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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00073
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: October 18, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00073

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Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony D. Clayton of the 160th Military Police Battalion was in a state of shock when he got the word: he would be the temporary command sergeant major of what will soon be known as Joint Task Force GTMO. I thought at first that they were kidding, he said, but I welcomed the opportunity and I welcomed the challenge. So Clayton should have no problem filling his new role during operation Enduring Freedom given his undying motivation and positive outlook. I like a good challenge. I like to go into a position Ive never been in and see if I can make a difference, said Clayton. If I can accomplish just one thing that will be an improvement for the servicemem bers here, then I will have achieved my goal. Looking to make that difference during his short tenure as the top NCO of JTF 160/170, Claytons main focus will be the servicemem bers themselves and what ways he can better their deployment. The thing I would like to accomplish is to boost the morale of the servicemembers of the Joint Task Force by improving their quality of life, he said. For exam ple, I would like to see better living conditions for the soldiers living out at Camp America and Camp Bulkeley. I would also like to see improved working conditions for the troops that are out at Camp Delta. And with not much time to work, Clayton has moved fast to ensure that the wheels of improve ment will be in swift motion when his successor arrives. All of these concerns have gone up the chain of command, he said. Command Sgt. Maj. Etheridge from SOUTHCOM has been here visiting and weve identi fied these changes, things that many servicemembers have already put up their chain of com mand, such as upgraded MWR facilities. So things will get better, if not for this rotation, then definitely for the next one. Change is good, according to Clayton, who sees the merging of Story and photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Command Sgt. Maj. Clayton temporarily takes the reins See CSM, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 Page 8 Page 15 Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160/170 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. New CSM, for now... Friday, October 18, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 19 Remember me? Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Two weeks ago, The Wire put out a survey, hoping our readers would fill it out and give us feedback on what we could do to improve the paper. We can count on one hand the amount of surveys we actually got back. You had your chance...and you blew it. Now enjoy what youve got. Page 16 Friday, October 18, 2002 with Spc. Derrick L. Barnes 114th MP Co. Q: Good afternoon, kind sir. Would you like to be this weeks 15 Minutes of Fame? A: Hmm... Well, I dont see why not. Q: Well, lets start out simple then. Where are you from and what do you do back home? A: Im from Mississippi, and I work in an automotive plant. Q: Wow, you went from work ing with cars to guarding detainees a big difference. How do you feel about your mis sion here? A: Honestly, I think my mis sion here is pretty simple. But just like building cars, it is important here to pay attention to detail and to be patient. Q: Well, patience is a virtue. Before you got here would you have considered yourself a patient person? A: I was somewhat of a patient person before, but being here def initely taught me how to be a lot more patient. Q: So, how would you describe yourself? A: I am a quiet, wise man. Q: Since youre such a wise man, may I ask what kind of advice do you have for people deployed here? A: Enjoy yourself while youre here. Make the best out of this experience. Q: Words to live by. Do you have a nickname, or is there something special the people here call you? A: Well, my friends call me Busy Bee. Q: Interesting. Any particular reason why? A: Nope, thats just what they call me Busy Bee. Q: Okay, that works for me. If you could change one thing about life at GTMO, what would it be, and why? A: Id have to say communica tions. Q: And when you say that you mean... A: I think it should be easier for the troops to call their families at home. Q: And whom do you like to reach out and touch? A: Excuse me, reach out and touch? Q: Sorry, I meant whom at home do you like to call? A: Oh, my wife and my mom. Q: And what do you do for fun down here? A: Read the Bible mostly, or go to the gym. Q: Not much of a partier, I gather? A: No, not much. Q: If your experience at GTMO were to be turned into a movie, what would the title be? A: Thats a tough one. Maybe we should come back to that one. Q: Not a problem. So, what was the most difficult adjustment for you to make when you arrived at GTMO? A: Id have to say getting to the latrines late at night. It is always a trek to get out of bed, get dressed, and make it there. Q: Definitely sounds incon venient to me. So, what is going to be the first thing you do when you get back home to good old Mississippi? A: Take a bath. Six months of showers gets old. A good home cooked meal would be nice too. And Ill take my kids to Chuck E. Cheeses. Q: Nothing like pizza and a huge rodent to lift your spirits. No, but seriously, what have you learned from being here? A: I learned a lot about the lit tle things. Most importantly I learned how to be a more patient person. Q: Has anything strange or unusual happened to you since you began your mission here? A: Nope, not that I can think of at the moment. Q: Not many people here can say that. So, if a hurricane were to hit GTMO and you were going to be trapped in a hurricane-proof bunker with two people from your company, who would they be and why? A: I would have to say Army Sgt. 1st Class Blackman and Army Sgt. Davis. I would choose them because theyre a lot like me quiet. They are also good lis teners and listen to people regard less of their rank. Q: Sounds like a wise choice. So, what kind of music do you like to listen to? A: I like R&B, blues, and rap. Q: Well, it has been nice chat ting with you. Lastly, Id like to ask how do you feel about your 15 Minutes of Fame? A: Well, I think its good for everyone to have the chance to express themselves. I guess this was just my time. Spc. Derrick L. Barnes, more than just a soldier a wise man. Interview and photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Busy Bee the quiet man of GTMO 15 Minutes of Fame...

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Page 2 Friday, October 18, 2002 Registering your POV JTF-160/170 Command Commander: Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Air Force Lt. Col. Eduardo Villavicencio OIC, 361st Public Affairs Detachment: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5426 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detachment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160/170. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Depart ment of Defense or the personnel within. JTF-160/170 Commanding Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey A Day in the Life comes to GTMO Provost Marshals Office On October 22nd, at 0001 local time across the globe, over 125 of the worlds top photojournalists, including thir teen Pulitzer Prize winners, will join forces with the worlds top military photographers to cre ate an historic portrait: A Day in the Life of the U.S. Armed Forces. A team will even be visiting us here at Guan tanamo Bay. It will be the lat est in the best-selling photojournalism series which includes A Day in the Life of America, which sold over a million copies and was on the bestseller list for fifty seven weeks. On locations in fifty-five countries, working through all twenty four time zones, they will be on a mission to create the most compelling, indelible and revealing images of an ordinary day in the U.S. mili tary and the extraordinary con tributions and sacrifices Americas armed forces are making during this critical time in world history. From a day with the Secretary of Defense to a new Marine recruit at Par ris Island, a solo reconnaissance pilot flying a high altitude mis sion over Central Asia to a mil itary city at sea conducting carrier operations in the Indian Ocean to a military maternity ward welcoming the newest member to a community larger than many nations. This is a portrait of unique culture. This is not a book about the latest military equipment and tactics. It is a timeless humaninterest story of responsibility, dedication and determination by a band of brothers, sisters and families, doing what they do better than anyone else in the world, 24/7/365. Like the previ ous A Day in the Life books, its release in late April, 2003 will be a major media event covered by all the major broadcast net works and publications. The oversize book with the 300-plus best pictures selected by the countrys most experi enced photo editors will take its place on coffee tables, book shelves and libraries around the world, including the Library of Congress and an exhibit at the Smithsonian. This project will be a photographic time capsule of Americas latest generation to respond to its countrys call to arms in defense of its tradi tions. Each picture truly will be worth a thousand words and the book will have only brief cap tions and no text. Like the pre vious projects, the video coverage of the making of this historic event, with its cast of thousands that knows no boundaries, will be critical to introducing the book to mil lions of people who might never have known about it oth erwise. For more information, please contact Army Capt. Annmarie Daneker at 5017. Its getting to be GTMO Special time again, as departing servicemembers look to pass on their functional clunkers to new arrivals needing wheels. But if you buy a new car, remember: Registration of Privately Owned Vehicles (POV). The following documents are required in order to register a POV: (1) Proof of Ownership, such as a Bill of sale, registration certificate, or title, issued or assigned to the person in whose name the vehicle is to be registered. (2) A valid driver's license. (3) Proof of liability insurance for a period of at least six months. Transfers of Registration. Within three days of transfer of ownership of a vehicle, the new owner shall apply for transfer of the registration to his/her name, and comply with all the requirements for registering a POV. Vehicle registrations and safety inspections are performed by NAVBASE Police at the Motor Vehicle Registration Office, located next to the Police station on Boatshed Road. Persons found to be operating unregistered or uninsured vehicles shall be sub ject to NAVBASE GTMO administrative actions and unit disciplinary action under the UCMJ. Notice: A 25" TV/VCR set, Model #T25208, Serial #B421NA597 is missing from 1510A in East Caravella. Anyone having knowledge of its location, please contact the JTF-160/170 Provost Marshal at 5057 or 5061. Calls will be kept confidential. Army Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal After seven months here at GTMO as commander of JTF-170, it is my privi lege to assume command of a unified JTF-160/170 until Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller takes over as head of JTF-GTMO next month. The position is only temporary, but let me assure you this interim will not be a mere holding pattern. I have already begun to address problems old and new with the detention operation here, from the quality of the food to the difficulties of merging commands that have devel oped separate cultures and ways of accomplishing our mission. We must all look for ways that JTF-160 and JTF-170 can come together, not just in structure but in spirit, and make sure that JTFGTMO represents yet another step for ward in the evolution of the critical and historic mission ongoing here in Guan tanamo Bay. Those who have served with me at JTF-170 already know that I am aggres sive when it comes to leadership. My aim in the coming weeks is to be proac tive, not reactive, and deal with issues before they become real problems problems that hamper the effectiveness of our mission. I put my soldiers first, and the information Command Sgt. Maj. Clayton and I crave most from section and unit leaders is what the command can do to make their people's lives better and their work here more efficient and effective. It is a real honor to be in command of the soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen of JTF-160 and JTF-170 who are so ably serving their country here in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and the global war on terrorism. Please do me the further honor of helping me to lead you better by taking up any issues you have with your chain of command. I assure you I am listening. Sincerely, Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey Page 15 Friday, October 18, 2002 W. T. Sampson sinks NAVSTA The young ladies from the W. T. Sampson High School soccer team blanked NAVSTA 3-0 at Cooper Field Tuesday night, improving their record to 3-0 in the standings of the womens soccer league. W. T. Sampson played aggressively in the first half. They seemed to be able to bring the ball down to enemy territory and make shots on goal at will. The well-coached and well-disciplined team obviously knew what they had to do to win the game. Their strategy involved pushing the ball up field and forcing NAVSTA to defend their goal. Sampson striker Page Gamm dictated the tempo of the game from the start. She played very aggressively in the opening minutes and had six shots on goal (with one hitting the cross bar) by the end of the first half. NAVSTAs game plan quickly became more defense-oriented. Their goal was merely to slow down the high-powered offense of W. T. Sampson. NAVSTA was able to keep them from scor ing in the first half, but by choosing to play more defensively they hurt their own chances to score, getting only four shots on goal. Both teams went to the sidelines scoreless at the end of the half. NAVSTA is playing more defense than offense in the first half of the game. They are trying to keep us from scoring. Maybe they want to keep the game tied so the game can go into a shoot-out and then they can try to beat us then, said Buddy Gamm, head coach of the W. T. Sampson team, said afterward. Gamm said W. T. Sampson had to control and protect the ball in the second half if they wanted to win the game. We were not passing the soccer ball very well in the first half. They were able to handle us because we were not taking care of the ball. That is something we have to work on at prac tice. But in the second half well change a couple of players in the lineup to see if we can spark up the offense, said Gamm. As the referee blew the whistle to start the second half, W. T. Sampsons team looked rested compared to NAVSTA, who didnt have any substitute players on their roster. This would eventually hurt NAVSTA as the game progressed. Indeed, the lack of manpower on NAVSTAs team eventually took its toll. W. T. Sampsons super sophomore, Shanavia Warfield, scored a goal with 7:13 left on the clock, putting her team on top and in control of the game. With that goal, W. T. Sampson had NAVSTA against the wall and in a compro mising position. NAVSTA now had to pick up its offensive productivity. This tactic would ultimately make NAVSTAs defense weak and give W. T. Sampson more opportunities to score. Warfield was able to get open with her savvy footwork, and she scored another goal with 2:23 left on the clock. The team was really confident after the score and they were now smelling blood and going for the kill. Victory was near for the young phenoms of W. T. Sampson. They were working the game clock by keeping NAVSTA from getting to ball upfield. As the game was coming to an end, they scored one more goal to secure a win and first place in the standings. Im just happy to get the win. I think we wore them down and were able to score. They didnt have any substitutes, said Coach Gamm. The lack of substitutes, and of course the great play of Warfield and Page Gamm, con tributed to NAVSTAs loss. It felt good scoring two goals for my team. I just went with the flow of the game. We have a good team this year and we should do fine in the league, said Warfield. W. T. Sampson is playing as projected for the season. Not only are they winning against older competition, they are having a good time and enjoying the game of soccer. It was great winning the game and NAVSTA is a very good team. It was lots of fun playing tonight, said Page Gamm. The league cant take these young guns from W. T. Sampson lightly they came to play, and they came to win it all. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Page Gamm eludes a defender as she maneuvers her way towards the goal and takes a shot. Soccer standings Womens soccer W. T. Sampson 3-0 Hospital 2-1 571st MP Co. 1-2 NAVSTA 0-3 W. T. Sampsons Jessi Percin (L) converges on the soccer ball and sets up teammate Page Gamm (R) for one of her six shots on goal in the high school teams 3-0 victory over NAVSTA.

