for the next sched uled bus to rotate to your stop. But it doesnt always have to be this way. As most people who ride the bus or walk have seen there are a large number of govern ment-owned vehicles moving around the base with one or two people in them. And, for some reason, the occupants of these vehicles do not feel the need to show a little courtesy and ask either the people without vehicles if they need a ride, despite the fact that often, the persons in the vehicles and those walking or waiting for the bus stop are going to the same general location. Common courtesy goes a long way to mak ing life better for everyone. Offering someone a ride, even if they decline that offer, shows that those who have the privilege to drive a vehicle care about those who do not have the same privilege. It also reinforces the mindset that we are all part of one joint task force, accomplish ing one mission one team, one fight. The bottom line is that everyone needs to be willing to help out the next guy. And those who have, help out the have-nots. So show a little courtesy. If youre traveling in a empty vehicle, and see someone walking like they have somewhere they have to be, or someone is at a bus top looking at each vehicle passing by as if theyd like a ride, stop. Its as simple as leaning toward the window and ask ing if they are going in the same direction as you and if they need a ride. They might say no, but at least you asked. After all, the person to whom you offer that ride might just be the person who helps you work an issue or project tomorrow, next week or a month or two from now. Thats my viewpoint. It wont change the world, but it could make life better for a few people, and in the end, it is the right thing to do. Think about it! Submitted by Army Sgt. Maj. Ruben Maestas Keep rising to the top Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Melissa Steinman of Port Security Unit 307 gives a young climber the encouragement needed to make it to the top of the rock-climbing wall at the Halloween festivities held at the Paintball Range on Saturday. The event brought together young members of the GTMO community and JTF volunteers for a costume contest, hayride, pumpkin-patch scavenger hunt, food and fun. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Common courtesy on wheels Page 3 Friday, November 1, 2002 Dental Technicians Navy Seaman Jimiel B. Simmons I have been a dental techni cian for about three years. Being at GTMO is great because you get to meet everyone on the island. Sooner or later, everyone has to go through the dental office. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jaymie Brinkmeier I really love being a dental technician, but the most excit ing part of my job is working in the operating room. It feels great helping people and mak ing them feel better. That is what drives me. Navy Seaman Nader I. Warah Being a technician is a step ping stone for me I want to become a dentist. I love this job because I like to see beau tiful, healthy smiles. I want to be the tech that is going to revolutionize the dental field. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tommie Crumedy Being a dental technician at GTMO has changed my life. Even though we are short of technicians right now, this has forced us to depend even more on one another. There is great teamwork at the office. The dental technicians at the Navy Hospital keep big, bright smiles on the faces of the Guantanamo Bay community. Its their job to take care of all of the Defense Department civilians, contract workers, ser vicemembers and family members on the island. This is not an easy task, but the eight-man crew of dental technicians work hard and work together to complete their mission. We are short on dental technicians right now, but because we work together we are able to get the job done, said Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tommie Crumedy. These hard-charging dental technicians want patients take steps to prevent cavities. Dental health care is an every day thing. Brush and floss every day to prevent cavities, or let the dental technicians fix you up its your choice! Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy Seaman Nader I. Warah looks at a patient's pearly whites and inspects his job after putting in a tooth filling. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tommie Crumedy gets a patient ready for a panoramic X-ray on the 2002 CC Proline machine. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Pamella O. Mason I work with the gums and the supporting structure of the mouth. I love my job and I love taking care of people. I want people to make sure they floss daily so they can preserve their beautiful smiles.

