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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00074
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: October 25, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00074

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At 4:00 Tuesday morning, photojournalist Larry Price is sitting in an idling van on Sher man Ave., waiting for joggers. In newspaper jargon we call this roaming, he says. Just going out, looking for pictures. Suddenly, Master Sgt. Donald W. Iafrate appears around the bend. Price gets out, sets up his shot. In the early-morning dark, the street signs and Iafrates reflector belt are glowing in the vans headlights; the bend in the road near the motor pool is set off by a column of palm trees. Price snaps a few. That might work, he says. He climbs back in, and the van pulls out. The search for shots begins again. Price, a freelance photojournalist and a man aging photo editor of the Denver Post, was at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base this week as part of the worldwide photojournalistic project A Day in the Life of the Military. The planned coffee-table tome is the latest in an ongoing series that began in 1981 with A Day in the Life of America and has covered countries, from Australia to Africa to the former Soviet Union. Until now. As Price was canvassing GTMO Tuesday, over 100 of Americas top photojournalists were each doing their own roaming at mili tary installations all over the world, from Bagram Air Force Base to Diego Garcia to Fort Bragg, each hoping their shots would be one (or more) of the 300-plus photos to be included in the finished book, due to be published by HarperCollins in April. Price figured he got a choice assignment. This place is so topical right now, he said. Im sure to get at least a few in. Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire A Day in the Life Of... series comes around to the military...and GTMO Photojournalist Larry Price snaps away as soldiers undergoing non-lethal weapons training stage a mock advance at Camp America on Tuesday. Price toured GTMO Tuesday as part of the Day in the Life of the Mil itary project, a coffee-table book featuring photographs of some 100 military installations around the world. See DAY IN LIFE, page 5 Page 10 P a ge 8 Page 15 Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-GTMO and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. GTMOs day in pictures Friday, October 25, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 20 A look inside... Page 16 Friday, October 25, 2002 with Navy IT2 Elisabeth N. Favorite Naval Computer Telecommunications Area Master Station Q: Hi! Welcome to 15 Min utes of Fame! Tell me a little about yourself. A: Thank you! My name is Elisabeth Naomi Favorite. Im originally from Myrtle Beach, S.C. Ive been in the Navy for four years. Im an Information Systems Technician, 2nd Class. GTMO is my first and only duty station. Q: Wow, you came here right out of school. So, how do you like it here? A: Ive been here 42 months. Its been great, but its time to go. Im headed to a ship outside of Norfolk the U.S.S. Bulkeley. Q: Oh, is that the same A: Yes, the same Rear Admiral Bulkeley as in Bulkeley Hall. Q: So, how old are you? Do you plan to stay in the Navy until retirement? A: Im 24. My plan is to stay in the Navy two more years, then go to college full time to become a doctor. Q: Thats great! Have you always wanted to study medi cine? A: Yes, thats always been my goal, from childhood. Q: Did you do well in school? A: I excelled in math. Q: Have your math skills helped you in your job here? A: No, not really. Q: Tell me about your job. Whats it like? A: As an information techni cian, my primary goal is to medi ate message traffic throughout the Navy. Im involved in supervis ing the message traffic and cir cuits for all communications e-mail, phone, Internet, etc. Inside and outside of GTMO. Im not too into computers, but I do like my job. Its not a bad field to be in. Q: Do you feel that you were prepared for the job you are doing after Basic Training? A: Yes, I do. In the nine weeks we were trained, I do believe I was prepared. Q: Only nine weeks? Not too long. Okay, now for a different type of question: Youre stranded on a desert island for the rest of your life with only one book to read. What would it be? A: Disappearing Acts by Terry McMillan. Shes my favorite author. Ive already read the book three times. Q: Whats your favorite song? A: I like Gangsta Lovin by Eve. I like the rough part of being in love. Q: Oh, so its the lyrics that attracted you? A: And I definitely love the video! Q: In your opinion, whats the greatest movie ever made? A: I love The Green Mile. Q: Okay, taking another direc tion... If you could go on vacation to someplace youve never been, where would you go? A: Paris, France! Q: Prior to being in the mili tary, had you ever traveled over seas? A: I took a senior cruise to Mexico and stopped at Cozumel. I loved it! It was only three days. I would like to take a week of vacation somewhere outside of the U.S. Q: Im sure youll get to do that soon. A: I definitely want to take advantage of going to Germany and all of Europe. I want to see the rest of the world. Q: If you went beyond 15 minutes of fame to just being famous, what would you like to be known for? A: For being natural. People dont need to remake themselves through surgery. You can look the way you want to look. Work hard, eat right and you can do it. Q: Thats very positive! If you could be assured of one thing in life besides money, what would it be? A: Love! Q: Ah! Youre a romantic. Who has had the greatest impact on you outside of a family mem ber? A: My best friend, Carolyn Stevenson. Shes really helped me to mature. Shes been with me the entire time Ive been here. Q: How would she describe you? A: Kind, pleasant, fun to be around. Then when its time to get serious, I get down to business. I keep it real, always. Q: If you had to describe the single most important thing youve learned, what would it be? A: Always respect your par ents. Youre always going to go back home, and youll always need them. Q: Any last words to the peo ple of GTMO? Youre going to be leaving the island in a few weeks. A: Please come to my farewell party! Its at Phillips Park on November 1st from 9 until! Navy IT2 Elisabeth N. Favorite well on her way to achieving some lofty goals. Interview and photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire These are a few of her Favorite things 15 Minutes of Fame...

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Page 2 Friday, October 25, 2002 JTF-GTMO Command Commander: Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Air Force Lt. Col. Eduardo Villavicencio OIC, 361st Public Affairs Detachment: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5426 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detachment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Multicultural Day Celebration Sunday, October 27, 2002 1-5 p.m. at Phillips Park Sponsored by Naval Station and Naval Hospital For more information, contact: Cathy Bautista 7-2450 Andrea Petrovanie 7-2033 New procedures for ordering supplies Effective October 15, 2002, each section will appoint a primary and alternate supply representative. The supply representatives will be designated on DA FORM 1687 (Sig nature Card). The original will be turned in to Customer Service at the warehouse (Bldg 611). One copy stays with the section and one copy will be turned in to Spc. Forstie (J4). This person will now be able to submit purchase orders (expendable and nonexpendable) through Customer Service. Expendable/consumable items are the usual office supplies that most now receive through the J4 section at the CDC. To request these items, the supply representative will fill out JLSG-ECS FORM 1 and submit it to the Customer Service clerk at Bldg 611. Items currently on-hand will be issued. Requisi tions will be submitted for non-stocked or zero balance items. Non-expendable/non-consumable items are items that can be reused such as filing cabinets, safes, engravers, and so forth. To request these items, the supply representative will fill out the Non Expendable/Consum able Request Form and submit the form through Customer Service at Bldg 611. Order status will be available after item is requisitioned. Customer Service operation hours are Monday through Friday from 8a.m. 4p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 8a.m. noon. The point of contact for Customer Service is QM1 Lamberson at x3002. For any ques tions regarding this matter, please contact Capt. Kost at x3073. Submitted by Air Force Capt. Wesley E. Manship Jr, Deputy J-4, JTFGTMO Chaplains Corner A little boy wanted to meet God. He knew it was a long trip to where God lived, so he packed his suitcase with Twinkies and a six-pack of root beer. When he had gone about three blocks, he met an old man who was sitting in the park staring at some pigeons. The boy sat next to him and opened his suitcase. He was about to take a drink from his root beer when he noticed the old man looked hungry. So he offered him a Twinkie. The old man gratefully accepted it and smiled at him. His smile was so pleasant that the boy wanted to see it again. So he offered him a root beer. Again, he smiled at him. The boy was delighted! They sat there all afternoon eat ing and smiling, but they never said a word. As it grew dark, the boy realized how tired he was and he got up to leave. But before he had gone more than a few steps, he turned around, ran back to the old man, and gave him a hug. He gave the boy his biggest smile ever! When the boy opened the door to his own house a short time later, his mother was sur prised by the look of joy on his face. She asked him, What did you do today that made you so happy? He replied, I had lunch with God. Before his mother could respond, he added, You know what? Hes got the most beauti ful smile Ive ever seen! Meanwhile the old man returned to his home. His son also saw the look of joy on his fathers face. So he asked, Dad, what did you do today that made you so happy? I ate Twinkies in the park with God. You know, hes much younger than I expected. Too often we underestimate the power of a smile, a kind act, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring all of which have the potential to turn a life around. People come into our lives for a rea son, for a season, or for a lifetime. Embrace all equally! Have lunch with God today! Submitted by Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Raymond A. Tetreault, JTF-GTMO Guidelines for tactical vehicle use Provost Marshals Office The guidelines for the use of Tactical and Non-tactical vehicles by members of JTF GTMO are outlined in Policy letter #3, Requirements for Traveling in Tacti cal and Non-Tactical Vehicles. The policy letter states in part that driv ers and passengers of Tactical vehicles must wear Kevlar helmets and appropriate military uniforms when the vehicle is operated off the paved roadway. When tactical vehicles are operated on paved roadways at GTMO, drivers may wear the Army Physical Fitness Training Uniform, while the passengers may wear civilian clothing, provided the clothing is in accordance with Policy letter #7, Civilian Clothes Policy. Approved parking areas for Tactical vehicles are the dirt parking lots behind McDonalds, the USMC Headquarters building, the G.J. Denich Gymnasium, and the Windward Loop housing area. Drivers and passengers must wear safety belts at all times. Drivers will use ground guides when backing up tactical vehicles. Engage the parking brake and deploy the chock-blocks when the vehicles are parked. Army Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-GTMO Meeting God Page 15 Friday, October 25, 2002 W.T. Sampson rolls over MPs W. T. Sampson improved their record to 50 by beating the 571st Military Police Com pany Tuesday night on Cooper Field and remains perfect on the soccer field. The 2-0 victory over the MPs put the Lady Pirates of W. T. Sampson High School ahead in the standings by two games. The Lady Pirates came out aggressively on the field. They wanted to score early in the game and put pressure on the soccer ball. Their aim was to make the 571st MP Co.s goalkeeper, Spc. Angela Neal, work. But Neal was up to the challenge. She was holding her own behind the net. She was like a brick wall. She didnt let anything go by her. Neal was keeping the 571st MP Co. in the game. The 571st MP Co. couldnt get into their offense because of all the pressure on the soccer ball. The Lady Pirates kept the ball on the 571st MP Co.s side of the field. This made it very hard to get their offense in sync. So, they had to rely on their defense to stop the onslaught by the Lady Pirates. They had four shots on goal before eighth grader Page Gann spotted senior Rachel Johann open by the net. Gann timed the pass perfectly and Johann kicked it into the net for the goal. They took the 1-0 lead to half time. The Lady Pirates had control of the game. In the second half the Lady Pirates seemed very confident, because they had more players on the team. They substituted more than the 571st MP Co. The MPs had only eight players on the roster. This was a big advantage going into the second half. The 571st MP Co. would eventually run out of gas, though, and succumb to the Lady Pirates iron will. As the game progressed, the 571st MP Co.s defense was getting sloppy and they were being called on a lot of penalties. One of the penalties led to a penalty kick, which Gann nailed to the left side of the net for a goal. The game was now 2-0. The Lady Pirates were on their way to another victory in the soccer league. It seems like the teams in the league are playing more defense than offense against us. They are playing more defense to keep us from scoring, but the benefit we have in the league is that we have more players than the other teams,said Coach Buddy Gann. Most teams have less than eight players on the roster. They were getting tired in the first half and I figured they would be very tired by the second half. So, we kept attacking the goal. We have good players and they are young and have fresh legs. We are able to wear teams out, said Coach Gann. Because the Lady Pirates are a young team, coach Gann always communicates and makes sure his team knows what is important in the game of soccer. Keep your head in the game and play the game because it is fun, said Coach Gann. I am surprised to be 5-0, but the girls have played together and practice hard. Because of the win they will have a day off. I am happy with them and they have been doing a good job on the field, said Coach Gann. Being in first place is not enough for the Lady Pirates. They feel they can improve in all areas of the game. It is great to be undefeated, but we need to work on our headers and left footers, said Gann. The Lady Pirates now have a strong hold on the competition. With only three games left in the season, they have a pivotal game against Navy Hospital Tuesday night. A win could mean clinching first place in the upcoming tournament. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Page Gann from W. T. Sampson scores a goal on a penalty kick in the second half to win 2-0 Tuesday night. Soccer standings Womens soccer W. T. Sampson 5-0 Hospital 3-2 571st MP Co. 1-4 NAVSTA 1-4 W. T. Sampsons senior Rachel Johann (R) battles with a defender from 571st MP Co. for the soccer ball.