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Page 14 Friday, October 18, 2002 Safe computing tips from J6 Tbe Captains Cup Men and Womens Division Volley ball Rosters are due at GJ Denich Gymnasium NLT 5PM on Monday, Oct. 21. The Mens Soccer Season will start on Monday, Oct. 28 and the Womens Soc cer Season will start on Oct. 29. *Saturday, Oct. 19: An 8K Volksmarchalong the Northeast Gate and Cuban perimeter, cameras allowed. Buses leave from Marine Hill at 0630. First come, first serve. Please contact Capt. Gormly or Maj. Buchanan at #5217 for more information. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Pete's Marina. Aerobics Classes, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 6AM-7AM, 8:30AM-9:30AM, and 5:00PM6:00PM. Tae-Kwon Do, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:30AM-12:30PM, and 6:00PM-9:00PM (one hour classes) Tues. and Thurs. 6:00PM-9:00PM. 1-on-1 Spinning Classes, GJ Denich Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 6:30PM-7:30PM. Yoga Classes, Tues. Thurs. 5:15PM-6:15PM, GJ Denich Gym Yoga Center. Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, Mon.-Fri., 11AM Mid night. Pool Hours: Marine Hill Pool: Open Swim, 6AM6PM, daily; Windjammer Pool: Lap Swim, 6AM8AM, Mon.-Sat., Open Swim, 10AM-6PM Mon.-Sat., 6AM-8AM & 10AM-6PM, Sun .; Deer Point Pool: Open Swim, 11AM-7PM, Mon.-Fri., 10AM-6PM Sat. & Sun. Friday, October 18th 7PM-12PM, Friday Extreme Bowling, Marblehead Lanes. Saturday, October 19th 6:30AM, Volksmarch to NE Gate (see above). Dawn Fishing Tournament, Pelican Petes Marina. Sunday, October 20th 1PM, Football Sundays, Goatlocker. 1PM-6PM, Extreme Bowling, Marblehead Lanes. 6:30PM, Bingo, Windjammer Club. 7PM, Spades Tournament, CBQ Liberty Center. Monday, October 21st 8AM-12PM, Adult Ceramic Classes, Ceramic Shop. 5PM, Captains Cup Mens and Womens Division Volleyball Rosters Due, GJ Denich Gymnasium. Tuesday, October 22nd 6:30PM, Bingo, Windjammer Club. Wednesday, October 23rd 9AM-11AM, and 6PM-7PM Adult Advanced Pottery Classes, Ceramics Shop. 7PM, Cricket Classic XIII Dart Tournament, CBQ Lib erty Center. 8PM, Karaoke, Windjammer Club. Thursday, October 24th 6PM, Bowling Party, courtesy of CBQ Liberty Center. INCOMING!! shouted the sentry, as the first salvos started to arrive. They came seemingly from nowhere innocent-looking e-mails announcing opportunities for free gifts, help for all manner of ailments, or even hellos from unknown persons around the world. The wrapper seems plain enough, but hidden inside these junk e-mails are often malicious pieces of computer code, designed to weaken our national defenses. These viruses can perform a variety of actions, from insert ing extra files on your com puter and leaving it open for others to share, to actually stealing information. These programs can even record the very keystrokes you enter on the keyboard. Remember that chat you had with a loved one last week? Someone else may have gotten quite a laugh out of it too. That e-mail you sent, talking around the last big mission you had? Its on its way around the world via AlJazeera. These may sound like extreme cases, but they are simply reminders that our information resources are con stantly under attack. The attacker may only be a scriptkiddie, or novice, out to learn what they can do with a com puter. Or it could be the work of serious anti-American com puter experts, bent on the mod ification, theft, or destruction of information resources. Each month, over 1,000 probes, scans and attacks are registered against DoD networks. Preventing these attacks, and mitigating the effects, depends on the concept of defense-in-depth. Each seg ment of the network has its own layers of protection, detec tion and recovery. At the border of each base, we utilize hardware and soft ware to create firewalls, filter ing the content and the addresses that can enter our protected domain. At the domain level, we utilize more software (Norton Anti-Virus, for example) to screen out spe cific types of files. But the most important part, the reaction force, kept in reserve to crush the enemy, is the User! The user is the most impor tant part of our defense in depth, because theyre the active play ers. Theyre the enemys way in. Users need to be aware of what they are doing when using government computers. Story by Marine Corps Master Sgt. Benjamin Philhower Special to The Wire Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin In a chat room? Watch what youre typing! You never know whos out there. Computer Security Guidelines 1. Do not open attachments from unknown senders. 2. Scan files you receive from friends. 3. Never download software from the Internet to a govern ment computer. 4. If the computer acts strangely, (new windows, messages about a different user, etc.) notify the J6 Helpdesk at x3534. 5. Become familiar with where your data is, and check it occasionally to verify it. 6. Never share your password. 7. Use strong passwords (combine Upper, lower, numeric and or special characters). 8. Always log off or lock your computer when you leave your desk. 9. Leave the machine turned on (turn off monitor) at night for admin updates. 10. Read and respond, or take action as directed by, System Administrator messages. 11. Do not save data on your local computer; use the net work drives provided. Looking to buy a new car? A house? Want to know where to get advice on saving or invest ing your money? Need to know how to balance your checkbook or develop a spending plan? Call Paul Walker at the Fleet and Family Support Center. Paul is a financial-services specialist and can answer these questions and many more concerning you and your money. Call Paul today at #4141 or #4153. Page 3 Friday, October 18, 2002 Boat Engineers Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Lester Swafford I do this in the civilian world. Being an mechanic comes naturally to me. I do my job to the best of my abilities so PSU 307 can complete its mission. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark D. Sundbom The electronic system on the boats we have here is less complicated than on the cutters, but I dont care what it is. I just enjoy fixing things. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Harold Roebuck I love working on boats; in my civilian job I build them. I joined the Coast Guard to learn how to work on these engines so I can fix my boats and go fishing all day. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Joe Dabamo Its a lot of fun working on the boats. The maintenance we give the them is essential to the mission, and I think it speaks for itself. GTMOs boat engineers play a vital role in keeping its waters safe. If the boats are not maintained, force protection goes down, said Coast Guard Petty Offi cer 1st Class David W. McCormick of PSU 307. We maintain and fix everything the unit has that is mechanical. Were here 24 hours a day, maintaining their motor vehicles, trailers, generators and boats. To earn their MK (mechanic) rate, these dedicated Coast Guardsmen have to go through 11 weeks of training to learn how to fix and maintain both dieseland gas-powered engines. They have to learn how to fix any boat engine on the fleet, but at GTMO they work mostly on the twin 175-horsepower outboards that power the units 25-foot Boston Whalers. And theyre constantly learning new technology. I remember the time when a screwdriver and hammer would fix the problem, said McCormick. Now we carry a laptop for the computer controlled fuel systems and our electronic components on the boats. Regard less of newfangled technology, the boat engineers keep the PSU 307 ready to patrol the GTMO waters. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Lester Swafford gets his hands dirty as he changes the fuel lift pump on an outboard engine. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark D. Sundbom installs a terminal strip for the components on a 20-foot Boston Whaler. Profession of the Week

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Page 4 Friday, October 18, 2002 This weeks question: What movie title would best describe you as a person? Air Force Airman James R. Andrews, J-6 Air Force One. Marine Corps Sgt. Jar ret Boren, MCSF Co. Desperado. Army Sgt. 1st Class James Russell, 43rd MPBN, J-6 Gladiator. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Legnaioli, JTF 160/170 Mail room Full Metal Jacket. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Steve Boyce, SEABEE 5 Mission Impossible 2. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Of Marines and mortars... Motivated Marines Lance Cpl. William Kennedy, Lance Cpl. Robert OBryant and Cpl. Chris Stalder of the Marine Corps Security Force Company took a break from their usual duties to partake in 60 mm mortar training on Wednes day at Marine Hill. The Marines were training to rapidly and expertly set up an M224 Mortar after the coordinates of their tar get have been relayed to them via radio. The 60 mm Mortar is intended to destroy by curved-trajectory fire. It can be used against light armored targets to create a smoke screen and terrain illumination. So if such a sit uation arises here at GTMO, these Marines will be ready for it. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Man on the Street Page 13 Friday, October 18, 2002 DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, October 18 8 p.m. Spy Kids 2, PG 99 min 10 p.m. Master of Disguise, PG 80 min Saturday, October 19 8 p.m. Serving Sara, PG13 100 min 10 p.m. Blood Work, R 111 min Sunday, October 20 8 p.m. XXX, PG13 114 min Monday, October 21 8 p.m. Signs, PG13 107 min Tuesday, October 22 8 p.m. Spy Kids 2, PG13 99 min Wednesday, October 23 8 p.m. Serving Sara, PG13 100 min Thursday, October 24 8 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG13 94 min CAMP BUCKELEY Friday, October 18 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann, PG13 91 min 10 p.m. The Sum of all Fears, PG13 119 min Saturday, October 19 8 p.m. The Accidental Spy, PG13 98 min 10 p.m. Hannibal, R 100 min Sunday, October 20 8, 10 p.m. The Widowmaker, PG13 138min Monday, October 21 8 p.m. Novocaine, R 95 min Tuesday, October 22 8 p.m. Like Mike, PG 100 min Wednesday, October 23 8 p.m. Gentlemans Game, R 112 min Thursday, October 24 8, 10 p.m. Tomb Raiders, PG13 101 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Do you lead life, Or does life lead you? Maybe reality is fiction And all lies are true. Could it be before you ever started You figured all hope was through? BECAUSE ITS NOT. Maybe life is an appetite in which You hit the spot. Maybe life is like cancer in which You caused the rot. IF THAT COULD BE You found your way through the dark ness, When you couldnt even see. You fight your way through dismay While scared people flee. Through thick and through thin On your side I will be. I LOOK UP TO YOU. Across 1 Congressional vote 4 Stir to activity 9 South by east 12 Irans neighbor 14 Italian city 15 Vessel 16 South American country 17 Make used to 18 Challenge 19 Tangle 21 Tryst 23 Quoth 25 Hole 26 Kind and gracious 30 Crypts 34 Hatchet 35 Unattractive 36 Antenna 37 What dogs sit on 39 Jalopy 41 Asian dress 42 Scarce 44 Way 46 After sun. 47 Map collection 48 Yelling 50 Rank 52 Bridge 53 Wetland plant 56 Bad smells 59 Sharpen 60 Howled 62 Wail 64 Waterless 65 Plentiful 66 Approach 67 Explosive 68 Looks for 69 Sere Down 1 Clip 2 Greek god of war 3 Fiber 4 Grinning 5 Attach 6 Astringent 7 Hardest to find 8 Proposal position 9 Cob 10 Floating ice 11 Before, poetically 13 Similar 15 Programs used to modify files 20 Pregos competi tion 22 Lug 24 Myth 26 Light weight wood 27 Correct 28 Asian nation 29 Dryad 31 __ Vice (tv show) 32 Lord 33 Catapult 36 Diametrical oppo site 38 Growled 40 Rowers needs 43 Russian ruler 45 Noodle 48 Bun topping 49 Noted 51 Large brass instru ments 53 Came into life 54 Piece 55 Publicity 57 Swamp grass 58 Scorch 59 Derby 61 Deer relative 63 Nose