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Page 2 Friday, November 1, 2002 JTF-GTMO Command Commander: Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Air Force Lt. Col. Eduardo Villavicencio OIC, 361st Public Affairs Detachment: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5426 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detachment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-GTMO. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Depart ment of Defense or the personnel within. As the interim Command Sgt. Maj. of JTF-GTMO, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of our servicemembers for their hard work and dedication to the vital mission that we perform here. I would like to remind all service members that each one of us is a men tor at one time or another knowingly or not. Therefore, it is imperative that we always try to do our best to set a positive example for others to follow, because you never know whom you may be mentoring. As some of us prepare for rede ployment, be reminded that it takes a team effort to keep all of us safe. Although this will be a time that more tasks may be added, remember that the rule is mission first, but safety always. Always use the buddy system. Thank you. JTF-GTMO Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony D. Clayton Chaplains Corner Navigators speak of a three point fix in order to be able to plot a reliable posi tion on a chart. A principle of discernment is spiri tual triangulation. Like navigation, if the distances from 3 different points intersect one another, we can be sure that we have discerned correctly. Its some thing like taking a navigational fix or lining up three dots on a plank to cut it straight. Spiritually, the three points needed together are: 1. Gods objective moral law, revealed in Sacred Scripture, apostolic Tradition and the present day Churchs authoritative interpretation of it; 2. The situation God providentially arranges for you; 3. The testimony of your own informed conscience, especially the inner peace that is a mark of the Spirits presence. To discern alone by: 1. Objective law is to run aground on legalism; 2. Situations is to drift aimlessly into relativism; 3. Individual conscience alone is to sink into subjectivism. To discern by lining up all three points at the same time is to be prudent. It is the only way to stay as close to the track as we can. The ancient Argonauts said: To navigate is precise; to live is not pre cise. We need all the help we can get, so spiritual triangulation is a great navi gational aid in the voyage of life. Submitted by Navy Lt. Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, USNR Reporting Motor Vehicle Accidents Provost Marshals Office All accidents or collisions involving motor vehicles need to be reported to the Guantanamo Bay Naval Station Police in a timely manner. In case of major accidents, the police will be notified immediately to insure that proper medical care is afforded to the injured. Except when it is necessary to notify the police or treat the injured, no person or vehicle may leave the scene of an accident or collision involving the fol lowing: -Death or personal injury -When damage to government prop erty is estimated to be in excess of $100.00 -When damage to personal property is estimated to be in excess of $500.00. In case of minor accidents, the police will be notified within 24 hours. Remember that overtaking or passing vehicles traveling in the same direction is prohibited at Guantanamo Bay. You may pass slow-moving vehicles or heavy equipment only when they have moved to the extreme right shoulder of the roadway. Follow all traffic regulations and always buckle up for your safety. Army Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-GTMO Spiritual Navigation Credit Management Class The Fleet and Family Support Center will be conducting a Credit Management class on November 6, 2002. The class runs from 11a.m. to noon in the Fleet and Family Support Center's training classroom. Interested? Please call 4141 to have your name added to the roster. Page 11 Friday, November 1, 2002 Hospital wins v-ball season opener Naval Hospital took the opening match of the GTMO volleyball season, sinking Port Security Unit 307 in two sets, 25-21 and 2515. Tuesday night at G.J. Denich gym. The highly anticipated volleyball season started off with a bang. The two teams both played well, but in the end, Naval Hospital was the stronger team. The first set started out evenly matched. They were tied at four until Navy Petty Offi cer 3rd Class Tommie Crumedy scored six straight points with his powerful serve. This put Naval Hospital in a comfortable position. They led the set 9-4. After that the two teams exchanged a few points. PSU 307s weakness in the game was returning the serve. Naval Hospital saw that and took advantage. PSU 307 was not able to stop Navy Hospi tal contract worker Hughleslie Skyer who scored the last eight points of the first set. Skyers awesome serve was unstoppable in the first set. PSU 307 didnt have an answer for it. PSU 307 fought and clawed back, but they were too far behind in the set. Hospital took the first set by a score of 25-21. The teams switched sides and were ready to do battle once again. It was do or die for PSU 307. They didnt want to lose. They had to match the intensity Naval Hospital had in the game. But it seemed every bounce was going go Naval Hospitals way. We were playing too tentatively and we were hoping things would go our way, said Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Brad T. Starks. We had to make things happen. We needed to be more aggressive on the court. We had to fight and really want to win. PSU 307 scored the first point in the set, but soon it became clear that wanting wasnt enough. Navy Hospital came back with three points on Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jahleel Browns serve, and this set the tone of the game. PSU 307 wouldnt give up they kept on fighting. The teams exchanged points on the next couple of serves until the streaky Naval Hospital put four more points on the score board. This worried PSU 307. Starks came up to serve and took matters into his own hands. He scored three points to make it 9-8. This was a momentum builder for the PSU team, which was able to tie the set at 10. The look on some of the Naval Hospitals players was one of concern. But Naval Hospital regained their compo sure. Brown looked confident and was ready to serve. He threw the ball up and slapped the volleyball to the middle of the defense. PSU 307 wasnt able to return the serve. Brown scored two more points to lead PSU 307 14-11. I was able to pick out the weakest link in the defense, so I would serve it there. Once you pick out the weakest link, you keep on drilling it there, said Brown. Naval Hospital continued with their highpowered offense. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Mark Hammel scored eight straight points to put the nail in the coffin for PSU 307. That onslaught destroyed any chance of PSU 307s coming back in the match. Crumedy scored the last three to seal the victory over PSU 307, 25-15. We started kind of slow, but we are work ing on our game, said Brown. We are going to have a strong team by the end of the sea son. We are just tuning up. Wait and see: Naval Hospital will be a team to be reckoned with in the league. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jahleel Brown goes up for the volleyball and spikes it for one of his eight points in the victory over PSU 307 in the season opener Tuesday night at G. J. Denich Gym. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jahleel Brown and Eugene S. Alexander almost collide returning a serve.