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Page 3 Friday, October 25, 2002 Laboratory Technicians Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Micah S. Webb GTMO is a really cool place to work because you get a variety of different cases. I was always intrigued about why people get sick and how can they be helped. Being a lab technician is a perfect field to feed my curiosity. The laboratory can help you find out why people get sick and how to cure them. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Kisham R. Harripersad Lab tech is an amazing field to be in, because if you enjoy medicine and the medical field you can learn a lot about how the human body functions. Being able to detect different ailments in the blood work and giving the proper diag nose for a patient makes it easier to find a cure for them. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Rosemarie T. Minaya I have been a laboratory technician since 1992 and my specialty is microbiol ogy. I like working with different organisms that try to attack the human body. I learned how to treat and kill different infections with different antibiotics. I enjoy my job and it is very challenging. There is never a dull moment at the laboratory. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Kizzy Duncan I work in the blood bank section of the laboratory and I feel it is the most critical section, because if I give someone the wrong blood type it can kill them. I am on call 24 hours a day. I like my job because from one minute to the next there is always something exciting happening at the laboratory. No germ or infection is safe with the human body detectives on the job. These highly trained laboratory technicians use microscopes and machines to help them fight the war against deadly organisms. They have trained intensely for a year in the Navys finest training facilities across the country. They can spot any change in the human body and can see the cause of any ailment through blood samples. If there is something wrong with you, they will find it. Blood is like a map. It gives a good under standing of what is going on at that time in the body. It gives you a better understanding of how the body functions, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Kisham R. Harripersad. So germs, be afraid. Be very afraid. The labora tory technicians of GTMO are coming for you! Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Kisham R. Harripersad analyzes a patients urine samples on a microscope to properly diagnose the ailment. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Micah S. Webb inserts blood samples into a bloodcount machine to determine the number of red and white blood cells. Page 14 Friday, October 25, 2002 From GTMO to Puerto Rico The Mens Soccer season will start Monday, Oct. 28 and the Womens Soccer season will start Tuesday, Oct. 29. Please contact Capt. Gormly at 5249 or Maj. Buchanan at 5255 for more information. Daily free daytime & evening lessons are available for sailing, kayaking, and motor boating at Pelican Pete's Marina. Aerobics Classes, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 6 a.m. 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., and 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Tues. and Thurs. 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Tae-Kwon Do, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., and 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. (one hour classes) Tues. and Thurs. 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. 1-on-1 Spinning Classes, G.J. Denich Gym, Mon.Thurs., 6:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Yoga Classes, Tues. Thurs. 5:15 p.m. 6:15 p.m., GJ Denich GymYoga Center. Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, Mon. Fri., 11 a.m. Midnight. Pool Hours: Marine Hill Pool: Open Swim, 6 a.m. -6 p.m., daily; Windjammer Pool: Lap Swim, 6 a.m. 8 a.m., Mon. Sat., Open Swim, 10 a.m. 6 p.m. daily .; Deer Point Pool: Open Swim, 11 a.m. 7 p.m., Mon. Fri., 10 a.m. 6 p.m., Sat. & Sun. Friday, October 25th 11 a.m. 1p.m., Free bowling, Marblehead Bowling Lanes. 7 p.m. 12 a.m., Friday Extreme Bowling, Marble head Lanes. Saturday, October 26th 6:30 a.m., Hospital Walk for Cancer, U.S. NAVBASE Hospital. 6 p.m. Bowling Party, Marblehead Lanes. Sunday, October 27th 1 p.m. 6 p.m., Extreme Bowling, Marblehead Lanes 6:30 p.m., Bingo, Windjammer Club. Monday, October 28th 8 a.m. 12 p.m., Adult Ceramic Classes, Ceramic Shop. Tuesday, October 29th 6:30 p.m., Bingo, Windjammer Club. 7 p.m. Table Tennis Tournament, Main CBQ Liberty Center Wednesday, October 30th 9 a.m. 11 a.m., 6 p.m. 9 p.m. Adult Advanced Pottery Classes, Ceramics Shop. 8 p.m., Karaoke, Windjammer Club. Thursday, October 31st 11 a.m. 12 a.m., Bowling, Marblehead Lanes. 6 p.m., Bowling Party, courtesy of CBQ Liberty Center. Servicemembers who are in GTMO long enough eventually accrue enough days on the ground to entitle them to go on leave. While many people choose to use their allotted ten days to go back home, a quick hop over to nearby Naval Station Roosevelt Roads in Puerto Rico may be a fun alternative. For servicemembers who decide that theyd like to spend their leave exploring the island of Puerto Rico, here are a few tips to keep in mind. Flights leave from the Leeward side of GTMO to Roosey Roads weekly on Tuesdays and Fridays. Flights return on Wednesdays and Satur days. When signing up for a seat on a space available basis, its important to get ones name on the list early. Flights to and from Roosey Roads are rarely packed, but dont risk getting left behind. The day before the scheduled flight, one must sign out with J-1, surrender ones I.D. badge, and contact the air terminal to have ones name placed on the passenger list. A nominal tax/inspection fee must be paid to get on a Space A flight. The cost going to Puerto Rico is $23.80 and the price to return is $12.80. The flight to Puerto Rico is about one hour and 20 minutes. Beverage and a snack are offered. Seating on the flight to Puerto Rico was open on my flight, so when I politely asked the flight attendants if I could take an open seat in first class, there was no problem. Upon arrival in Puerto Rico a representative from Avis RentA-Car met me at the terminal. Its almost mandatory to rent a car if one plans to leave Roosey Roads at all. Roosey Roads is in the town of Ceiba on Puerto Ricos eastern coast. If ones ultimate destination is San Juan on the islands north coast, even a oneway rental of $29 for a subcom pact car makes a lot of sense, given that a cab ride to the same destination can cost upwards of $60! My guidebooks had hinted strongly that driving in Puerto Rico might prove hectic, but I had little trouble. The highway signage could have been better in some places, but the traffic, though fast, was light for rush hour on a Tuesday. Most of the traffic was heading away from San Juan. I was relaxing in a huge room at the Wyndham El San Juan in the Isla Verde section of Puerto Ricos capital about an hour after leaving the naval base. After a quick shower I explored the hotel and the sur rounding area. Isla Verde is a classy, upscale neighborhood, full of large hotels with casinos and many restaurants and night clubs. I didnt feel nervous walk ing the streets, but like in any large city, its best to remain alert in unfamiliar surroundings. For dinner, I settled on Lupis, a Mexican chain restaurant. One dissapointing aspect of my Puerto Rico trip was the fact that I had to diligently search for authentic island cuisine. Every where I turned there was a Burger King or a Wendys. I spent the next day exploring Old San Juan, the section of the city dating back to the time of the islands first governor, Ponce de Leon. This quaint neighborhood has a lot to offer the sightseer and shopper. On Calle Fortaleza (Fortaleza Street) I discovered a strip of reasonably priced jewelry shops, and I was able to pick up some rings and necklaces that will make excellent Christmas gifts. As can be expected, there were quite a few tacky tourist gift shops around where you can pick up refrigerator magnets, tshirts and shot glasses, but you can also find paintings, statues and carved wooden masks in this area as well. Old San Juan reminded me a great deal of New Orleans with a dash of San Fran cisco thrown in. The streets were hilly and narrow, and every alleyway held the promise of something new to explore. As lunchtime approached, I avoided the temptation of fast food and found exactly what I was looking for in Cafe San Juan, a cozy hole in the wall across from Plaza Colon where a statue of Christopher Columbus stands. I wavered over sev eral choices on the menu, but ultimately went for mofongo an Afro-Puerto Rican dish of mashed plantains formed into a volcano-like shape and stuffed with chicken, beef or seafood that has been stewed with toma toes and green peppers. Delicious! In the days that fol lowed I explored Loiza, a village with a rich African heritage dat ing back to the islands colonial period, and Fajardo, a 200 yearold town that is the jumping off point for excursions to the Span ish Virgin Islands Vieques and Culebra. Fajardo was cramped and the street signs were non-existent. My halting Spanish was pushed to the limit, but I was able to get by. If one is in the mood for lob ster or paella I recommend Rosas Sea Food. Be warned I had a devil of a time finding the dead-end street its on, and they dont take reservations. All too soon my leave was up. I only made good on a mere frac tion of the grand plans I had out lined for myself the day trip to St. Thomas and the visit to the rainforest of El Yunque never materialized. The bright spot is, missing out on these opportunities has given me a thousand reasons to return to La Isla del Encanto The Island of Enchantment at the earliest opportunity. Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire The fortress of San Cristobal at sunset in Old San Juan.