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JTF-160 and JTF-170 as a smart move. The merger was a good idea because it will bring all of the services together, he said. Being on the same page can only make life better. Therell be more resources now, which will mean more can be accomplished. I would like to see more consistency, and I believe that will happen now. The chains of command and NCO support channels will be strengthened because well have better communication. Although comparisons might be drawn between this new leader and the man he has replaced, the legendary Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Funaro that will not hem up Clayton, who knows the job just as well. I admired the way Command Sgt. Maj. Funaro took care of the servicemembers. He had a presence throughout the task force, said Clayton. But I intend to also have a presence in following his footsteps as far as taking care of every soldier, sailor, airman, Marine and Coastguardsman, because they are my main concern. And while you wont see Clayton ceremo niously smacking a private in the head with his cover like his predecessor did, he will carry on nevertheless with his own style of command by following the Golden Rule. Do unto others as you want others to do to you, is what I say. I lead by example. I wouldnt ask anyone to do something that I havent done myself, said Clay ton. I have an open door policy, and I like to see service members learning as they go. That learning, he said, comes from effort. And Clay tons advice to all servicemembers is to never give up in the face of diffi culty. For all of the lower enlisted, they should strive to be the best in whatever they want to accomplish, and they will get there. And for the NCOs, they are the backbone of all of the serv ices, said Clayton. This is how we get things done. The fact is we want to continue to have an atmosphere where NCOs can step up, do their jobs and execute. This system works, and we need to continue maintaining such high standards for the JTF. Such an attitude is what has kept Clay ton at the top of his game for some time now. His reserve unit, the 160th MPBN from Tallahassee, Fla., was originally activated for duty in Afghanistan last Christmas but, in a mysterious military way, ended up spending around five months at Ft. Ben ning, Ga. While there, the time was spent training until the 160th eventually arrived at GTMO to become the battalion in charge of running Camp Delta. And this being Claytons first deployment since being in the reserves, he said it has been better than he could have expected. I hope this isnt my last deployment either, because this has been something different than anything Ive been through before, he said. Its been a very rewarding experience. But this deployment has been real good to me because of the professional people Ive come into contact with, whether it be the lower enlisted, NCOs or officers. When the people under you do a job well done, it makes it eas ier for people in my position. Even with his last few weeks here at that top enlisted spot, Clayton is still thankful to see the light at the end of the deployment tunnel. I really look forward to going home and seeing my family and returning to my job, said Clayton, a mental health program analyst for Florida State Hospital. Hell be returning a changed man, he said. This deployment has changed me in that now I notice the little things are the ones that are the most important. Ive gotten into PT quite a bit since Ive been here, and Ive really bettered myself. This deployment has also made me realized the importance of the mili tary as a whole, that we all have our part. And with the current global war on terror ism being a significant historical cornerstone for the military, Clayton is glad to be here in the relative thick of it. Im very proud to be playing a part in oper ation Enduring Freedom, but I never dreamed that it would be in this capacity, said Clayton. Its really something to look back on and be able to tell families, communities and the rest of the citizens. Were down here making a dif ference. Every servicemember thats a part of this joint task force has been making a difference, and Clayton is striving to make some more with his new role. Its been a long road for him, and looking to the future, he sees the coming JTF-GTMO as setting the standard in military operations. Good things are to come, he said. With time, I believe that this operation here will evolve into a one of the better joint task forces in the entire military. Page 5 Friday, October 18, 2002 CSM, from page 1 Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony D. Clayton checks in with Navy Chief Marcia Cunning ham to see the status of her work and state of her morale. Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony D. Clayton of the 160th MPBN is the temporary com mand sergeant major of Joint Task Force 160/170. During his short stay in this posi tion, Clayton hopes to boost the morale and quality of life of all servicemembers. Page 12 Friday, October 18, 2002 Being deployed to GTMO is tough enough without having to do it for free. The mission of J-8 is to make sure servicemembers here are paid timely and correctly, said Army Sgt. Michael Lackey, with the 153rd Finance Bat talion and working for J-8 of Joint Task Force 160/170. We dont want our servicemembers to be worried about their pay while theyre focusing on their mission. That has been the challenge for J-8. J-8 is divided into two sections, with one taking care of finance issues, and the other dealing with budgets. The finance office is located on the first floor of the Pink Palace. This is the location where servicemembers can come with their questions and to address pay issues. All servicemem bers are welcome to come to us with their pay problems, said Army 1st Lt. Rhonda Stevens, 153rd Finance Battalion, the officer in charge of J-8 finance section. Our main job here is cus tomer service. We are qualified to help solve any pay issues related to the Army personnel, but we can also help the other servicemembers research pay problems through the Defense Joint Military Sys tem, she said. J-8 can help with Leave and Earning Statements (LES), Servicemembers Group Life Insurance (SGLI), Thrift Savings Plan (TSP), Hardship Duty Pay and Basic Housing Allowance (BAH). J-8s procedure to address servicemem bers issues and inquiries is simple. When people come to see us, they have to fill out pay inquiry forms and other necessary documents stating exactly what their pay problem is. This helps us find out whats going on, said Lackey. After collecting the necessary forms from our clients, we go to the Defense Joint Mili tary Pay System to further analyze the issue. Based on our findings, we make corrections, he said. We have been fixing problems that have been neglected before many of our ser vicemembers were even mobilized. The most common issues, said Lackey, are BAH and Family Separation pay. Sometimes people come to us with LESs that have for their zip code and for dependents. Once we get the necessary docu ments from them, we get into the system and fix that, he said. In addition to responding to inquiries sub mitted by servicemembers here on base, J-8 is entrusted with another important task. We are responsible to input into the com puter system Hardship Duty Pay for all the reserve servicemembers, said Lackey. This is a challenging task for J-8 because after 30 days in theater, reservists at GTMO are entitled to hardship duty pay. To help end some confusion, Lackey said for reservists to know that they have recieved their HDP, it will say Other Credits $50.00 on their LES. For active duty personnel, it should read Save Pay $50.00 on their LES. Army Sgt. 1st Class Robert Ruth, also of the 153rd Finance Battalion and the noncom misioned officer in charge of the shop, praises the efficiency of the base-wide computer sys tem, which is used for financial inquiries and data entry. Twice a week, he or another staff person from his office goes to Camp America to address the soldiers issues in person. Now, I can go to Camp America and tell a soldier what is wrong with his LES before get ting to my office, said Ruth. When I get to my office, all I need to do is resolve his prob lem to the best of my ability. Ruth, who has been in the Army for 19 years, said that servicemembers should know how to read their LES. One of his goals is to schedule a class schooling servicemembers about in the ins and outs of their paycheck. For Army Pfc. Amanda Taylor, who recently joined the battalion, working for J-8 helps her better understand the many intricacies of the finance process. She said that she is learning a lot about reservists pay system, which is different from the system used for active-duty person nel. Taylor comes from a fam ily that knows about finance. Her father and two of her brothers, who are still in the Army, worked as finance spe cialists. So military finance was a natural path for her to follow. Though new to the finance world, she finds her job grati fying. I like helping soldiers getting their money. Its very important. If had a pay prob lem, I would like it to be resolved quickly. The J-8 finance section, which is mostly run by the personnel from 153rd FBN, used to be under the leadership of Navy Chief Petty Officer Loretta Jackson, who continues to share her finance experience with the soldiers of the 153rd. She seems confident about the work of the Army personnel. Now, J-8 should be able to assist any ser vicemember, Jackson said. Were all here to support them. Well go that extra mile. For the best service, Lackey said that all servicemembers should check their LES through the EMSS site, which is now being replaced by myPay, a newer and more enhanced system. The more prepared they come to us, the easier it is for us to fix their situation, he said. But in any case, I want people to know that when they come to me, Ill do my best to square them away. Story and photos by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire J-8: Ensuring you get paid on time, correctly Army Sgt. Michael Lackey, 153rd Finance Battalion, left, explains to Army Pfc. Brandon Stanley, right, from the 43rd Military Police Battalion, the various transactions that occurred in his leave earnings statement for the past few months he has been here at GTMO. Army Pfc. Amanda Taylor, 153rd Finance Battalion, reviews a servicemembers pay inquiry. 1st Lt. Rhonda Stevens, 153rd FBN, the OIC of J-8 finance shop, works the offices busy phones.

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Page 6 Friday, October 18, 2002 On a uniformly gray Tuesday morning in Camp Delta, at an exact time which I cannot divulge, Sgt. Rodney Bishops shift in the ser geant-of-the-guard (SOG) tower is starting, and it has just begun to rain. Down below in MP-land, the guards patrolling the camps main aisles have donned ponchos. The cell-block gatekeepers are set tled into their tiny lean-tos as the light drizzle slowly darkens the gravel. Up here, the drops tap out a lazy steel-drum rhythm on the towers tin roof, and Bishop, a soldier with the 2/142 infantry company, is pulling my leg about his foul-weather contingency plan. If it gets wet in here, he says, I just go downstairs to the QRF (the Quick Reaction Force area, where the tower guards spend the other half of their shift) and wait it out. He laughs. No, no. You just stow the log book in the box to keep it dry, get on your gear if you brought it, and go on doing what youre doing. Rain or shine. What Bishop is doing, now and for the next sixsi hours, is acting as the hub of the deten tion areas tower-based monitoring system. Ten towers are spread at strategic locations throughout Delta and Delta II, with more due to come online when Camp III becomes oper ational; towering above them all is the cen trally located Tower 2, the SOG tower where Bishop mans the radio, taking calls from the other towers and deciding which reports need to be passed along to the 2/142s communica tions shack in Camp America. If the towers are the eyes of Delta, looking down at the camp and out beyond the walls, the SOG tower is its brain. And with little in the way of trouble plaguing this tightly run detention center, Bishops post is the closest thing the towers have to a hotbed of activity. It can get to be frying times when you got both radios going, and everybodys calling something in, says Staff Sgt. Billy J. Bryley, who will be taking over for Bishop when his shift is up. But its usually nothing too bad. Yeah, some guysll call in a gnat flying by, laughs Staff Sgt. John C. Worthington, a platoon sergeant with the 2/142. Its nothing but Alert, alert, alert. Worthington and Bryley have shown me up to the tower, and have stuck around a while to chat with Bishop and fill me in on the job. But before long, they bid us farewell and go on to other duties down below tower guard is a solitary job, and except on days when there is a pesky writer from The Wire hanging on his every word and noting his every movement, Bishop is up there all alone. A while back, we had two of us in each tower, he says. It was better in a way, hav ing somebody to talk to. But it also took twice as many guys to do the job; we were all work ing twice as hard. So when we got permission from the JTF to go down to one in a tower, we went ahead and did it. Thats why I like being the SOG. Overall, SOG is the most exciting tower, Bishop says. Youre getting talked to all the time, logging reports, coordinating everything. It makes the time go faster. It He cuts himself off. Five minutes before the hour. Time for the radio check. All towers, all towers, this is SOG, says Bishop. Radio check. Tower 1 roger out. Tower 3 roger out. Tower 5 roger out. Tower 6 roger out. Tower 7 roger out. Tower 8 roger out. Tower 9 roger out. Tower 10 roger out. QRF roger out. Bishop pauses. Tower 2 is him, but... Tower 4, this is SOG. Would you try that again? Tower 4. I got you. Tower 4 is one of the new guys the 1/22 of the 4th Infanty Division, active-duty soldiers out of Fort Hood, Texas that arrived last weekend to supplemement the 2/142 crew in their ever-increasing list of force-protection responsibilities here at GTMO. They have all been here before and in fact those here now volunteered to return but after four months, some of the procedures have changed, and the new infantrymen are still making a few minor adjustments to the 2/142s way of running force protection from the towers. Were still working some of the bugs out, but its better already having them here, Bishop says. Theyre picking it up fine. Once you get down the basic stuff, theres really nothing else, he says. He pauses, lis tens to the radio for a moment, then presses the button to transmit. SOG to QRF. Can we send somebody to Tower 10 to relieve for a bathroom break? *** I ask Bishop if anything crazy ever hap pened on his watch. No, nothing. Just cell extractions, when one of the detainees has been acting up or needs to go to the detention hospital, he says. Weve been trained in that too, so if were in the QRF were ready and if were in the tow ers were watching extra close for trouble. Those are the hot moments. But nothings ever really happened where weve had to get involved from up here. I look down at the camp. Here and there, detainees are on the move toddling along in their shower shoes, shackles on their wrists and ankles and an MP guard on each arm, zip ping by on the back seats of golf carts, their escorts keeping them in place with an arm across the waist and a gloved hand gripping the arm-rest across from them. I think of Sein feld the stop-short move. It is not a scene that suggests trouble is in the offing. The tower people do have their rules of engagement, Bishop says, gesturing mean ingfully to the M-16 hanging from a clip on the six-foot-square towers inside wall. When theres something going on, like detainees being brought into the camp, you try to line up angles of fire in case the people on the ground need that support in case the detainees get the best of the guards. But the only real mishap wed have to deal with from up here is if theres mishan dling down there by the MP guards. And that Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire On shift at Camp Delta: The loneliest job in Delta: A guard with the 2/142 infantry mans his post on the camps perimeter. The Wire s thoroughly scrubbed, J-2 approved, shift-by-shift series kicks off with When duty called, Texas delivered. The 602nd Maintenance Company from Fort Hood, Texas, is an active-duty unit con sisting of mechanics, supply specialists, machinists, technicians and vehicle operators. Responsibilities for this unit include order ing and tracking parts, dispatching and tasking vehicles, to maintaining those vehicles when theyre in need of repair. Ive spent the last four of my thirteen years in the Army working as a supply spe cialist with the 602nd, said Staff Sgt. Michael Sanders. Here at GTMO, we deal with main tenance of all vehicles and organization of the parts that keep those vehicles running. We order parts for all the types of vehicles you see roaming the base, including mainte nance vehicles, 5-tons, HUMVEEs and buses, he said. We have a good system, so we can get any required parts, fast. Our job here at GTMO pretty much fol lows a routine, said Spc. Jeremiah N. Proctor. We place the order, and the parts come in every time the barge comes in. Performing a routine job well is nothing new for most of these troops. Technically, this mission here is similar to the work we do back home at the warehouse, said Sanders. But at Fort Hood, we support different units and deal with a wider area of work responsibilities. We deal with many more different parts. My tasks here are similar to those back home where Im working out of the ware house issuing parts, said Proctor. But for some of the soldiers from the 602nd, their assigned tasks here arent so sim ilar to the work they did back home. Back at Fort Hood, I work as a mechanic fixing vehicles, said Spc. Shane M. Golay. When I got here, they had me working main tenance fixing a fleet of 5-ton trucks. But they ended up training me to drive buses, and now I strictly run the bus route. Not that change is always a bad thing. Sometimes you have to get up and out of your everyday routine to really open your eyes. I enjoy being a mechanic because I love the work, said Golay. But its nice meeting a lot of people every day on the bus. In that way, its better than working in the motor pool with the same group of people all the time. When the Army called upon the 602nd for assistance, they answered the call with more than enough highly motivated soldiers to per form what needed to be done down here. JTF-160 asked for the personnel they needed from our unit, and we supplied it, said Proctor. Originally we came down with 25 troops, but half the crew has been sent back to Fort Hood already. Some of our troops got sent back home for having no work down here, said Golay. But they kept a hold on our mechanics and a few supply guys. At times the job can get stressful, said Sanders. But we have to keep the vehicles running and make sure the mission keeps rolling. One more difference from Fort Hood: here at GTMO, the 602nd soldiers have had the unique opportunity to work in a joint environ ment, where the servicemember standing next to you might not have done a pushup since Basic Training. At GTMO, were performing our mission combined with different units from different branches of the service, said Sanders. There is a good blend of units working together at the motor pool here, said Proctor. Its a good learning experience to get to work with guys from the other services, said Sanders. Hopefully these guys will take back with them some things that theyve picked up from me. Its been a different experience working in the motor pool here with the different branches of service, said Golay. They did the job using their system, and we took care of business using ours. But weve all ended up coming together and cooperating, and every things worked out very well so far. No matter the difference of insignia on an individuals uniform, one thing is known in the maintenance game: if you fix something right the first time and take every job with a one shot, one kill mentality, it will lead to a smoother and more successful operation as time passes by. In the beginning, we were busy ordering a lot of parts because many vehicles were break ing down, said Sanders. But the guys in the motor pool have been doing a great job keep ing all the vehicles up, running and missionready. Thats made everything easier. Motivation and pride have carried them this far, and confidence will carry them throughout the rest of their tour here, even when the going might get tougher. Now, with JTF-160 and JTF-170 joining together, there will be more vehicles for us to worry about and more parts that have to be ordered, said Proctor. But weve been doing a great job of holding things down, and that wont stop with the merger. Coming here and supporting JTFs mis sion has been all right, said Golay. Well be here doing whatever jobs they have for us until we leave, and then were gone. Im proud to be part of this mission, said Sanders. I think weve been doing an out standing job. All good things seem to come to an end, so unfortunately proud moments do as well. But for these active-duty troopers, its all about moving on with positive inspiration and moti vation thats high, always ready to accept what the future holds for them. Im looking forward to getting out of here and heading back to Fort Hood, said Proctor. But since 9/11, weve been deploying a lot, so Im sure it wont be too long before were back out and at it again. Page 11 Friday, October 18, 2002 602nd Maint. Co. delivers their part Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Spc. Shane M. Golay, who started out working maintenance, now drives the bus routes of GTMO. Staff Sgt. Michael Sanders searches through the inventory to find a match for a HUMVEE headlight. Spc. Jeremiah N. Proctor orders vehicle parts with a computerized system.