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Finally! The day has come when youre going back home, returning to those you left behind so many moons ago. Yes, this is the day youve been waiting for, reuniting with spouses, children, and loved ones. But brace yourself, servicemember, there may be some unexpected changes in the life you left when you departed and landed on GTMO. Troops deployed to Guantanamo Bay in support of operation Enduring Freedom left behind friends, loved ones, and careers to self lessly fulfill their obligation to defend our nation in these chaotic and unstable times. As the days of their service go by here on the island where time seems to stand still, its easy to forget that the world outside has been mov ing at a business-as-usual pace. Although the men and women serving in GTMO have not waged war and carried fallen comrades off the field, they may still find that returning to the real world leaves them feeling out of place. Just because GTMO is not a hot zone and troops stationed here arent dodging bul lets doesnt mean that they will return home unaffected by their time here or smoothly adjust to the changes at home, said Army Maj. Sharon M. Newton, OIC 85th Combat Stress Control, Fort Hood, Texas. Weve found that redeploying back home is actually more stressful than deploying from home. Some soldiers feel the anxiety of not knowing what to expect upon their return, or they expect to go back and pick up where they left off they hope to resume their normal rou tine, when things may have changed quite a bit, she said. Story by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire How to deal with the stress of redeploying back to the life you left behind See GOING HOME, page 5 Page 6 Page 3 Page 11 Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-GTMO and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. So youre going home... Friday, November 1, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 21 A look inside... Beat Who ? Army Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey, center, is outnumbered but not outranked Thursday as Cheryl L. Lewis, left, and Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn help the JTF-GTMO commander get into the fighting spirit as they each pull for their branch of service in the upcoming Army-Navy football game. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Page 12 Friday, November 1, 2002 with Spc. Mario Lozoya 346th MP Company Q: Spc. Mario Lozoya, wel come to 15 Minutes of Fame! Tell us a little about yourself. A: Well, I am 22, and a stu dent. I study theatre back in Kansas and I am down here with the 346th MP Co. I am also a selfproclaimed computer nerd. Q: What classifies you as a computer nerd? A: I dunno. I guess because I immerse myself into the charac ters in my computer games. Q: Okay, so you told me once upon a time that you are loud and boisterous. What is a good exam ple of this? A: Wednesday night mayhem at the Windjammer, otherwise known as Karaoke Night. The loud part usually happens after I warm up and lose my inhibitions. Q: Interesting. So how do the Karaoke King and his faithful crew entertain themselves on just a regular day? A: Theres a little brotherly war going on between us and the other hooch next to us. Its pretty crazy. They throw pebbles at us...we throw bigger ones back. Its been going on for weeks now. Q: It seems to me that you never get bored, Spc. Lozoya. A: Believe it. Sometimes I try to entertain myself by speaking to my bunk pillow. Like the vol leyball in Cast Away. And no, I havent named the pillow yet. Q: So, I know you probably want to be a rock star, right? If you formed a band here, what would the name be? A: Nothing to do with GTMO, fa-sure. But I would probably give the members cool names like Iguana Steve on bass and Banana Rat Danny on drums. And my DJ would be Hoochmaster Mike. Q: Cool. So, are you a lean, mean MP-ing machine? A: Nah, more like a supply machine. Im a supply clerk. Q: Whats your motto; Leaping through toilet paper rolls in one single bound? A: Yo, thats messed up! But I can take it, though. Everyones got jokes! Q: Whats the best part about GTMO? A: Cheap entertainment. Period. Q: If you had to describe your self as a musical instrument, what would it be and why? A: Thats a tough one. Um...got it. A kazoo. And why? Because when you play one, they are lots of fun, full of hot air and you really never know what is gonna come out till its over. Sorta like me. I never know whats coming outta my mouth until its already out. Q: Is there anyone you idol ize? A: Yeah, sort of a cross between Kurt Cobain and Richard Pryor. Q: Wow, thats a freaky combo. Why a cross between those two? A: Well, Kurt was very tal ented and Mr. Pryor was a funny brother. Id sorta like to end up somewhere in the middle. Q: If you ran the world, what would you do differently? I for one would say kids around the world can have JELL-O Pudding Pops for breakfast. How about you? A: Free pizza for all. I would do away with the soup kitchens and start handing out free pies. You just go in and say to the fat guy in the dirty apron, No soup for me today, Joey, Ill take a meat-loving pan. Q: Huh? A: Hey, its a start. Q: If you could market your self as Mario the Rock Star, what would be the first item you would want mass-produced? A: Id like to package Marios Annoying Noise maker. You know those little things with the balls on them that go up and down that you win from Chuck E. Cheeses? You always see that one kid who cant grasp the concept to make it work. I would LOVE to see my face on one of those! Q: Hmm. What do you do to beat the routine here? A: Well, the hooch war, of course. And I like to play the gui tar, call home, listen to the ocean breezes, take long walks on the beach... Q: Dude, this is not an ad for a dating service! Any last words for new people coming to GTMO? A: Dont go insane from the routine here try to have a vari ety. There is more here than meets the eye. Spc. Mario Lozoya strikes up a tune to entertain himself and his hooch buddies in his Camp America SEAhut. Interview and photo by Spc. Ivey N. Hodges Special to The Wire The King of Karaoke 15 Minutes of Fame...