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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00071
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: October 4, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00071

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PAGE 1

With the hurricane season hanging around GTMO from the start of June until the end of November, the personnel assigned here must be well prepared for any extreme weather conditions. Or not so extreme. On September 25th, many of the servicemembers assigned here felt the first effects of this years hurricane season when Tropical Storm Lili was approaching from the south, picking up velocity and seemingly headed right in our direction. For such situations, there are guide lines that must be followed to keep us safe from the ravages of any brewing storm. There are five categories associ ated with a coming storm, ranging from Condition Five (the normal GTMO rou tine) to Condition One, where destruc tive winds are expected within 12 hours. The threat condition the base is in deter mines what actions should and should not be taken by servicemembers. In an 8 a.m. weather warning issued on the 25th by the National Hurricane Center, Lili was expected to hit GTMO head on, so action was called for all per sonnel living out at Camp America in SEAhuts to be evacuated from their wooden homes and moved into better storm-prepared housing at Windward Loop. Just in case. The houses in Windward Loop arent hurricane proof, but they are hurri cane resistant, said Navy Chief Eugene Santorella, Naval Station Housing. The strength of these houses are much more likely to handle the harsh conditions of a storm than Camp Americas SEAhuts. This wasnt an exercise, said JTF160s Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Funaro. We got to demonstrate our destructive weather plan. If the wind got really heavy, we didnt want to take a chance of a roof caving in on a SEAhut out at the Camp. We got the word during the early hours of Wednesday that we were going to be moving into the Loop, said Sgt. Raymond C. Hardie of the 2/142 Infantry Company. Me and three other Non-Commissioned Officers were moved in to stay with three Army Cap tains. They showed us great hospitality and made us feel right at home. When they told us a storm was com ing and we had to move out, we were Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The GTMO storm that hardly was Friday, October 4, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 17 Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Tropical storm Lili cries wolf twice, and the residents of GTMO react in a moments notice As the storm generated, the troops of Guantanamo Bay geared up to face the predicted onslaught of Tropical Storm Lili head on. See STORM, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 P a ge 8 Page 15 Page 16 Friday, October 4, 2002 With Army Staff Sgt. Veronica D. Sims Q: What do you want people who read this to know about you after reading your 15 minutes of fame? A: Hmm. Well, I want people to know that even though I have a mean walk, I am a really sweet person with a warm and tender heart. Q: Okay, so are you ready to reveal the real Staff Sgt. Veronica D. Sims and begin your 15 min utes of fame? A: I've been ready! Q: Where on this glorious GTMO do you work, and what unit are you from? A: I am with the 160 MP Bat talion out of Tallahassee, Fla., and I work at the Detention Hospital. I basically provide security to the hospital staff and detainees. Q: And how do you feel about working so closely with the detainees? A: Well as a civilian I work in a federal prison so I am used to this kind of work environment. Q: But, there must be a lot of differences between the two, right? A: Oh of course, for starters I work with female inmates back in the civilian world. Also, there are a lot of dos and donts working with the detainees. I have to watch what I say and do a lot more. For exam ple at my job back in the states if an inmate asks me to get them anything, a water or just anything, I would never do it. It would be looked at as showing favorites. But here things are different. Q: Enough about work, consid ering I am sure that is what your busy with the majority of your time here. Tell me, what do you do for fun? A: I run. After I work a 12-hour shift, you can find me running. Q: Running for the hills I bet. A: Just running away a stressful day. Q: Is there anything else you enjoy doing? A: Other than working out, I like to go to the movies and just chill out with my roommates. Q: Ah, housemates! They can be your best friends or your worst enemies. And how about yours? A: I've got a good group. In fact, every Thursday night we cook dinner and thank God for making it through the week. And we drink a lot of apple juice. Q: Lucky lady, six females in two rooms could mean war. But anyway, what is the weirdest thing you've seen since you've been here? A: Banana rats! I do not take them well. And they travel in herds. Q: We're definitely outnum bered. Well, other than wiping out the ever-increasing hordes of banana rats roaming the streets, what would you like to change about GTMO? A: Transportation. Every house or SEAhut should have their own vehicle. No offense to the bus driv ers. Q: Keep it up and you'll never get a ride. If you could talk to any one about to deploy here, what would you tell him or her? A: I'd tell them to catch a ride on the GTMO Queen because it don't GTMO better than that. Oh, and to bring plenty of mosquito repellant. And a pair of shades wouldn't hurt. Q: How do you feel being involved in history in the making? A: Being here for this mission I realized that maybe I can make a difference. I might not be thrilled to be down here, but knowing that the people at home appreciate us, and that what we're doing here will impact the people of the future, leaves me with a good feeling. Q: Spoken like a true soldier. A: Thanks. Q: What will you remember most about GTMO when you leave? A: The fun I had with the peo ple who helped me get through the most horrible of days. And, to say I was a part of a good cause, once all the stress and frustration of it is behind me. Q: And in closing, you'd like to say...? A: First, I'd like to say keep God first. Live, love, for today because tomorrow is not prom ised. And, finally, a glass of apple juice a day keeps the bull$%#@ away! Catch a ride on the GTMO Queen because it dont GTMO better than that.. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire All bark, no bite: GTMOs sweetest soldier