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hasnt happened. If I have to use that weapon, theres a seri ous problem. A lot has gone wrong. Other than that, were in the safest place in the world. I look around. The rain has stopped, leav ing the tower dry and the air thick with mois ture and perfectly still. A squadron of dragonflies chugs by the tower, passing over the cell blocks in apparent formation. That inimitable Delta smell, I suddenly realize, isnt so bad up here. The aluminum guard on the towers ladder begins to shake we have a visitor. It is Capt. Jason C. Beaty, the 2/142s company commander, paying Bishop and I a visit. He gives me a grin and a thumbs up. I ask him how the days going. Its a routine day for the tower guards, he says. Theyre up here day and night, 24 hours a day, watching the camp. Sometimes its uneventful, sometimes theres activity. Todays been pretty quiet. He and Bishop chat a while about the sup plementing 1/22, who are now staffing nearly half the towers. Its working out well, Beaty says. We all lean over the rail for a minute, watching as a detainee with an amputated foot is wheeled back to his cell after a trip to the clinic. Beaty turns. Boy, its humid today, he says, as a drop of sweat rolls off the end of his nose. He bids us goodbye, gets back on the ladder, and descends out of view. *** Down in the camp, its now lunch time. Two soldiers hump boxes of MREs (vegetar ian, Im guessing) into the cell block area from a palate outside the gate. Guards begin to filter toward their eating area toting white styro foam to-go boxes. Below us, we hear a voice calling up its Staff Sgt. Robert W. Reese, telling Bishop its time for chow. Bishop ties the gray NEX shopping basket he keeps in the tower to a long green rope and lowers it over the side. Reese puts two meals in the basket I am being treated to lunch as a guest of the tower people and we hoist up the days lunch: chicken, vegetables and a din ner roll, with carrot cake for desert. Not bad at all. I am munching away when Bishops radio crackles. Thats how I know its lunch time, he says, smiling and shaking his head. He puts his food back down and tends to the business at hand: an unidentified ship, barely dis cernible in the haze, has aroused the concern of one of the towers at the edge of the camp. After a few minutes of listening to all the towers weigh in over the radio, and a few peeks through his binoculars, Bishop silences the other towers with a report: All towers, all towers, you have, out in the waters, a Coast Guard cutter and a merchant vessel. The assents roll in: Roger out. Roger out. Roger out. Its over. Most of our exciting action comes from the outside, Bishop explains between bites of chicken. People taking unauthorized pic tures. Unescorted migrant workers. We have had boats in our waters that are unrecogniz able. We call it in to our office, they call it in to the Navy skywatch, and it goes as far as it has to go from there. My favorite moment was when the the jets flew over prior to Sept. 11, he says, look ing up at the sky. Two fighters just roared over. M ade the soldiers feel good. And the detainees started yelling Allah, and Im thinking, he aint gonna help you. *** The time spent in the towers can really wear you out, Bishop says. You ask any of the guys what theyd rather do, towers of patrols, theyd say patrols. But its not so bad. Its an opportunity to think about things, to understand things. He catches me yawning in the steamy air. Sometimes you got to fight the Z-monster, but you just fight it. The thing to remember, if theres nothing going on, if its boring, thats good, he says. Nothing going on means people down there are doing what theyre supposed to be doing. *** Six hours after it began, Bishops time in the SOG tower is done. Now, he explains, he heads down to the QRF to stand ready there for another sixxx hours of on-call down time, just in case something bad does happen and the infantry is needed. But nothing is happening. Bishop neatly piles his flak jacket, LBE belt and Kevlar against the wall. Its quiet, Staff Sgt. Worthington tells me in the hallway. There used to be a lot more work for the towers when they were building Camp III; sometimes the contractors would gather outside the fence and sneak peeks inside. But not much lately. Bishop and a few others mill around the shift board, and he tells me his options a nap, a movie in the QRFs TV room, or, well, more hanging around, chatting, waiting for his twel hours to end and set him free for another welve before it starts all over again. He and a few others convice a reluctant Sgt. Sammy General Franco to make a run up to the Camp America mini-mart for Gatorade and smokes. *** This is it. This is all we do now, Bishop says. Just be here, just in case. Hes not in the mood for a nap, so he joins Reese and a handful of other tower guards for relaxation time on the QRFs back steps. The buildings are stocked with shackles, riot gear, weapons both lethal and non-lethal. Outside, twoo gun trucks stand at the ready. But for the moment, the QRF team consists of a handful of weary sergeants sitting on the back steps, smoking, in a just-regathering rain. Page 7 Friday, October 18, 2002 sixx hours in the tower a day in the life of the 2/142 infantrymen with the birds eye view. The walls and towers of Camp Delta, as seen from the media observation point through an 85mm lens. Page 10 Friday, October 18, 2002 Its better to be safe than sorry, said Army Capt. Eric Carlson of J-2. We try to prevent anything from being put out that could be used against us. In a nutshell, that is one mission of the ser vicemembers that work in the J-2 shop of what will soon be Joint Task Force GTMO: making sure that operational security is not compromised. Were responsible for security of the JTF, said Carlson. We look at certain force protec tion issues, operational security and analyze intelligence. We look at all aspects of intelli gence coming in and out of the base, and given what intel we have, see any weaknesses that we have. We do intelligence gathering from multi ple sources and put the pieces of the puzzle together to try to figure out how close is the enemy to coming toward us at GTMO, said Sgt. 1st Class Roger Brisson of J-2. We also look at vulnerabilities of the installations on post and try to figure out what ways they can be compromised and we take the steps to pro tect the soldiers who work there. We give the commander this information so that he can base his plans on protecting us. Examining likely targets is the work of our analysts and counter-intelligence person nel, said Carlson. We look from the terrorists point of view, how would he get in, and figure out ways of fixing any thing that needs to be fixed. Another important job of the J-2 is mak ing sure terrorists cant go through our trash. Certainly burning the trash is a critical mission, said Bris son. From papers dealing with service members coming and going to supply orders, they are destroyed to protect them from any unperceived enemies that might try to gain access to them. Any hard copies of any material that have names and numbers can be used by the enemy, said Carlson. Thats a mission weve accomplished really well. And while everyone serving within the joint task forces here has an important role, the mission of J-2 is immense even in the grand scheme of things. This is a critical mission, said Bris son. Information like your credit card bill can be used to gather intelligence on the strength of the personnel down here and what our capabilities or vul nerabilities are. Every little piece of information is another part of the puzzle, and the more little pieces terrorists get, the easier it is for them to get the whole picture and thereby come up with a plan of attack, whether its to repatriate their comrades or kill Americans. We have to assume that there are opera tives gathering intel on us, said Carlson. Cuba is listening. They know what we do. And if they know, its possible that someone else knows. Were surrounded by a commu nist country, which monitors everything we say or do as far as radio transmissions, com puters, the Internet, even phone lines. People need to watch what they say. That means walking a fine line between classified information and harmless chitchat. Because sometimes the littlest things can have the biggest consequences. When in doubt, dont say it, said Carlson. Youre privy to information that not every one needs to know, dont let anyone know. When youre e-mailing or on the phone with a loved one, be conscious of what youre say ing, because you may know things that in the wrong hands could hurt you, your family, the United States and the war on terrorism. And so the members of J-2 rely on every other servicemember here to practice good OPSEC, which at this point theyre doing very well, said Carlson. With this many troops its tough, but I think OPSEC is improving all the time, Carl son said. We have counter-intelligence peo ple within the camps that handle a lot of OPSEC issues, because the guards especially have to watch what they say. The detainees can hear them, and sometimes theyll say something and the guards will be trying to fig ure out how they found that out. But the guards have been good out there. Performing such a vital mission is no walk in the park, especially when that park is lit tered with potential ammo for the enemy. And all through the merging of the two Joint task forces and difficulties that come with that, the mission of J-2 must continue. With the merger of the JTFs, the J-2 will be very spread out, but were still doing the same job, said Carlson. Its very tough, almost impossible, to have 100 percent opera tional security, but we focus on the important things and try to do the best we can. Despite the difficulties, the servicemem bers in the J-2 shop are proud of the job theyre doing. Im proud to be an American, Im proud to be in the United States Armed Forces and Im proud to be here on deployment as a citizensoldier serving my county in its time of need, said Brisson. Safeguarding sensitive infor mation is one of the more important jobs I could be doing here. This is stuff that well tell are grandchil dren about, said Carlson. Its a real positive to actually be a part of the operation handling the detainees. And while Carlson may be proud of his success so far, in the end J2 depends on every one else practicing good OPSEC. Operational security is an ongoing strug gle, because its human nature to talk about the things that we do, said Carlson. And in some cases, we have to go against human nature, which is not an easy task. But there are still people out there that want to hurt us, so servicemembers need to be careful and not become complacent. Story by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire OPSEC: critical mission keeping us safe Photo by Spc. Ivey N. Hodges Army Sgt. 1st Class Roger Brisson of J-2 examines a secret document, which in the wrong hands, could spell certain doom for the U.S. and the war on terror. J-2 fights the good fight to ensure good operational security is maintained Photo by Spc. Ivey N. Hodges Army Sgt. 1st Class Roger Brisson of J-2 empties burn bags into an incinerator.

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When you go to the Navy Exchange commissary, you are going to notice some changes in the classifi cation and placement of your favorite items. Do not panic! Its not the NEXs intention to get you con fused. This change is part of a rigorous renovation process to better serve you, said commissary manager Beverly Prater. We are reorganizing the commissary for easier shopping, said Prater. Some items that were on the left will be moved to right. But everything will be where its supposed to be. For example, when you go to baking, all items related to baking will be together. She also said that the installation of new fixtures will allow the store to add more new items that are constantly in demand by the patrons. This is the final phase of the renovation we started a year ago. Now, everything is new. We are proud to do it. Its the communitys only place to shop, and now weve made it better, she said. The job required a lot of manpower. The Defense Commissary Agency selected highly skilled and experienced personnel from major private-sector manufacturers such as Procter & Gamble to come to GTMO for this wall-to-wall renovation. And from Saturday evening to Tuesday morning, NEX and DECA employees put their skills together to remove outdated fixtures and replace them with new ones. After installing the new shelves, they worked day and night to ensure that the new item classifications made good logical sense and would provide fast and easy shopping for all customers, whatever they came in to buy. Were very happy to have finished with it all, said Prater. We hope everyone else likes it too. Page 8 Page 9 Friday, October 18, 2002 New-look commissary for fast, easy shopping Raymond Waugh, who works in the visual merchandising and resetting department of the Navy Exchange, removes the old fixtures of the commissary shelves Saturday evening before the beginning of the renovation process that will help the NEX better serve civilians and servicemembers at GTMO. Story and photos by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire NEX employee Anthony Cohen meticulously rearranges the items that were removed for the renovation of the commissary shelves Sunday morning. Ainsley Gordon, an employee of the NEX, carefully checks out the bar code of the items that are displayed on the brand new shelves Sunday afternoon during the renovation process. Cecilio Brigola, who works for the Navy Exchange on a part-time basis in maintenance and stocking, arduously applies the strength of his muscles to rip into pieces a corru gated box whose contents have been emptied during the renovation of the commissary. Kent Hurt, one of the highly skilled personnel sent by the Defense Commissary Agency, checks out the classification of the items displayed on the new shelves.

