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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00072
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: October 11, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00072

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PAGE 1

Page 16 Friday, October 11, 2002 with Marine Cpl. Marc A. Palos, MCSF Co., DET A, Bravo Co. 123 Q: Where are you from? A: Im from San Angelo, Texas, but I grew up in Sonora. Its a very small town right outside of San Angelo and whenever I visit people always remember me. Unfortunately the nearest reserve center is is a 3 1/2 hour drive away. Q: What made you join the Marine Corps? A: I always wanted to be a Marine. I see them as being made of honor and high intellect. Q: What do you think makes Marines really stand out from the other services? A: You have your branches, and theyre all good, but then you have Marines. They stand out due to their tradition and the way they handle business. Its a way of life; a way of thinking. If youre not a Marine, its hard to understand. Q: How do you feel about your mission guarding the communist Cuban fenceline at GTMO? A: Well, I was on active duty from 1994 to 1998, but after Sept. 11, I knew I had to come back. So participating in a mission of vast importance such as this is a great honor. Marines have been here for over 100 years keeping the wolf away from the door, and now with Camp Delta here, its not just one wolf but a pack of wolves. Q: Say you were sent into a blazing battlefield armed with only a plastic fork. A: Marines are trained to kill if they have no weapons, which is when the Marine becomes the weapon. So a plastic fork would stay in my back pocket, and Ill take care of everything else. Q: You versus the entire Cuban Army...who wins? A: I do. Not only because an American Marine carries bravery and courage, but also intelligence. The more you know, the stronger you are. They would be no match for me. Q: Could you quite possibly be the greatest war-fighter ever? A: Absolutely. If not, I would nt be here. I didnt come into the Marines to work in an office or move some boxes. I came in with the sole purpose to fight a war, be on the front lines and see the enemy in the eyes. Otherwise, it would be a waste of my time. Q: When not fighting wars, what do you do as a civilian? A: Accounting for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas. I like it a lot. Its not easy, but its good to work the mind. Theres a differ ence between making a living and living life, and being a Marine makes me appreciate what life I have. Q: Whats the biggest chal lenge youve had to overcome? A: Ive been through some hard times, but the hardest thing right now is being away from my 7year-old son. Nothing replaces family. He misses me. Hes very proud of his Marine father. Q: What type of kid were you growing up? A: Quiet and shy. My father had a tire company and I was raised in a tire shop. Not like we werent well off, but he made us grow up learning what it is to work for a living. Q: How has that way of living impacted your life? A: If that didnt happen to me, I wouldnt be here, without a shadow of a doubt. That work ethic will always stick with me, its made me what I am. Hopefully I can pass that on to my son. Q: What do you think of those new uniforms the Marines are sporting? A: Theyre great. Theyll be more realistic in a combat situa tion. They help to identify Marines as not being like everyone else. Q: What do you think of a uni form made entirely out of velvet? A: I have no comment on that. Q: What if you were sent back in time to prevent the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. How would you pull it off? A: I would very easily remove Booth and his conspirators from the scenario using extreme caution so as not to alter history any more. Q: What message do you have for all of the lower enlisted? A: Rank is pretty much the same as authority, but never con fuse authority with leadership. It takes a great person to become a leader, no matter what rank he is. Q: What is best in life? A: Thats up to the individual. It comes down to what will make you proud, happy and satisfied, regardless of what that is. Q: What do you think the future holds for you? A: I dont know where Ill be, but Ill stick closer to my son and become more educated. I have no idea where that will take me, but as long as Im proud, happy and sat isfied, it doesnt matter. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano All-American Marine Corps Cpl. Marc A. Palos, MCSF Co. Det. A, Bravo Co. 123, stands tall with his weapon of choice, the versatile M-203 grenade launcher. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire War fighting Marine on life, work and velvet 15 Minutes of Fame... Officially, Joint Task Force 160 will live on at Guantanamo Bay until Nov. 1. But the brigadier general and command sergeant major that led the detention part of this deten tion operation for the past seven months are gone, having departed GTMO this week to return to Rhode Island and their former lives. Before long they will be part-time soldiers again, near to their homes and loved ones, out of this unrelenting sun. Wednesday, it was time for Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus and Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro to be honored by their troops and superiors alike. It is indeed my great honor and pleasure to represent Gen. Hill this afternoon to say thanks to both Brig. Gen. Baccus and Com mand Sgt. Maj. Funaro for their hard work for your hard work and all that you've done in JTF-160 through a very difficult and strategically significant time, said Air Force Maj. Gen. Robert D. Bishop, deputy combat ant commander of U.S. Southern Command. Under the able leadership of Brig. Gen. Bac cus and Command Sgt. Maj. Funaro, JTF-160 has conducted detention ops at Camp X-Ray up to the 28th of April, picked up and moved the entire operation without incident, com pleted the construction of camps Alpha and Delta, oversaw the construction of Camp II and are overseeing the construction of Camp III, and all the while youve been moving, Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160/170 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Farewell to a command Friday, October 11, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 18 Story by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire JTF-160s Brig. Gen. Baccus and Command Sgt. Maj. Funaro say their last goodbyes to GTMO Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano A formation of JTF-160 troops and an assemblage of honored guests gather in front of the JTF-160 head quarters building Wednesday for a farewell ceremony honoring Brig. Gen. Baccus and CSM Funaro. See FAREWELL, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 Page 15 Page 8

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Page 15 Friday, October 11, 2002 NAVST A takes the trophy home again NAVSTA repeated again as flag football champions with a 26-13 victory over the Hood Ratz Thursday night at Cooper Field. But NAVSTAs latest Super Bowl win was not smooth sailing, with the finale of the double-elimination tournament living up to the fans wildest expectations. The Hood Ratz were in the losers bracket and fighting for a chance to play for the championship against NAVSTA, who was undefeated and in the winners bracket of the tournament. This meant the Hood Ratz had to beat NAVSTA twice in one evening to win the championship. The Hood Ratz knew what they had to do: come out strong. They shocked NAVSTA by scoring 14 points at the start of the first game. NAVSTA couldnt recover from this deficit, and the Hood Ratz won 32-28. And so the second game would decide the season and crown a champion. This was do or die time. They had us on our heels in the first game. We came out flat and the Hood Ratz made it hard to come back. We have to step up in the next game, said Navy Petty Offi cer 2nd Class Balton D. Hill after the opener. The underdog Hood Ratz had the edge coming into the second game. They had the frantic crowd on their side and the momentum of a victory under their belt. After all, they had just beaten an unde feated NAVSTA juggernaut and forced a deciding game for the championship. Their confidence was sky high, and it showed when they took the field. The Hood Ratz scored on their first drive, putting NAVSTA down by seven points, and then buckled down on defense and forced NAVSTA to punt. As the half progressed, though, NAVSTA was able to capitalize on a mistake the Hood Ratz defense committed on an attempted tackle. Two players collided and were not able to grab the flag. NAVSTAs Hill was able to break free and score a touchdown tying the game for NAVSTA at seven. The teams were going at one another like two gladiators in a death match. NAVSTA finally broke the tie by scoring a touchdown. With time running out in the first half, how ever, the Hood Ratz provided a little of their own magic when quarterback Army Sgt. James Stringfellow connected with Spc.Was car Vizcaino for a 49-yard touchdown pass to end the first half. This was turning out to be a heavyweight matchup. The game was all tied at 13 and the crowd seemed as if they didnt want this game to end, whoever they were rooting for. This was a championship game for the ages. NAVSTAs team came out on the field calm and cool for the second half. It seemed they had a script and suddenly were sure how this game was going to turn out. Navy Seaman Antonio Robinson began taking what the Hood Ratz defense gave him. If the defense gave his wide receivers a 10yard cushion, he would throw short; if they played them close he would throw deep. Then came the big play. With the Hood Ratz in an aggressive man-to-man defense, Robinson and his favorite receiver Hill made eye contact at the line of scrimmage. The ball was snapped and Hill took off toward the end zone. A perfect spiral was coming down to his hands. He made an off-balance catch and took it to the big house for a score. The extra point put NAVSTA in the dri vers seat, 20-13. On their answering drive, the Hood Ratz played like they would come back with ease. They were working the whole field, throwing the ball to the left and right, trying to confuse NAVSTA and keep them off-guard. As the Hood Ratz approached NAVSTAs 30-yard line they made a devastating mistake. Stringfellow misfired on a pass and Hill inter cepted. This put NAVSTA in control of the game and the game was now theirs to lose. The championship was in their grasp. And in the style of a champion, NAVSTA put the knife in, scoring again and putting the game out of reach for the Hood Ratz. NAVSTAs offense played out the half with time on their side, running down the play clock and staying inbounds, and its defense finished the job, stopping the Hood Ratz one more time with less than 2 minutes left in the game. There would be no miracle comebacks for the Hood Ratz. NAVSTAs 26-13 win meant that the championship trophy was going to stay in Guantanamo Bay for another year. Their dom ination throughout the season and the tourna ment had paid in another Super Bowl crown. The Hood Ratz played an outstanding game, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Bernard Jennings. We had a tough time com ing back from that. In the end, we lost our per fect season, but the loss gave us motivation to win the tournament. These two teams had battled four times this season, and with every game that passed they respected and admired one another more. We learned an important lesson in this tournament: sportsmanship. Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan and his team are a class act, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class James Schols. The tournament brought out the best in everyone. We were able to win because of teamwork, without that we would have lost, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Tom Good win afterward. The important thing is that we won the championship, he added as he walked away, bringing this dramatic season to a close. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire NAVSTAs team celebrates their victory on the gridiron with Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn after winning the flag football championship over the Hood Ratz, 26-13. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Bernard Jennings, the tournament MVP, fights his way to the first down marker to help NAVSTA win the game. Page 2 Friday, October 11, 2002 JTF-160/JTF-170 Command Commander: Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Air Force Lt. Col. Eduardo Villavicencio OIC, 361st Public Affairs Detachment: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160/JTF-170. This publication is printed under the pro visions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the per sonnel within. Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus MWR Watch FYI Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Pete's Marina. Aerobics Classes Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 6AM-7AM, 8AM9:30AM, and 5:00PM-6:00PM. Tae-Kwon Do Marine Hill Gym, MF, 11:30AM-12:30PM, and 6:00PM9:00PM (one hour classes). 1-on-1 Spinning Classes GJ Denich Gym, MWF, 6:30PM-7:30PM. Yoga Classes 5:15PM-6:15PM, GJ Denich Gym Yoga Center. Pool Hours: Marine Hill Pool: Open Swim, 6:00AM-8:00AM; Lap Swim, 10:00AM6:00PM. Windjammer Pool: Lap Swim, 6:00AM to 8:00AM. Deer Point Pool: 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Today, Friday, October 11th Columbus Day Fishing Tournament, Oct. 11-14, signup ends at MWR Marina on Sat. 9:00AM. Extreme Bowling, Marble head Lanes, 7:00PM-Midnight. Saturday, October 12th 6:00AM: Hispanic Heritage 5K Run. Childrens Ceramics class, 8AM-10AM. Sunday, October 13th 1:00PM: Football Sundays, Goatlocker: E7, E8, E9, or civilian equivalent. 5:00PM: GTMO Queen Fishing Trip from Bayview Dock. 20-Person Limit, $5 per person. Monday, October 14th Adult Ceramic Class, 8AM-12PM Tuesday, October 15th 6:30PM, Bingo Night at Windjammer. Wednesday, October 16th 8:00PM, Karaoke Night at Windjammer. Also, a message from J8 Finance: Employee/Member Self Service is implementing a new look. Effective October 15, software changes will be implemented where myPay replaces Employee/Member Self Service. myPay will be accessible using the following URL: https://mypay.dfas.mil. The E/MSS URL will still continue to work: https://emss.dfas.mil and will direct you to myPay URL. Current access to E/MSS remains unchanged and the PIN number established in E/MSS will continue to work for myPay. For more information or a brochure on the enhanced capabilities of myPay, contact Lt. Rhonda Stevens at ext. 5433. To all the Servicemen and women of Joint Task Force 160 and the Naval Station: Every day of my tenure as your commander, I have reflected upon your outstanding support of the mission that has faced us. Whether you are a member of the guard force dealing with the detainees or a bus driver trans porting personnel, you have all performed your duties in an exemplary manner. It has truly been a privilege to serve as your commander. I leave behind an outstanding organization, which is up to the challenges that you will face as the new Joint Task Force stands up. But more importantly, I leave behind soldiers, Marines, sailors, airmen and Coast Guardsmen who prove every day they are dedicated to the ideals our country was founded upon, and are proud to be in the serv ice of their nation. It has been a pleasure to serve with every one of you, and thank you for your sacrifices. Godspeed, Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, RIARNG Contact Capt. Gormly at x5249 for more information. The NEX will be closed Sunday, Oct. 13 for renovations, so get your weekend shopping done now!