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Page 2 Friday, October 4, 2002 Warnings for Swimmers & Snorkelers JTF-160 Command Commander: Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Army Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Army Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. UPDATE Army Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Foraker, reserve military policeman with the 342nd MP Co., has been missing since 1:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24. His wallet and clothing were discovered along the perimeter of Camp America. A search is still underway. 2nd Lt. Matthew Larrison has been appointed Summary Court Officer to handle Staff Sgt. Forakers affairs here. Anyone with relevant business should call Larrison at x3150. Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Encountering the Holy Spirit can be thrilling and powerful. But what if such times werent reserved just for certain moments in your life? It is possible to experience the Holy Spirits presence and revival frequently if you run after the Holy Spirit to follow where He leads. Here are some ways you can follow the Holy Spirits lead: Decide that you truly want to go where the Spirit leads you. If youre struggling with fear, remember that Gods love and wisdom will always cause Him to act in your best interests. Think and pray about what is currently hin dering your intimacy with God. Ask God to reveal sin that you need to confess, then con fess it and ask for the grace you need to over come it. Make worship a priority in your life. Arrange your schedule so that you have the time for focused, frequent worship. Sacrifice whatever else you need to so that you have room for God in all areas of your life. Con serve your time and energy to devote to His purposes. Claim your identity in Christ. Dont look for your identity anywhere else. Ask God to show you how He sees you, then have confi dence in Him to help you stay focused on His purposes for your life. Fight complacency in your life. Dont settle for living for God only part of time; strive to do so all the time. Pursue the constant growth that God wants for you. Be prepared to be surprised. God may bring about unexpected situations in your life, and youll be transformed in ways that change the core of who you are as a person. Humble yourself regularly before God. Seek His holiness, not self-righteousness. When you attend a church service, look for God to express Himself rather than seeking to express yourself. Pursue forgiveness and reconciliation with others with whom youve been in any type of conflict. Strive for unity in the body of Christ. [By Whitley Hopler, www.crosswalk.com. Adapted from Follow the Fire, by Steve Gray.] Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR Guantanamo Bay waters are subject to strong, varying, tidal and oceanic currents, and dangerous marine life. COMNAVBASEGTMOINST 1710.10G states that if you swim or snorkel in open waters, you do so at your own risk. Please exercising extreme cau tion; lifeguards are not on duty. Swimming and snorkeling is authorized within 50 yards of any shoreline, except in industrial areas, marinas, or within the immediate area of the Windward and Lee ward ferry landings. Unless swimming or snorkeling within 50 yards from the shoreline of Philips Dive Pier or any public beach, a dive flag buoy shall be employed. Avoid swimming or snorkeling during inclement weather or hurricane warnings. Swimming is not authorized anywhere near the shoreline of Radio Range. REMEMBER: Swimming alone is against regulations. Use the buddy system. -Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 Follow the Holy Spirits Lead JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. R. W. Funaro I would like to publicly thank all the Windward Loop and East Caravella residents who went out of their way to accommodate the Camp America troops during the last destructive-weather evacua tions this past week. The stories continue to pour in about how many of you went out and bought extra food and cleared out living room space for your guests. Of course we had the stiffs that think they own the housing area and became belligerent with their guests, telling them what they could not do. But we wont waste print on them. Many new friendships have been created because of the posi tive attitude of taking care of fel low servicemembers. The Camp America residents in many cases reciprocated with their own gen erosity. This showed the true spirit of the service values. Thanks again for pitching in to take care of our own. Page 15 Friday, October 4, 2002 NAVSTA, playing like champions NAVSTA kept rolling in the playoffs by beating the 342nd MP Co. Buckeyes 20-12 Monday at Cooper Field. NAVSTAs record is still unblemished in the flag football league. This victory puts them one step closer to their fourth championship crown in a row. They are focused and deter mined to win the title with a per fect record. However, the win over the Buckeyes was not easy. The Buckeyes pushed NAVSTA into uncharted waters in the first half, able to shut down NAVSTAs high-powered run ning offense, which is their bread and butter. NAVSTA led by only 7-6 by half time. Spectators were in shock! They were used to seeing NAVSTA bulldoze though the competition, but this time it was n't happening. The Buckeyes were an all around good team. They stopped us from playing our game. We were making too many mistakes on the field, said Navy Seaman Antonio Robinson. They knew the mistakes on the field were keeping the Buckeyes in the game. Not only were they one point behind but also they were building confidence as the game kept going. At halftime NAVSTA looked stoic and concerned on the side lines as they were discussing how to beat the Buckeyes defense. When the two teams met on the gridiron to start the second half, the crowd knew something had to give. Was it going to be NAVSTAs perfect season or was it going to be the Buckeyes' defense? NAVSTA had to change their strategy in the second half if they wanted to win. Their usual run ning offense tactics were shut down. We were turning the ball over in the first half, but when we fig ured out the Buckeyes defense strategy we started scoring points. We started throwing the ball more and opening up the field. This made their defense vulnerable, said Robinson. NAVSTA forced the Buckeyes to cover them man-to-man. They began to spread themselves out all over the field. This opened up the field and made more passing possible. So they launched a pass attack. Many teams have not seen NAVSTAs passing offense because their running offense is often enough to win. We started playing our game in the second half, throwing more instead of just running, said Robinson. Robinson and Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Balton D. Hill connected for a touchdown to make the score 13-6. That was not a designed play, said Hill. We improvised and ran our own pass routes. I have to give the credit to Robin son; if there is an open man he will find him. Scoring that touch down and putting my team on top felt good. What we really want is to have an undefeated season. That score changed the momentum of the game. NAVSTA was back in control. NAVSTA and the Buckeyes each scored another touchdown, but it was too little, too late for the Buckeyes. The game clock ran out on them. The final score was 20-12. NAVSTA sent another team to the losing bracket of the tourna ment. We are still undefeated in the season. That is what keeps us strongly motivated to win. The games are getting tougher as we go deeper in the tournament. The competition is better now because losing a game could end your sea son, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Goodwin. The Buckeyes played hard and valiantly, but NAVSTA was too strong. The Buckeyes defense was very good. We were tested in that game, but Naval Station beats an Army team again. You will see us in the upcoming championship game, said Robinson. NAVSTA says it is playing for much more than a title this year. They are playing for domination. They want to create something like the Yankees, Duke Univer sity or UCLA when coach John Wooden led his team to ten straight NCAA titles. NAVSTA wants to start a dynasty. We want to keep the champi onship trophy where it belongs... with NAVSTA, said Hill. We have won three straight years and we are looking for number four. We want to keep that tradition growing. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Goodwin catches a pass at the 10 yard-line, then spins away from a Buckeye defender and takes the football in for a touchdown putting NAVSTA in the lead for good. They won 20-12 over the Buckeyes. NAVSTAs unstoppable quarterback Navy Seaman Antonio Robinson, right, smokes by the Buckeyes defense as he runs for a 23-yard gain.