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When you go to the Navy Exchange commissary, you are going to notice some changes in the classifi cation and placement of your favorite items. Do not panic! Its not the NEXs intention to get you con fused. This change is part of a rigorous renovation process to better serve you, said commissary manager Beverly Prater. We are reorganizing the commissary for easier shopping, said Prater. Some items that were on the left will be moved to right. But everything will be where its supposed to be. For example, when you go to baking, all items related to baking will be together. She also said that the installation of new fixtures will allow the store to add more new items that are constantly in demand by the patrons. This is the final phase of the renovation we started a year ago. Now, everything is new. We are proud to do it. Its the communitys only place to shop, and now weve made it better, she said. The job required a lot of manpower. The Defense Commissary Agency selected highly skilled and experienced personnel from major private-sector manufacturers such as Procter & Gamble to come to GTMO for this wall-to-wall renovation. And from Saturday evening to Tuesday morning, NEX and DECA employees put their skills together to remove outdated fixtures and replace them with new ones. After installing the new shelves, they worked day and night to ensure that the new item classifications made good logical sense and would provide fast and easy shopping for all customers, whatever they came in to buy. Were very happy to have finished with it all, said Prater. We hope everyone else likes it too. Page 8 Page 9 Friday, October 18, 2002 New-look commissary for fast, easy shopping Raymond Waugh, who works in the visual merchandising and resetting department of the Navy Exchange, removes the old fixtures of the commissary shelves Saturday evening before the beginning of the renovation process that will help the NEX better serve civilians and servicemembers at GTMO. Story and photos by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire NEX employee Anthony Cohen meticulously rearranges the items that were removed for the renovation of the commissary shelves Sunday morning. Ainsley Gordon, an employee of the NEX, carefully checks out the bar code of the items that are displayed on the brand new shelves Sunday afternoon during the renovation process. Cecilio Brigola, who works for the Navy Exchange on a part-time basis in maintenance and stocking, arduously applies the strength of his muscles to rip into pieces a corru gated box whose contents have been emptied during the renovation of the commissary. Kent Hurt, one of the highly skilled personnel sent by the Defense Commissary Agency, checks out the classification of the items displayed on the new shelves.

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hasnt happened. If I have to use that weapon, theres a seri ous problem. A lot has gone wrong. Other than that, were in the safest place in the world. I look around. The rain has stopped, leav ing the tower dry and the air thick with mois ture and perfectly still. A squadron of dragonflies chugs by the tower, passing over the cell blocks in apparent formation. That inimitable Delta smell, I suddenly realize, isnt so bad up here. The aluminum guard on the towers ladder begins to shake we have a visitor. It is Capt. Jason C. Beaty, the 2/142s company commander, paying Bishop and I a visit. He gives me a grin and a thumbs up. I ask him how the days going. Its a routine day for the tower guards, he says. Theyre up here day and night, 24 hours a day, watching the camp. Sometimes its uneventful, sometimes theres activity. Todays been pretty quiet. He and Bishop chat a while about the sup plementing 1/22, who are now staffing nearly half the towers. Its working out well, Beaty says. We all lean over the rail for a minute, watching as a detainee with an amputated foot is wheeled back to his cell after a trip to the clinic. Beaty turns. Boy, its humid today, he says, as a drop of sweat rolls off the end of his nose. He bids us goodbye, gets back on the ladder, and descends out of view. *** Down in the camp, its now lunch time. Two soldiers hump boxes of MREs (vegetar ian, Im guessing) into the cell block area from a palate outside the gate. Guards begin to filter toward their eating area toting white styro foam to-go boxes. Below us, we hear a voice calling up its Staff Sgt. Robert W. Reese, telling Bishop its time for chow. Bishop ties the gray NEX shopping basket he keeps in the tower to a long green rope and lowers it over the side. Reese puts two meals in the basket I am being treated to lunch as a guest of the tower people and we hoist up the days lunch: chicken, vegetables and a din ner roll, with carrot cake for desert. Not bad at all. I am munching away when Bishops radio crackles. Thats how I know its lunch time, he says, smiling and shaking his head. He puts his food back down and tends to the business at hand: an unidentified ship, barely dis cernible in the haze, has aroused the concern of one of the towers at the edge of the camp. After a few minutes of listening to all the towers weigh in over the radio, and a few peeks through his binoculars, Bishop silences the other towers with a report: All towers, all towers, you have, out in the waters, a Coast Guard cutter and a merchant vessel. The assents roll in: Roger out. Roger out. Roger out. Its over. Most of our exciting action comes from the outside, Bishop explains between bites of chicken. People taking unauthorized pic tures. Unescorted migrant workers. We have had boats in our waters that are unrecogniz able. We call it in to our office, they call it in to the Navy skywatch, and it goes as far as it has to go from there. My favorite moment was when the the jets flew over prior to Sept. 11, he says, look ing up at the sky. Two fighters just roared over. M ade the soldiers feel good. And the detainees started yelling Allah, and Im thinking, he aint gonna help you. *** The time spent in the towers can really wear you out, Bishop says. You ask any of the guys what theyd rather do, towers of patrols, theyd say patrols. But its not so bad. Its an opportunity to think about things, to understand things. He catches me yawning in the steamy air. Sometimes you got to fight the Z-monster, but you just fight it. The thing to remember, if theres nothing going on, if its boring, thats good, he says. Nothing going on means people down there are doing what theyre supposed to be doing. *** Six hours after it began, Bishops time in the SOG tower is done. Now, he explains, he heads down to the QRF to stand ready there for another sixxx hours of on-call down time, just in case something bad does happen and the infantry is needed. But nothing is happening. Bishop neatly piles his flak jacket, LBE belt and Kevlar against the wall. Its quiet, Staff Sgt. Worthington tells me in the hallway. There used to be a lot more work for the towers when they were building Camp III; sometimes the contractors would gather outside the fence and sneak peeks inside. But not much lately. Bishop and a few others mill around the shift board, and he tells me his options a nap, a movie in the QRFs TV room, or, well, more hanging around, chatting, waiting for his twel hours to end and set him free for another welve before it starts all over again. He and a few others convice a reluctant Sgt. Sammy General Franco to make a run up to the Camp America mini-mart for Gatorade and smokes. *** This is it. This is all we do now, Bishop says. Just be here, just in case. Hes not in the mood for a nap, so he joins Reese and a handful of other tower guards for relaxation time on the QRFs back steps. The buildings are stocked with shackles, riot gear, weapons both lethal and non-lethal. Outside, twoo gun trucks stand at the ready. But for the moment, the QRF team consists of a handful of weary sergeants sitting on the back steps, smoking, in a just-regathering rain. Page 7 Friday, October 18, 2002 sixx hours in the tower a day in the life of the 2/142 infantrymen with the birds eye view. The walls and towers of Camp Delta, as seen from the media observation point through an 85mm lens. Page 10 Friday, October 18, 2002 Its better to be safe than sorry, said Army Capt. Eric Carlson of J-2. We try to prevent anything from being put out that could be used against us. In a nutshell, that is one mission of the ser vicemembers that work in the J-2 shop of what will soon be Joint Task Force GTMO: making sure that operational security is not compromised. Were responsible for security of the JTF, said Carlson. We look at certain force protec tion issues, operational security and analyze intelligence. We look at all aspects of intelli gence coming in and out of the base, and given what intel we have, see any weaknesses that we have. We do intelligence gathering from multi ple sources and put the pieces of the puzzle together to try to figure out how close is the enemy to coming toward us at GTMO, said Sgt. 1st Class Roger Brisson of J-2. We also look at vulnerabilities of the installations on post and try to figure out what ways they can be compromised and we take the steps to pro tect the soldiers who work there. We give the commander this information so that he can base his plans on protecting us. Examining likely targets is the work of our analysts and counter-intelligence person nel, said Carlson. We look from the terrorists point of view, how would he get in, and figure out ways of fixing any thing that needs to be fixed. Another important job of the J-2 is mak ing sure terrorists cant go through our trash. Certainly burning the trash is a critical mission, said Bris son. From papers dealing with service members coming and going to supply orders, they are destroyed to protect them from any unperceived enemies that might try to gain access to them. Any hard copies of any material that have names and numbers can be used by the enemy, said Carlson. Thats a mission weve accomplished really well. And while everyone serving within the joint task forces here has an important role, the mission of J-2 is immense even in the grand scheme of things. This is a critical mission, said Bris son. Information like your credit card bill can be used to gather intelligence on the strength of the personnel down here and what our capabilities or vul nerabilities are. Every little piece of information is another part of the puzzle, and the more little pieces terrorists get, the easier it is for them to get the whole picture and thereby come up with a plan of attack, whether its to repatriate their comrades or kill Americans. We have to assume that there are opera tives gathering intel on us, said Carlson. Cuba is listening. They know what we do. And if they know, its possible that someone else knows. Were surrounded by a commu nist country, which monitors everything we say or do as far as radio transmissions, com puters, the Internet, even phone lines. People need to watch what they say. That means walking a fine line between classified information and harmless chitchat. Because sometimes the littlest things can have the biggest consequences. When in doubt, dont say it, said Carlson. Youre privy to information that not every one needs to know, dont let anyone know. When youre e-mailing or on the phone with a loved one, be conscious of what youre say ing, because you may know things that in the wrong hands could hurt you, your family, the United States and the war on terrorism. And so the members of J-2 rely on every other servicemember here to practice good OPSEC, which at this point theyre doing very well, said Carlson. With this many troops its tough, but I think OPSEC is improving all the time, Carl son said. We have counter-intelligence peo ple within the camps that handle a lot of OPSEC issues, because the guards especially have to watch what they say. The detainees can hear them, and sometimes theyll say something and the guards will be trying to fig ure out how they found that out. But the guards have been good out there. Performing such a vital mission is no walk in the park, especially when that park is lit tered with potential ammo for the enemy. And all through the merging of the two Joint task forces and difficulties that come with that, the mission of J-2 must continue. With the merger of the JTFs, the J-2 will be very spread out, but were still doing the same job, said Carlson. Its very tough, almost impossible, to have 100 percent opera tional security, but we focus on the important things and try to do the best we can. Despite the difficulties, the servicemem bers in the J-2 shop are proud of the job theyre doing. Im proud to be an American, Im proud to be in the United States Armed Forces and Im proud to be here on deployment as a citizensoldier serving my county in its time of need, said Brisson. Safeguarding sensitive infor mation is one of the more important jobs I could be doing here. This is stuff that well tell are grandchil dren about, said Carlson. Its a real positive to actually be a part of the operation handling the detainees. And while Carlson may be proud of his success so far, in the end J2 depends on every one else practicing good OPSEC. Operational security is an ongoing strug gle, because its human nature to talk about the things that we do, said Carlson. And in some cases, we have to go against human nature, which is not an easy task. But there are still people out there that want to hurt us, so servicemembers need to be careful and not become complacent. Story by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire OPSEC: critical mission keeping us safe Photo by Spc. Ivey N. Hodges Army Sgt. 1st Class Roger Brisson of J-2 examines a secret document, which in the wrong hands, could spell certain doom for the U.S. and the war on terror. J-2 fights the good fight to ensure good operational security is maintained Photo by Spc. Ivey N. Hodges Army Sgt. 1st Class Roger Brisson of J-2 empties burn bags into an incinerator.