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Page 4 Friday, October 25, 2002 This weeks question: What do you think is the greatest invention ever? Army Pvt. Travis Axline 1/22 Inf. Company Ive got to say women. I can never know what theyre gonna do. Navy PO3 Pamella Mason, Dental Techn. The telephone. It was there before the age of the Internet. Navy Lt. Thomas Bailey, Pharmacist Penicillin. This antibiotic saved the lives of many sick people. Army Sgt. James Stringfellow, Motor Pool Radio. Before TV, that was the only way to get news. Air Force Staff Sgt. George Fillingame, Motor Pool Airplanes. They make it easier to get around the world. Compiled by Army Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin and Spc. Jose A. Martinez Down with the wire As part of increased force protection directives,volun teers came out this week to the hillsides below the Pink Palace and the head shed to help remove and replace the razor wire sur rounding the buildings. The job of establishing a new perimiter is expected to last several weeks. Pictured from left to right are some of J-3s finest force protectors Marine Cpl. Pete Colombini, Army Sgt. Todd Taylor, Army Staff Sgt. Tom McCarthy and Spc. Kevin Laiter. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Man on the Street Page 13 Friday, October 25, 2002 DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, October 25 8 p.m. Master of Disguise, PG 80 min 10 p.m. Serving Sara, PG13 100 min Saturday, October 26 8 p.m. Spy Kids 2, PG 99 min 10 p.m. Blue Crush, PG13 104 min Sunday, October 27 8 p.m. The Ring, PG13 115 min Monday, October 28 8 p.m. Spy Kids 2, PG 99 min Tuesday, October 29 8 p.m. Blue Crush, PG13 104 min Wednesday, October 30 8 p.m. The Ring, PG13 115 min Thursday, October 31 8 p.m. Master of Disguise, PG 80 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, October 25 8 p.m. Exorcist 2000, R 121 min 10 p.m. From Hell, R 122 min Saturday, October 26 8 p.m. 13 Ghosts, R 91 min 10 p.m. Ghost World, R 111 min Sunday, October 27 8, 10 p.m. The Ninth Gate, R 113 min Monday, October 28 8 p.m. Resident Evil, R 101 min Tuesday, October 29 8 p.m. Jason X, R 93 min Wednesday, October 30 8 p.m. Murder by Numbers, R 120 min Thursday, October 31 8, 10 p.m. Panic Room, R 118 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris A bitter, sweet world this is. In a world filled with strain, I suffer no pain. Trekking through life, Full speed like a train, Through clouds and through rain, I proclaim... to succeed. Off this world I will feed, While I plant my seed. AS TIME PASSES BY, I will grow. Absorb what I can, While I teach what I know. I'll raise my head high, When it wants to hang low. And when my day comes, I'll be ready to go. Across 1 Brace oneself 6 Shrew 11 Movie 2001s talking computer 14 Winnow 15 Hip 16 Genius 17 Type of communication 18 African nation 19 Winter mo. 20 Flange 22 Talk incessantly 23 Opp. of aft 24 Highs 27 Central Intelligence Agency 29 An essential constituent of DNA 31 What Bojangles did 34 Electroencephalograph (abbr.) 35 Ordeal 36 Armed robbery 38 Animal foot 41 __-a-sketch 42 Jocund 43 Roman garments 44 Grain 45 Asian nation 46 Furniture mover 47 Female sheep 48 A representation of a chemical reaction 50 A document issued by an educational institution 54 Lodge 55 IOU part 56 Swiss-like cheese 57 Unrefined metal 59 Fall mo. 61 Succor 62 Negative battery terminal 64 Clothes pressers 68 Pole 69 Ten cent coins 70 Asian nation 71 Eye infection 72 Meager 73 Cope (2 wds.) Down 1 Fast plane 2 Equal 3 Moray 4 Always 5 Of or relating to the vocabulary 6 Frump 7 Gone 8 Capital of Morocco 9 To speak as a prophet 10 Japanese money 11 Capital of Vietnam 12 Squirrels dinner 13 Embankment 21 Not max 23 Madagascar franc (abbr.) 24 Express 25 Celebration 26 Mace 28 Hurt 30 Still 32 Telegraphic signal 33 Uncanny 37 Iranians neighbor 38 Childhood disease 39 Luminous 40 Cowboy John 42 A memory device 43 Kid 45 The other half of Jima 46 Rhythmic movements 47 Shade tree 49 Card game 50 Honeys 51 Imbecile 52 Rice farm 53 Scent 58 Adams garden 60 Leaf maker 62 Spots 63 Eastern Standard Time 65 Choose 66 Snatch 67 Foxy October 18th:

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Page 12 Friday, October 25, 2002 Eager to show a broader picture than the detention operation for which most Americans know GTMO best these days, Price made the rounds of all of the bases most photogenic spots, from the lighthouse for a sunrise over the sea to the patrolling Marines at the Northeast Gate, from a walk on the golf course to a sun set tour of GTMOs waters aboard a Boston Whaler with the Coast Guardsmen of PSU 307. The nature of this book is not so much to fixate on the military in the current political cli mate of the times, but to show the public things theyre not going to see extraordinary pic tures of ordinary events. There was no skipping Camp America, though, and Price was happy to stumble across a group of MPs and infantrymen receiving nonlethal weapons training on Camp As sunbaked gravel. Trailed by his media escort, Army Capt. Annmarie Daneker, and two military broad casters, Army Sgt. Paul Morando and Spc. Christian Farrell of the 361st Press Camp Headquarters, charged with contributing to a promotional video that will accompany the books release, Price shot breakfast at the Hos pital Galley, lunch at McDonalds and dinner at the Windjammer. He shot soldiers and sailors and Boy Scouts. And after 17 hours behind the lens, he put it all to bed with the obligatory visit to GTMOs hottest media spot, snapping the lights of Camp Delta from beyond the fence. I took about 1,000 shots in all, a weary Price said at 10:00 p.m. And I got some great stuff a Marine behind a .50-cal driving along the fenceline, the weapons training, the sunrise at the lighthouse. The highlight was probably the trip up the GTMO River. Price said the widespread Department of Defense support of the project and the sup port he got on the ground here made for a successful shoot, if a tiring one. You have to get a lot of sleep the night before, he said, but I like to work continu ously, chasing the light and just seeing pictures, and then taking them. Its a long day, he said, packing up his gear. But its been a great one. Page 5 Friday, October 25, 2002 DAY IN LIFE, from page 1 Price, on the PSU 307 boat, cruises out into Guantanamo Bay in search of the coveted sunset shot. Price shoots the moon near the lighthouse while Spc. Paul Morando, behind, films the process. Price patrols GTMOs waters aboard a PSU boat. Price lines up a shot of a Marine guard tower on the Cuban border from the deck of a PSU boat. Price strolls the fairways in search of golfers.