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Page 3 Friday, October 11, 2002 Master-at-arms Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Brandon S. Langford I want to make a difference, being at the scene at the right place at the right time. I want to be there to stop it or prevent it from happening. Navy Seaman Andrew Beasley I enjoy working with the children of GTMO and make an impact on them. I have a chance to make a difference in peoples lives. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Michael G. Tuemler This is a great place to learn our rate. A young sailor can learn every aspect of law enforcement at GTMO. We are the only law enforcement agency here. Navy Seaman Berik Nicholson My Navy career has changed for the better. I have been working here for five months and I enjoy working with the GTMO community. Whatever you do, dont call them SPs. The specially trained sailors who roam the 45 square miles of U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay in white pickup trucks are offcially known as Masters at Arms -and they are indeed masters of their domain. This team of men and women nobly serve 24 hours a day, seven days a week, keeping peace and tranquil ity in the GTMO community. We provide force protection for GTMO, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Michael G. Tuemler. And were also a training ground. Being here in GTMO is a great opportunity for young sailors to learn every thing they can about their job. On this island the MAs do it all: work on traffic details, catch speeders with radar guns, become a criminal investigator, work at the Naval Station air port or just go on patrol, keeping the mean streets of GTMO as nice as possible. Day in and day out, the people of GTMO put their trust in the hands of these Masters at Arms, and in return the men and women in the white pickup trucks do their very best to make sure life in this quiet com munity is always smooth sailing. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy seaman Berik Nicholson checks in with dispatch while on traffic patrol. Navy Seaman Andrew Beasley patrols in front of W. T. Sampson elementary school and makes sure the traffic runs smoothly and the children are safe. Profession of the Week Page 14 Friday, October 11, 2002 In their own words.... The Wire: What was it like taking over here in March? How was that first week on the job? Gen. Baccus: First of all, coming down to such an impor tant job was really a credit to the fact that the Army and the Department of Defense trusted a National Guard officer to come down and assume command of a Joint Task Force. The first week? It was very...confusing, trying to under stand all the aspects that are involved in this mission. I had to try to understand all the pieces and try to coordinate them. That's probably one of the tougher parts of this mission. When I got here in March, the Marines were in charge, the detainees were out at X-Ray and the guards were living out at Freedom Heights in a tent city. It's been quite a tour from that point in time to now. The Wire: How have you dealt with all the international scrutiny of this operation? GB: One of the important things in dealing with the media as well as any of the visiting delegations that have come through to see the operation is to stress the fact all the servicemen and women per forming the mission here are highly professional. They do their job in a tremendous way. And that's resulted in a successful mission to date. As long as we stress the fact that we are securing our own person nel, maintaining operational awareness and also making sure that the detainees are secured properly and treated humanely, then there's very little that people can criticize. The Wire: Where do you see this mission's place in history? GB: From a parochial perspective, this is the first time a Brigadelevel unit has been activated in the National Guard since WWII, so that's quite an event. In a larger sense, certainly the fact that the entire world is watching what goes on down here, means that American ideas and the American way of life are being demonstrated on a daily basis by how we deal with the detainees and the way we perform the mission. The Wire: What are your thoughts on the merger? GB: The establishment of JTF-GTMO will signal a new phase of operations here. In January the mission was stood up with five day's notice before detainees started arriving; it was stand up, get ready, do it at any cost. The merger is reflective of the fact that now we need to look again at how the operation is being conducted, where there are efficiencies that can be gained by joining staffs or eliminating head quarters, to make the mission run better. The Wire: What are you going to do when you get home? GB: Go back to my job as the director of the Veterans Cemetery for the state of Rhode Island. The Wire: You're a general who doesn't get around too much to social events, who isn't out and about all that often. How do you approach being a general? GB: As you might expect, we deal with a myriad of responsibilities, but I've tried to be open and get out and see as many of the servicemen and women involved in the task force as often as I possibly can. But more importantly, I wanted to make sure that they could be proud of their leader, that they could look to him to set the example, that they could see the fact that by his daily conduct they could see how important this mission is. The Wire: How has this oper ation changed since you arrived? CSM Funaro: Oh, We've gone from night to day. It's typi cal military, typical Army you move in, and then you dig in. You constantly improve your site. When I first got here, they still had the GP Mediums up at Camp X-Ray. When the guards moved to Camp America they had noth ing but an air-conditioned SEAhut and a bunk. We put up phone lines with DSN. We brought in televisions with DVD setups. We replaced the push-but ton showers with keyed faucets. We brought in a gymnasium with equipment. We brought in the Sea side Galley. We opened the Internet Caf with 30 computers. And there are more improvements coming. The Wire: Did you consider that the focus of your job here, improv ing quality-of-life for the guards? CSM: Yes. The Wire: What was it like for you to come from a Guard brigade in Rhode Island to leading a high-profile detention operation in Cuba? CSM: Too damn much politics. I find that a lot of people preach Army values but don't practice them. And you can quote me. The Wire: How do you deal with that? CSM: My style is to cut through the bulls*** and get the job done. I am very proud, extremely proud, of the way I've taken care of the sol diers at Camp America, and I am damn proud of all of them. There's a lot of pressure, mental pressure, on the soldiers down there. And that filters back up here, and back down there. I think they all have to be commended for the job that they've done, and the professionalism they have shown in performing their job. The Wire: What's it like to be leaving? CSM: Great. The Wire: What do you think of merging JTF-160 and JTF-170? CSM: I think it's a great idea. I think it probably should have been done from the beginning. In a lot of cases, the left hand didn't know what the right hand was doing. And I think when we first stood up the two JTFs, nobody really knew what to expect. I think we've made it an awful lot easier for those that follow us because we've put everything in place. All they have to do is improve it. The blueprint is already here. The Wire: What are you going to do when you get home? CSM: Oh, I'll take a little bit of time off. I think as soon as my employer finds out I'm back I work for a precision-tool manufac turer, doing technical support and customer relations I'm going to get a phone call. Maybe I'll have to hide for a little while. The Wire: You're sort of a friendly guy, you walk around hitting troops with your hat, kicking them in them the a**. In terms of being a sergeant major, how do you tackle the job? CSM: The most important aspect of my job is taking care of the sol diers. And too many of us in leadership positions forget where we came from. That young E3 or E4 down there is the most important person at that camp. More important than me. More important than the generals. Because without those E3s and E4s, the job wouldn't get done. Those are the ones we need to take care of. So they have to know that I'm approachable. That's where my per sonality comes in. And I really, honestly believed that the soldiers rec ognized that when I paid attention to them, it came from my heart. Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro Two days before they departed GTMO forever, Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus and Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro each sat down with The Wire editor Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini. This is what they said...

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Page 4 Friday, October 11, 2002 This weeks question: How do you think youve changed since youve been at GTMO? Marine Staff Sgt. Jarvis I. Davis, MCSF Co. Im more athletic. Ive taken advantage of the MWR recreational activi ties that are available for servicemembers. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark J. Thomp son, Navy OMD I'm a lot more laid back. More patience. I appreciate all the time I have now. I don't have to deal with city life. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gregory T. Waters, Base Security I've learned how to adapt with continuous heat by staying hydrated. Youve got to drink water here. Army Staff Sgt. Ronald E. Hall, 160th MPBN "I've changed physically. I go to the gym everyday. Besides I got promoted while I was here. Things couldn't get any better." Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gerson Paul Naval Hospital I've become penny-wise. Been here two years and saved a lot of money. Plus, I've also improved my fishing skills. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Detention Hospital cuts the ribbon Navy Cmdr. Mike Moskowitz, Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, Brown and Root quality control manager Grady Griffin, Navy Capt. Albert J. Shimkus, Navy Cmdr. Jaine Carroll and Army Staff Sgt. Roger L. Christopher officially open the new Detention Hospital at Camp Delta in a ceremony Saturday. Staffed by the sailors of Fleet Hospital 20, the new hospital is a hard ened structure with improved facilities for the treatment of detainees. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Roy Santana Man on the Street Page 13 Friday, October 11, 2002 DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, October 11 8 p.m. The Country Bears, G 88 min 10 p.m. The Adventures of Pluto Nash, PG13 96 min Saturday, October 12 8 p.m. Master of Disguise, PG 80 min 10 p.m. XXX, PG13 114 min Sunday, October 13 8 p.m. Blood Work R -111 min Monday, October 14 8 p.m. Master of Disguise, PG 80 min Tuesday, October 15 8 p.m. XXX, PG13 114 min Wednesday, October 16 8 p.m. Signs, PG13 -107 min Thursday, October 17 8 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG13 94 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, October 11 8 p.m. The One, PG13 86 min 10 p.m. Platoon, R 113 min Saturday, October 12 8 p.m. The Crew, R 88 min 10 p.m. The Matrix, PG13 108 min Sunday, October 13 8, 10 p.m. Gladiator, R 149 min Monday, October 14 8 p.m. Bless the Child, R -100 min Tuesday, October 15 8 p.m. Partners, R 93 min Wednesday, October 16 8 p.m. Angelas Ashes, R 120 min Thursday, October 17 8, 10 p.m. Blackheart, R 95 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris With reality scarred, it could be real hard when an inch feels like a yard. If you could only see where you would go, youd probably kick back and take it slow. Living life one day at a time, hoping things flowed just like a rhyme. People grow older as time passes on. Now is here today, then tomorrow its gone. Love over War is what should be said, While people keep killing and hatred is spread. Your GTMO Horoscope Mar. 21 Apr. 19 You'll take any challenge that your command throws your way on Monday or Tuesday. You get down to business on Wednesday and keep your nose to the grindstone on Thursday. Maybe you'd rather be doing something else, but at least this is for a good cause. The fun begins mid-Friday. People just getting to know you stand in awe of your true magnificence. Saturday and Sunday are high-energy days, the perfect time to go get a little extra PT in. You're a Fire Sign burning the can dle at both ends, and yet you never seem to run out of fuel. Jul. 23 Aug. 22 What worked in the training or the movies doesn't seem to apply on Monday or Tuesday. Real life is more complex and requires continual adjustments. If the observer affects the observed, you're part of the problem rather than part of the solution. By Wednesday your mood dips. A ridiculous delusion gives you an excuse to act out. But is it worth it? You'll owe friends and NCO's an explanation! If only to let them divert you from the dangerous course you're taking. Between Friday and Sunday, youre in a positive mood. Nov. 22 Dec. 21 Say what you mean on Monday and Tuesday. Send others off on a mission and stake your claim on what they bring back. Conviction and command feel natural. Thanks to last week's thundering success, you're still entitled to change the world any way you want. Wednesday, someone chal lenges your authority. This person who com plicated your life had a reason. The weekend is yours; maybe it's a good-bye party as you leave for parts unknown. Apr. 20 May 20 Other people are your biggest problem on Monday and Tuesday. Someone may be actively harassing you, and that's where your EO officer comes in. Changing your tune on Wednesday sweeps you off your feet with an overflow of pos itive energy. You can do no wrong until Friday, and even then it's all a matter of perspective. Others are finished applauding what you've done, but the next thing you do might get them started all over again. You may even get a coin for all your hard work. Aug. 23 Sep. 22 Starting Monday, the rules no longer apply. If it's your job to fix a broken system, your work is cut out for you... why hello J-6. Abandoning what seems beyond repair raises other issues. Will you recreate what you had or go with a new model? Wednesday answers your question with a chal lenge. You have three days to do what's never been done before. By Friday it's obvious you bit off more than you could chew. Maybe you should have asked for help. You welcome a distracting weekend. Dec. 22 Jan. 19 Monday finds you still reeling from the happy impact of the last few days. Devious people try sneaking something past you, but your eyes are still sharp. Don't buy anything expensive from the NEX or online until you know more about the product and the seller. Starting Wednesday, you openly pursue a secret goal. Enlist others without telling them too much. On Saturday, your situa tion this weekend is less than idealwork again? Make the best of it, remember thinngs can only get better! May 21 Jun. 21 You're well-connected with other troops as the week begins. Arts and hobbies are the most important things. The ceramics shop may be just the right place for you. Wednesday and Thursday there's time for everything and nothing seems wasted. However, Friday, you're not so lucky, and trouble seems to be everywhere. Leave it behind as you escape into a balanced, motivated week end. You're welcome in any group, and your group is welcome everywhere. By Sunday, you're the hero again. Nothing can keep you down. Sep. 23 Oct. 22 When telling the whole truth, be complimenta ry. You'd rather have allies than enemies. Monday and Tuesday find you playful, curious and ready for anything. Stay focused, because the rest of the week is loaded with difficult surprises. On Friday you see where you stand, and it makes you nerv ous. You're now at the mercy of your command you can only hope they treat you fairly. A little shopping at the Nex may cheer you up. Faith and charm get you through weekend. Have a great time, you deserve it! Jan. 20 Feb. 18 If there's a party on Monday or Tuesday, you're at the center. But don't forget there's work to do in the morning. Many believe your tall tales and fol low you anywhere. This is your cosmic role and you play it well. But if you start believing your own myth, Wednesday takes the wind out of your sails. The weekend brings you time to play. Keep your schedule open instead of locking into any firm plans. Behaving yourself, you win the heart of someone that was afraid to approach you until now. Jun. 22 Jul. 22 Your unit members disappoint you on Monday or Tuesday. It breaks your heart when an accomplished group falls apart. You'd do better on your own, but you're a part of the team. From Wednesday to Friday, you're delighted with your new accomplish ments. Momentum builds in your new state of freedom. However, external restrictions clamp down by Saturday, could it be another hurricane? You knew it was too good to last. Oct. 23 Nov. 21 As the week begins, it's tempting to be rude but remember your actions could come with a counseling statement. You're delighted to tell certain people what you think of them. By Wednesday you're out of the danger zone. You are in a motivated, energized mood and ready to demonstrate your leader ship skills for everyone around you. The weekend brings you rela xation. Maybe a trip to the Leeward side beaches would be just the perfect finishing touch. Feb. 19 Mar. 20 Your plate is full on Monday and Tuesday. It's more than you can handle, but all this attention means you're needed and loved. Between Wednesday and Friday your hard work pays off! By Saturday, you're looking for ways to improve on things that everyone else thinks are just fine, for example the cleanliness of your living area. You may not get a lot of agreement and you're spending your budget too fast. Remember, youre not the only one who lives there, so youre not the only one who should pay.