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Page 6 Friday, October 18, 2002 On a uniformly gray Tuesday morning in Camp Delta, at an exact time which I cannot divulge, Sgt. Rodney Bishops shift in the ser geant-of-the-guard (SOG) tower is starting, and it has just begun to rain. Down below in MP-land, the guards patrolling the camps main aisles have donned ponchos. The cell-block gatekeepers are set tled into their tiny lean-tos as the light drizzle slowly darkens the gravel. Up here, the drops tap out a lazy steel-drum rhythm on the towers tin roof, and Bishop, a soldier with the 2/142 infantry company, is pulling my leg about his foul-weather contingency plan. If it gets wet in here, he says, I just go downstairs to the QRF (the Quick Reaction Force area, where the tower guards spend the other half of their shift) and wait it out. He laughs. No, no. You just stow the log book in the box to keep it dry, get on your gear if you brought it, and go on doing what youre doing. Rain or shine. What Bishop is doing, now and for the next sixsi hours, is acting as the hub of the deten tion areas tower-based monitoring system. Ten towers are spread at strategic locations throughout Delta and Delta II, with more due to come online when Camp III becomes oper ational; towering above them all is the cen trally located Tower 2, the SOG tower where Bishop mans the radio, taking calls from the other towers and deciding which reports need to be passed along to the 2/142s communica tions shack in Camp America. If the towers are the eyes of Delta, looking down at the camp and out beyond the walls, the SOG tower is its brain. And with little in the way of trouble plaguing this tightly run detention center, Bishops post is the closest thing the towers have to a hotbed of activity. It can get to be frying times when you got both radios going, and everybodys calling something in, says Staff Sgt. Billy J. Bryley, who will be taking over for Bishop when his shift is up. But its usually nothing too bad. Yeah, some guysll call in a gnat flying by, laughs Staff Sgt. John C. Worthington, a platoon sergeant with the 2/142. Its nothing but Alert, alert, alert. Worthington and Bryley have shown me up to the tower, and have stuck around a while to chat with Bishop and fill me in on the job. But before long, they bid us farewell and go on to other duties down below tower guard is a solitary job, and except on days when there is a pesky writer from The Wire hanging on his every word and noting his every movement, Bishop is up there all alone. A while back, we had two of us in each tower, he says. It was better in a way, hav ing somebody to talk to. But it also took twice as many guys to do the job; we were all work ing twice as hard. So when we got permission from the JTF to go down to one in a tower, we went ahead and did it. Thats why I like being the SOG. Overall, SOG is the most exciting tower, Bishop says. Youre getting talked to all the time, logging reports, coordinating everything. It makes the time go faster. It He cuts himself off. Five minutes before the hour. Time for the radio check. All towers, all towers, this is SOG, says Bishop. Radio check. Tower 1 roger out. Tower 3 roger out. Tower 5 roger out. Tower 6 roger out. Tower 7 roger out. Tower 8 roger out. Tower 9 roger out. Tower 10 roger out. QRF roger out. Bishop pauses. Tower 2 is him, but... Tower 4, this is SOG. Would you try that again? Tower 4. I got you. Tower 4 is one of the new guys the 1/22 of the 4th Infanty Division, active-duty soldiers out of Fort Hood, Texas that arrived last weekend to supplemement the 2/142 crew in their ever-increasing list of force-protection responsibilities here at GTMO. They have all been here before and in fact those here now volunteered to return but after four months, some of the procedures have changed, and the new infantrymen are still making a few minor adjustments to the 2/142s way of running force protection from the towers. Were still working some of the bugs out, but its better already having them here, Bishop says. Theyre picking it up fine. Once you get down the basic stuff, theres really nothing else, he says. He pauses, lis tens to the radio for a moment, then presses the button to transmit. SOG to QRF. Can we send somebody to Tower 10 to relieve for a bathroom break? *** I ask Bishop if anything crazy ever hap pened on his watch. No, nothing. Just cell extractions, when one of the detainees has been acting up or needs to go to the detention hospital, he says. Weve been trained in that too, so if were in the QRF were ready and if were in the tow ers were watching extra close for trouble. Those are the hot moments. But nothings ever really happened where weve had to get involved from up here. I look down at the camp. Here and there, detainees are on the move toddling along in their shower shoes, shackles on their wrists and ankles and an MP guard on each arm, zip ping by on the back seats of golf carts, their escorts keeping them in place with an arm across the waist and a gloved hand gripping the arm-rest across from them. I think of Sein feld the stop-short move. It is not a scene that suggests trouble is in the offing. The tower people do have their rules of engagement, Bishop says, gesturing mean ingfully to the M-16 hanging from a clip on the six-foot-square towers inside wall. When theres something going on, like detainees being brought into the camp, you try to line up angles of fire in case the people on the ground need that support in case the detainees get the best of the guards. But the only real mishap wed have to deal with from up here is if theres mishan dling down there by the MP guards. And that Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire On shift at Camp Delta: The loneliest job in Delta: A guard with the 2/142 infantry mans his post on the camps perimeter. The Wire s thoroughly scrubbed, J-2 approved, shift-by-shift series kicks off with When duty called, Texas delivered. The 602nd Maintenance Company from Fort Hood, Texas, is an active-duty unit con sisting of mechanics, supply specialists, machinists, technicians and vehicle operators. Responsibilities for this unit include order ing and tracking parts, dispatching and tasking vehicles, to maintaining those vehicles when theyre in need of repair. Ive spent the last four of my thirteen years in the Army working as a supply spe cialist with the 602nd, said Staff Sgt. Michael Sanders. Here at GTMO, we deal with main tenance of all vehicles and organization of the parts that keep those vehicles running. We order parts for all the types of vehicles you see roaming the base, including mainte nance vehicles, 5-tons, HUMVEEs and buses, he said. We have a good system, so we can get any required parts, fast. Our job here at GTMO pretty much fol lows a routine, said Spc. Jeremiah N. Proctor. We place the order, and the parts come in every time the barge comes in. Performing a routine job well is nothing new for most of these troops. Technically, this mission here is similar to the work we do back home at the warehouse, said Sanders. But at Fort Hood, we support different units and deal with a wider area of work responsibilities. We deal with many more different parts. My tasks here are similar to those back home where Im working out of the ware house issuing parts, said Proctor. But for some of the soldiers from the 602nd, their assigned tasks here arent so sim ilar to the work they did back home. Back at Fort Hood, I work as a mechanic fixing vehicles, said Spc. Shane M. Golay. When I got here, they had me working main tenance fixing a fleet of 5-ton trucks. But they ended up training me to drive buses, and now I strictly run the bus route. Not that change is always a bad thing. Sometimes you have to get up and out of your everyday routine to really open your eyes. I enjoy being a mechanic because I love the work, said Golay. But its nice meeting a lot of people every day on the bus. In that way, its better than working in the motor pool with the same group of people all the time. When the Army called upon the 602nd for assistance, they answered the call with more than enough highly motivated soldiers to per form what needed to be done down here. JTF-160 asked for the personnel they needed from our unit, and we supplied it, said Proctor. Originally we came down with 25 troops, but half the crew has been sent back to Fort Hood already. Some of our troops got sent back home for having no work down here, said Golay. But they kept a hold on our mechanics and a few supply guys. At times the job can get stressful, said Sanders. But we have to keep the vehicles running and make sure the mission keeps rolling. One more difference from Fort Hood: here at GTMO, the 602nd soldiers have had the unique opportunity to work in a joint environ ment, where the servicemember standing next to you might not have done a pushup since Basic Training. At GTMO, were performing our mission combined with different units from different branches of the service, said Sanders. There is a good blend of units working together at the motor pool here, said Proctor. Its a good learning experience to get to work with guys from the other services, said Sanders. Hopefully these guys will take back with them some things that theyve picked up from me. Its been a different experience working in the motor pool here with the different branches of service, said Golay. They did the job using their system, and we took care of business using ours. But weve all ended up coming together and cooperating, and every things worked out very well so far. No matter the difference of insignia on an individuals uniform, one thing is known in the maintenance game: if you fix something right the first time and take every job with a one shot, one kill mentality, it will lead to a smoother and more successful operation as time passes by. In the beginning, we were busy ordering a lot of parts because many vehicles were break ing down, said Sanders. But the guys in the motor pool have been doing a great job keep ing all the vehicles up, running and missionready. Thats made everything easier. Motivation and pride have carried them this far, and confidence will carry them throughout the rest of their tour here, even when the going might get tougher. Now, with JTF-160 and JTF-170 joining together, there will be more vehicles for us to worry about and more parts that have to be ordered, said Proctor. But weve been doing a great job of holding things down, and that wont stop with the merger. Coming here and supporting JTFs mis sion has been all right, said Golay. Well be here doing whatever jobs they have for us until we leave, and then were gone. Im proud to be part of this mission, said Sanders. I think weve been doing an out standing job. All good things seem to come to an end, so unfortunately proud moments do as well. But for these active-duty troopers, its all about moving on with positive inspiration and moti vation thats high, always ready to accept what the future holds for them. Im looking forward to getting out of here and heading back to Fort Hood, said Proctor. But since 9/11, weve been deploying a lot, so Im sure it wont be too long before were back out and at it again. Page 11 Friday, October 18, 2002 602nd Maint. Co. delivers their part Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Spc. Shane M. Golay, who started out working maintenance, now drives the bus routes of GTMO. Staff Sgt. Michael Sanders searches through the inventory to find a match for a HUMVEE headlight. Spc. Jeremiah N. Proctor orders vehicle parts with a computerized system.

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JTF-160 and JTF-170 as a smart move. The merger was a good idea because it will bring all of the services together, he said. Being on the same page can only make life better. Therell be more resources now, which will mean more can be accomplished. I would like to see more consistency, and I believe that will happen now. The chains of command and NCO support channels will be strengthened because well have better communication. Although comparisons might be drawn between this new leader and the man he has replaced, the legendary Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Funaro that will not hem up Clayton, who knows the job just as well. I admired the way Command Sgt. Maj. Funaro took care of the servicemembers. He had a presence throughout the task force, said Clayton. But I intend to also have a presence in following his footsteps as far as taking care of every soldier, sailor, airman, Marine and Coastguardsman, because they are my main concern. And while you wont see Clayton ceremo niously smacking a private in the head with his cover like his predecessor did, he will carry on nevertheless with his own style of command by following the Golden Rule. Do unto others as you want others to do to you, is what I say. I lead by example. I wouldnt ask anyone to do something that I havent done myself, said Clay ton. I have an open door policy, and I like to see service members learning as they go. That learning, he said, comes from effort. And Clay tons advice to all servicemembers is to never give up in the face of diffi culty. For all of the lower enlisted, they should strive to be the best in whatever they want to accomplish, and they will get there. And for the NCOs, they are the backbone of all of the serv ices, said Clayton. This is how we get things done. The fact is we want to continue to have an atmosphere where NCOs can step up, do their jobs and execute. This system works, and we need to continue maintaining such high standards for the JTF. Such an attitude is what has kept Clay ton at the top of his game for some time now. His reserve unit, the 160th MPBN from Tallahassee, Fla., was originally activated for duty in Afghanistan last Christmas but, in a mysterious military way, ended up spending around five months at Ft. Ben ning, Ga. While there, the time was spent training until the 160th eventually arrived at GTMO to become the battalion in charge of running Camp Delta. And this being Claytons first deployment since being in the reserves, he said it has been better than he could have expected. I hope this isnt my last deployment either, because this has been something different than anything Ive been through before, he said. Its been a very rewarding experience. But this deployment has been real good to me because of the professional people Ive come into contact with, whether it be the lower enlisted, NCOs or officers. When the people under you do a job well done, it makes it eas ier for people in my position. Even with his last few weeks here at that top enlisted spot, Clayton is still thankful to see the light at the end of the deployment tunnel. I really look forward to going home and seeing my family and returning to my job, said Clayton, a mental health program analyst for Florida State Hospital. Hell be returning a changed man, he said. This deployment has changed me in that now I notice the little things are the ones that are the most important. Ive gotten into PT quite a bit since Ive been here, and Ive really bettered myself. This deployment has also made me realized the importance of the mili tary as a whole, that we all have our part. And with the current global war on terror ism being a significant historical cornerstone for the military, Clayton is glad to be here in the relative thick of it. Im very proud to be playing a part in oper ation Enduring Freedom, but I never dreamed that it would be in this capacity, said Clayton. Its really something to look back on and be able to tell families, communities and the rest of the citizens. Were down here making a dif ference. Every servicemember thats a part of this joint task force has been making a difference, and Clayton is striving to make some more with his new role. Its been a long road for him, and looking to the future, he sees the coming JTF-GTMO as setting the standard in military operations. Good things are to come, he said. With time, I believe that this operation here will evolve into a one of the better joint task forces in the entire military. Page 5 Friday, October 18, 2002 CSM, from page 1 Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony D. Clayton checks in with Navy Chief Marcia Cunning ham to see the status of her work and state of her morale. Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony D. Clayton of the 160th MPBN is the temporary com mand sergeant major of Joint Task Force 160/170. During his short stay in this posi tion, Clayton hopes to boost the morale and quality of life of all servicemembers. Page 12 Friday, October 18, 2002 Being deployed to GTMO is tough enough without having to do it for free. The mission of J-8 is to make sure servicemembers here are paid timely and correctly, said Army Sgt. Michael Lackey, with the 153rd Finance Bat talion and working for J-8 of Joint Task Force 160/170. We dont want our servicemembers to be worried about their pay while theyre focusing on their mission. That has been the challenge for J-8. J-8 is divided into two sections, with one taking care of finance issues, and the other dealing with budgets. The finance office is located on the first floor of the Pink Palace. This is the location where servicemembers can come with their questions and to address pay issues. All servicemem bers are welcome to come to us with their pay problems, said Army 1st Lt. Rhonda Stevens, 153rd Finance Battalion, the officer in charge of J-8 finance section. Our main job here is cus tomer service. We are qualified to help solve any pay issues related to the Army personnel, but we can also help the other servicemembers research pay problems through the Defense Joint Military Sys tem, she said. J-8 can help with Leave and Earning Statements (LES), Servicemembers Group Life Insurance (SGLI), Thrift Savings Plan (TSP), Hardship Duty Pay and Basic Housing Allowance (BAH). J-8s procedure to address servicemem bers issues and inquiries is simple. When people come to see us, they have to fill out pay inquiry forms and other necessary documents stating exactly what their pay problem is. This helps us find out whats going on, said Lackey. After collecting the necessary forms from our clients, we go to the Defense Joint Mili tary Pay System to further analyze the issue. Based on our findings, we make corrections, he said. We have been fixing problems that have been neglected before many of our ser vicemembers were even mobilized. The most common issues, said Lackey, are BAH and Family Separation pay. Sometimes people come to us with LESs that have for their zip code and for dependents. Once we get the necessary docu ments from them, we get into the system and fix that, he said. In addition to responding to inquiries sub mitted by servicemembers here on base, J-8 is entrusted with another important task. We are responsible to input into the com puter system Hardship Duty Pay for all the reserve servicemembers, said Lackey. This is a challenging task for J-8 because after 30 days in theater, reservists at GTMO are entitled to hardship duty pay. To help end some confusion, Lackey said for reservists to know that they have recieved their HDP, it will say Other Credits $50.00 on their LES. For active duty personnel, it should read Save Pay $50.00 on their LES. Army Sgt. 1st Class Robert Ruth, also of the 153rd Finance Battalion and the noncom misioned officer in charge of the shop, praises the efficiency of the base-wide computer sys tem, which is used for financial inquiries and data entry. Twice a week, he or another staff person from his office goes to Camp America to address the soldiers issues in person. Now, I can go to Camp America and tell a soldier what is wrong with his LES before get ting to my office, said Ruth. When I get to my office, all I need to do is resolve his prob lem to the best of my ability. Ruth, who has been in the Army for 19 years, said that servicemembers should know how to read their LES. One of his goals is to schedule a class schooling servicemembers about in the ins and outs of their paycheck. For Army Pfc. Amanda Taylor, who recently joined the battalion, working for J-8 helps her better understand the many intricacies of the finance process. She said that she is learning a lot about reservists pay system, which is different from the system used for active-duty person nel. Taylor comes from a fam ily that knows about finance. Her father and two of her brothers, who are still in the Army, worked as finance spe cialists. So military finance was a natural path for her to follow. Though new to the finance world, she finds her job grati fying. I like helping soldiers getting their money. Its very important. If had a pay prob lem, I would like it to be resolved quickly. The J-8 finance section, which is mostly run by the personnel from 153rd FBN, used to be under the leadership of Navy Chief Petty Officer Loretta Jackson, who continues to share her finance experience with the soldiers of the 153rd. She seems confident about the work of the Army personnel. Now, J-8 should be able to assist any ser vicemember, Jackson said. Were all here to support them. Well go that extra mile. For the best service, Lackey said that all servicemembers should check their LES through the EMSS site, which is now being replaced by myPay, a newer and more enhanced system. The more prepared they come to us, the easier it is for us to fix their situation, he said. But in any case, I want people to know that when they come to me, Ill do my best to square them away. Story and photos by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire J-8: Ensuring you get paid on time, correctly Army Sgt. Michael Lackey, 153rd Finance Battalion, left, explains to Army Pfc. Brandon Stanley, right, from the 43rd Military Police Battalion, the various transactions that occurred in his leave earnings statement for the past few months he has been here at GTMO. Army Pfc. Amanda Taylor, 153rd Finance Battalion, reviews a servicemembers pay inquiry. 1st Lt. Rhonda Stevens, 153rd FBN, the OIC of J-8 finance shop, works the offices busy phones.