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Page 3 Friday, October 4, 2002 Pharmacy Technicians Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Mike Latimer We are here on a mission. That is what is important. We are profes sional and we are here to do a job. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Tamika Richardson What I like the most is interacting with people. I see them come to the phar macy sick and in a couple of days they are well and walking around the NEX. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Yokasta H. Bisono After a patient has a long day at the hospital and they are not feeling well, it is easy for them to get aggravated. So we do our best to make them feel better. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Paul Henderson I love working with my fellow com rades at the pharmacy. They make it fun and enjoyable to come to work. This is the best job in the Navy. The Naval Hospitals pharmacy is manned by four petty officers. They are the last line in the war against infections. The pharmacy is in charge of all the medication on the island. From a minor headache to a severe infec tion, they have what you need to alleviate your pain. The technicians take their job very seriously. We always check one another to make sure the pre scriptions are filled out right, because if we make a mistake, a patient can lose his life, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Mike Latimer. The Navy puts them through rigorous training to become qualified. The training is intense and long for those who hope to become pharmacy technicians. They train for six months and must memorize 1,200 different drugs along with all the side effects of the drugs, their contra-indications, generic names and what the drugs look like before they can make the grade and be classified A pharmacy technician sometimes has to work long hours doing rounds in the hospital. They are on call 24 hours, but for those who need a routine prescription filled, the pharmacys operational hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday to Friday. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Paul Henderson stays busy at the Navy Hospitals pharmacy measuring out medicine for GTMO residents. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Yokasta H. Bisono prepares an IV to be adminis tered to a patient admitted to the Navy Hospital before she goes on rounds. Page 14 Friday, October 4, 2002 The Wire Survey Let us know what you think! All Fall Division Soccer rosters will be due on Friday, Sept. 20th. The Soccer season runs from Monday, Sept. 30th through Fri day, Nov. 8th. Contact Capt. Gormly or Maj. Buchanan at x5249 for more infor mation about MWR events. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. Mon day-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM-6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Flag Football Leagues, M-F, 6 PM, Cooper Field. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM4:00PM. Today, Friday, October 4th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Saturday, October 5th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 11:30AM-2:00PM, JTF160 Commander's Cup Series Awards Ceremony and Closing Cook-Out. Sunday, October 6th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 5:00PM, Chess Tournament IX, CBQ. Monday, October 7th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, October 8th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1:00PM-7:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower Wednesday, October 9th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1:00PM-7:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower 7:00PM, 9-Ball Tournament, CBQ. Thursday, October 10th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Optional information: AGE: ______ RANK/GRADE: ______ SERVICE: ______ AFFILIATION: Dependent______ DOD Civ ______ Other ______ Servicemember_____ Answer on a scale of 1 through 5 where it applies. 1Outstanding 2Excellent 3Very Good 4Needs Improvement 5No Interest Give us your thoughts on the following questions: 1. How would you rate The Wire as a whole? 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 2. How are we representing the Armed Services? 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 4. What would you like to see more of/less of in The Wire? Comments:__________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ 5. If you could change anything in The Wire what would it be and why? Comments:__________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ 6. How do you rate each of the following columns: Chaplains Corner: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Commanders Corner: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Command Sergeant Majors Corner: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Man on the Street: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ In Brief: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Sports: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ 15 Minutes of Fame: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Profession of the Week: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Crossword Puzzle: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Movie Schedule: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Horoscope: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Provost Marshals Corner 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Frustrated Poetry Corner: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Frustrated Chef 1____ 2_____ 3 _____ 4______ 5______ MWR Watch 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Additional comments and suggestions, including stories you particularly liked or disliked: _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ NOTE: Please drop your survey off at one of the boxes located in following places by October 10, 2002: 1. The NEX 2. The Seaside Galley 3. Windward Loop Housing Your comments and ideas are important to us!

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Page 4 Friday, October 4, 2002 The storm that never showed When GTMO heard that Tropical Storm Lili might stop in for a visit, GTMO got ready! Employees at the Marina pulled over 34 boats out of the water in anticipation of her fury. But after it was determined Lili wasnt going to blow through our neighborhood it was time for GTMO to get back to normal. Marina employee Colin Williams took part in returning over 34 boats to the water last Thursday. Oh, well. Better safe than sunk. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko This weeks question: Were you worried about Tropical Storm Lili? Sgt. 1st Class Anthony M. Williams, 178th Mili tary Police Company Whatever would happen happened. I had no wor ries. I was just going to ride it out. We were going to work through it one way or another. Bob Barkley, civilian, Kvaerner Been here for years, and Ive seen it before. If it came, Id be ready. No dancing in the storm though. I might be old, but Im not stupid. Air Force Staff Sgt. David Wright, Joint Task Force 170 I took all precautions to ensure that my house mates would be safe from the ravages of the storm. We were ready to respond, if need be. Navy Seaman Appren tice John D. Rose, Detention Hospital 20 I planned to go for it and board up all the windows. I stocked up on water. You cant drink rain water, you know, because its not purified. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Josh J. Cooley, Joint Task Force 170 Like my name says, I was going to play it coolly Someone was going to have to be responsible, so I stocked up on essentials like water and food. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Page 13 Friday, October 4, 2002 DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, October 4 8 p.m. Adventures of Pluto Nash, PG13 96 min 10 p.m Austin Powers 3, PG13 91 min Saturday, October 5 8 p.m. The Country Bears, G 88 min 10 p.m. Blood Work, R 111 min Sunday, October 6 8 p.m. K-19 Widowmaker, PG13 138 min Monday, October 7 8 p.m. Adventures of Pluto Nash, PG13 96 min Tuesday, October 8 8 p.m. Signs, PG13 107 min Wednesday, October 9 8 p.m. Blood Work, R 111 min Thursday, October 10 8 p.m. Signs, PG13 107 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, October 4 8 p.m. Frequency, PG13 117 min 10 p.m. Eraser, R 101 min Saturday, October 5 8 p.m. Charlies Angels, PG13 98 min 10 p.m. Shaft, R 100 min Sunday, October 6 8, 10 p.m. A Beautiful Mind, PG13 135 min Monday, October 7 8 p.m. Sleepy Hollow, R 100 min Tuesday, October 8 8 p.m. Chill Factor, R 102 min Wednesday, October 9 8 p.m. Meet the Parents, PG13 108 min Thursday, October 10 8, 10 p.m. Lucky Numbers, R 108 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris *Horoscopes: Week of October 7 October 13 Mar. 21 Apr. 19 Getting comfortable in GTMO is difficult for the Ram on Monday and Tuesday, and you're likely to get upset when even the tiniest detail of your plan goes awry. Spend time on your own as much as possible in the beginning of the week, Aries. Although you think you're doing the right thing by being honest and telling it like it is on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, the people around you may view your comments as just plain insensitive and unprofessional. It's possible to tell the truth in a tactful way. If you need help ask for it. People are more than willing to assist you. Jul. 23 Aug. 22 You know a lot more than you're letting on this Monday and Tuesday, which makes it difficult for those around you to get the job done. Although you should always be informed, there's certainly no need not to keep everyone else from knowing whats going on. Enjoy good times with friends, family or romantic partner midweek, when all of your troubles seem to fade into the background. You know that you have to do the right thing in order to maintain any sense of selfrespect on Saturday and Sunday, so do yourself a favor and steer clear of the party scene! Nov. 22 Dec. 21 You may not be worried about the who, what, where and when aspects of life on Monday and Tues day, but you're definitely pondering why things hap pen. Pencil in some time to spend in a quiet place thinking about the meaning of it all, Sagittarius. Even if you don't come up with the answers, you'll find a cer tain peace in contemplation. On Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, your mood becomes much more jovial, which makes parties and social events jump to the top of your priority list. But don't spend too much money at the Tiki Bar or you'll regret it. Apr. 20 May 20 Emotions run deep on Monday and Tuesday, and your passion for your current partner or secret crush is undeniable. With any luck, they'll feel the same way about you! Tending to financial matters takes up most of your time midweek, so be prepared to crunch the numbers and work with figures until you get it right. Review your LES'! When you talk on Saturday and Sunday, people listen. This is a good time to demon strate your leadership skills. Taking a trip to the gym for some extra PT can do nothing but further motivate you for the upcoming week. Aug. 23 Sep. 22 Once you make up your mind on Monday and Tuesday, no one else has even the slightest chance of changing it. While some would call you stubborn, you insist that you're simply self-assured. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday find you in a daredevil mood, but remember Safety first. Running through the streets at night with out your reflective belt will only get you hurt. If you budget your time correctly, perhaps you can get the boring tasks out of the way in time to pursue the adventures after all. If you're single and looking, the weekend is the best time at meeting someone new. Dec. 22 Jan. 19 Put all of your ammo on the table before you make your final decision on Monday and Tuesday. It's impor tant to pay attention to detail, you never know where the answer may be. Even though your mood has been a bit pessimistic lately, Friday you believe in the impos sible. Replace the word 'alright' in your vocabulary with 'outstanding' and watch what a difference positive thinking can make in your life. While your friend is ready to leave GTMO earlier than expected, you're just getting started. Don't feel guilty about envying them -your time will come soon enough! May 21 Jun. 21 Your moves are calculated as you attempt to reach your PT goals on Monday and Tuesday. You use every available resource to your advantage in the beginning of the week, which further advances your quest for the absolute body. You want what's best for your friends and family on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, but you need to resist the urge to preach your set of values to your fellow troops. It might be difficult to watch them struggle, but it's important to let them learn from their own mistakes. Although you're happy to remain at home relaxing on Saturday and Sunday. Sep. 23 Oct. 22 You feel that what's yours is yours on Monday and Tuesday, and you really don't want to share it. This is a good time to work on being more generous, Libra, especially if your housemates are in need. Your life feels particularly balanced on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, which is exactly the way you like things to be. Go out on a limb and share your ideas with your section midweek. The responses are bound to be better than you could have even dared to anticipate. An old memory or someone from your past jolts you out of your normal, happy rhythm on Saturday or Sunday. Jan. 20 Feb. 18 GTMO slows down on Monday, leaving you with a lot of time on your hands. Even though you might not be comfortable with the silence that this period of pri vacy brings, try to use it wisely. You're so anxious to get back into the social swing of things on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday that you'll probably be open to inviting new members to your group that you might not have considered before. This is a wise move, Aquarius, as all groups and teams benefit from diversity. And you can find a unit from almost any state here, remem berit don't GTMO better than this! Jun. 22 Jul. 22 You normally love a good mystery, but you are more likely to shy away from the unknown than you are to run toward it on Monday and Tuesday. If you're not feeling comfort in your own living area on Wednes day, Thursday and Friday, don't hesitate to call a meet ing and to make yourself feel better. Reading, taking a quiet walk by the Marina or getting away to the Lee ward side are all ways you can contribute to your own well-being. Your work schedule may conflict with your personal life on Saturday and Sunday. Don't forget the mission comes first, Cancer! Oct. 23 Nov. 21 As the week begins, you feel powerful, energetic and confident enough in your abilities to do anything you put your mind to and are tasked to do. By Wednes day, however, pressure from your family or section may cause you to give in to something you don't nec essarily want to do. Trust your instincts midweek, Scor pio. If your heart is saying no, don't let your voice say yes. Although you are determined to win the battle on Saturday and Sunday, you probably can't count on the opposition to put up much of a fight. In fact, the two of you may even actually be on the same side! Feb. 19 Mar. 20 Examine everything in detail before coming up with your final analysis on Monday. It's better to be cer tain when you go to your command than to base your decisions on guesswork. Your commander or comrade feels they know what is best for you on Wednesday, but you couldn't agree with them less. Are you reject ing their advice because you truly believe that it's wrong, or because you don't like being told what to do? Throw out that stubborn attitude and do the right thing. An NCO or chaplain can be most helpful to you this weekend, especially if your problem feels hopeless. *for entertainment purposes only I am an American Soldier A protector of the greatest nation on Earth I always wanted this, since birth Stood tall and fought hard to show what Id be worth Thats what I wanted, so thats where I am because I started to root off and grow from my stem. It took a while, to find my direction But now I back my selection with my countrys affection I accepted fate with my arms opened wide So Ill live for the moment and take life in stride My teams The One When Im wearing BDUs, Im not thinking about fun RED, WHITE and BLUE, and these colors dont run