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receiving, securing and process ing wave after wave of detainees. Youve completed the transition from the Marines to the 89th Mil itary Police Brigade to the 43rd Military Police Brigade, all in marvelous fashion. Bishop thanked the JTF-160 soldiers for securing detainees, performing force protection without blemish forging a cohesive Joint Task Force but hosting an endless parade of vis itors, and saluted Baccus and Funaro: Your steady hands have helped ensure the mis sion's success. Then the guests of honor said their offi cial goodbyes. Thank you for being here, Baccus said. I wont recount all the things that Gen. Bishop men tioned. But I will say cer tainly from the bottom of my heart that with out the support of all the ser vicemen and women of the Joint Task Force, none of those things mentioned could possibly have been done. A leader never does those things him or herself, but relies on everyone to their jobs, and you have been outstanding. I wish that all the servicemen and women here continue to per form in an outstanding manner, and I'm sure that they will con tinue to demonstrate the fact that they can perform any mission that is given to us in connection to this task force, he continued. And certainly, Gen. Dunlavey, I wish you the best of luck. Funaro, in typical fashion, was more impassioned in his farewell address and more blunt. Even on my last day its gotta be hot out here, he said, lapsing into indecipherable Italian. I cant wait to get back to Narra gansett Bay. Its been a great joy and a great honor to be the com mand sergeant major of this Joint Task Force, he con tinued. This is a difficult chal lenge for any body who comes here, because this country has never done any thing like this before...so weve made a few mistakes along the way but weve done a lot of things right. And I am very proud of those things that we've done right. We gave you our loyalty; it was always soldiers first. We per formed our duty in an admirable manner. We treated you with respect, the respect that you deserved. And we gave you self less service...We never fed our egos because we didnt have any. And we did that proudly. I believe we served you with honor, he continued. I believe we gave you integrity and served you with integrity, and I believe we showed the courage to fight when we thought we were right. And if those words sound familiar, Funaro boomed, what I read off were the Army values. We lived them, we ate them, we slept them. And some people dont even know them. So I proudly leave here with integrity, with my head held high, for a job that deep down in my heart I know Ive done damn well, and I wish all of you well, he concluded. Godspeed to all of you, and good luck. Soon, JTF-160 and JTF-170 will be no more. Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey takes tempo rary command of both JTFs until the two are merged under the command of Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller next month. The ending of the term of Bac cus and Funaro at the head of JTF-160, which has had the responsibility of housing the detainees safely and securely while steadily improving the quality-of-life of the MPs that guard them, marks the end of the GTMO detention operations transition from the newness and chaos of spring to the routines and efficiencies of fall. These seven months saw the hardearned maturation of a mission that must continue to support the war on terrorism for as long as it is necessary. There have been critics both foreign and domestic of the work of this leadership; there have been admirers. But Baccus and Funaros role in this day-by-day etching of history cannot be questioned. And their work will not be soon forgotten. Page 5 Friday, October 11, 2002 FAREWELL, from page 1 Photo by Tech. Sgt. Roy Santana Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus delivers his final salute as JTF-160 commander Wednes day. Flanking him from L to R are: Air Force Maj. Gen. Robert Bishop, Deputy Combatant Cdr., SOUTHCOM; Army Maj. Gen Michael Dunlavey, now com mander of JTF-160 and JTF-170; Command Sgt. Maj. Michael T. Etheridge, CSM SOUTHCOM, and Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro, CSM JTF-160. At the podium is Lt. Col. George T. Villari, master of ceremonies for the event. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro lets loose Wednesday in his farewell address to the JTF-160 troops. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Col. Winfred S. Cummings, chief of staff for JTF-160 and JTF-170, takes in the ceremony. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Departing JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus gives his farewell address to the assembled troops. Page 12 Friday, October 11, 2002 Give me a #2, please, and watch the beard! Haircut? Haircut? Haircut? Pfc. Keith West, a Camp Delta guard with the 571st MP Co., is making the rounds of F block Wednesday morning, offering his charges something they haven't had for months: a break from the routine and a little relief from the heat. For a few days last week, the world's most famous detention center doubled as perhaps its fastest, cheapest barbershop as JTF-160 volunteers came out to Camp Delta, donned smocks and gloves and set up chairs in the exercise areas of Camp Delta's detention blocks. For the volunteers, no experi ence was required, and none was needed. This was a classic keepit-simple operation with electric clippers: no high-and-tights, no little-off-the-sides. Each of the 20 detainees in F block that answered Wests call was led out, still shackled, by a pair of MP escorts, given a chair and asked the big question. What do you want 0, 1 or 2? Spc. Terrence Stiles, with the 153rd Finance Co. at J8, asks his first customer. 1, or 2? The detainee looks up, uncom prehending, at West and his part ner from the 571st, Sgt. Shanie Wery. West helps out All off? All off? and gets a nod. Stiles, on his third day cutting and by now pretty handy with the clippers, grins as he tucks a sheet under the detainees chin, tilts his head forward and switches on the clippers. My specialty. In about two minutes, its over. There is a large pile of wavy black hair on the ground in front of the detainee, whose scalp gleams white beneath a thin layer of stubble. He looks up at West. All gone, says West. All done, says Stiles. The detainee leans his head forward again as Stiles gives his head and neck a once-over with a paintbrush. Wery pulls the sheet off, and she and West stand their charge up to escort him back inside the cell block. The detainee looks around. Thank you, he says. *** Suddenly, we turn around and the gate to the exercise area is opening for Gen. Baccus. You guys the volunteer barbers? Yes, sir, we say, in unison. Thanks for doing this, he says. He nods, and smiles, then turns and leaves. So you guys volunteered to cut their hair? Wery says later, sounding incredulous. Its something different, Stiles replies. I work in finance, so...this is kind of fun. Spc. Angelo Baca, a bus driver with the 418th Transportation Co., agrees. Its a change of pace, he says. Nobody is exactly offering to trade jobs with the guards here, though, and Sgt. Brian Boatner, also with the 571st and the block commander here, just wants this particular barbershop to close up as soon as possible. The job of a Camp Delta guard may be a dull routine, with every day the same, but thats how you know youre doing it right. Its more work for us, he says. Two of us have to be out here for each of them, so shuttling them out for haircuts makes it tough to cover the door and the phone. *** If a long and full beard is indeed a sign of authority and piety in Muslim cultures, detainee haircut number seven may well have been the mayor of Kandahar. A short, stocky, robustlooking type, he has a wiry, graystreaked beard that radiates out from his chin and reaches halfway down his chest. And as Stiles starts in with an efficient #1, that beard is what concerns him most. Just be careful when you get down near the ears, he tells Baca. Stop where the beard starts. I screwed up on one guy yesterday and cut a little too far. He got awful mad, walking around with a lopsided beard. *** Not all, man, please, not all. Detainee haircut number 15 speaks pretty good English, and is friendly, grinning as he requests something short of the scalp-bar ers Stiles and Baca have been giv ing the rest of the block. He and Stiles negotiate a , by far the longest cut of the day, and the decision turns out to be an enemy of our brisk turnover rate. You got some thick hair, you know that? Stiles says as he shakes out the #5-length plastic clipper-guards for the umpteenth time. Youre gonna have to pay extra for this. OK, twenty dollars, the detainee agrees with a smile, and seizes on the chance to plead his case for some strangers. Ameri can soldiers take me from street, he says. Like thief. Gee, thats not very nice, West says with gentle sarcasm. I get the feeling hes heard this sort of thing before. Eventually, Stiles has to get the scissors. Youre getting Super Cuts now, he tells the detainee. Whyd you want it so long? You got a date tonight or something? When Stiles finishes, its pretty choppy, but as theres no mirrors out here, the detainee is pleased. Thank you. Next time you get the triplezero, Stiles says, and takes off the sheet. Could you put those scissors back in the box? Wery says. When theyre put away, she and West escort another satisfied cus tomer back to his cell block. *** At 11:00 a.m., after three hours and 20 detainees, were all fin ished. Stiles, Baca and I look around at the sizable piles of dark hair dotting the clean white cement of the exercise area. We joke briefly about clutching up a handful and selling it on EBay before sweeping the piles into trash bags and heading out. West tells us that Stiles and Bacas handiwork apparently got good reviews back in the cell block. A couple more in there wanted one once the others started coming back, he says. Sorry, one chance only. I, for one, am glad to be leav ing Camp Delta. There is a defi nite sweaty-detainees-who-eat-alot-of-curry smell about the place, as well as a bit of a gnat problem, and now the sun is really starting to beat down. I am starting to think about a haircut myself. Sgt. Boatner isnt displeased either. This kind of thing can drag out, he says. But it went pretty smooth. He looks up. And we got some good weather today... He shuts the gate behind us with a clang, and Camp Delta is back to normal again. Story and photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Due to operational security concerns (and possibly the Geneva Convention, were not sure), we cant show you a detainee getting his hair cut inside Camp Delta. But trust us, it happened. And it looked pretty much like this. JTF-160 volunteer barbers come out to Delta to offer hot-headed detainees a quick-and-dirty haircut. (Hold the shave.)