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Page 4 Friday, October 18, 2002 This weeks question: What movie title would best describe you as a person? Air Force Airman James R. Andrews, J-6 Air Force One. Marine Corps Sgt. Jar ret Boren, MCSF Co. Desperado. Army Sgt. 1st Class James Russell, 43rd MPBN, J-6 Gladiator. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Legnaioli, JTF 160/170 Mail room Full Metal Jacket. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Steve Boyce, SEABEE 5 Mission Impossible 2. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Of Marines and mortars... Motivated Marines Lance Cpl. William Kennedy, Lance Cpl. Robert OBryant and Cpl. Chris Stalder of the Marine Corps Security Force Company took a break from their usual duties to partake in 60 mm mortar training on Wednes day at Marine Hill. The Marines were training to rapidly and expertly set up an M224 Mortar after the coordinates of their tar get have been relayed to them via radio. The 60 mm Mortar is intended to destroy by curved-trajectory fire. It can be used against light armored targets to create a smoke screen and terrain illumination. So if such a sit uation arises here at GTMO, these Marines will be ready for it. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Man on the Street Page 13 Friday, October 18, 2002 DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, October 18 8 p.m. Spy Kids 2, PG 99 min 10 p.m. Master of Disguise, PG 80 min Saturday, October 19 8 p.m. Serving Sara, PG13 100 min 10 p.m. Blood Work, R 111 min Sunday, October 20 8 p.m. XXX, PG13 114 min Monday, October 21 8 p.m. Signs, PG13 107 min Tuesday, October 22 8 p.m. Spy Kids 2, PG13 99 min Wednesday, October 23 8 p.m. Serving Sara, PG13 100 min Thursday, October 24 8 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG13 94 min CAMP BUCKELEY Friday, October 18 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann, PG13 91 min 10 p.m. The Sum of all Fears, PG13 119 min Saturday, October 19 8 p.m. The Accidental Spy, PG13 98 min 10 p.m. Hannibal, R 100 min Sunday, October 20 8, 10 p.m. The Widowmaker, PG13 138min Monday, October 21 8 p.m. Novocaine, R 95 min Tuesday, October 22 8 p.m. Like Mike, PG 100 min Wednesday, October 23 8 p.m. Gentlemans Game, R 112 min Thursday, October 24 8, 10 p.m. Tomb Raiders, PG13 101 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Do you lead life, Or does life lead you? Maybe reality is fiction And all lies are true. Could it be before you ever started You figured all hope was through? BECAUSE ITS NOT. Maybe life is an appetite in which You hit the spot. Maybe life is like cancer in which You caused the rot. IF THAT COULD BE You found your way through the dark ness, When you couldnt even see. You fight your way through dismay While scared people flee. Through thick and through thin On your side I will be. I LOOK UP TO YOU. Across 1 Congressional vote 4 Stir to activity 9 South by east 12 Irans neighbor 14 Italian city 15 Vessel 16 South American country 17 Make used to 18 Challenge 19 Tangle 21 Tryst 23 Quoth 25 Hole 26 Kind and gracious 30 Crypts 34 Hatchet 35 Unattractive 36 Antenna 37 What dogs sit on 39 Jalopy 41 Asian dress 42 Scarce 44 Way 46 After sun. 47 Map collection 48 Yelling 50 Rank 52 Bridge 53 Wetland plant 56 Bad smells 59 Sharpen 60 Howled 62 Wail 64 Waterless 65 Plentiful 66 Approach 67 Explosive 68 Looks for 69 Sere Down 1 Clip 2 Greek god of war 3 Fiber 4 Grinning 5 Attach 6 Astringent 7 Hardest to find 8 Proposal position 9 Cob 10 Floating ice 11 Before, poetically 13 Similar 15 Programs used to modify files 20 Pregos competi tion 22 Lug 24 Myth 26 Light weight wood 27 Correct 28 Asian nation 29 Dryad 31 __ Vice (tv show) 32 Lord 33 Catapult 36 Diametrical oppo site 38 Growled 40 Rowers needs 43 Russian ruler 45 Noodle 48 Bun topping 49 Noted 51 Large brass instru ments 53 Came into life 54 Piece 55 Publicity 57 Swamp grass 58 Scorch 59 Derby 61 Deer relative 63 Nose

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Page 14 Friday, October 18, 2002 Safe computing tips from J6 Tbe Captains Cup Men and Womens Division Volley ball Rosters are due at GJ Denich Gymnasium NLT 5PM on Monday, Oct. 21. The Mens Soccer Season will start on Monday, Oct. 28 and the Womens Soc cer Season will start on Oct. 29. *Saturday, Oct. 19: An 8K Volksmarchalong the Northeast Gate and Cuban perimeter, cameras allowed. Buses leave from Marine Hill at 0630. First come, first serve. Please contact Capt. Gormly or Maj. Buchanan at #5217 for more information. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Pete's Marina. Aerobics Classes, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 6AM-7AM, 8:30AM-9:30AM, and 5:00PM6:00PM. Tae-Kwon Do, Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:30AM-12:30PM, and 6:00PM-9:00PM (one hour classes) Tues. and Thurs. 6:00PM-9:00PM. 1-on-1 Spinning Classes, GJ Denich Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 6:30PM-7:30PM. Yoga Classes, Tues. Thurs. 5:15PM-6:15PM, GJ Denich Gym Yoga Center. Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, Mon.-Fri., 11AM Mid night. Pool Hours: Marine Hill Pool: Open Swim, 6AM6PM, daily; Windjammer Pool: Lap Swim, 6AM8AM, Mon.-Sat., Open Swim, 10AM-6PM Mon.-Sat., 6AM-8AM & 10AM-6PM, Sun .; Deer Point Pool: Open Swim, 11AM-7PM, Mon.-Fri., 10AM-6PM Sat. & Sun. Friday, October 18th 7PM-12PM, Friday Extreme Bowling, Marblehead Lanes. Saturday, October 19th 6:30AM, Volksmarch to NE Gate (see above). Dawn Fishing Tournament, Pelican Petes Marina. Sunday, October 20th 1PM, Football Sundays, Goatlocker. 1PM-6PM, Extreme Bowling, Marblehead Lanes. 6:30PM, Bingo, Windjammer Club. 7PM, Spades Tournament, CBQ Liberty Center. Monday, October 21st 8AM-12PM, Adult Ceramic Classes, Ceramic Shop. 5PM, Captains Cup Mens and Womens Division Volleyball Rosters Due, GJ Denich Gymnasium. Tuesday, October 22nd 6:30PM, Bingo, Windjammer Club. Wednesday, October 23rd 9AM-11AM, and 6PM-7PM Adult Advanced Pottery Classes, Ceramics Shop. 7PM, Cricket Classic XIII Dart Tournament, CBQ Lib erty Center. 8PM, Karaoke, Windjammer Club. Thursday, October 24th 6PM, Bowling Party, courtesy of CBQ Liberty Center. INCOMING!! shouted the sentry, as the first salvos started to arrive. They came seemingly from nowhere innocent-looking e-mails announcing opportunities for free gifts, help for all manner of ailments, or even hellos from unknown persons around the world. The wrapper seems plain enough, but hidden inside these junk e-mails are often malicious pieces of computer code, designed to weaken our national defenses. These viruses can perform a variety of actions, from insert ing extra files on your com puter and leaving it open for others to share, to actually stealing information. These programs can even record the very keystrokes you enter on the keyboard. Remember that chat you had with a loved one last week? Someone else may have gotten quite a laugh out of it too. That e-mail you sent, talking around the last big mission you had? Its on its way around the world via AlJazeera. These may sound like extreme cases, but they are simply reminders that our information resources are con stantly under attack. The attacker may only be a scriptkiddie, or novice, out to learn what they can do with a com puter. Or it could be the work of serious anti-American com puter experts, bent on the mod ification, theft, or destruction of information resources. Each month, over 1,000 probes, scans and attacks are registered against DoD networks. Preventing these attacks, and mitigating the effects, depends on the concept of defense-in-depth. Each seg ment of the network has its own layers of protection, detec tion and recovery. At the border of each base, we utilize hardware and soft ware to create firewalls, filter ing the content and the addresses that can enter our protected domain. At the domain level, we utilize more software (Norton Anti-Virus, for example) to screen out spe cific types of files. But the most important part, the reaction force, kept in reserve to crush the enemy, is the User! The user is the most impor tant part of our defense in depth, because theyre the active play ers. Theyre the enemys way in. Users need to be aware of what they are doing when using government computers. Story by Marine Corps Master Sgt. Benjamin Philhower Special to The Wire Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin In a chat room? Watch what youre typing! You never know whos out there. Computer Security Guidelines 1. Do not open attachments from unknown senders. 2. Scan files you receive from friends. 3. Never download software from the Internet to a govern ment computer. 4. If the computer acts strangely, (new windows, messages about a different user, etc.) notify the J6 Helpdesk at x3534. 5. Become familiar with where your data is, and check it occasionally to verify it. 6. Never share your password. 7. Use strong passwords (combine Upper, lower, numeric and or special characters). 8. Always log off or lock your computer when you leave your desk. 9. Leave the machine turned on (turn off monitor) at night for admin updates. 10. Read and respond, or take action as directed by, System Administrator messages. 11. Do not save data on your local computer; use the net work drives provided. Looking to buy a new car? A house? Want to know where to get advice on saving or invest ing your money? Need to know how to balance your checkbook or develop a spending plan? Call Paul Walker at the Fleet and Family Support Center. Paul is a financial-services specialist and can answer these questions and many more concerning you and your money. Call Paul today at #4141 or #4153. Page 3 Friday, October 18, 2002 Boat Engineers Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Lester Swafford I do this in the civilian world. Being an mechanic comes naturally to me. I do my job to the best of my abilities so PSU 307 can complete its mission. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark D. Sundbom The electronic system on the boats we have here is less complicated than on the cutters, but I dont care what it is. I just enjoy fixing things. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Harold Roebuck I love working on boats; in my civilian job I build them. I joined the Coast Guard to learn how to work on these engines so I can fix my boats and go fishing all day. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Joe Dabamo Its a lot of fun working on the boats. The maintenance we give the them is essential to the mission, and I think it speaks for itself. GTMOs boat engineers play a vital role in keeping its waters safe. If the boats are not maintained, force protection goes down, said Coast Guard Petty Offi cer 1st Class David W. McCormick of PSU 307. We maintain and fix everything the unit has that is mechanical. Were here 24 hours a day, maintaining their motor vehicles, trailers, generators and boats. To earn their MK (mechanic) rate, these dedicated Coast Guardsmen have to go through 11 weeks of training to learn how to fix and maintain both dieseland gas-powered engines. They have to learn how to fix any boat engine on the fleet, but at GTMO they work mostly on the twin 175-horsepower outboards that power the units 25-foot Boston Whalers. And theyre constantly learning new technology. I remember the time when a screwdriver and hammer would fix the problem, said McCormick. Now we carry a laptop for the computer controlled fuel systems and our electronic components on the boats. Regard less of newfangled technology, the boat engineers keep the PSU 307 ready to patrol the GTMO waters. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Lester Swafford gets his hands dirty as he changes the fuel lift pump on an outboard engine. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark D. Sundbom installs a terminal strip for the components on a 20-foot Boston Whaler. Profession of the Week