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gone, said Sgt. Tony Bennings of 2/142s sec ond platoon. We were ready for the worst, but of course, not much ended up happening. It was good how we reacted so fast, said Army Pfc. Keith N. West of the 571st MP. Co. If the storm did strike, our SEAhuts would have probably ended up somewhere in com munist Cuba. It might have happened. But tropical storms often change, well, like the weather, and on Thursday the storm started to dissipate, become disorganized and take a more southerly route. And so the troops packed their freshly unpacked bags, moved back out to the Camp and were gone Friday morning as fast as they had come. It only took the troops a mere three hours to move all their stuff in, and another three hours to move it all back out, said Santorella. No matter how you look at it, it was an awe some move for the amount of people we had moving that much gear. An amazing logistical feat it might have been, but not everyone was thrilled by the apparent false alarm. They gave us just a taste of paradise by let ting us stay in the Loop, but then they took it right back away, said Bennings. Before long, however, paradise for these troops would be found again. On Friday at 7 p.m., another weather warn ing emerged. The storm had abruptly changed direction, and was now heading due north in our direction and regaining strength along the way. By Saturday at around 2 a.m., the troops out at Camp America got the word that the storm had gained some momentum taking a bold route right at them. This time, the storm was to hit even harder, and Tropical Storm Condition One was quickly put into effect. House restric tions were set, the NEX was closed, boats were pulled from the waters, vehicles were tied down and only essential per sonnel were to be work ing out of a single contingency headquar ters at Bulkeley Hall. Round Two looked to be the big one, and once again the troops had to quickly pack their stuff and move back to sturdier shelter. The second time was chaotic, said Army Sgt. 1st Class David J. Bleger of the 346 MP. Co. We received zero notice. We stowed away our unnecessary gear, packed up the Conexes (shipping containers) and took what we needed back to the Loop. We boarded the doors on our SEAhuts and left everything in place. The storm had started tracking North and heading right toward us, so to be safe over sorry, we moved the troops back to the Loop, said Funaro. Everything was in place for some pretty severe impact, said Timothy Valle, Navy Chief Petty Officer in Charge of the Meteorol ogy Detachment here at GTMO. So everyone sat around Saturday keeping posted to updated weather bulletins on the tel evision and awaiting the storms destructive wrath to strike. By 8 p.m., Lili was 95 miles south-southwest of GTMO with 50 mph sus tained winds, and was expected to strengthen before its arrival here, according to the National Weather Service. The storm was moving Northwest at 5 mph, and National Hurricane Center forecast ers expected Lili near Cubas southern coast by late Saturday or the early hours of Sunday. We were ahead of the game by tracking the storm, said Sgt. 1st Class Phillip O. Blackman of the 114th MP. Co. Even if we had to move back and fourth a hundred times, it would have been all right because it all comes down to keeping the soldiers safe. While people were bracing for the worst, they were only treated to a few heavy rain showers throughout Saturday afternoon with winds gusting only up to 40 knots, rather than the tumultuous, roof-ripping storm that was thought to be coming. By Sunday morning, the storm redirected and tracked a more southwestern path, and it was clear that Tropical Storm Lili was not going to lay GTMO to waste. The storm con dition was lowered, the NEX and McDonalds reopened, and it was back to normal business on base. By Monday morning, the troops from Camp America were on their way back to their homes by the sea. There would be no more Saturdays spent in recliners in front of college football, no more backyard barbecues, but going home is never all bad. Some soldiers were happy to get back to Camp America, said Funaro. That is their comfort zone. It was nice at the Loop, but Im happy to be back at Camp America with all of my own people, said West. Most people living at the Loop were sup portive of the mission and sympathetic toward us, said Sgt. M. Hebert of the 239th MP Co. Im proud of how 99% of the people received their guests, said Funaro. All ser vicemembers got to meet new people, and that aspect was extremely successful. It means a lot for the soldiers from Camp America to make new friends. Most of JTF-160 welcomed the com pany, said Santorella. They knew they were coming back, and their doors were opened for them. This experience prepared us like a fire drill would in case the real deal ever happens. Elsewhere, however, Tropical Storm Lili did indeed prove to be the real deal. On Tues day, having bypassed GTMO, the storm uprooted trees and destroyed homes in Western Cuba before moving on to batter Lousisiana this week. Im happy the storm didnt hit us, said Funaro. But it was a good adventure for our servicemembers. It was the newness of the experience that created the camaraderie that we had. All the moves were only a small inconvenience considering the safety factors. In the end, Tropical Storm Lili missed. No SEAhuts blew away. No power outages occurred. No hurricane baskets were distrib uted. Few people even got wet. All was well on GTMO, save for a lone deuce-and-a-half that got stuck in the mud. Mother Nature may have spared us this time but the hurricane season isnt over yet. But thanks to Lilis near misses, well be ready next time. Page 5 Friday, October 4, 2002 STORM, from page 1 Behold: The often talked about, yet rarely seen, hur ricane basket that supplies only the bare essentials. Sgt. Raymond Foster from the 297th Transportation Company removes a freshly loaded Conex from the Loop before moving it back out to Camp A. Were holding things down infantry style, said Sgt. Tony Bennings of the 2/124 INF. Co, as he and his troops unload their truck for the second time out at Camp A. Second platoon leads the way, he roared. Page 12 Friday, October 4, 2002 One of the seven wonders of the ancient world was the Light house of Alexandria, in Pharos, Egypt. Its light guided seafarers approaching the bay from 290 B.C. to 1480 A.D. The Windward Point light house at the southeastern end of Guantanamo Bay is a much hum bler structure with a shorter history than the one in ancient Egypt, but to Cuban-American Coast Guard PS3 William Papi Farias, this lit tle lighthouse still qualifies as a wonder. Theres something romantic about a lighthouse, says Farias, who works with Coast Guard Port Security Unit 307. At the same time, a lighthouse conjures a sense of history. To live in a lighthouse would be a dream. Id like to retire to one. Farias has had a long-standing love affair with lighthouses, instilled in him by his father, who was a merchant marine in Cuba. As a child, he wanted to follow in his fathers footsteps and have a career that tied in to his love of the sea. Fate dictated that he wouldnt end up in the Cuban Merchant Marines, though he would get to strengthen his ties to the ocean in another way. Like many Cuban families in the 1950s, the Farias family found themselves having to pull up stakes and leave the country when Fidel Castro rose to power. My brother and I were actually born in Queens, New York, explains Farias. The family moved back to Cuba when I was only a few months old. Then we had to leave again when I was 9 years old. In 1959, the Farias family fled Cuba for Miami. Later, they moved to Tampa. Despite all of the upheaval in his early life, Farias never forgot his desire to connect with his fam ilys nautical past. He has served in the Navy and the Coast Guard for 24 years and has traveled exten sively. Ironically, now that his tenure with the military is almost up, his travels have brought him back almost to where he began. Because of his deployment to Guantanamo, Farias has returned to the land of his forefathers for the first time in over forty years. At first, merely being back on Cuban soil was enough, but gradually Farias started to become enamored of the idea of leaving something of him self behind when he departs the island. Inspiration struck one day in June when Farias and