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4th Infantry Division joins the force They come from miles around, to per form an unknown mission. They come to show what theyre made of, to protect, to serve, and to endure freedom. They are the mind and body of the Army, the active duty infantrymen of the 4th Infantry Division from Fort Hood, Texas. And for them, the Guantanamo Bay adventure is just about to begin. We dont know our specific tasks yet, but were ready to take over whatever they got to give us here. After all, were activeduty infantrymen, said 2nd Lt. Don Calderwood, platoon leader of the 4th ID. I took over this unit only two weeks before we were deployed, he said, and this crew exceeded all the high expecta tions I had of them. And now, were here to meet and exceed the standards that this Joint Task Force expects of us. When we got the word we were coming to GTMO to serve as part of Operation Enduring Freedom, the troops were eager to come out here and be soldiers, said Sgt. 1st Class Jackie A. Stewart, platoon ser geant. And being highly-trained infantrymen, these soldiers are no strangers to being dedicated to their work. Back at Fort Hood, were constantly training hard to prepare for all and any missions, said Staff Sgt. James D. Parker. Thats just how it is with active duty. Its our nature to be always training, said Stewart. Were always ready to exe cute a mission on a moments notice. Even being hardcore, high speed, active duty soldiers, you can never be too ready for any mission to come. There is always extra work and preparation put into a unit before it is ready to be deployed. To prepare us for this deployment, we implemented additional infantry training in riot control into our schedule, said Calderwood. Before deploying, we were going over live fire, tactical movements and maneu vering, said Stewart. Now, were sitting through briefings and going through field exercises such as non-lethal munitions training to help us to get settled in. Ive been training troops with this unit for the past three years, said Parker. Now Im ready to step out on the field with them and get the job done. Settling into a new environment isnt always easy, though; its a process of adapting and overcoming that takes time. GTMOs hot, sultry air is usually a new experience that causes the troops to suffer and pay while theyre out in field perform ing their vital duties. Its tough training out in the heat, Sgt. Feliciano R. Cruz. But this is what has to be done, so we are prepared for the mission ahead. The heat here is similar to that of Texas, but the air is more humid, said Stewart. Still, I think were better prepared for a mis sion in this type of climate being that were use to train ing back home in these conditions. Perhaps what theyre used to the most is the concept of teamwork. Throughout all our training, Ive seen good unity within the unit, said Calderwood. The team is well organized and seems to work very well together. The group is squared away with good work ethics. A lot of these good work habits have been passed down from good super visors, he said. Experienced NCOs know what has to happen, and they make it happen, said Parker. Part of being a good leader is having the ability to motivate, said Calderwood. And motivation is also no stranger to this band of brothers, no matter how long they have been in the service. Recently a lot of new guys have come into this unit, fresh out of Basic Combat Training, said Pvt. Joseph A. Morris. These guys came in showing some fresh new motivation. The young troops are filled with moti vation, Calderwood agreed. All they need to do is look up to their NCOs for guidance. The younger troops who just finished Basic Training are still in the process of learning, said Stewart. But our leaders are doing a great job using their knowledge to help them with any problems. I have confidence in all the young troops, said Parker. Theyll step up to do what they have to do. Our team leaders have been pushing these soldiers very hard since Day One, and the troops have been stepping up to the challenge. Theyll prove theyve got what it takes here on their first mission. The troops of the 4th ID have been keep ing themselves busy their first week on the ground, between catching up on all the essential training needed to perform their tasks effectively and making themselves at home, so their time here will go as smooth and successful as possibly. Im expecting to do a lot of work here, said Morris. Hopefully well be able to make time for some good PT. And with an abundance of unit pride and patriotism, these troops are ready to do what they were bred to do. Well do our time here, then go back home, said Cruz. Even though this seems to be a peaceful mission, we have prepared for the worst, and we will suc ceed no matter what the case. Our families are proud of us all for defending our country and supporting the president on putting a lid on terrorism, said Parker. Were ready to rock, said Morris. Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire The troops of the 4th Infantry Division hit the groud running, partaking in riot-control training out on the range days just after their arrival here Sunday. 2nd Lt. Don Calderwood, platoon leader of the 4th Infantry Division (r) and Sgt. 1st Class Jackie A. Stewart, platoon sergeant (l), will skillfully pass their knowledge on to the new troops in their unit. Page 11 Friday, October 11, 2002 Page 6 Friday, October 11, 2002 GTMO said viva! to all things hot and spicy Saturday as the Hispanic Heritage Asso ciation here sponsored a dinner dance at the Windjammer Ballroom to increase awareness about Hispanic Heritage Month. The special soiree, which took months of preparation and rehearsal, gathered more than 350 civilians and servicemembers, including special guests Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey, commander of JTF-170, Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, commander of JTF-160 and Navy Capt. Robert Buehn, the base com mander. Not to mention some VIPs-to-be. I am satisfied and very proud at the turnout and happy to see families with chil dren present, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Pedro A. Santiago, the president of GTMOs Hispanic Heritage Association. My goal was to make a difference, added Santiago, to show the community of Guantanamo Bay that the entire family, including children, could participate in the events, drama, and other activities. Indeed, this was no ordinary Saturday night at the Windjammer. Many of the guests who showed up were dressed in their Sunday best for the occasion. The stage was embellished with paintings and a banner that read His panic Heritage Celebration 2002, the entrance to the ballroom was set with a mix ture of hand made art decorations. Multi-col ored spot lights shone from the ceiling, illuminating Hispanic culture in all its glory. Some people sat at the tables with their friends and family members. Others sat with coworkers and dates for the evening. Peo ple mingled, talked and made new acquantainces as they learned more about the Hispanic culture. In the midst of the commotion, the master of ceremony for the night, Army Capt. Juan J. Gonza lez, went up to the stage, greeted every one with a warm welcome, and called for silence. A hush fell upon the room. Navy Petty Offi cer 3rd Class Noemi Litchfield officially opened the evening with a stirring a cap pella rendition of the U.S. national anthem. Santiago fol lowed with a few words explaining the purpose of the evening, which was to pay tribute to the contributions of the Lati nos, Chicanos and Hispanics to America and the world. After the presidents presentation, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni, Naval Base GTMOs Catholic chaplain, took the pulpit to share his reflections on the celebration and its theme: Strength in unity, faith and diversity. For strength in unity, concentrate on what unites us with out denying the things that make us different, he said. For faith, search for the truth with a sincere heart for diver sity, look at the way words are used to mean different things. To better illustrate this last point, Salamoni used the Spanish word papa which means potato or pope, depending on the speakers country of origin. Then it was time for the guests to savor and appreciate some Hispanic dishes. A zesty tra ditional cuisine was served: chicken fricassee, with yellow rice and pigeon peas, white rice By Army Master Sgt. Enid RamosMandell and Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Hispanic Heritage Dance spices Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey mimics the salsa moves of Spc. Roberto Batista. Photo by Army Master Sgt. Enid Ramos-Mandell Navy Lt. Ruth E. Goldberg and HM3 Roland Molone dance the jarabe tapatillo. Photo by Army Master Sgt. Enid Ramos-Mandell Table display of Hispanic art made by the children from the W.T. Sampson Elememtary School. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Some of youngest artists perform the tamborito, a dance originated from Panama.

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complementing a succulent roast pork. And for dessert, a tasty treat indeed: tembleque, a pudding made of rice and coconut. Navy Lt. Joy Whitlock, who was tasting Hispanic food for the first time, was ready to move to Costa Rica. This is really good, she said. I am glad I came. The cuisine is deli cious. After dinner came the entertainment. The guests were treated to poetry, songs and diverse types of folk music and dances from all across the Hispanic world. Dancers performed the cumbia from Colombia, bachata from Dominican Repub lic, tamborito from Panama, jarave tapatillo from Mexico, salsa from New York, cha-cha from Cuba and merengue from Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Their renditions were received with a standing ovation by the audience. Even some children present crawled up to the bottom of the stage as if to get in the groove of the night. The celebration was a success due to the support of the servicemembers and civilians, said Navy Lt. Ruth Ercilia Goldberg, secretary and treasurer of the organization. The whole community really pulled together. There was tremendous support from the radio stations; AFRTS, the Navy hospitals, Maj. Gen Dunlavey, Brig. Gen. Baccus, Navy Capt. Shimkus, and Navy Capt. Buehn. Special credit goes to Petty Officer 1st Class Sara K. Holman and HM3 Roland Molone, the choreographers for the associa tion, she continued. Without them, there would have been no diversity in our dance renditions. I wanted to bring this idea to GTMO, and it was a success, said Santiago. This years theme was well-represented. The event shows what Americans and Hispanics are all Page 7 Friday, October 11, 2002 up a GTMO Saturday night Phot by Master Sgt Enid Ramos-Mandell Strength in unity is depicted by this Parranda which is very similar to Christmas caroling. The community forms a group that goes from house to house singing and celebrating. Photo by Army Master Sgt. Enid Ramos-Mandell Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Noemi Litchfield dances and sings the popular song Mi Tierra. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Navy Lt.Joy Whitlock savors the authentic fric asee de pollo prepared for the celebration. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Marie Brewer plays her guitar as she performs a rendition of Bailamos by Enrique Iglesias. Page 10 Friday, October 11, 2002 The servicemembers serving in operation Enduring Freedom and the current global war on terrorism are history in the making, and it is falls to the job of a certain breed of soldier to ensure that their experiences are forever caught for posterity. That is the mission of the 44th Military History Detachment, a team of only three soldiers from Fort McPherson, Ga. A history detachment is the collector for the historian, who will put such information in an historical record, said Maj. Doug Hendy, commander of the 44th MHD. We dont ana lyze it, we just collect it, much like an advance scout will just collect intelligence. As a military history detachment, were here to capture whats going here right now for historical purposes, said Sgt. 1st Class Regina Allen, the units administrative NCO. Its a crucial piece of the puzzle. While U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) has a record of the paperwork, orders and daily sit uation reports from GTMO, the actual feel of the servicemembers during the current global war on terrorism is sorely missing from such sterile documents. Therefore, the 44th was sent by SOUTHCOM to capture the history of those serving here and whats going on with the merging of the two joint task forces. Our focus here was to fill in the gaps with oral history, which is done by interviewing the troops, said Hendy. Through extensive interviews and collect ing artifacts, the units goal was to give an idea of what life was like at GTMO. But with only an eight-day stay here, they needed to choose carefully to who they would talk to and what they would collect. The interviewing process was definitely a selective one, said Hendy. We had to go to leaders and the staff, to understand how deci sions were made and get a sense of the com mand climate. But we also couldnt leave out the lower enlisted, so we of course went to guards out at the camps. Part was merely gathering a recollection of the what goes into making such a mission as Enduring Freedom a successful one, from command decisions to the importance of a guards job. Partly the 44th was after a more personal touch. We wanted to capture the experience of the individual, said Hendy. What was it like for the reservists and national guardsmen, to have to leave their families, jobs and schools to serve their country. We came to catch the sacrifices that the servicemembers are making down here. Once back at Fort McPherson, the soldiers of the 44th will begin to transcribe and organ ize all of the interviews and artifacts that they collected while here. From there, its in the hands of the historian. After we collect all the info, it is then up to the SOUTHCOM historian to decide what is to be done with it, said Allen. Once its cat alogued, it might be put in a museum, used for research or placed into archives. Out of the 25 military history detachments in the Army, the 44th MHD is the only activeduty unit. And so their other full time mission is to train the other Reserve and National Guard history detachments. Being the only active duty unit, our real mission is to train the other 24 Reserve and National Guard military history detachments, said Hendy. Well take them to the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., and train them on the interview process, such as whats important and not important when collecting artifacts and documents, because you cant simply collect everything. We also try to incul cate our active-duty operational mindset and terminology to the other MHDs. And while these history detachments may be a rarity, it doesnt mitigate their importance. Were the type of unit that you really wouldnt appreciate until you wanted one, said Hendy. But you want people with a mil itary background, people who understand this type of culture and language to be collecting the history of the military rather than a civilian historian with no military experience. And over half of the MHDs have been mobilized, he added, which shows that commands realize that history is important, and that servicemembers need to know their legacy. Good units draw strength from their legacy. It gives them a source to rally around, Hendy said. Overall, the 44th MHDs quick mission to GTMO has proven itself to be yet another suc cess for the history books. This was a great opportunity to hone our skills, said Hendy. We were welcomed with open arms by both Joint Task Forces, and I think weve captured the essence of whats going on down here, the logistics, the per sonal experiences and the command perspec tive. Weve been able to compile the nuts and bolts of the operation, which will help to put all of it into better context for future use. We had some stumbling blocks, like any mission will have, but overall I feel it was a success, said Allen. It was very informative. You may hear what goes on during deploy ments, but actually being there and getting into that mindset is a great experience. And just meeting the troops is what impressed Hendy the most. Coming down here reminded me of the role of the National Guard and Reserves and their importance, he said. That no matter what job a soldier may have, they all want to be soldiers. And that applies equally to other services. America is a tough country, and everyone here wants to serve it proudly. 44th MHD preserving GTMOs legacy Story by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Sgt. 1st Class Mitchell Huth, NCOIC of the 44th MHD, reviews the units collected material, which includes a vintage sign from Freedom Heights and a compendium of every issue ofThe Wire published. Photo by Air Force Staff Sgt. Jennie Ivey Sgt. 1st Class Mitchell Huth, NCOIC of the 44th MHD, expertly conducts an official historical interview.