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Page 2 Friday, October 18, 2002 Registering your POV JTF-160/170 Command Commander: Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Air Force Lt. Col. Eduardo Villavicencio OIC, 361st Public Affairs Detachment: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5426 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detachment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160/170. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Depart ment of Defense or the personnel within. JTF-160/170 Commanding Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey A Day in the Life comes to GTMO Provost Marshals Office On October 22nd, at 0001 local time across the globe, over 125 of the worlds top photojournalists, including thir teen Pulitzer Prize winners, will join forces with the worlds top military photographers to cre ate an historic portrait: A Day in the Life of the U.S. Armed Forces. A team will even be visiting us here at Guan tanamo Bay. It will be the lat est in the best-selling photojournalism series which includes A Day in the Life of America, which sold over a million copies and was on the bestseller list for fifty seven weeks. On locations in fifty-five countries, working through all twenty four time zones, they will be on a mission to create the most compelling, indelible and revealing images of an ordinary day in the U.S. mili tary and the extraordinary con tributions and sacrifices Americas armed forces are making during this critical time in world history. From a day with the Secretary of Defense to a new Marine recruit at Par ris Island, a solo reconnaissance pilot flying a high altitude mis sion over Central Asia to a mil itary city at sea conducting carrier operations in the Indian Ocean to a military maternity ward welcoming the newest member to a community larger than many nations. This is a portrait of unique culture. This is not a book about the latest military equipment and tactics. It is a timeless humaninterest story of responsibility, dedication and determination by a band of brothers, sisters and families, doing what they do better than anyone else in the world, 24/7/365. Like the previ ous A Day in the Life books, its release in late April, 2003 will be a major media event covered by all the major broadcast net works and publications. The oversize book with the 300-plus best pictures selected by the countrys most experi enced photo editors will take its place on coffee tables, book shelves and libraries around the world, including the Library of Congress and an exhibit at the Smithsonian. This project will be a photographic time capsule of Americas latest generation to respond to its countrys call to arms in defense of its tradi tions. Each picture truly will be worth a thousand words and the book will have only brief cap tions and no text. Like the pre vious projects, the video coverage of the making of this historic event, with its cast of thousands that knows no boundaries, will be critical to introducing the book to mil lions of people who might never have known about it oth erwise. For more information, please contact Army Capt. Annmarie Daneker at 5017. Its getting to be GTMO Special time again, as departing servicemembers look to pass on their functional clunkers to new arrivals needing wheels. But if you buy a new car, remember: Registration of Privately Owned Vehicles (POV). The following documents are required in order to register a POV: (1) Proof of Ownership, such as a Bill of sale, registration certificate, or title, issued or assigned to the person in whose name the vehicle is to be registered. (2) A valid driver's license. (3) Proof of liability insurance for a period of at least six months. Transfers of Registration. Within three days of transfer of ownership of a vehicle, the new owner shall apply for transfer of the registration to his/her name, and comply with all the requirements for registering a POV. Vehicle registrations and safety inspections are performed by NAVBASE Police at the Motor Vehicle Registration Office, located next to the Police station on Boatshed Road. Persons found to be operating unregistered or uninsured vehicles shall be sub ject to NAVBASE GTMO administrative actions and unit disciplinary action under the UCMJ. Notice: A 25" TV/VCR set, Model #T25208, Serial #B421NA597 is missing from 1510A in East Caravella. Anyone having knowledge of its location, please contact the JTF-160/170 Provost Marshal at 5057 or 5061. Calls will be kept confidential. Army Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal After seven months here at GTMO as commander of JTF-170, it is my privi lege to assume command of a unified JTF-160/170 until Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller takes over as head of JTF-GTMO next month. The position is only temporary, but let me assure you this interim will not be a mere holding pattern. I have already begun to address problems old and new with the detention operation here, from the quality of the food to the difficulties of merging commands that have devel oped separate cultures and ways of accomplishing our mission. We must all look for ways that JTF-160 and JTF-170 can come together, not just in structure but in spirit, and make sure that JTFGTMO represents yet another step for ward in the evolution of the critical and historic mission ongoing here in Guan tanamo Bay. Those who have served with me at JTF-170 already know that I am aggres sive when it comes to leadership. My aim in the coming weeks is to be proac tive, not reactive, and deal with issues before they become real problems problems that hamper the effectiveness of our mission. I put my soldiers first, and the information Command Sgt. Maj. Clayton and I crave most from section and unit leaders is what the command can do to make their people's lives better and their work here more efficient and effective. It is a real honor to be in command of the soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen of JTF-160 and JTF-170 who are so ably serving their country here in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and the global war on terrorism. Please do me the further honor of helping me to lead you better by taking up any issues you have with your chain of command. I assure you I am listening. Sincerely, Maj. Gen. Michael E. Dunlavey Page 15 Friday, October 18, 2002 W. T. Sampson sinks NAVSTA The young ladies from the W. T. Sampson High School soccer team blanked NAVSTA 3-0 at Cooper Field Tuesday night, improving their record to 3-0 in the standings of the womens soccer league. W. T. Sampson played aggressively in the first half. They seemed to be able to bring the ball down to enemy territory and make shots on goal at will. The well-coached and well-disciplined team obviously knew what they had to do to win the game. Their strategy involved pushing the ball up field and forcing NAVSTA to defend their goal. Sampson striker Page Gamm dictated the tempo of the game from the start. She played very aggressively in the opening minutes and had six shots on goal (with one hitting the cross bar) by the end of the first half. NAVSTAs game plan quickly became more defense-oriented. Their goal was merely to slow down the high-powered offense of W. T. Sampson. NAVSTA was able to keep them from scor ing in the first half, but by choosing to play more defensively they hurt their own chances to score, getting only four shots on goal. Both teams went to the sidelines scoreless at the end of the half. NAVSTA is playing more defense than offense in the first half of the game. They are trying to keep us from scoring. Maybe they want to keep the game tied so the game can go into a shoot-out and then they can try to beat us then, said Buddy Gamm, head coach of the W. T. Sampson team, said afterward. Gamm said W. T. Sampson had to control and protect the ball in the second half if they wanted to win the game. We were not passing the soccer ball very well in the first half. They were able to handle us because we were not taking care of the ball. That is something we have to work on at prac tice. But in the second half well change a couple of players in the lineup to see if we can spark up the offense, said Gamm. As the referee blew the whistle to start the second half, W. T. Sampsons team looked rested compared to NAVSTA, who didnt have any substitute players on their roster. This would eventually hurt NAVSTA as the game progressed. Indeed, the lack of manpower on NAVSTAs team eventually took its toll. W. T. Sampsons super sophomore, Shanavia Warfield, scored a goal with 7:13 left on the clock, putting her team on top and in control of the game. With that goal, W. T. Sampson had NAVSTA against the wall and in a compro mising position. NAVSTA now had to pick up its offensive productivity. This tactic would ultimately make NAVSTAs defense weak and give W. T. Sampson more opportunities to score. Warfield was able to get open with her savvy footwork, and she scored another goal with 2:23 left on the clock. The team was really confident after the score and they were now smelling blood and going for the kill. Victory was near for the young phenoms of W. T. Sampson. They were working the game clock by keeping NAVSTA from getting to ball upfield. As the game was coming to an end, they scored one more goal to secure a win and first place in the standings. Im just happy to get the win. I think we wore them down and were able to score. They didnt have any substitutes, said Coach Gamm. The lack of substitutes, and of course the great play of Warfield and Page Gamm, con tributed to NAVSTAs loss. It felt good scoring two goals for my team. I just went with the flow of the game. We have a good team this year and we should do fine in the league, said Warfield. W. T. Sampson is playing as projected for the season. Not only are they winning against older competition, they are having a good time and enjoying the game of soccer. It was great winning the game and NAVSTA is a very good team. It was lots of fun playing tonight, said Page Gamm. The league cant take these young guns from W. T. Sampson lightly they came to play, and they came to win it all. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Page Gamm eludes a defender as she maneuvers her way towards the goal and takes a shot. Soccer standings Womens soccer W. T. Sampson 3-0 Hospital 2-1 571st MP Co. 1-2 NAVSTA 0-3 W. T. Sampsons Jessi Percin (L) converges on the soccer ball and sets up teammate Page Gamm (R) for one of her six shots on goal in the high school teams 3-0 victory over NAVSTA.

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Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony D. Clayton of the 160th Military Police Battalion was in a state of shock when he got the word: he would be the temporary command sergeant major of what will soon be known as Joint Task Force GTMO. I thought at first that they were kidding, he said, but I welcomed the opportunity and I welcomed the challenge. So Clayton should have no problem filling his new role during operation Enduring Freedom given his undying motivation and positive outlook. I like a good challenge. I like to go into a position Ive never been in and see if I can make a difference, said Clayton. If I can accomplish just one thing that will be an improvement for the servicemem bers here, then I will have achieved my goal. Looking to make that difference during his short tenure as the top NCO of JTF 160/170, Claytons main focus will be the servicemem bers themselves and what ways he can better their deployment. The thing I would like to accomplish is to boost the morale of the servicemembers of the Joint Task Force by improving their quality of life, he said. For exam ple, I would like to see better living conditions for the soldiers living out at Camp America and Camp Bulkeley. I would also like to see improved working conditions for the troops that are out at Camp Delta. And with not much time to work, Clayton has moved fast to ensure that the wheels of improve ment will be in swift motion when his successor arrives. All of these concerns have gone up the chain of command, he said. Command Sgt. Maj. Etheridge from SOUTHCOM has been here visiting and weve identi fied these changes, things that many servicemembers have already put up their chain of com mand, such as upgraded MWR facilities. So things will get better, if not for this rotation, then definitely for the next one. Change is good, according to Clayton, who sees the merging of Story and photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Command Sgt. Maj. Clayton temporarily takes the reins See CSM, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 Page 8 Page 15 Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160/170 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. New CSM, for now... Friday, October 18, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 19 Remember me? Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Two weeks ago, The Wire put out a survey, hoping our readers would fill it out and give us feedback on what we could do to improve the paper. We can count on one hand the amount of surveys we actually got back. You had your chance...and you blew it. Now enjoy what youve got. Page 16 Friday, October 18, 2002 with Spc. Derrick L. Barnes 114th MP Co. Q: Good afternoon, kind sir. Would you like to be this weeks 15 Minutes of Fame? A: Hmm... Well, I dont see why not. Q: Well, lets start out simple then. Where are you from and what do you do back home? A: Im from Mississippi, and I work in an automotive plant. Q: Wow, you went from work ing with cars to guarding detainees a big difference. How do you feel about your mis sion here? A: Honestly, I think my mis sion here is pretty simple. But just like building cars, it is important here to pay attention to detail and to be patient. Q: Well, patience is a virtue. Before you got here would you have considered yourself a patient person? A: I was somewhat of a patient person before, but being here def initely taught me how to be a lot more patient. Q: So, how would you describe yourself? A: I am a quiet, wise man. Q: Since youre such a wise man, may I ask what kind of advice do you have for people deployed here? A: Enjoy yourself while youre here. Make the best out of this experience. Q: Words to live by. Do you have a nickname, or is there something special the people here call you? A: Well, my friends call me Busy Bee. Q: Interesting. Any particular reason why? A: Nope, thats just what they call me Busy Bee. Q: Okay, that works for me. If you could change one thing about life at GTMO, what would it be, and why? A: Id have to say communica tions. Q: And when you say that you mean... A: I think it should be easier for the troops to call their families at home. Q: And whom do you like to reach out and touch? A: Excuse me, reach out and touch? Q: Sorry, I meant whom at home do you like to call? A: Oh, my wife and my mom. Q: And what do you do for fun down here? A: Read the Bible mostly, or go to the gym. Q: Not much of a partier, I gather? A: No, not much. Q: If your experience at GTMO were to be turned into a movie, what would the title be? A: Thats a tough one. Maybe we should come back to that one. Q: Not a problem. So, what was the most difficult adjustment for you to make when you arrived at GTMO? A: Id have to say getting to the latrines late at night. It is always a trek to get out of bed, get dressed, and make it there. Q: Definitely sounds incon venient to me. So, what is going to be the first thing you do when you get back home to good old Mississippi? A: Take a bath. Six months of showers gets old. A good home cooked meal would be nice too. And Ill take my kids to Chuck E. Cheeses. Q: Nothing like pizza and a huge rodent to lift your spirits. No, but seriously, what have you learned from being here? A: I learned a lot about the lit tle things. Most importantly I learned how to be a more patient person. Q: Has anything strange or unusual happened to you since you began your mission here? A: Nope, not that I can think of at the moment. Q: Not many people here can say that. So, if a hurricane were to hit GTMO and you were going to be trapped in a hurricane-proof bunker with two people from your company, who would they be and why? A: I would have to say Army Sgt. 1st Class Blackman and Army Sgt. Davis. I would choose them because theyre a lot like me quiet. They are also good lis teners and listen to people regard less of their rank. Q: Sounds like a wise choice. So, what kind of music do you like to listen to? A: I like R&B, blues, and rap. Q: Well, it has been nice chat ting with you. Lastly, Id like to ask how do you feel about your 15 Minutes of Fame? A: Well, I think its good for everyone to have the chance to express themselves. I guess this was just my time. Spc. Derrick L. Barnes, more than just a soldier a wise man. Interview and photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Busy Bee the quiet man of GTMO 15 Minutes of Fame...