fellow Coast Guard QM3 Melissa Steinman were out on their vessel patrolling the waters of the bay. They hap pened to cruise within sight of the Windward Point lighthouse and realized that it had become sadly neglected. It was then that Farias became a man on a mission. Farias and Steinman put their heads together and by the Fourth of July they had drafted and sub mitted a comprehensive proposal to PSU 307s command for the renovation of the lighthouse. The name of the endeavor? Operation P.R.I.D.E. The acronym stands for Pride in yourself, Respect for all others, Integrity always, Devotion to duty, and Encouragement for the future, says Farias. Farias envi sioned that the lighthouse renova tion project would make GTMO just a little bit better than when we arrived. The proposal, which had to get the approval of the Public Works Department and the base Safety Officer, to name a few agencies and individuals, detailed the equipment needed for the job, how the work would be scheduled and how Farias would go about getting the manpower needed to complete the task. We had to go through four or five logistical meetings, says Farias, but we finally got the goahead a few months after we thought of the idea. By September 21, the approvals were done, the materials had been gathered and the project was ready to get underway. Farias planned to start by replacing the termite-weakened doors of the old garage next to the museum on the grounds of the lighthouse. Once that structure was in satisfactory condition, it would serve as a stor age area for the paint, brushes, scraping tools and other needed equipment. Unfortunately, Mother Nature didnt cooperate. Heavy rains deterred the dozens of people who had responded to the ads for vol unteers he had placed on 103.1 The Blitz. Undaunted, Farias and Stein man went out in the torrential rain that day and started the long process of scraping and sanding. Warnings about Tropical Storm Lili on September 25 postponed work yet again, though the day ultimately turned out to be sunny. Finally, on September 27, Farias and five of his friends from PSU307 came out and began to make some real progress. The structural engineers in the group took out their buzz saws and started making new garage doors while Papi donned a white pro tective suit and breathing appara tus and started chipping through the accumulated paint on the museum. The lighthouse itself will be the last item to be dealt with. Farias estimates that there are at least seven to eight layers of paint to go through before they reach the actual metal surface. For that task, a 1500 psi pressure washer will be used to blast off the old paint and rust with concentrated streams of water. Farias expects to leave Guan tanamo in a few months, so he knows that Operation PRIDE wont be completed by him. Still, he feels satisfaction in having put the project in motion. This is a chance to restore a piece of Coast Guard history, plus unite all the services through vol unteerism, says Farias. We will truly be united for GTMO. Coast Guard PS3 William Papi Farias dons his protective scraping suit. Papi Farias, surveying the bay from the top of the lighthouse. Built in 1903, the tower is 60 ft. of riveted iron with a cupola made of copper. The weather vane has directional symbols in Spanish (i.e. O for oeste, or west). The light at the end of the bay Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire A Cuban-American expatriate returns to the land of his birth, determined to leave his mark on Guantanamo Bay

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The 346th Military Police Company Escort Guard is a sister company of the 342nd MP Co. EG, said 1st Lt. Kenneth W. Bryan, the acting commander of the 346th MP Co. Formed in 1943 as an escort guard com pany, its primary mission is to plan and exe cute escort operations of enemy prisoners of war and U.S. prisoners in support of the corps theater of operations. This MP unit, from Hutchinson, Kan., has a long history of deployments and accom plishments. It has been drawing from its field experience and expertise to support operation Enduring Freedom by handling the detainees from the global war on terrorism. While the detainees are transported to GTMO by the 342nd, the 346th MP Co. EG has the task of escorting them from the Lee ward side to their quarters at Camp Delta and maintaining the watch. Our mission here falls into the military police standards. We provide guards for the detainees after we brought them to the camp for in-processing, said Bryan, who works the night shift with the ever-vigilant soldiers of his company at Camp Delta. Such has been the mission of the 346th since May 12. We came prepared for the mission, said 1st Sgt. Melvin Tipton, the companys top enlisted soldier. While we were at Fort Leav enworth for our annual training, we had to run a detention facility for six weeks. We had hands-on training. In addition, We have a lot of soldiers with correctional and law enforcement back grounds, said Tipton. It didnt take my sol diers too much time to adjust to what the mis sion requires of them. Although the mission-ready personnel of the 346th have not yet transported the detainees from overseas to GTMO, many of them seem to enjoy the escort mission from Leeward to Camp Delta. I got a taste of it, and I like it, said Sgt Ty Roberts, who now works the night shift and has been part of the escort team. I want to do more, he said. For Staff Sgt. Joel Andrews, this mission is a different animal. Andrews has been with the unit for 14 years. Since then he has seen a lot of EPW and POW movements. Here, we are working as individuals. We go to work and come back to the hut, he said. When I was in the desert, on the battlefield, we transported a lot of EPWs, and we worked mostly as a group, he said as he remembers the stormy days of operation Desert Storm. Its still fun to do something different what a lot of people are not allowed to do, said Andrews. When it comes to the night shift, the sol diers see the change in different light. I like the night watch, said Sgt. David Arbuckle. Its quiet. Theres more cama raderie. We have time to learn more about each other. Roberts sees it differ ently. I think that at night, we miss the detainee contact. We are not feeding, showering and escorting the detainees. There is no action, he said. Some times we have to fight with boredom in the midst of the night. But MPs are multi-purpose. We do what we have to do, and we stay alert. As these self-motivat ing soldiers perform their duty beyond reproach, their first sergeant said he wants them to continue to hold their head high because theyve been entrusted with the watch of the detainees from the war. They are living American history, said Tipton. He also said he is proud of them for win ning the Commanders Cup. The Commanders Cup was a competition made up of 11 events. The soldiers of the 346th displayed esprit de corps by winning the overall competition by 1,000 points. Winning the Commanders Cup was a big accomplishment for my company, Tip ton said. Teamwork, Tipton said, is the leading asset of the company. And since this is the units first deployment after operation Desert Storm, many of the soldiers are working together for the first time. Its great to be part of this unit, said Pfc. Kari A. Moore, who has been with the unit for three years. When I first joined the unit, they wel comed me with open arms and made me one of them, she said. This is my first deploy ment with the 346th. Now, I am learning more about them, and theyre learning about me. Its a whole learning experience for me. Above all, Ive learned not to stress about things that used to bother me at home. There are bigger things to worry about. We are at war. I am proud and happy to be here, serving the country whose principles and lifestyle I believe in. Upholding truth, justice and the American way is nothing new to the 346th. Theyve maintained their legacy from escorting EPWs in the European and Pacific theaters of opera tion during World War II to bringing the detainees from the current war on terrorism to Page 11 Friday, October 4, 2002 the call and haul detainees to GTMO Story by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Staff Sgt. Kenneth Browne of the 346th MP Co. EG skillfully handles the daily