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Page 8 Friday, October 11, 2002 Page 9 Army Sgt. Earnest Cook, 114th MP Co., cleans up after working a long, tiresome shift. Nothing beats brushing your teeth out in the intense heat. Spc. Keith Brown, 114th MP Co. catches some zzz before heading back to work Trick or treat? This spooky hooch is ready for Halloween. Army Sgt. Steve C. Andronis, 342nd MP Co., phones home. Army Staff Sgt. Sam Brown, 239th MP Co., and Army Staff Sgt. Shane A. Kirkpatrick, 239th MP Co, get pumped up at the gym during their down time. Welcome to Camp America! Day-to-day at Camp A Where can you find twelve beds, twelve soldiers, and very little room? That's right, if you live out at Camp America you know the answer...your hooch. Although the living conditions at Camp America are not exact ly luxurious, they do offer something spe cial: The kind of unity that comes from shar ing common responsi bilities, interests, and yes, living quarters is known as esprit de corps This bond can start at the gym, while waiting on line to use the telephone, or on the way back from another long shift at Delta. Wherever it starts, it is the heart of Camp A. And its beat makes this mission run. Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire

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Page 8 Friday, October 11, 2002 Page 9 Army Sgt. Earnest Cook, 114th MP Co., cleans up after working a long, tiresome shift. Nothing beats brushing your teeth out in the intense heat. Spc. Keith Brown, 114th MP Co. catches some zzz before heading back to work Trick or treat? This spooky hooch is ready for Halloween. Army Sgt. Steve C. Andronis, 342nd MP Co., phones home. Army Staff Sgt. Sam Brown, 239th MP Co., and Army Staff Sgt. Shane A. Kirkpatrick, 239th MP Co, get pumped up at the gym during their down time. Welcome to Camp America! Day-to-day at Camp A Where can you find twelve beds, twelve soldiers, and very little room? That's right, if you live out at Camp America you know the answer...your hooch. Although the living conditions at Camp America are not exact ly luxurious, they do offer something spe cial: The kind of unity that comes from shar ing common responsi bilities, interests, and yes, living quarters is known as esprit de corps This bond can start at the gym, while waiting on line to use the telephone, or on the way back from another long shift at Delta. Wherever it starts, it is the heart of Camp A. And its beat makes this mission run. Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire

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complementing a succulent roast pork. And for dessert, a tasty treat indeed: tembleque, a pudding made of rice and coconut. Navy Lt. Joy Whitlock, who was tasting Hispanic food for the first time, was ready to move to Costa Rica. This is really good, she said. I am glad I came. The cuisine is deli cious. After dinner came the entertainment. The guests were treated to poetry, songs and diverse types of folk music and dances from all across the Hispanic world. Dancers performed the cumbia from Colombia, bachata from Dominican Repub lic, tamborito from Panama, jarave tapatillo from Mexico, salsa from New York, cha-cha from Cuba and merengue from Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Their renditions were received with a standing ovation by the audience. Even some children present crawled up to the bottom of the stage as if to get in the groove of the night. The celebration was a success due to the support of the servicemembers and civilians, said Navy Lt. Ruth Ercilia Goldberg, secretary and treasurer of the organization. The whole community really pulled together. There was tremendous support from the radio stations; AFRTS, the Navy hospitals, Maj. Gen Dunlavey, Brig. Gen. Baccus, Navy Capt. Shimkus, and Navy Capt. Buehn. Special credit goes to Petty Officer 1st Class Sara K. Holman and HM3 Roland Molone, the choreographers for the associa tion, she continued. Without them, there would have been no diversity in our dance renditions. I wanted to bring this idea to GTMO, and it was a success, said Santiago. This years theme was well-represented. The event shows what Americans and Hispanics are all Page 7 Friday, October 11, 2002 up a GTMO Saturday night Phot by Master Sgt Enid Ramos-Mandell Strength in unity is depicted by this Parranda which is very similar to Christmas caroling. The community forms a group that goes from house to house singing and celebrating. Photo by Army Master Sgt. Enid Ramos-Mandell Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Noemi Litchfield dances and sings the popular song Mi Tierra. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Navy Lt.Joy Whitlock savors the authentic fric asee de pollo prepared for the celebration. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Marie Brewer plays her guitar as she performs a rendition of Bailamos by Enrique Iglesias. Page 10 Friday, October 11, 2002 The servicemembers serving in operation Enduring Freedom and the current global war on terrorism are history in the making, and it is falls to the job of a certain breed of soldier to ensure that their experiences are forever caught for posterity. That is the mission of the 44th Military History Detachment, a team of only three soldiers from Fort McPherson, Ga. A history detachment is the collector for the historian, who will put such information in an historical record, said Maj. Doug Hendy, commander of the 44th MHD. We dont ana lyze it, we just collect it, much like an advance scout will just collect intelligence. As a military history detachment, were here to capture whats going here right now for historical purposes, said Sgt. 1st Class Regina Allen, the units administrative NCO. Its a crucial piece of the puzzle. While U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) has a record of the paperwork, orders and daily sit uation reports from GTMO, the actual feel of the servicemembers during the current global war on terrorism is sorely missing from such sterile documents. Therefore, the 44th was sent by SOUTHCOM to capture the history of those serving here and whats going on with the merging of the two joint task forces. Our focus here was to fill in the gaps with oral history, which is done by interviewing the troops, said Hendy. Through extensive interviews and collect ing artifacts, the units goal was to give an idea of what life was like at GTMO. But with only an eight-day stay here, they needed to choose carefully to who they would talk to and what they would collect. The interviewing process was definitely a selective one, said Hendy. We had to go to leaders and the staff, to understand how deci sions were made and get a sense of the com mand climate. But we also couldnt leave out the lower enlisted, so we of course went to guards out at the camps. Part was merely gathering a recollection of the what goes into making such a mission as Enduring Freedom a successful one, from command decisions to the importance of a guards job. Partly the 44th was after a more personal touch. We wanted to capture the experience of the individual, said Hendy. What was it like for the reservists and national guardsmen, to have to leave their families, jobs and schools to serve their country. We came to catch the sacrifices that the servicemembers are making down here. Once back at Fort McPherson, the soldiers of the 44th will begin to transcribe and organ ize all of the interviews and artifacts that they collected while here. From there, its in the hands of the historian. After we collect all the info, it is then up to the SOUTHCOM historian to decide what is to be done with it, said Allen. Once its cat alogued, it might be put in a museum, used for research or placed into archives. Out of the 25 military history detachments in the Army, the 44th MHD is the only activeduty unit. And so their other full time mission is to train the other Reserve and National Guard history detachments. Being the only active duty unit, our real mission is to train the other 24 Reserve and National Guard military history detachments, said Hendy. Well take them to the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., and train them on the interview process, such as whats important and not important when collecting artifacts and documents, because you cant simply collect everything. We also try to incul cate our active-duty operational mindset and terminology to the other MHDs. And while these history detachments may be a rarity, it doesnt mitigate their importance. Were the type of unit that you really wouldnt appreciate until you wanted one, said Hendy. But you want people with a mil itary background, people who understand this type of culture and language to be collecting the history of the military rather than a civilian historian with no military experience. And over half of the MHDs have been mobilized, he added, which shows that commands realize that history is important, and that servicemembers need to know their legacy. Good units draw strength from their legacy. It gives them a source to rally around, Hendy said. Overall, the 44th MHDs quick mission to GTMO has proven itself to be yet another suc cess for the history books. This was a great opportunity to hone our skills, said Hendy. We were welcomed with open arms by both Joint Task Forces, and I think weve captured the essence of whats going on down here, the logistics, the per sonal experiences and the command perspec tive. Weve been able to compile the nuts and bolts of the operation, which will help to put all of it into better context for future use. We had some stumbling blocks, like any mission will have, but overall I feel it was a success, said Allen. It was very informative. You may hear what goes on during deploy ments, but actually being there and getting into that mindset is a great experience. And just meeting the troops is what impressed Hendy the most. Coming down here reminded me of the role of the National Guard and Reserves and their importance, he said. That no matter what job a soldier may have, they all want to be soldiers. And that applies equally to other services. America is a tough country, and everyone here wants to serve it proudly. 44th MHD preserving GTMOs legacy Story by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Sgt. 1st Class Mitchell Huth, NCOIC of the 44th MHD, reviews the units collected material, which includes a vintage sign from Freedom Heights and a compendium of every issue ofThe Wire published. Photo by Air Force Staff Sgt. Jennie Ivey Sgt. 1st Class Mitchell Huth, NCOIC of the 44th MHD, expertly conducts an official historical interview.

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4th Infantry Division joins the force They come from miles around, to per form an unknown mission. They come to show what theyre made of, to protect, to serve, and to endure freedom. They are the mind and body of the Army, the active duty infantrymen of the 4th Infantry Division from Fort Hood, Texas. And for them, the Guantanamo Bay adventure is just about to begin. We dont know our specific tasks yet, but were ready to take over whatever they got to give us here. After all, were activeduty infantrymen, said 2nd Lt. Don Calderwood, platoon leader of the 4th ID. I took over this unit only two weeks before we were deployed, he said, and this crew exceeded all the high expecta tions I had of them. And now, were here to meet and exceed the standards that this Joint Task Force expects of us. When we got the word we were coming to GTMO to serve as part of Operation Enduring Freedom, the troops were eager to come out here and be soldiers, said Sgt. 1st Class Jackie A. Stewart, platoon ser geant. And being highly-trained infantrymen, these soldiers are no strangers to being dedicated to their work. Back at Fort Hood, were constantly training hard to prepare for all and any missions, said Staff Sgt. James D. Parker. Thats just how it is with active duty. Its our nature to be always training, said Stewart. Were always ready to exe cute a mission on a moments notice. Even being hardcore, high speed, active duty soldiers, you can never be too ready for any mission to come. There is always extra work and preparation put into a unit before it is ready to be deployed. To prepare us for this deployment, we implemented additional infantry training in riot control into our schedule, said Calderwood. Before deploying, we were going over live fire, tactical movements and maneu vering, said Stewart. Now, were sitting through briefings and going through field exercises such as non-lethal munitions training to help us to get settled in. Ive been training troops with this unit for the past three years, said Parker. Now Im ready to step out on the field with them and get the job done. Settling into a new environment isnt always easy, though; its a process of adapting and overcoming that takes time. GTMOs hot, sultry air is usually a new experience that causes the troops to suffer and pay while theyre out in field perform ing their vital duties. Its tough training out in the heat, Sgt. Feliciano R. Cruz. But this is what has to be done, so we are prepared for the mission ahead. The heat here is similar to that of Texas, but the air is more humid, said Stewart. Still, I think were better prepared for a mis sion in this type of climate being that were use to train ing back home in these conditions. Perhaps what theyre used to the most is the concept of teamwork. Throughout all our training, Ive seen good unity within the unit, said Calderwood. The team is well organized and seems to work very well together. The group is squared away with good work ethics. A lot of these good work habits have been passed down from good super visors, he said. Experienced NCOs know what has to happen, and they make it happen, said Parker. Part of being a good leader is having the ability to motivate, said Calderwood. And motivation is also no stranger to this band of brothers, no matter how long they have been in the service. Recently a lot of new guys have come into this unit, fresh out of Basic Combat Training, said Pvt. Joseph A. Morris. These guys came in showing some fresh new motivation. The young troops are filled with moti vation, Calderwood agreed. All they need to do is look up to their NCOs for guidance. The younger troops who just finished Basic Training are still in the process of learning, said Stewart. But our leaders are doing a great job using their knowledge to help them with any problems. I have confidence in all the young troops, said Parker. Theyll step up to do what they have to do. Our team leaders have been pushing these soldiers very hard since Day One, and the troops have been stepping up to the challenge. Theyll prove theyve got what it takes here on their first mission. The troops of the 4th ID have been keep ing themselves busy their first week on the ground, between catching up on all the essential training needed to perform their tasks effectively and making themselves at home, so their time here will go as smooth and successful as possibly. Im expecting to do a lot of work here, said Morris. Hopefully well be able to make time for some good PT. And with an abundance of unit pride and patriotism, these troops are ready to do what they were bred to do. Well do our time here, then go back home, said Cruz. Even though this seems to be a peaceful mission, we have prepared for the worst, and we will suc ceed no matter what the case. Our families are proud of us all for defending our country and supporting the president on putting a lid on terrorism, said Parker. Were ready to rock, said Morris. Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire The troops of the 4th Infantry Division hit the groud running, partaking in riot-control training out on the range days just after their arrival here Sunday. 2nd Lt. Don Calderwood, platoon leader of the 4th Infantry Division (r) and Sgt. 1st Class Jackie A. Stewart, platoon sergeant (l), will skillfully pass their knowledge on to the new troops in their unit. Page 11 Friday, October 11, 2002 Page 6 Friday, October 11, 2002 GTMO said viva! to all things hot and spicy Saturday as the Hispanic Heritage Asso ciation here sponsored a dinner dance at the Windjammer Ballroom to increase awareness about Hispanic Heritage Month. The special soiree, which took months of preparation and rehearsal, gathered more than 350 civilians and servicemembers, including special guests Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey, commander of JTF-170, Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, commander of JTF-160 and Navy Capt. Robert Buehn, the base com mander. Not to mention some VIPs-to-be. I am satisfied and very proud at the turnout and happy to see families with chil dren present, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Pedro A. Santiago, the president of GTMOs Hispanic Heritage Association. My goal was to make a difference, added Santiago, to show the community of Guantanamo Bay that the entire family, including children, could participate in the events, drama, and other activities. Indeed, this was no ordinary Saturday night at the Windjammer. Many of the guests who showed up were dressed in their Sunday best for the occasion. The stage was embellished with paintings and a banner that read His panic Heritage Celebration 2002, the entrance to the ballroom was set with a mix ture of hand made art decorations. Multi-col ored spot lights shone from the ceiling, illuminating Hispanic culture in all its glory. Some people sat at the tables with their friends and family members. Others sat with coworkers and dates for the evening. Peo ple mingled, talked and made new acquantainces as they learned more about the Hispanic culture. In the midst of the commotion, the master of ceremony for the night, Army Capt. Juan J. Gonza lez, went up to the stage, greeted every one with a warm welcome, and called for silence. A hush fell upon the room. Navy Petty Offi cer 3rd Class Noemi Litchfield officially opened the evening with a stirring a cap pella rendition of the U.S. national anthem. Santiago fol lowed with a few words explaining the purpose of the evening, which was to pay tribute to the contributions of the Lati nos, Chicanos and Hispanics to America and the world. After the presidents presentation, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni, Naval Base GTMOs Catholic chaplain, took the pulpit to share his reflections on the celebration and its theme: Strength in unity, faith and diversity. For strength in unity, concentrate on what unites us with out denying the things that make us different, he said. For faith, search for the truth with a sincere heart for diver sity, look at the way words are used to mean different things. To better illustrate this last point, Salamoni used the Spanish word papa which means potato or pope, depending on the speakers country of origin. Then it was time for the guests to savor and appreciate some Hispanic dishes. A zesty tra ditional cuisine was served: chicken fricassee, with yellow rice and pigeon peas, white rice By Army Master Sgt. Enid RamosMandell and Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Hispanic Heritage Dance spices Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey mimics the salsa moves of Spc. Roberto Batista. Photo by Army Master Sgt. Enid Ramos-Mandell Navy Lt. Ruth E. Goldberg and HM3 Roland Molone dance the jarabe tapatillo. Photo by Army Master Sgt. Enid Ramos-Mandell Table display of Hispanic art made by the children from the W.T. Sampson Elememtary School. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Some of youngest artists perform the tamborito, a dance originated from Panama.