PAGE 6

Page 6 Friday, October 25, 2002 Page 11 Friday, October 25, 2002 (left:) Marine Sgt. Jon Grinter gives the gathered crowd a quick lesson in the history of the pres ence of the U.S. in Cuba. (below:) Marine Capt. William W. Elliott III, with wife, Mar garet, and their 11-week-old daughter Grayson, possibly the youngest person ever to walk the fenceline. (right) This sun bleached banana rat skull was just one of the many strange sights that dotted the trail from Kittery Beach to the Northeast Gate. The road goes ever on and on. The 8K stroll took approx imately two hours to complete, though from certain van tage points it looked like it would never end. At the end of the trek the walkers were treated to a glimpse of the gate that leads to communist Cuba. Ironically enough, the sign reads, Republic of Cuba, Free Territory of America. Volksmarch to Northeast Gate At 7 a.m. on Saturday, a group of nearly 100 people boarded buses at the parade grounds at Marine Hill to take part in GTMOs first North east Gate Volksmarch. Volksmarching, a popular activity in Europe, combines the best aspects of physical fitness and sightseeing. Saturdays event, a cooperative effort by Morale, Welfare and Recreation and Marine Capt. William W. Elliott III, attracted servicemembers, contractors, spouses and even a few children. The buses dropped the walkers off at the Kit tery Beach starting point at 7:30. Marine Sgt. Jon Grinter laid down the simple ground rules (drink lots of water and stay to the left of the fence) and they were off. By 9:30 even the slowest walkers had made it to the guard post by the Northeast Gate. MWRs Donnell Daniels rewarded the group with commemorative medals and some refresh ing fruits and beverages. The event concluded with Grinter giving the group a summary of how the Guantanamo Bay Naval Station came into being, complete with highlights from the days of the Cold War. After Grinters speech, the walkers took the opportunity to stare through the gate into com munist Cuba and take pictures. Then it was back to the buses and a return trip to Marine Hill. Judging by the buzz on the ride back, the next Volksmarch will be just as eagerly attended. Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire

PAGE 7

Page 7 Friday, October 25 2002 Page 10 Friday, October 25, 2002 A few weeks ago, Kvaerner workers stum bled across what looked to be a landmine while putting in a water pipe behind the LCN building. They reported their discovery to the ordnance department, which then checked out the situation for themselves and determined it was a job to be passed on to the highly trained, explosive masters of the Explosive Ordnance Disposal mobile unit 2 detachment from Roo sevelt Roads, Puerto Rico. We came down to find what looked to be live landmines hooked with live fuses, said Navy Chief Petty Officer Bradley C. Bunde. So we left them in their place and blew them up with C4. Its as simple as that. If any suspected explosives are discovered at Guantanamo Bay, these guys get the word, then come down and blow it up. Not a bad gig. We come here any time there is an emer gency about ordnance popping up. We deter mine what the supposed ordnance is, and what has to be done with it to ensure the protection of all individuals and property, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Mike R. Adams of the EOD mobile unit 2. We also perform range sweeps for any unexploded ordnance such as grenades, assault rockets, mortars and general-purpose bombs,said Adams. Could it be that every individual here at Guantanamo Bay should walk around in fear of stepping on a landmine and blowing them selves up, and possibly a buddy as well? It turns out, where the mine was found used to be a training area for practice mines, said Bunde. So probably not. These guys are smart and know a lot about explosives and how to handle them. After 56 weeks of training, who wouldnt be? Not everyone can make it into this field of work, said Bunde. It takes the highest cal iber of an individual to get through the train ing. Only the highly motivated make it to be highly trained. A normal task of the EOD mobile unit 2 detachment is making regularly scheduled voyages to GTMO to retrieve unexploded ordnance from the dif ferent ranges. When ever a range is in use, ordnance workers are nearby keeping an accurate account of all of the ordnance mal functions. We keep record of all the duds that dont go off at the ranges here, said Navy Sea man Nathan J. Drollman, GTMO ordnance department. Then we pass our information on the EOD team. Duds are accounted for, said Bunde. Then our job is to search for them, find them, pile them up and take care of them. In the past, we were reporting here once every three months, said Adams. But now with JTF here, there is a lot of ordnance train ing going on, so there are bound to be duds. According to Adams, there is an average dud rate of around 20% on U.S. ordnance. Dealing with things that could just blow up and rip someone into pieces isnt a job that many would be eager to take. But these guys display much pride in what they do and always play it cautiously. We use extreme safety doing range sweeps and demolition operations because of the danger factor, said Bunde. With duds, the threat is even more heightened because explosives are built to go off, and when they dont, theres a problem. Things could even be worse than whats originally expected. We know to be careful about all ord nance, said Adams. We go out in search of mines with a two-man team and use an ord nance locator, which is almost like a metal detector for explosives. Whenever live ordnance is found, we have to get rid of it, said Bunde. If we can blow it up where it is, thats what well do. The simplest thing to do is leave ordnance where its found resting, place C4 on it and blow it up, said Adams. But if the explo sives are near any important structures, we will proceed by moving them safely and then blowing them up somewhere else with up to 150lb of net explosive weight, configured together in one pile. When boldly trekking the ranges, these troops are expecting to find the goods, but in the GTMO backcountry while performing a mine sweep, the odds arent so well known. We found a bunch of mines during a mine sweep Wednesday that had to be at least ten years old, said Adams. They were home made with U.S. military fuses on them. And there are more of them out there. You never know what Castro could have placed out there, said Bunde. And these explosive experts have some good advice for all of the people who want to keep all of their body parts in one piece. If you see ordnance, dont mess with it or move it, said Bunde. Just get a good mark on it and call ordnance. If you spot anything out of the ordinary, call security, said Adams. Dont take it into your own hands. When it comes down to it, leave it to the guys who wont blow it. We got what it takes to get the job done, said Adams. Dont mess with explosives, said Bunde. Its not worth your life. During a mine sweep performed Wednesday, home made land mines with live fuses were discovered. Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire These guys arent sweeping for dust Navy Chief Petty Officer Bradley C. Bunde exam ines the remains of a Mark 3A2 offensive grenade that was found while searching Grenadillo Range. (L to R) Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Mike R. Adams, Seaman Nathan J. Droll man, Seaman Bryan M. Burton and Chief Petty Officer Bradley C. Bunde perform a sweep of the terrain at the Grenadillo Range for any unexploded ordnance.

PAGE 8

Physically fit troops get the job done, and its up to the gyms of Guantanamo Bay to see that they are properly pumped up. Take the G.J. Denich Gym, Marine Hill Fitness Center and the Camp America gym. Each offers a similarly solid physical fitness experience with a common goal in mind: well-balanced workouts, which lead to well-balanced servicemembers, who in turn lead to missions well done. The G.J. Denich Gym offers by far the most selection for those craving a long and hard work out. With a plethora of free weights, benches and machines available, one will be like a kid in a candy store. Also offered is a basketball court, a selection of cardio-vascular machines, a spinning room and the sauna room for those who just want to sweat the worries of the day away. Not just for Marines, the Marine Hill Fitness Center, while not as flashy as its Denich gym cousin, offers a solid selection of weights and machines for those potential ironmen out there. In addition to that basic steel goodness, the gym also sports a high-speed rock climbing wall for those who want to take their workouts to bold new heights. The Camp America gym is strictly a utilitarian arena of iron and sweat. Located at its namesake, the humble tent allows the MPs who diligently guard Camp Delta a chance to flex their muscles and keep in peak physical shape through its selec tion of free weights and limited, yet effective sup ply of machines. Whether the servicemembers are training for a physical fitness test, trying out a new workout pro gram or were just born with a barbell in their hands, any one of these three gyms will satisfy their craving for steel or perfectly toned muscles if theyre willing to give it their all. For all the military personnel here, a visit to a gym should fit like a glove. So, no matter which one you choose to train in, if youve got a heart of fire and an undying desire to get in shape while at GTMO, hurry up and waste no time in making a pick. Work hard, and these gyms will allow you a chance to work even harder. Remember: no pain, no gain. Page 8 Page 9 Friday, October 25, 2002 Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Dakeem Coleman of Navy Station Security displays his chiseled muscles as he cranks another repe tition of tricep extensions while at the Marine Hill Fitness Center. Three gyms, one mission Army Sgt. Isidro Romero of the 2/142nd Inf. Com pany works up a quick sweat while strenously per forming one last shoulder press at the Camp Amer ica gym. After a hard workout at the G.J. Denich Gym, brazen gym rats can crawl into the sauna room for that well-earned break. Story and photos by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Hardcore Spc. Robert Lovely of the 43rd MP Brigade lifts the weight of many men during an intense session of dips while at the Marine Hill Fitness Center. A focused mind is key in the job performance of any troop. One cant get any more focused than going to the gym for a good set of concentration curls.