administrative duties of the company while his fellow soldiers slum ber after working their night shift at Camp Delta. The 346th MP Co. EG keeps a watchful eye on the detainees Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano As dusk approaches and the 346th MP Co. EG prepares to go on shift at Camp Delta, Army Staff Sgt. Drew Echols, operations NCO with the unit, exits the units headquarters to check on the readiness of the troops. Page 6 Friday, October 4, 2002 Blood may make the green grass grow, as your drill sergeant used to say, but its fuel, fuel, fuel that makes the vehicles go. And while few may give a second thought to the stuff when they fill up their cars, trucks, boats, helicopters and planes here at GTMO, for the hardy band of self-proclaimed fuelies at the Defense Energy Supply Center here, their job is not about getting noticed. In fact, its just the opposite. Its not a glamorous job, says Dan Anto nis, DESC Director here and head of contrac tor Kvaerner-Willbros fuel operation on base. The only time fuel gets any attention is when there isnt any. If we do our job right, fuelies are just...were just there. Their job, Antonis says, breaks down pretty simply: Get the stuff from the tankers to the tanks. The devil, as always, is in the details. We get all our fuel brought to GTMO by ocean-going tanker. The fuels officer here sends out a five-month slate our require ments for that time period and DESC arranges for a tanker to pick up the fuel and bring it here; a load comes in every three or four months. One load is usually about 175,000 barrels, Antonis says, and at 42 gallons to the barrel, thats almost 7.5 million gallons of unleaded, diesel and JP5 jet fuel that gets deposited into Antonis on-shore storage tanks here. Thats when Antonis and his deputy Ken Trotters crew of 17 Jamaican and Phillipino fuelies spring into action, first testing the batch in a laboratory to make sure it meets specifications, and then getting it out fast to whats known in the fuel business as the end user namely, everything on GTMO with a motor. The fuel that goes to Leeward side goes through the Cross-Bay Pipeline to the JP5 tank farm near the airport. On Windward side, the crew fills up its fleet of 21 trucks and takes the fuel everywhere it needs to go to Camp Delta to run the generators and the mobile light plants, to the fueling station where the govern ment vehicles fill up, to the NEX gas station by the Dowtown Lyceum, to the marina where Coast Guard patrol boats and MWR boats get theirs. To the hospitals. To the contractors out in the field. And to Antonis biggest customer, the desalinization plant, without which GTMO would have neither water nor power. And at the rate GTMO guzzles, the go juice can go pretty fast. The desalinization plant alone consumes some 700,000 gallons of diesel a month. GTMOs birds from civil ian jumbo jets and prop planes to miltary C6s and C130s used over 300,000 gallons of JP5 jet fuel in August. As for boats, the GTMO ferry uses about 15,000 gallons of diesel a month. Harbor Patrol goes through 10,000 gallons of gasoline for recreational boats and the Coast Guards 24-hours-a-day Boston Whaler patrol boats. On land, Camp Deltas generators alone use almost 6,000 gallons of diesel in a typical month, with diesel-powered vehicles from Humvees to deuce-and-a-halfs to Coast Guard cutters soaking up the rest, Antonis says. The swarm of vans, Jeep Cherokees, pickup trucks and other gasoline-operated vehicles on base go through nearly 80,000 gal lons of medium-grade unleaded. (POVs, filled up at private expense at the NEX gas station, are good for another 20,000.) It didnt used to be this way. Last year at this time, we would normally issue a total of around 42,000 gallons of product a month, Antonis said. That has doubled since you guys the JTF missions got here in January. We had a 100 percent increase for gasoline, a 15 per cent increase for diesel and a 30-40 percent increase for jet fuel. Dan and his crew have done an excellent job meeting the big increase in demand, said Larry Blackman, GTMO fuels officer, who oversees the contrac tors at KvaernerWillbros and makes sure all the fuel gets ordered thats needed. Before January, we were kind of a Sleepy Hollow around here. Thats one reason why my wife Diane and I shes a budget analyst for the housing depart ment wanted to do my twilight tour here before I retired. Then the JTFs showed up. Its still nowhere near what it was when I was fuels officer here before from to This base was really booming with Navy then. But its a heck of a lot busier than it was in December. Antonis competence and effciency have allowed Blackman to focus on another out growth of the detention operations arrival here: $55 million in ugrade and renovation projects to get GTMOs fuel facilities in tiptop shape for the long haul. Thats mostly what I do now; keep on top of those projects and make sure theyre on Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Fuels paradise: This crew of CW4 Joseph M. LeBlanc, a pilot with the Massachusetts Army National Guard, does the honors refueling his Miami-bound C-26 at Leeward Air Terminal. Ferdinand M. Catapang, one of the fuelies at Kvaerner-Willbros, tops off the gasoline tank at the self-service fueling station off Sherman Avenue. Joel Hepburn, Kvaerner-Willbros operations chief at Leeward Air Terminal, humps the hose and gets ready to fuel up GTMOs base helicopter.

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track, he said. I can let Dan and his people handle the day-to-day fuel operations. One of those people, Joel Hepburn, remembers the January madness well. As the operations chief for the Leeward Air Termi nals refueling needs, Hepburn handles every thing from inventory to data entry to fueling aircraft and teaching other workers to do it safely and quickly. With planes coming and going 24 hours a day, the fueling operation is on call at all hours too and Hepburn calls the detention operations early days the busiest of his life. This place was crazy, he said. In Janu ary, February and into March, planes were coming and going all the time, needing to be refueled and sent on so that more planes could land. It was the most amazing thing, the biggest challenge of my life. And Hepburn wouldnt have traded it for anything. I love this job, he said. I say its the most important job on the base. Because these planes are pretty much the only means of getting in or out. And if the aircraft dont have fuel, you dont go nowhere. And though he likes to deliver his service with a smile, joking with pilots and crew members while the JP5 flows, Hepburn takes his responsibility seriously. I personally try to set a standard on which I get respect, he said. When you get the call from the tower, you go out and do the job, and do it well. Thats it. Sometimes, there are a lot of planes and it will take a while to get to everybody. But my motto is, if a plane dont have to wait, it dont have to wait. Nobody gets grouchy waiting for fuel with me around. From what Ive heard from pilots and crews, they do an outstanding job, said Mike Samsal, Leewards Air Traffic Control coordi nator and the man whose call makes Hepburn jump. Very professional, very safety con scious and everybody still gets that home town welcome when they get here. Spend a day or two around fuelies, and you realize where that attitude comes from. Fuel is the blood of the military; these guys mission is to make sure the militarys heart keeps beating. And somewhere along the way, it gets into their blood too, and becomes a way of life. Ive been in fuel since 1967, said Antonis. I started out with the Air Force in Vietnam, then Thailand, and when I got out and became a contractor I went right back to Thailand, doing the same job at three times the money. From there it was Panama as a mechanic, then I came back to the U.S. for college, then back to Panama as the fuels manager from 1983 until I retired in 1997. And in 1999 I came out of retirement to take the job with KvaernerWillbros here. I owe everything I know to the Air Force, fuel-wise, he said. But Ive been work ing in gas stations since I was 14. I was a mechanic at Char lie Collins Chevy in Bayonne, N.J. I guess you could say I was born to do this it sure seems that way. Antonis opera tion