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receiving, securing and process ing wave after wave of detainees. Youve completed the transition from the Marines to the 89th Mil itary Police Brigade to the 43rd Military Police Brigade, all in marvelous fashion. Bishop thanked the JTF-160 soldiers for securing detainees, performing force protection without blemish forging a cohesive Joint Task Force but hosting an endless parade of vis itors, and saluted Baccus and Funaro: Your steady hands have helped ensure the mis sion's success. Then the guests of honor said their offi cial goodbyes. Thank you for being here, Baccus said. I wont recount all the things that Gen. Bishop men tioned. But I will say cer tainly from the bottom of my heart that with out the support of all the ser vicemen and women of the Joint Task Force, none of those things mentioned could possibly have been done. A leader never does those things him or herself, but relies on everyone to their jobs, and you have been outstanding. I wish that all the servicemen and women here continue to per form in an outstanding manner, and I'm sure that they will con tinue to demonstrate the fact that they can perform any mission that is given to us in connection to this task force, he continued. And certainly, Gen. Dunlavey, I wish you the best of luck. Funaro, in typical fashion, was more impassioned in his farewell address and more blunt. Even on my last day its gotta be hot out here, he said, lapsing into indecipherable Italian. I cant wait to get back to Narra gansett Bay. Its been a great joy and a great honor to be the com mand sergeant major of this Joint Task Force, he con tinued. This is a difficult chal lenge for any body who comes here, because this country has never done any thing like this before...so weve made a few mistakes along the way but weve done a lot of things right. And I am very proud of those things that we've done right. We gave you our loyalty; it was always soldiers first. We per formed our duty in an admirable manner. We treated you with respect, the respect that you deserved. And we gave you self less service...We never fed our egos because we didnt have any. And we did that proudly. I believe we served you with honor, he continued. I believe we gave you integrity and served you with integrity, and I believe we showed the courage to fight when we thought we were right. And if those words sound familiar, Funaro boomed, what I read off were the Army values. We lived them, we ate them, we slept them. And some people dont even know them. So I proudly leave here with integrity, with my head held high, for a job that deep down in my heart I know Ive done damn well, and I wish all of you well, he concluded. Godspeed to all of you, and good luck. Soon, JTF-160 and JTF-170 will be no more. Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey takes tempo rary command of both JTFs until the two are merged under the command of Army Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller next month. The ending of the term of Bac cus and Funaro at the head of JTF-160, which has had the responsibility of housing the detainees safely and securely while steadily improving the quality-of-life of the MPs that guard them, marks the end of the GTMO detention operations transition from the newness and chaos of spring to the routines and efficiencies of fall. These seven months saw the hardearned maturation of a mission that must continue to support the war on terrorism for as long as it is necessary. There have been critics both foreign and domestic of the work of this leadership; there have been admirers. But Baccus and Funaros role in this day-by-day etching of history cannot be questioned. And their work will not be soon forgotten. Page 5 Friday, October 11, 2002 FAREWELL, from page 1 Photo by Tech. Sgt. Roy Santana Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus delivers his final salute as JTF-160 commander Wednes day. Flanking him from L to R are: Air Force Maj. Gen. Robert Bishop, Deputy Combatant Cdr., SOUTHCOM; Army Maj. Gen Michael Dunlavey, now com mander of JTF-160 and JTF-170; Command Sgt. Maj. Michael T. Etheridge, CSM SOUTHCOM, and Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro, CSM JTF-160. At the podium is Lt. Col. George T. Villari, master of ceremonies for the event. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro lets loose Wednesday in his farewell address to the JTF-160 troops. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Col. Winfred S. Cummings, chief of staff for JTF-160 and JTF-170, takes in the ceremony. Photo by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Departing JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus gives his farewell address to the assembled troops. Page 12 Friday, October 11, 2002 Give me a #2, please, and watch the beard! Haircut? Haircut? Haircut? Pfc. Keith West, a Camp Delta guard with the 571st MP Co., is making the rounds of F block Wednesday morning, offering his charges something they haven't had for months: a break from the routine and a little relief from the heat. For a few days last week, the world's most famous detention center doubled as perhaps its fastest, cheapest barbershop as JTF-160 volunteers came out to Camp Delta, donned smocks and gloves and set up chairs in the exercise areas of Camp Delta's detention blocks. For the volunteers, no experi ence was required, and none was needed. This was a classic keepit-simple operation with electric clippers: no high-and-tights, no little-off-the-sides. Each of the 20 detainees in F block that answered Wests call was led out, still shackled, by a pair of MP escorts, given a chair and asked the big question. What do you want 0, 1 or 2? Spc. Terrence Stiles, with the 153rd Finance Co. at J8, asks his first customer. 1, or 2? The detainee looks up, uncom prehending, at West and his part ner from the 571st, Sgt. Shanie Wery. West helps out All off? All off? and gets a nod. Stiles, on his third day cutting and by now pretty handy with the clippers, grins as he tucks a sheet under the detainees chin, tilts his head forward and switches on the clippers. My specialty. In about two minutes, its over. There is a large pile of wavy black hair on the ground in front of the detainee, whose scalp gleams white beneath a thin layer of stubble. He looks up at West. All gone, says West. All done, says Stiles. The detainee leans his head forward again as Stiles gives his head and neck a once-over with a paintbrush. Wery pulls the sheet off, and she and West stand their charge up to escort him back inside the cell block. The detainee looks around. Thank you, he says. *** Suddenly, we turn around and the gate to the exercise area is opening for Gen. Baccus. You guys the volunteer barbers? Yes, sir, we say, in unison. Thanks for doing this, he says. He nods, and smiles, then turns and leaves. So you guys volunteered to cut their hair? Wery says later, sounding incredulous. Its something different, Stiles replies. I work in finance, so...this is kind of fun. Spc. Angelo Baca, a bus driver with the 418th Transportation Co., agrees. Its a change of pace, he says. Nobody is exactly offering to trade jobs with the guards here, though, and Sgt. Brian Boatner, also with the 571st and the block commander here, just wants this particular barbershop to close up as soon as possible. The job of a Camp Delta guard may be a dull routine, with every day the same, but thats how you know youre doing it right. Its more work for us, he says. Two of us have to be out here for each of them, so shuttling them out for haircuts makes it tough to cover the door and the phone. *** If a long and full beard is indeed a sign of authority and piety in Muslim cultures, detainee haircut number seven may well have been the mayor of Kandahar. A short, stocky, robustlooking type, he has a wiry, graystreaked beard that radiates out from his chin and reaches halfway down his chest. And as Stiles starts in with an efficient #1, that beard is what concerns him most. Just be careful when you get down near the ears, he tells Baca. Stop where the beard starts. I screwed up on one guy yesterday and cut a little too far. He got awful mad, walking around with a lopsided beard. *** Not all, man, please, not all. Detainee haircut number 15 speaks pretty good English, and is friendly, grinning as he requests something short of the scalp-bar ers Stiles and Baca have been giv ing the rest of the block. He and Stiles negotiate a , by far the longest cut of the day, and the decision turns out to be an enemy of our brisk turnover rate. You got some thick hair, you know that? Stiles says as he shakes out the #5-length plastic clipper-guards for the umpteenth time. Youre gonna have to pay extra for this. OK, twenty dollars, the detainee agrees with a smile, and seizes on the chance to plead his case for some strangers. Ameri can soldiers take me from street, he says. Like thief. Gee, thats not very nice, West says with gentle sarcasm. I get the feeling hes heard this sort of thing before. Eventually, Stiles has to get the scissors. Youre getting Super Cuts now, he tells the detainee. Whyd you want it so long? You got a date tonight or something? When Stiles finishes, its pretty choppy, but as theres no mirrors out here, the detainee is pleased. Thank you. Next time you get the triplezero, Stiles says, and takes off the sheet. Could you put those scissors back in the box? Wery says. When theyre put away, she and West escort another satisfied cus tomer back to his cell block. *** At 11:00 a.m., after three hours and 20 detainees, were all fin ished. Stiles, Baca and I look around at the sizable piles of dark hair dotting the clean white cement of the exercise area. We joke briefly about clutching up a handful and selling it on EBay before sweeping the piles into trash bags and heading out. West tells us that Stiles and Bacas handiwork apparently got good reviews back in the cell block. A couple more in there wanted one once the others started coming back, he says. Sorry, one chance only. I, for one, am glad to be leav ing Camp Delta. There is a defi nite sweaty-detainees-who-eat-alot-of-curry smell about the place, as well as a bit of a gnat problem, and now the sun is really starting to beat down. I am starting to think about a haircut myself. Sgt. Boatner isnt displeased either. This kind of thing can drag out, he says. But it went pretty smooth. He looks up. And we got some good weather today... He shuts the gate behind us with a clang, and Camp Delta is back to normal again. Story and photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Due to operational security concerns (and possibly the Geneva Convention, were not sure), we cant show you a detainee getting his hair cut inside Camp Delta. But trust us, it happened. And it looked pretty much like this. JTF-160 volunteer barbers come out to Delta to offer hot-headed detainees a quick-and-dirty haircut. (Hold the shave.)