PAGE 9

Physically fit troops get the job done, and its up to the gyms of Guantanamo Bay to see that they are properly pumped up. Take the G.J. Denich Gym, Marine Hill Fitness Center and the Camp America gym. Each offers a similarly solid physical fitness experience with a common goal in mind: well-balanced workouts, which lead to well-balanced servicemembers, who in turn lead to missions well done. The G.J. Denich Gym offers by far the most selection for those craving a long and hard work out. With a plethora of free weights, benches and machines available, one will be like a kid in a candy store. Also offered is a basketball court, a selection of cardio-vascular machines, a spinning room and the sauna room for those who just want to sweat the worries of the day away. Not just for Marines, the Marine Hill Fitness Center, while not as flashy as its Denich gym cousin, offers a solid selection of weights and machines for those potential ironmen out there. In addition to that basic steel goodness, the gym also sports a high-speed rock climbing wall for those who want to take their workouts to bold new heights. The Camp America gym is strictly a utilitarian arena of iron and sweat. Located at its namesake, the humble tent allows the MPs who diligently guard Camp Delta a chance to flex their muscles and keep in peak physical shape through its selec tion of free weights and limited, yet effective sup ply of machines. Whether the servicemembers are training for a physical fitness test, trying out a new workout pro gram or were just born with a barbell in their hands, any one of these three gyms will satisfy their craving for steel or perfectly toned muscles if theyre willing to give it their all. For all the military personnel here, a visit to a gym should fit like a glove. So, no matter which one you choose to train in, if youve got a heart of fire and an undying desire to get in shape while at GTMO, hurry up and waste no time in making a pick. Work hard, and these gyms will allow you a chance to work even harder. Remember: no pain, no gain. Page 8 Page 9 Friday, October 25, 2002 Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Dakeem Coleman of Navy Station Security displays his chiseled muscles as he cranks another repe tition of tricep extensions while at the Marine Hill Fitness Center. Three gyms, one mission Army Sgt. Isidro Romero of the 2/142nd Inf. Com pany works up a quick sweat while strenously per forming one last shoulder press at the Camp Amer ica gym. After a hard workout at the G.J. Denich Gym, brazen gym rats can crawl into the sauna room for that well-earned break. Story and photos by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Hardcore Spc. Robert Lovely of the 43rd MP Brigade lifts the weight of many men during an intense session of dips while at the Marine Hill Fitness Center. A focused mind is key in the job performance of any troop. One cant get any more focused than going to the gym for a good set of concentration curls.

PAGE 10

Page 7 Friday, October 25 2002 Page 10 Friday, October 25, 2002 A few weeks ago, Kvaerner workers stum bled across what looked to be a landmine while putting in a water pipe behind the LCN building. They reported their discovery to the ordnance department, which then checked out the situation for themselves and determined it was a job to be passed on to the highly trained, explosive masters of the Explosive Ordnance Disposal mobile unit 2 detachment from Roo sevelt Roads, Puerto Rico. We came down to find what looked to be live landmines hooked with live fuses, said Navy Chief Petty Officer Bradley C. Bunde. So we left them in their place and blew them up with C4. Its as simple as that. If any suspected explosives are discovered at Guantanamo Bay, these guys get the word, then come down and blow it up. Not a bad gig. We come here any time there is an emer gency about ordnance popping up. We deter mine what the supposed ordnance is, and what has to be done with it to ensure the protection of all individuals and property, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Mike R. Adams of the EOD mobile unit 2. We also perform range sweeps for any unexploded ordnance such as grenades, assault rockets, mortars and general-purpose bombs,said Adams. Could it be that every individual here at Guantanamo Bay should walk around in fear of stepping on a landmine and blowing them selves up, and possibly a buddy as well? It turns out, where the mine was found used to be a training area for practice mines, said Bunde. So probably not. These guys are smart and know a lot about explosives and how to handle them. After 56 weeks of training, who wouldnt be? Not everyone can make it into this field of work, said Bunde. It takes the highest cal iber of an individual to get through the train ing. Only the highly motivated make it to be highly trained. A normal task of the EOD mobile unit 2 detachment is making regularly scheduled voyages to GTMO to retrieve unexploded ordnance from the dif ferent ranges. When ever a range is in use, ordnance workers are nearby keeping an accurate account of all of the ordnance mal functions. We keep record of all the duds that dont go off at the ranges here, said Navy Sea man Nathan J. Drollman, GTMO ordnance department. Then we pass our information on the EOD team. Duds are accounted for, said Bunde. Then our job is to search for them, find them, pile them up and take care of them. In the past, we were reporting here once every three months, said Adams. But now with JTF here, there is a lot of ordnance train ing going on, so there are bound to be duds. According to Adams, there is an average dud rate of around 20% on U.S. ordnance. Dealing with things that could just blow up and rip someone into pieces isnt a job that many would be eager to take. But these guys display much pride in what they do and always play it cautiously. We use extreme safety doing range sweeps and demolition operations because of the danger factor, said Bunde. With duds, the threat is even more heightened because explosives are built to go off, and when they dont, theres a problem. Things could even be worse than whats originally expected. We know to be careful about all ord nance, said Adams. We go out in search of mines with a two-man team and use an ord nance locator, which is almost like a metal detector for explosives. Whenever live ordnance is found, we have to get rid of it, said Bunde. If we can blow it up where it is, thats what well do. The simplest thing to do is leave ordnance where its found resting, place C4 on it and blow it up, said Adams. But if the explo sives are near any important structures, we will proceed by moving them safely and then blowing them up somewhere else with up to 150lb of net explosive weight, configured together in one pile. When boldly trekking the ranges, these troops are expecting to find the goods, but in the GTMO backcountry while performing a mine sweep, the odds arent so well known. We found a bunch of mines during a mine sweep Wednesday that had to be at least ten years old, said Adams. They were home made with U.S. military fuses on them. And there are more of them out there. You never know what Castro could have placed out there, said Bunde. And these explosive experts have some good advice for all of the people who want to keep all of their body parts in one piece. If you see ordnance, dont mess with it or move it, said Bunde. Just get a good mark on it and call ordnance. If you spot anything out of the ordinary, call security, said Adams. Dont take it into your own hands. When it comes down to it, leave it to the guys who wont blow it. We got what it takes to get the job done, said Adams. Dont mess with explosives, said Bunde. Its not worth your life. During a mine sweep performed Wednesday, home made land mines with live fuses were discovered. Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire These guys arent sweeping for dust Navy Chief Petty Officer Bradley C. Bunde exam ines the remains of a Mark 3A2 offensive grenade that was found while searching Grenadillo Range. (L to R) Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Mike R. Adams, Seaman Nathan J. Droll man, Seaman Bryan M. Burton and Chief Petty Officer Bradley C. Bunde perform a sweep of the terrain at the Grenadillo Range for any unexploded ordnance.

PAGE 11

Page 6 Friday, October 25, 2002 Page 11 Friday, October 25, 2002 (left:) Marine Sgt. Jon Grinter gives the gathered crowd a quick lesson in the history of the pres ence of the U.S. in Cuba. (below:) Marine Capt. William W. Elliott III, with wife, Mar garet, and their 11-week-old daughter Grayson, possibly the youngest person ever to walk the fenceline. (right) This sun bleached banana rat skull was just one of the many strange sights that dotted the trail from Kittery Beach to the Northeast Gate. The road goes ever on and on. The 8K stroll took approx imately two hours to complete, though from certain van tage points it looked like it would never end. At the end of the trek the walkers were treated to a glimpse of the gate that leads to communist Cuba. Ironically enough, the sign reads, Republic of Cuba, Free Territory of America. Volksmarch to Northeast Gate At 7 a.m. on Saturday, a group of nearly 100 people boarded buses at the parade grounds at Marine Hill to take part in GTMOs first North east Gate Volksmarch. Volksmarching, a popular activity in Europe, combines the best aspects of physical fitness and sightseeing. Saturdays event, a cooperative effort by Morale, Welfare and Recreation and Marine Capt. William W. Elliott III, attracted servicemembers, contractors, spouses and even a few children. The buses dropped the walkers off at the Kit tery Beach starting point at 7:30. Marine Sgt. Jon Grinter laid down the simple ground rules (drink lots of water and stay to the left of the fence) and they were off. By 9:30 even the slowest walkers had made it to the guard post by the Northeast Gate. MWRs Donnell Daniels rewarded the group with commemorative medals and some refresh ing fruits and beverages. The event concluded with Grinter giving the group a summary of how the Guantanamo Bay Naval Station came into being, complete with highlights from the days of the Cold War. After Grinters speech, the walkers took the opportunity to stare through the gate into com munist Cuba and take pictures. Then it was back to the buses and a return trip to Marine Hill. Judging by the buzz on the ride back, the next Volksmarch will be just as eagerly attended. Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire

PAGE 12

Page 12 Friday, October 25, 2002 Eager to show a broader picture than the detention operation for which most Americans know GTMO best these days, Price made the rounds of all of the bases most photogenic spots, from the lighthouse for a sunrise over the sea to the patrolling Marines at the Northeast Gate, from a walk on the golf course to a sun set tour of GTMOs waters aboard a Boston Whaler with the Coast Guardsmen of PSU 307. The nature of this book is not so much to fixate on the military in the current political cli mate of the times, but to show the public things theyre not going to see extraordinary pic tures of ordinary events. There was no skipping Camp America, though, and Price was happy to stumble across a group of MPs and infantrymen receiving nonlethal weapons training on Camp As sunbaked gravel. Trailed by his media escort, Army Capt. Annmarie Daneker, and two military broad casters, Army Sgt. Paul Morando and Spc. Christian Farrell of the 361st Press Camp Headquarters, charged with contributing to a promotional video that will accompany the books release, Price shot breakfast at the Hos pital Galley, lunch at McDonalds and dinner at the Windjammer. He shot soldiers and sailors and Boy Scouts. And after 17 hours behind the lens, he put it all to bed with the obligatory visit to GTMOs hottest media spot, snapping the lights of Camp Delta from beyond the fence. I took about 1,000 shots in all, a weary Price said at 10:00 p.m. And I got some great stuff a Marine behind a .50-cal driving along the fenceline, the weapons training, the sunrise at the lighthouse. The highlight was probably the trip up the GTMO River. Price said the widespread Department of Defense support of the project and the sup port he got on the ground here made for a successful shoot, if a tiring one. You have to get a lot of sleep the night before, he said, but I like to work continu ously, chasing the light and just seeing pictures, and then taking them. Its a long day, he said, packing up his gear. But its been a great one. Page 5 Friday, October 25, 2002 DAY IN LIFE, from page 1 Price, on the PSU 307 boat, cruises out into Guantanamo Bay in search of the coveted sunset shot. Price shoots the moon near the lighthouse while Spc. Paul Morando, behind, films the process. Price patrols GTMOs waters aboard a PSU boat. Price lines up a shot of a Marine guard tower on the Cuban border from the deck of a PSU boat. Price strolls the fairways in search of golfers.

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Page 4 Friday, October 25, 2002 This weeks question: What do you think is the greatest invention ever? Army Pvt. Travis Axline 1/22 Inf. Company Ive got to say women. I can never know what theyre gonna do. Navy PO3 Pamella Mason, Dental Techn. The telephone. It was there before the age of the Internet. Navy Lt. Thomas Bailey, Pharmacist Penicillin. This antibiotic saved the lives of many sick people. Army Sgt. James Stringfellow, Motor Pool Radio. Before TV, that was the only way to get news. Air Force Staff Sgt. George Fillingame, Motor Pool Airplanes. They make it easier to get around the world. Compiled by Army Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin and Spc. Jose A. Martinez Down with the wire As part of increased force protection directives,volun teers came out this week to the hillsides below the Pink Palace and the head shed to help remove and replace the razor wire sur rounding the buildings. The job of establishing a new perimiter is expected to last several weeks. Pictured from left to right are some of J-3s finest force protectors Marine Cpl. Pete Colombini, Army Sgt. Todd Taylor, Army Staff Sgt. Tom McCarthy and Spc. Kevin Laiter. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Man on the Street Page 13 Friday, October 25, 2002 DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, October 25 8 p.m. Master of Disguise, PG 80 min 10 p.m. Serving Sara, PG13 100 min Saturday, October 26 8 p.m. Spy Kids 2, PG 99 min 10 p.m. Blue Crush, PG13 104 min Sunday, October 27 8 p.m. The Ring, PG13 115 min Monday, October 28 8 p.m. Spy Kids 2, PG 99 min Tuesday, October 29 8 p.m. Blue Crush, PG13 104 min Wednesday, October 30 8 p.m. The Ring, PG13 115 min Thursday, October 31 8 p.m. Master of Disguise, PG 80 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, October 25 8 p.m. Exorcist 2000, R 121 min 10 p.m. From Hell, R 122 min Saturday, October 26 8 p.m. 13 Ghosts, R 91 min 10 p.m. Ghost World, R 111 min Sunday, October 27 8, 10 p.m. The Ninth Gate, R 113 min Monday, October 28 8 p.m. Resident Evil, R 101 min Tuesday, October 29 8 p.m. Jason X, R 93 min Wednesday, October 30 8 p.m. Murder by Numbers, R 120 min Thursday, October 31 8, 10 p.m. Panic Room, R 118 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris A bitter, sweet world this is. In a world filled with strain, I suffer no pain. Trekking through life, Full speed like a train, Through clouds and through rain, I proclaim... to succeed. Off this world I will feed, While I plant my seed. AS TIME PASSES BY, I will grow. Absorb what I can, While I teach what I know. I'll raise my head high, When it wants to hang low. And when my day comes, I'll be ready to go. Across 1 Brace oneself 6 Shrew 11 Movie 2001s talking computer 14 Winnow 15 Hip 16 Genius 17 Type of communication 18 African nation 19 Winter mo. 20 Flange 22 Talk incessantly 23 Opp. of aft 24 Highs 27 Central Intelligence Agency 29 An essential constituent of DNA 31 What Bojangles did 34 Electroencephalograph (abbr.) 35 Ordeal 36 Armed robbery 38 Animal foot 41 __-a-sketch 42 Jocund 43 Roman garments 44 Grain 45 Asian nation 46 Furniture mover 47 Female sheep 48 A representation of a chemical reaction 50 A document issued by an educational institution 54 Lodge 55 IOU part 56 Swiss-like cheese 57 Unrefined metal 59 Fall mo. 61 Succor 62 Negative battery terminal 64 Clothes pressers 68 Pole 69 Ten cent coins 70 Asian nation 71 Eye infection 72 Meager 73 Cope (2 wds.) Down 1 Fast plane 2 Equal 3 Moray 4 Always 5 Of or relating to the vocabulary 6 Frump 7 Gone 8 Capital of Morocco 9 To speak as a prophet 10 Japanese money 11 Capital of Vietnam 12 Squirrels dinner 13 Embankment 21 Not max 23 Madagascar franc (abbr.) 24 Express 25 Celebration 26 Mace 28 Hurt 30 Still 32 Telegraphic signal 33 Uncanny 37 Iranians neighbor 38 Childhood disease 39 Luminous 40 Cowboy John 42 A memory device 43 Kid 45 The other half of Jima 46 Rhythmic movements 47 Shade tree 49 Card game 50 Honeys 51 Imbecile 52 Rice farm 53 Scent 58 Adams garden 60 Leaf maker 62 Spots 63 Eastern Standard Time 65 Choose 66 Snatch 67 Foxy October 18th:

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Page 3 Friday, October 25, 2002 Laboratory Technicians Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Micah S. Webb GTMO is a really cool place to work because you get a variety of different cases. I was always intrigued about why people get sick and how can they be helped. Being a lab technician is a perfect field to feed my curiosity. The laboratory can help you find out why people get sick and how to cure them. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Kisham R. Harripersad Lab tech is an amazing field to be in, because if you enjoy medicine and the medical field you can learn a lot about how the human body functions. Being able to detect different ailments in the blood work and giving the proper diag nose for a patient makes it easier to find a cure for them. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Rosemarie T. Minaya I have been a laboratory technician since 1992 and my specialty is microbiol ogy. I like working with different organisms that try to attack the human body. I learned how to treat and kill different infections with different antibiotics. I enjoy my job and it is very challenging. There is never a dull moment at the laboratory. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Kizzy Duncan I work in the blood bank section of the laboratory and I feel it is the most critical section, because if I give someone the wrong blood type it can kill them. I am on call 24 hours a day. I like my job because from one minute to the next there is always something exciting happening at the laboratory. No germ or infection is safe with the human body detectives on the job. These highly trained laboratory technicians use microscopes and machines to help them fight the war against deadly organisms. They have trained intensely for a year in the Navys finest training facilities across the country. They can spot any change in the human body and can see the cause of any ailment through blood samples. If there is something wrong with you, they will find it. Blood is like a map. It gives a good under standing of what is going on at that time in the body. It gives you a better understanding of how the body functions, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Kisham R. Harripersad. So germs, be afraid. Be very afraid. The labora tory technicians of GTMO are coming for you! Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Kisham R. Harripersad analyzes a patients urine samples on a microscope to properly diagnose the ailment. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Micah S. Webb inserts blood samples into a bloodcount machine to determine the number of red and white blood cells. Page 14 Friday, October 25, 2002 From GTMO to Puerto Rico The Mens Soccer season will start Monday, Oct. 28 and the Womens Soccer season will start Tuesday, Oct. 29. Please contact Capt. Gormly at 5249 or Maj. Buchanan at 5255 for more information. Daily free daytime & evening lessons are available for sailing, kayaking, and motor boating at Pelican Pete's Marina. Aerobics Classes, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 6 a.m. 7 a.m., 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., and 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Tues. and Thurs. 8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m., 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Tae-Kwon Do, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., and 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. (one hour classes) Tues. and Thurs. 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. 1-on-1 Spinning Classes, G.J. Denich Gym, Mon.Thurs., 6:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Yoga Classes, Tues. Thurs. 5:15 p.m. 6:15 p.m., GJ Denich GymYoga Center. Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, Mon. Fri., 11 a.m. Midnight. Pool Hours: Marine Hill Pool: Open Swim, 6 a.m. -6 p.m., daily; Windjammer Pool: Lap Swim, 6 a.m. 8 a.m., Mon. Sat., Open Swim, 10 a.m. 6 p.m. daily .; Deer Point Pool: Open Swim, 11 a.m. 7 p.m., Mon. Fri., 10 a.m. 6 p.m., Sat. & Sun. Friday, October 25th 11 a.m. 1p.m., Free bowling, Marblehead Bowling Lanes. 7 p.m. 12 a.m., Friday Extreme Bowling, Marble head Lanes. Saturday, October 26th 6:30 a.m., Hospital Walk for Cancer, U.S. NAVBASE Hospital. 6 p.m. Bowling Party, Marblehead Lanes. Sunday, October 27th 1 p.m. 6 p.m., Extreme Bowling, Marblehead Lanes 6:30 p.m., Bingo, Windjammer Club. Monday, October 28th 8 a.m. 12 p.m., Adult Ceramic Classes, Ceramic Shop. Tuesday, October 29th 6:30 p.m., Bingo, Windjammer Club. 7 p.m. Table Tennis Tournament, Main CBQ Liberty Center Wednesday, October 30th 9 a.m. 11 a.m., 6 p.m. 9 p.m. Adult Advanced Pottery Classes, Ceramics Shop. 8 p.m., Karaoke, Windjammer Club. Thursday, October 31st 11 a.m. 12 a.m., Bowling, Marblehead Lanes. 6 p.m., Bowling Party, courtesy of CBQ Liberty Center. Servicemembers who are in GTMO long enough eventually accrue enough days on the ground to entitle them to go on leave. While many people choose to use their allotted ten days to go back home, a quick hop over to nearby Naval Station Roosevelt Roads in Puerto Rico may be a fun alternative. For servicemembers who decide that theyd like to spend their leave exploring the island of Puerto Rico, here are a few tips to keep in mind. Flights leave from the Leeward side of GTMO to Roosey Roads weekly on Tuesdays and Fridays. Flights return on Wednesdays and Satur days. When signing up for a seat on a space available basis, its important to get ones name on the list early. Flights to and from Roosey Roads are rarely packed, but dont risk getting left behind. The day before the scheduled flight, one must sign out with J-1, surrender ones I.D. badge, and contact the air terminal to have ones name placed on the passenger list. A nominal tax/inspection fee must be paid to get on a Space A flight. The cost going to Puerto Rico is $23.80 and the price to return is $12.80. The flight to Puerto Rico is about one hour and 20 minutes. Beverage and a snack are offered. Seating on the flight to Puerto Rico was open on my flight, so when I politely asked the flight attendants if I could take an open seat in first class, there was no problem. Upon arrival in Puerto Rico a representative from Avis RentA-Car met me at the terminal. Its almost mandatory to rent a car if one plans to leave Roosey Roads at all. Roosey Roads is in the town of Ceiba on Puerto Ricos eastern coast. If ones ultimate destination is San Juan on the islands north coast, even a oneway rental of $29 for a subcom pact car makes a lot of sense, given that a cab ride to the same destination can cost upwards of $60! My guidebooks had hinted strongly that driving in Puerto Rico might prove hectic, but I had little trouble. The highway signage could have been better in some places, but the traffic, though fast, was light for rush hour on a Tuesday. Most of the traffic was heading away from San Juan. I was relaxing in a huge room at the Wyndham El San Juan in the Isla Verde section of Puerto Ricos capital about an hour after leaving the naval base. After a quick shower I explored the hotel and the sur rounding area. Isla Verde is a classy, upscale neighborhood, full of large hotels with casinos and many restaurants and night clubs. I didnt feel nervous walk ing the streets, but like in any large city, its best to remain alert in unfamiliar surroundings. For dinner, I settled on Lupis, a Mexican chain restaurant. One dissapointing aspect of my Puerto Rico trip was the fact that I had to diligently search for authentic island cuisine. Every where I turned there was a Burger King or a Wendys. I spent the next day exploring Old San Juan, the section of the city dating back to the time of the islands first governor, Ponce de Leon. This quaint neighborhood has a lot to offer the sightseer and shopper. On Calle Fortaleza (Fortaleza Street) I discovered a strip of reasonably priced jewelry shops, and I was able to pick up some rings and necklaces that will make excellent Christmas gifts. As can be expected, there were quite a few tacky tourist gift shops around where you can pick up refrigerator magnets, tshirts and shot glasses, but you can also find paintings, statues and carved wooden masks in this area as well. Old San Juan reminded me a great deal of New Orleans with a dash of San Fran cisco thrown in. The streets were hilly and narrow, and every alleyway held the promise of something new to explore. As lunchtime approached, I avoided the temptation of fast food and found exactly what I was looking for in Cafe San Juan, a cozy hole in the wall across from Plaza Colon where a statue of Christopher Columbus stands. I wavered over sev eral choices on the menu, but ultimately went for mofongo an Afro-Puerto Rican dish of mashed plantains formed into a volcano-like shape and stuffed with chicken, beef or seafood that has been stewed with toma toes and green peppers. Delicious! In the days that fol lowed I explored Loiza, a village with a rich African heritage dat ing back to the islands colonial period, and Fajardo, a 200 yearold town that is the jumping off point for excursions to the Span ish Virgin Islands Vieques and Culebra. Fajardo was cramped and the street signs were non-existent. My halting Spanish was pushed to the limit, but I was able to get by. If one is in the mood for lob ster or paella I recommend Rosas Sea Food. Be warned I had a devil of a time finding the dead-end street its on, and they dont take reservations. All too soon my leave was up. I only made good on a mere frac tion of the grand plans I had out lined for myself the day trip to St. Thomas and the visit to the rainforest of El Yunque never materialized. The bright spot is, missing out on these opportunities has given me a thousand reasons to return to La Isla del Encanto The Island of Enchantment at the earliest opportunity. Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire The fortress of San Cristobal at sunset in Old San Juan.