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Page 4 Friday, October 11, 2002 This weeks question: How do you think youve changed since youve been at GTMO? Marine Staff Sgt. Jarvis I. Davis, MCSF Co. Im more athletic. Ive taken advantage of the MWR recreational activi ties that are available for servicemembers. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark J. Thomp son, Navy OMD I'm a lot more laid back. More patience. I appreciate all the time I have now. I don't have to deal with city life. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gregory T. Waters, Base Security I've learned how to adapt with continuous heat by staying hydrated. Youve got to drink water here. Army Staff Sgt. Ronald E. Hall, 160th MPBN "I've changed physically. I go to the gym everyday. Besides I got promoted while I was here. Things couldn't get any better." Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Gerson Paul Naval Hospital I've become penny-wise. Been here two years and saved a lot of money. Plus, I've also improved my fishing skills. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Detention Hospital cuts the ribbon Navy Cmdr. Mike Moskowitz, Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, Brown and Root quality control manager Grady Griffin, Navy Capt. Albert J. Shimkus, Navy Cmdr. Jaine Carroll and Army Staff Sgt. Roger L. Christopher officially open the new Detention Hospital at Camp Delta in a ceremony Saturday. Staffed by the sailors of Fleet Hospital 20, the new hospital is a hard ened structure with improved facilities for the treatment of detainees. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Roy Santana Man on the Street Page 13 Friday, October 11, 2002 DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, October 11 8 p.m. The Country Bears, G 88 min 10 p.m. The Adventures of Pluto Nash, PG13 96 min Saturday, October 12 8 p.m. Master of Disguise, PG 80 min 10 p.m. XXX, PG13 114 min Sunday, October 13 8 p.m. Blood Work R -111 min Monday, October 14 8 p.m. Master of Disguise, PG 80 min Tuesday, October 15 8 p.m. XXX, PG13 114 min Wednesday, October 16 8 p.m. Signs, PG13 -107 min Thursday, October 17 8 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG13 94 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, October 11 8 p.m. The One, PG13 86 min 10 p.m. Platoon, R 113 min Saturday, October 12 8 p.m. The Crew, R 88 min 10 p.m. The Matrix, PG13 108 min Sunday, October 13 8, 10 p.m. Gladiator, R 149 min Monday, October 14 8 p.m. Bless the Child, R -100 min Tuesday, October 15 8 p.m. Partners, R 93 min Wednesday, October 16 8 p.m. Angelas Ashes, R 120 min Thursday, October 17 8, 10 p.m. Blackheart, R 95 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris With reality scarred, it could be real hard when an inch feels like a yard. If you could only see where you would go, youd probably kick back and take it slow. Living life one day at a time, hoping things flowed just like a rhyme. People grow older as time passes on. Now is here today, then tomorrow its gone. Love over War is what should be said, While people keep killing and hatred is spread. Your GTMO Horoscope Mar. 21 Apr. 19 You'll take any challenge that your command throws your way on Monday or Tuesday. You get down to business on Wednesday and keep your nose to the grindstone on Thursday. Maybe you'd rather be doing something else, but at least this is for a good cause. The fun begins mid-Friday. People just getting to know you stand in awe of your true magnificence. Saturday and Sunday are high-energy days, the perfect time to go get a little extra PT in. You're a Fire Sign burning the can dle at both ends, and yet you never seem to run out of fuel. Jul. 23 Aug. 22 What worked in the training or the movies doesn't seem to apply on Monday or Tuesday. Real life is more complex and requires continual adjustments. If the observer affects the observed, you're part of the problem rather than part of the solution. By Wednesday your mood dips. A ridiculous delusion gives you an excuse to act out. But is it worth it? You'll owe friends and NCO's an explanation! If only to let them divert you from the dangerous course you're taking. Between Friday and Sunday, youre in a positive mood. Nov. 22 Dec. 21 Say what you mean on Monday and Tuesday. Send others off on a mission and stake your claim on what they bring back. Conviction and command feel natural. Thanks to last week's thundering success, you're still entitled to change the world any way you want. Wednesday, someone chal lenges your authority. This person who com plicated your life had a reason. The weekend is yours; maybe it's a good-bye party as you leave for parts unknown. Apr. 20 May 20 Other people are your biggest problem on Monday and Tuesday. Someone may be actively harassing you, and that's where your EO officer comes in. Changing your tune on Wednesday sweeps you off your feet with an overflow of pos itive energy. You can do no wrong until Friday, and even then it's all a matter of perspective. Others are finished applauding what you've done, but the next thing you do might get them started all over again. You may even get a coin for all your hard work. Aug. 23 Sep. 22 Starting Monday, the rules no longer apply. If it's your job to fix a broken system, your work is cut out for you... why hello J-6. Abandoning what seems beyond repair raises other issues. Will you recreate what you had or go with a new model? Wednesday answers your question with a chal lenge. You have three days to do what's never been done before. By Friday it's obvious you bit off more than you could chew. Maybe you should have asked for help. You welcome a distracting weekend. Dec. 22 Jan. 19 Monday finds you still reeling from the happy impact of the last few days. Devious people try sneaking something past you, but your eyes are still sharp. Don't buy anything expensive from the NEX or online until you know more about the product and the seller. Starting Wednesday, you openly pursue a secret goal. Enlist others without telling them too much. On Saturday, your situa tion this weekend is less than idealwork again? Make the best of it, remember thinngs can only get better! May 21 Jun. 21 You're well-connected with other troops as the week begins. Arts and hobbies are the most important things. The ceramics shop may be just the right place for you. Wednesday and Thursday there's time for everything and nothing seems wasted. However, Friday, you're not so lucky, and trouble seems to be everywhere. Leave it behind as you escape into a balanced, motivated week end. You're welcome in any group, and your group is welcome everywhere. By Sunday, you're the hero again. Nothing can keep you down. Sep. 23 Oct. 22 When telling the whole truth, be complimenta ry. You'd rather have allies than enemies. Monday and Tuesday find you playful, curious and ready for anything. Stay focused, because the rest of the week is loaded with difficult surprises. On Friday you see where you stand, and it makes you nerv ous. You're now at the mercy of your command you can only hope they treat you fairly. A little shopping at the Nex may cheer you up. Faith and charm get you through weekend. Have a great time, you deserve it! Jan. 20 Feb. 18 If there's a party on Monday or Tuesday, you're at the center. But don't forget there's work to do in the morning. Many believe your tall tales and fol low you anywhere. This is your cosmic role and you play it well. But if you start believing your own myth, Wednesday takes the wind out of your sails. The weekend brings you time to play. Keep your schedule open instead of locking into any firm plans. Behaving yourself, you win the heart of someone that was afraid to approach you until now. Jun. 22 Jul. 22 Your unit members disappoint you on Monday or Tuesday. It breaks your heart when an accomplished group falls apart. You'd do better on your own, but you're a part of the team. From Wednesday to Friday, you're delighted with your new accomplish ments. Momentum builds in your new state of freedom. However, external restrictions clamp down by Saturday, could it be another hurricane? You knew it was too good to last. Oct. 23 Nov. 21 As the week begins, it's tempting to be rude but remember your actions could come with a counseling statement. You're delighted to tell certain people what you think of them. By Wednesday you're out of the danger zone. You are in a motivated, energized mood and ready to demonstrate your leader ship skills for everyone around you. The weekend brings you rela xation. Maybe a trip to the Leeward side beaches would be just the perfect finishing touch. Feb. 19 Mar. 20 Your plate is full on Monday and Tuesday. It's more than you can handle, but all this attention means you're needed and loved. Between Wednesday and Friday your hard work pays off! By Saturday, you're looking for ways to improve on things that everyone else thinks are just fine, for example the cleanliness of your living area. You may not get a lot of agreement and you're spending your budget too fast. Remember, youre not the only one who lives there, so youre not the only one who should pay.

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Page 3 Friday, October 11, 2002 Master-at-arms Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Brandon S. Langford I want to make a difference, being at the scene at the right place at the right time. I want to be there to stop it or prevent it from happening. Navy Seaman Andrew Beasley I enjoy working with the children of GTMO and make an impact on them. I have a chance to make a difference in peoples lives. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Michael G. Tuemler This is a great place to learn our rate. A young sailor can learn every aspect of law enforcement at GTMO. We are the only law enforcement agency here. Navy Seaman Berik Nicholson My Navy career has changed for the better. I have been working here for five months and I enjoy working with the GTMO community. Whatever you do, dont call them SPs. The specially trained sailors who roam the 45 square miles of U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay in white pickup trucks are offcially known as Masters at Arms -and they are indeed masters of their domain. This team of men and women nobly serve 24 hours a day, seven days a week, keeping peace and tranquil ity in the GTMO community. We provide force protection for GTMO, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Michael G. Tuemler. And were also a training ground. Being here in GTMO is a great opportunity for young sailors to learn every thing they can about their job. On this island the MAs do it all: work on traffic details, catch speeders with radar guns, become a criminal investigator, work at the Naval Station air port or just go on patrol, keeping the mean streets of GTMO as nice as possible. Day in and day out, the people of GTMO put their trust in the hands of these Masters at Arms, and in return the men and women in the white pickup trucks do their very best to make sure life in this quiet com munity is always smooth sailing. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy seaman Berik Nicholson checks in with dispatch while on traffic patrol. Navy Seaman Andrew Beasley patrols in front of W. T. Sampson elementary school and makes sure the traffic runs smoothly and the children are safe. Profession of the Week Page 14 Friday, October 11, 2002 In their own words.... The Wire: What was it like taking over here in March? How was that first week on the job? Gen. Baccus: First of all, coming down to such an impor tant job was really a credit to the fact that the Army and the Department of Defense trusted a National Guard officer to come down and assume command of a Joint Task Force. The first week? It was very...confusing, trying to under stand all the aspects that are involved in this mission. I had to try to understand all the pieces and try to coordinate them. That's probably one of the tougher parts of this mission. When I got here in March, the Marines were in charge, the detainees were out at X-Ray and the guards were living out at Freedom Heights in a tent city. It's been quite a tour from that point in time to now. The Wire: How have you dealt with all the international scrutiny of this operation? GB: One of the important things in dealing with the media as well as any of the visiting delegations that have come through to see the operation is to stress the fact all the servicemen and women per forming the mission here are highly professional. They do their job in a tremendous way. And that's resulted in a successful mission to date. As long as we stress the fact that we are securing our own person nel, maintaining operational awareness and also making sure that the detainees are secured properly and treated humanely, then there's very little that people can criticize. The Wire: Where do you see this mission's place in history? GB: From a parochial perspective, this is the first time a Brigadelevel unit has been activated in the National Guard since WWII, so that's quite an event. In a larger sense, certainly the fact that the entire world is watching what goes on down here, means that American ideas and the American way of life are being demonstrated on a daily basis by how we deal with the detainees and the way we perform the mission. The Wire: What are your thoughts on the merger? GB: The establishment of JTF-GTMO will signal a new phase of operations here. In January the mission was stood up with five day's notice before detainees started arriving; it was stand up, get ready, do it at any cost. The merger is reflective of the fact that now we need to look again at how the operation is being conducted, where there are efficiencies that can be gained by joining staffs or eliminating head quarters, to make the mission run better. The Wire: What are you going to do when you get home? GB: Go back to my job as the director of the Veterans Cemetery for the state of Rhode Island. The Wire: You're a general who doesn't get around too much to social events, who isn't out and about all that often. How do you approach being a general? GB: As you might expect, we deal with a myriad of responsibilities, but I've tried to be open and get out and see as many of the servicemen and women involved in the task force as often as I possibly can. But more importantly, I wanted to make sure that they could be proud of their leader, that they could look to him to set the example, that they could see the fact that by his daily conduct they could see how important this mission is. The Wire: How has this oper ation changed since you arrived? CSM Funaro: Oh, We've gone from night to day. It's typi cal military, typical Army you move in, and then you dig in. You constantly improve your site. When I first got here, they still had the GP Mediums up at Camp X-Ray. When the guards moved to Camp America they had noth ing but an air-conditioned SEAhut and a bunk. We put up phone lines with DSN. We brought in televisions with DVD setups. We replaced the push-but ton showers with keyed faucets. We brought in a gymnasium with equipment. We brought in the Sea side Galley. We opened the Internet Caf with 30 computers. And there are more improvements coming. The Wire: Did you consider that the focus of your job here, improv ing quality-of-life for the guards? CSM: Yes. The Wire: What was it like for you to come from a Guard brigade in Rhode Island to leading a high-profile detention operation in Cuba? CSM: Too damn much politics. I find that a lot of people preach Army values but don't practice them. And you can quote me. The Wire: How do you deal with that? CSM: My style is to cut through the bulls*** and get the job done. I am very proud, extremely proud, of the way I've taken care of the sol diers at Camp America, and I am damn proud of all of them. There's a lot of pressure, mental pressure, on the soldiers down there. And that filters back up here, and back down there. I think they all have to be commended for the job that they've done, and the professionalism they have shown in performing their job. The Wire: What's it like to be leaving? CSM: Great. The Wire: What do you think of merging JTF-160 and JTF-170? CSM: I think it's a great idea. I think it probably should have been done from the beginning. In a lot of cases, the left hand didn't know what the right hand was doing. And I think when we first stood up the two JTFs, nobody really knew what to expect. I think we've made it an awful lot easier for those that follow us because we've put everything in place. All they have to do is improve it. The blueprint is already here. The Wire: What are you going to do when you get home? CSM: Oh, I'll take a little bit of time off. I think as soon as my employer finds out I'm back I work for a precision-tool manufac turer, doing technical support and customer relations I'm going to get a phone call. Maybe I'll have to hide for a little while. The Wire: You're sort of a friendly guy, you walk around hitting troops with your hat, kicking them in them the a**. In terms of being a sergeant major, how do you tackle the job? CSM: The most important aspect of my job is taking care of the sol diers. And too many of us in leadership positions forget where we came from. That young E3 or E4 down there is the most important person at that camp. More important than me. More important than the generals. Because without those E3s and E4s, the job wouldn't get done. Those are the ones we need to take care of. So they have to know that I'm approachable. That's where my per sonality comes in. And I really, honestly believed that the soldiers rec ognized that when I paid attention to them, it came from my heart. Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro Two days before they departed GTMO forever, Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus and Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro each sat down with The Wire editor Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini. This is what they said...