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Page 2 Friday, October 25, 2002 JTF-GTMO Command Commander: Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Air Force Lt. Col. Eduardo Villavicencio OIC, 361st Public Affairs Detachment: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5426 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detachment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Multicultural Day Celebration Sunday, October 27, 2002 1-5 p.m. at Phillips Park Sponsored by Naval Station and Naval Hospital For more information, contact: Cathy Bautista 7-2450 Andrea Petrovanie 7-2033 New procedures for ordering supplies Effective October 15, 2002, each section will appoint a primary and alternate supply representative. The supply representatives will be designated on DA FORM 1687 (Sig nature Card). The original will be turned in to Customer Service at the warehouse (Bldg 611). One copy stays with the section and one copy will be turned in to Spc. Forstie (J4). This person will now be able to submit purchase orders (expendable and nonexpendable) through Customer Service. Expendable/consumable items are the usual office supplies that most now receive through the J4 section at the CDC. To request these items, the supply representative will fill out JLSG-ECS FORM 1 and submit it to the Customer Service clerk at Bldg 611. Items currently on-hand will be issued. Requisi tions will be submitted for non-stocked or zero balance items. Non-expendable/non-consumable items are items that can be reused such as filing cabinets, safes, engravers, and so forth. To request these items, the supply representative will fill out the Non Expendable/Consum able Request Form and submit the form through Customer Service at Bldg 611. Order status will be available after item is requisitioned. Customer Service operation hours are Monday through Friday from 8a.m. 4p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 8a.m. noon. The point of contact for Customer Service is QM1 Lamberson at x3002. For any ques tions regarding this matter, please contact Capt. Kost at x3073. Submitted by Air Force Capt. Wesley E. Manship Jr, Deputy J-4, JTFGTMO Chaplains Corner A little boy wanted to meet God. He knew it was a long trip to where God lived, so he packed his suitcase with Twinkies and a six-pack of root beer. When he had gone about three blocks, he met an old man who was sitting in the park staring at some pigeons. The boy sat next to him and opened his suitcase. He was about to take a drink from his root beer when he noticed the old man looked hungry. So he offered him a Twinkie. The old man gratefully accepted it and smiled at him. His smile was so pleasant that the boy wanted to see it again. So he offered him a root beer. Again, he smiled at him. The boy was delighted! They sat there all afternoon eat ing and smiling, but they never said a word. As it grew dark, the boy realized how tired he was and he got up to leave. But before he had gone more than a few steps, he turned around, ran back to the old man, and gave him a hug. He gave the boy his biggest smile ever! When the boy opened the door to his own house a short time later, his mother was sur prised by the look of joy on his face. She asked him, What did you do today that made you so happy? He replied, I had lunch with God. Before his mother could respond, he added, You know what? Hes got the most beauti ful smile Ive ever seen! Meanwhile the old man returned to his home. His son also saw the look of joy on his fathers face. So he asked, Dad, what did you do today that made you so happy? I ate Twinkies in the park with God. You know, hes much younger than I expected. Too often we underestimate the power of a smile, a kind act, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring all of which have the potential to turn a life around. People come into our lives for a rea son, for a season, or for a lifetime. Embrace all equally! Have lunch with God today! Submitted by Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Raymond A. Tetreault, JTF-GTMO Guidelines for tactical vehicle use Provost Marshals Office The guidelines for the use of Tactical and Non-tactical vehicles by members of JTF GTMO are outlined in Policy letter #3, Requirements for Traveling in Tacti cal and Non-Tactical Vehicles. The policy letter states in part that driv ers and passengers of Tactical vehicles must wear Kevlar helmets and appropriate military uniforms when the vehicle is operated off the paved roadway. When tactical vehicles are operated on paved roadways at GTMO, drivers may wear the Army Physical Fitness Training Uniform, while the passengers may wear civilian clothing, provided the clothing is in accordance with Policy letter #7, Civilian Clothes Policy. Approved parking areas for Tactical vehicles are the dirt parking lots behind McDonalds, the USMC Headquarters building, the G.J. Denich Gymnasium, and the Windward Loop housing area. Drivers and passengers must wear safety belts at all times. Drivers will use ground guides when backing up tactical vehicles. Engage the parking brake and deploy the chock-blocks when the vehicles are parked. Army Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-GTMO Meeting God Page 15 Friday, October 25, 2002 W.T. Sampson rolls over MPs W. T. Sampson improved their record to 50 by beating the 571st Military Police Com pany Tuesday night on Cooper Field and remains perfect on the soccer field. The 2-0 victory over the MPs put the Lady Pirates of W. T. Sampson High School ahead in the standings by two games. The Lady Pirates came out aggressively on the field. They wanted to score early in the game and put pressure on the soccer ball. Their aim was to make the 571st MP Co.s goalkeeper, Spc. Angela Neal, work. But Neal was up to the challenge. She was holding her own behind the net. She was like a brick wall. She didnt let anything go by her. Neal was keeping the 571st MP Co. in the game. The 571st MP Co. couldnt get into their offense because of all the pressure on the soccer ball. The Lady Pirates kept the ball on the 571st MP Co.s side of the field. This made it very hard to get their offense in sync. So, they had to rely on their defense to stop the onslaught by the Lady Pirates. They had four shots on goal before eighth grader Page Gann spotted senior Rachel Johann open by the net. Gann timed the pass perfectly and Johann kicked it into the net for the goal. They took the 1-0 lead to half time. The Lady Pirates had control of the game. In the second half the Lady Pirates seemed very confident, because they had more players on the team. They substituted more than the 571st MP Co. The MPs had only eight players on the roster. This was a big advantage going into the second half. The 571st MP Co. would eventually run out of gas, though, and succumb to the Lady Pirates iron will. As the game progressed, the 571st MP Co.s defense was getting sloppy and they were being called on a lot of penalties. One of the penalties led to a penalty kick, which Gann nailed to the left side of the net for a goal. The game was now 2-0. The Lady Pirates were on their way to another victory in the soccer league. It seems like the teams in the league are playing more defense than offense against us. They are playing more defense to keep us from scoring, but the benefit we have in the league is that we have more players than the other teams,said Coach Buddy Gann. Most teams have less than eight players on the roster. They were getting tired in the first half and I figured they would be very tired by the second half. So, we kept attacking the goal. We have good players and they are young and have fresh legs. We are able to wear teams out, said Coach Gann. Because the Lady Pirates are a young team, coach Gann always communicates and makes sure his team knows what is important in the game of soccer. Keep your head in the game and play the game because it is fun, said Coach Gann. I am surprised to be 5-0, but the girls have played together and practice hard. Because of the win they will have a day off. I am happy with them and they have been doing a good job on the field, said Coach Gann. Being in first place is not enough for the Lady Pirates. They feel they can improve in all areas of the game. It is great to be undefeated, but we need to work on our headers and left footers, said Gann. The Lady Pirates now have a strong hold on the competition. With only three games left in the season, they have a pivotal game against Navy Hospital Tuesday night. A win could mean clinching first place in the upcoming tournament. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Page Gann from W. T. Sampson scores a goal on a penalty kick in the second half to win 2-0 Tuesday night. Soccer standings Womens soccer W. T. Sampson 5-0 Hospital 3-2 571st MP Co. 1-4 NAVSTA 1-4 W. T. Sampsons senior Rachel Johann (R) battles with a defender from 571st MP Co. for the soccer ball.

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At 4:00 Tuesday morning, photojournalist Larry Price is sitting in an idling van on Sher man Ave., waiting for joggers. In newspaper jargon we call this roaming, he says. Just going out, looking for pictures. Suddenly, Master Sgt. Donald W. Iafrate appears around the bend. Price gets out, sets up his shot. In the early-morning dark, the street signs and Iafrates reflector belt are glowing in the vans headlights; the bend in the road near the motor pool is set off by a column of palm trees. Price snaps a few. That might work, he says. He climbs back in, and the van pulls out. The search for shots begins again. Price, a freelance photojournalist and a man aging photo editor of the Denver Post, was at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base this week as part of the worldwide photojournalistic project A Day in the Life of the Military. The planned coffee-table tome is the latest in an ongoing series that began in 1981 with A Day in the Life of America and has covered countries, from Australia to Africa to the former Soviet Union. Until now. As Price was canvassing GTMO Tuesday, over 100 of Americas top photojournalists were each doing their own roaming at mili tary installations all over the world, from Bagram Air Force Base to Diego Garcia to Fort Bragg, each hoping their shots would be one (or more) of the 300-plus photos to be included in the finished book, due to be published by HarperCollins in April. Price figured he got a choice assignment. This place is so topical right now, he said. Im sure to get at least a few in. Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire A Day in the Life Of... series comes around to the military...and GTMO Photojournalist Larry Price snaps away as soldiers undergoing non-lethal weapons training stage a mock advance at Camp America on Tuesday. Price toured GTMO Tuesday as part of the Day in the Life of the Mil itary project, a coffee-table book featuring photographs of some 100 military installations around the world. See DAY IN LIFE, page 5 Page 10 P a ge 8 Page 15 Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-GTMO and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. GTMOs day in pictures Friday, October 25, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 20 A look inside... Page 16 Friday, October 25, 2002 with Navy IT2 Elisabeth N. Favorite Naval Computer Telecommunications Area Master Station Q: Hi! Welcome to 15 Min utes of Fame! Tell me a little about yourself. A: Thank you! My name is Elisabeth Naomi Favorite. Im originally from Myrtle Beach, S.C. Ive been in the Navy for four years. Im an Information Systems Technician, 2nd Class. GTMO is my first and only duty station. Q: Wow, you came here right out of school. So, how do you like it here? A: Ive been here 42 months. Its been great, but its time to go. Im headed to a ship outside of Norfolk the U.S.S. Bulkeley. Q: Oh, is that the same A: Yes, the same Rear Admiral Bulkeley as in Bulkeley Hall. Q: So, how old are you? Do you plan to stay in the Navy until retirement? A: Im 24. My plan is to stay in the Navy two more years, then go to college full time to become a doctor. Q: Thats great! Have you always wanted to study medi cine? A: Yes, thats always been my goal, from childhood. Q: Did you do well in school? A: I excelled in math. Q: Have your math skills helped you in your job here? A: No, not really. Q: Tell me about your job. Whats it like? A: As an information techni cian, my primary goal is to medi ate message traffic throughout the Navy. Im involved in supervis ing the message traffic and cir cuits for all communications e-mail, phone, Internet, etc. Inside and outside of GTMO. Im not too into computers, but I do like my job. Its not a bad field to be in. Q: Do you feel that you were prepared for the job you are doing after Basic Training? A: Yes, I do. In the nine weeks we were trained, I do believe I was prepared. Q: Only nine weeks? Not too long. Okay, now for a different type of question: Youre stranded on a desert island for the rest of your life with only one book to read. What would it be? A: Disappearing Acts by Terry McMillan. Shes my favorite author. Ive already read the book three times. Q: Whats your favorite song? A: I like Gangsta Lovin by Eve. I like the rough part of being in love. Q: Oh, so its the lyrics that attracted you? A: And I definitely love the video! Q: In your opinion, whats the greatest movie ever made? A: I love The Green Mile. Q: Okay, taking another direc tion... If you could go on vacation to someplace youve never been, where would you go? A: Paris, France! Q: Prior to being in the mili tary, had you ever traveled over seas? A: I took a senior cruise to Mexico and stopped at Cozumel. I loved it! It was only three days. I would like to take a week of vacation somewhere outside of the U.S. Q: Im sure youll get to do that soon. A: I definitely want to take advantage of going to Germany and all of Europe. I want to see the rest of the world. Q: If you went beyond 15 minutes of fame to just being famous, what would you like to be known for? A: For being natural. People dont need to remake themselves through surgery. You can look the way you want to look. Work hard, eat right and you can do it. Q: Thats very positive! If you could be assured of one thing in life besides money, what would it be? A: Love! Q: Ah! Youre a romantic. Who has had the greatest impact on you outside of a family mem ber? A: My best friend, Carolyn Stevenson. Shes really helped me to mature. Shes been with me the entire time Ive been here. Q: How would she describe you? A: Kind, pleasant, fun to be around. Then when its time to get serious, I get down to business. I keep it real, always. Q: If you had to describe the single most important thing youve learned, what would it be? A: Always respect your par ents. Youre always going to go back home, and youll always need them. Q: Any last words to the peo ple of GTMO? Youre going to be leaving the island in a few weeks. A: Please come to my farewell party! Its at Phillips Park on November 1st from 9 until! Navy IT2 Elisabeth N. Favorite well on her way to achieving some lofty goals. Interview and photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire These are a few of her Favorite things 15 Minutes of Fame...