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Page 15 Friday, October 11, 2002 NAVST A takes the trophy home again NAVSTA repeated again as flag football champions with a 26-13 victory over the Hood Ratz Thursday night at Cooper Field. But NAVSTAs latest Super Bowl win was not smooth sailing, with the finale of the double-elimination tournament living up to the fans wildest expectations. The Hood Ratz were in the losers bracket and fighting for a chance to play for the championship against NAVSTA, who was undefeated and in the winners bracket of the tournament. This meant the Hood Ratz had to beat NAVSTA twice in one evening to win the championship. The Hood Ratz knew what they had to do: come out strong. They shocked NAVSTA by scoring 14 points at the start of the first game. NAVSTA couldnt recover from this deficit, and the Hood Ratz won 32-28. And so the second game would decide the season and crown a champion. This was do or die time. They had us on our heels in the first game. We came out flat and the Hood Ratz made it hard to come back. We have to step up in the next game, said Navy Petty Offi cer 2nd Class Balton D. Hill after the opener. The underdog Hood Ratz had the edge coming into the second game. They had the frantic crowd on their side and the momentum of a victory under their belt. After all, they had just beaten an unde feated NAVSTA juggernaut and forced a deciding game for the championship. Their confidence was sky high, and it showed when they took the field. The Hood Ratz scored on their first drive, putting NAVSTA down by seven points, and then buckled down on defense and forced NAVSTA to punt. As the half progressed, though, NAVSTA was able to capitalize on a mistake the Hood Ratz defense committed on an attempted tackle. Two players collided and were not able to grab the flag. NAVSTAs Hill was able to break free and score a touchdown tying the game for NAVSTA at seven. The teams were going at one another like two gladiators in a death match. NAVSTA finally broke the tie by scoring a touchdown. With time running out in the first half, how ever, the Hood Ratz provided a little of their own magic when quarterback Army Sgt. James Stringfellow connected with Spc.Was car Vizcaino for a 49-yard touchdown pass to end the first half. This was turning out to be a heavyweight matchup. The game was all tied at 13 and the crowd seemed as if they didnt want this game to end, whoever they were rooting for. This was a championship game for the ages. NAVSTAs team came out on the field calm and cool for the second half. It seemed they had a script and suddenly were sure how this game was going to turn out. Navy Seaman Antonio Robinson began taking what the Hood Ratz defense gave him. If the defense gave his wide receivers a 10yard cushion, he would throw short; if they played them close he would throw deep. Then came the big play. With the Hood Ratz in an aggressive man-to-man defense, Robinson and his favorite receiver Hill made eye contact at the line of scrimmage. The ball was snapped and Hill took off toward the end zone. A perfect spiral was coming down to his hands. He made an off-balance catch and took it to the big house for a score. The extra point put NAVSTA in the dri vers seat, 20-13. On their answering drive, the Hood Ratz played like they would come back with ease. They were working the whole field, throwing the ball to the left and right, trying to confuse NAVSTA and keep them off-guard. As the Hood Ratz approached NAVSTAs 30-yard line they made a devastating mistake. Stringfellow misfired on a pass and Hill inter cepted. This put NAVSTA in control of the game and the game was now theirs to lose. The championship was in their grasp. And in the style of a champion, NAVSTA put the knife in, scoring again and putting the game out of reach for the Hood Ratz. NAVSTAs offense played out the half with time on their side, running down the play clock and staying inbounds, and its defense finished the job, stopping the Hood Ratz one more time with less than 2 minutes left in the game. There would be no miracle comebacks for the Hood Ratz. NAVSTAs 26-13 win meant that the championship trophy was going to stay in Guantanamo Bay for another year. Their dom ination throughout the season and the tourna ment had paid in another Super Bowl crown. The Hood Ratz played an outstanding game, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Bernard Jennings. We had a tough time com ing back from that. In the end, we lost our per fect season, but the loss gave us motivation to win the tournament. These two teams had battled four times this season, and with every game that passed they respected and admired one another more. We learned an important lesson in this tournament: sportsmanship. Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan and his team are a class act, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class James Schols. The tournament brought out the best in everyone. We were able to win because of teamwork, without that we would have lost, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Tom Good win afterward. The important thing is that we won the championship, he added as he walked away, bringing this dramatic season to a close. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire NAVSTAs team celebrates their victory on the gridiron with Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn after winning the flag football championship over the Hood Ratz, 26-13. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Bernard Jennings, the tournament MVP, fights his way to the first down marker to help NAVSTA win the game. Page 2 Friday, October 11, 2002 JTF-160/JTF-170 Command Commander: Army Maj. Gen. Michael Dunlavey Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Air Force Lt. Col. Eduardo Villavicencio OIC, 361st Public Affairs Detachment: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160/JTF-170. This publication is printed under the pro visions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the per sonnel within. Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus MWR Watch FYI Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Pete's Marina. Aerobics Classes Marine Hill Gym, Mon., Wed., and Fri., 6AM-7AM, 8AM9:30AM, and 5:00PM-6:00PM. Tae-Kwon Do Marine Hill Gym, MF, 11:30AM-12:30PM, and 6:00PM9:00PM (one hour classes). 1-on-1 Spinning Classes GJ Denich Gym, MWF, 6:30PM-7:30PM. Yoga Classes 5:15PM-6:15PM, GJ Denich Gym Yoga Center. Pool Hours: Marine Hill Pool: Open Swim, 6:00AM-8:00AM; Lap Swim, 10:00AM6:00PM. Windjammer Pool: Lap Swim, 6:00AM to 8:00AM. Deer Point Pool: 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Today, Friday, October 11th Columbus Day Fishing Tournament, Oct. 11-14, signup ends at MWR Marina on Sat. 9:00AM. Extreme Bowling, Marble head Lanes, 7:00PM-Midnight. Saturday, October 12th 6:00AM: Hispanic Heritage 5K Run. Childrens Ceramics class, 8AM-10AM. Sunday, October 13th 1:00PM: Football Sundays, Goatlocker: E7, E8, E9, or civilian equivalent. 5:00PM: GTMO Queen Fishing Trip from Bayview Dock. 20-Person Limit, $5 per person. Monday, October 14th Adult Ceramic Class, 8AM-12PM Tuesday, October 15th 6:30PM, Bingo Night at Windjammer. Wednesday, October 16th 8:00PM, Karaoke Night at Windjammer. Also, a message from J8 Finance: Employee/Member Self Service is implementing a new look. Effective October 15, software changes will be implemented where myPay replaces Employee/Member Self Service. myPay will be accessible using the following URL: https://mypay.dfas.mil. The E/MSS URL will still continue to work: https://emss.dfas.mil and will direct you to myPay URL. Current access to E/MSS remains unchanged and the PIN number established in E/MSS will continue to work for myPay. For more information or a brochure on the enhanced capabilities of myPay, contact Lt. Rhonda Stevens at ext. 5433. To all the Servicemen and women of Joint Task Force 160 and the Naval Station: Every day of my tenure as your commander, I have reflected upon your outstanding support of the mission that has faced us. Whether you are a member of the guard force dealing with the detainees or a bus driver trans porting personnel, you have all performed your duties in an exemplary manner. It has truly been a privilege to serve as your commander. I leave behind an outstanding organization, which is up to the challenges that you will face as the new Joint Task Force stands up. But more importantly, I leave behind soldiers, Marines, sailors, airmen and Coast Guardsmen who prove every day they are dedicated to the ideals our country was founded upon, and are proud to be in the serv ice of their nation. It has been a pleasure to serve with every one of you, and thank you for your sacrifices. Godspeed, Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, RIARNG Contact Capt. Gormly at x5249 for more information. The NEX will be closed Sunday, Oct. 13 for renovations, so get your weekend shopping done now!

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Page 16 Friday, October 11, 2002 with Marine Cpl. Marc A. Palos, MCSF Co., DET A, Bravo Co. 123 Q: Where are you from? A: Im from San Angelo, Texas, but I grew up in Sonora. Its a very small town right outside of San Angelo and whenever I visit people always remember me. Unfortunately the nearest reserve center is is a 3 1/2 hour drive away. Q: What made you join the Marine Corps? A: I always wanted to be a Marine. I see them as being made of honor and high intellect. Q: What do you think makes Marines really stand out from the other services? A: You have your branches, and theyre all good, but then you have Marines. They stand out due to their tradition and the way they handle business. Its a way of life; a way of thinking. If youre not a Marine, its hard to understand. Q: How do you feel about your mission guarding the communist Cuban fenceline at GTMO? A: Well, I was on active duty from 1994 to 1998, but after Sept. 11, I knew I had to come back. So participating in a mission of vast importance such as this is a great honor. Marines have been here for over 100 years keeping the wolf away from the door, and now with Camp Delta here, its not just one wolf but a pack of wolves. Q: Say you were sent into a blazing battlefield armed with only a plastic fork. A: Marines are trained to kill if they have no weapons, which is when the Marine becomes the weapon. So a plastic fork would stay in my back pocket, and Ill take care of everything else. Q: You versus the entire Cuban Army...who wins? A: I do. Not only because an American Marine carries bravery and courage, but also intelligence. The more you know, the stronger you are. They would be no match for me. Q: Could you quite possibly be the greatest war-fighter ever? A: Absolutely. If not, I would nt be here. I didnt come into the Marines to work in an office or move some boxes. I came in with the sole purpose to fight a war, be on the front lines and see the enemy in the eyes. Otherwise, it would be a waste of my time. Q: When not fighting wars, what do you do as a civilian? A: Accounting for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas. I like it a lot. Its not easy, but its good to work the mind. Theres a differ ence between making a living and living life, and being a Marine makes me appreciate what life I have. Q: Whats the biggest chal lenge youve had to overcome? A: Ive been through some hard times, but the hardest thing right now is being away from my 7year-old son. Nothing replaces family. He misses me. Hes very proud of his Marine father. Q: What type of kid were you growing up? A: Quiet and shy. My father had a tire company and I was raised in a tire shop. Not like we werent well off, but he made us grow up learning what it is to work for a living. Q: How has that way of living impacted your life? A: If that didnt happen to me, I wouldnt be here, without a shadow of a doubt. That work ethic will always stick with me, its made me what I am. Hopefully I can pass that on to my son. Q: What do you think of those new uniforms the Marines are sporting? A: Theyre great. Theyll be more realistic in a combat situa tion. They help to identify Marines as not being like everyone else. Q: What do you think of a uni form made entirely out of velvet? A: I have no comment on that. Q: What if you were sent back in time to prevent the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. How would you pull it off? A: I would very easily remove Booth and his conspirators from the scenario using extreme caution so as not to alter history any more. Q: What message do you have for all of the lower enlisted? A: Rank is pretty much the same as authority, but never con fuse authority with leadership. It takes a great person to become a leader, no matter what rank he is. Q: What is best in life? A: Thats up to the individual. It comes down to what will make you proud, happy and satisfied, regardless of what that is. Q: What do you think the future holds for you? A: I dont know where Ill be, but Ill stick closer to my son and become more educated. I have no idea where that will take me, but as long as Im proud, happy and sat isfied, it doesnt matter. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano All-American Marine Corps Cpl. Marc A. Palos, MCSF Co. Det. A, Bravo Co. 123, stands tall with his weapon of choice, the versatile M-203 grenade launcher. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire War fighting Marine on life, work and velvet 15 Minutes of Fame... Officially, Joint Task Force 160 will live on at Guantanamo Bay until Nov. 1. But the brigadier general and command sergeant major that led the detention part of this deten tion operation for the past seven months are gone, having departed GTMO this week to return to Rhode Island and their former lives. Before long they will be part-time soldiers again, near to their homes and loved ones, out of this unrelenting sun. Wednesday, it was time for Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus and Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro to be honored by their troops and superiors alike. It is indeed my great honor and pleasure to represent Gen. Hill this afternoon to say thanks to both Brig. Gen. Baccus and Com mand Sgt. Maj. Funaro for their hard work for your hard work and all that you've done in JTF-160 through a very difficult and strategically significant time, said Air Force Maj. Gen. Robert D. Bishop, deputy combat ant commander of U.S. Southern Command. Under the able leadership of Brig. Gen. Bac cus and Command Sgt. Maj. Funaro, JTF-160 has conducted detention ops at Camp X-Ray up to the 28th of April, picked up and moved the entire operation without incident, com pleted the construction of camps Alpha and Delta, oversaw the construction of Camp II and are overseeing the construction of Camp III, and all the while youve been moving, Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160/170 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Farewell to a command Friday, October 11, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 18 Story by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire JTF-160s Brig. Gen. Baccus and Command Sgt. Maj. Funaro say their last goodbyes to GTMO Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano A formation of JTF-160 troops and an assemblage of honored guests gather in front of the JTF-160 head quarters building Wednesday for a farewell ceremony honoring Brig. Gen. Baccus and CSM Funaro. See FAREWELL, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 Page 15 Page 8