got a little extra attention this week, at least, when the start of Fiscal Year 2003 on Oct. 1 and a procedural change that will now allow the JTFs to bill their fuel directly to DESC in Virginia instead of through GTMOs Navy leadership had JTF drivers bringing in their gas keys for re-formatting. And between FY03s fresh load of paperwork and the tanker of diesel due to arrive in the next few days, things are a little hectic around the office these days. But GTMO wont notice. Unleaded and diesel will still flow at the pumps, fuel trucks will still arrive to refill the generators that light up Camp Deltas spotlit nights, planes will still land, refuel and take off again. The countless engines of the detention operation will roar on, moving the mission and its people wherever they need to go. The only thing people want to know about fuel, says Trotter, who handles the operations preventive maintenance, is how much it costs. Which reminds him prices, set annually by the U.S. comptroller, are down this year. Diesel is $0.81 a gallon, down from $0.96; gasoline is $0.85, down from $1.22; and JP5 is $0.86, down from $1.02 in FY 02. Maybe this year, GTMOs fuelies will get a little glamor after all. Two Kvaerner-Willbros fuelies hand a hose to Coast Guardsmen on the USCG Confidence at Pier Charlie. Page 7 Friday, October 4, 2002 contractors makes GTMO go Kvaerner-Willbros employee Sunday Canoy closes the gate behind an entering visitor at the operations headquarters facility on Potter Ave. The United States Coast Guard cutter Confidence pulls up to Pier Charlie for refueling. Page 10 Friday, October 4, 2002 The soldiers of this unit have a motto: You call, we haul. In addition to guarding the detainees in Camp Delta with an ever vigilant eye, these soldiers are also in charge of another very important task, a mission so far unique to the Joint Task Force operation. It is answering the call and actually bringing the detainees from the battlefield to their cells. Performing this mission is a unit of reservists from Columbus, Ohio, the globetrotting sol diers of the 342nd Military Police Company Escort Guard. Basically, our unit is responsible for trans porting enemy prisoners of war from one place to another, whether by vehicle, foot, rail or air, said Capt. Brent Haas, commander of the 342nd. For operation Enduring Freedom and the current global war on terrorism, were the first reserve unit to conduct trans-global detainee transportation. Our mission here is to escort the detainees from where theyre captured to Cuba, and we also perform guard duty inside of Camp Delta, said 1st Lt. Gregory Falkowski, pla toon leader with the 342nd. Since February, the soldiers of the 342nd have been going on escort missions to distant battlefields. Mobilized out of Fort Dix, N.J., originally only three-quarters of the unit came to GTMO. The rest went on escort missions based out of Fort Dix. But by May, it was decided that the entire company was needed to assist in the guard duties within Camp Delta, meaning that GTMO would become the units sole base of operations. Given the units concentration in the escort ing field, they are in a high priority category for deployments, making them quite valuable. Were a highly deployable unit, given that our focus is on a singular track, which is escorting prisoners, said Falkowski. Theyre only two escort guard units in the Army reserves, and were both here at GTMO. But the job of brining the detainees here is long and compli cated, involving long flights, foreign coun tries and the stress of landing in a combat zone. Once were in country, our focus is always on speed and accuracy, said Falkowski. Theres always the presence of possible enemy attacks, so when we get there, we do what we have to do and get back in the air as soon as we can. The average soldier in the unit has been on six missions, said Falkowski, and when not on escort missions, the 342nd works in Camp Delta, just like any other MP unit here. Our unit is a rare breed, said Staff Sgt. Edward Heckathorn of the 342nd. We do a lot, and this job can get very draining at times, not really physically but mentally. Those flights in the C-130s are pretty long, and then when we return its back to the long shifts at the camp. When a mission comes up, were pulled off the work schedule and we get to it, said Falkowski. But well find out with a two or three day notice if we have a mission. The sec retary of defense is the final approving authority on when we get them. The mission and the number of detainees will dictate how many teams will get called up, said Haas. But when that happens is really anyones guess. Todays soldier is bright and intelligent, and hes going to ask questions and want answers, he said. But you cant always give them the best answer. But the soldiers of the 342nd have done an outstand ing job with the mission that theyre tasked with. Their training is what helps them get the job done. During their stay at Fort Dix, the unit underwent special Air Force Raven train ing, which is an intensive two-week course that deals with all forms of aircraft security. The Raven training wasnt bad at all, said Spc. Brian Payne of the 342nd. We trained out on flight lines and had guys all shackled up, acting as detainees. The entire thing was very hands-on. The intensity of that training involved a lot of close quarter, non-lethal measures to deescalate any disturbances that can occur, said Haas. This training was paramount in the preparation of the air mission. Thankfully, the special instructions we received in regards to de-escalation have never come into play dur ing the actual missions. But its definitely bet ter to have it than not to. It was also a big thing to work with the Air Force, said Falkowski. We even had a cou ple guys go through the entire Raven school and become certified. There are only around 250 certified Ravens in the Air Force, and we had Army in there making history. The soldiers of the 342nd are also appre ciative of the historical significance of their mission and their role in the war on terrorism. Just thinking that were the ones doing it, were responsible for bringing the detainees here, makes you feel important, said Sgt. Michael M. Cox of the 342nd. This is a different kind of war, and we are making history, said Payne. Sure its a drag to be away from you family now, but to be able to tell your kids and grandkids down the road on what you did here, its an awesome experience. My kids are so proud of me, it really makes me feel great, said Heckathorn. And its great to be a part of military history. Im thankful that the Army has taken me places I would never have gone to on my own. You cant help but feel good about it. We take great pride in what we do, said Haas. Every mission done is done with 100 percent success. Ensuring the safety of the soldiers and detainees is also something for the entire camp to feel prideful about. And Haas is also proud of the fact that his unit continually comes through when the call comes. It shows that when reservists are called upon, reservists can do. Story and photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Military Police Escort Guards answer The 342nd MP Co. EG receives a briefing from JTF-160 Commanding Gen. RIck Baccus during a formation after their shift at Camp Delta is over. Army Capt. Brent Haas, commander of the 342nd MP Co. EG, exhibits extreme pride with the job performance of his unit and the success of their mission. The 342nd MP Co. EG: Making history during the global war on terrorism

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Troops stationed at Guantanamo Bay have little fear of injury from enemy fire, it's the smaller things that can put a soldier out of commission and impede mission capabilities here. Set up as a triage to treat sick patients but capable of sav ing lives is your neighborhood Aid Station. However, most patients who walk past the little red cross and enter the Aid Station are simply in need of fast, efficient medical assistance to get their bodies back to full mission capability. The Joint Aid Station located at Windward Loop is responsible for treating all sick call patients from Windward Loop, East Caravella, and Villamar housing areas. Their hours of operation are Monday through Friday 7a.m.4:30p.m. Patients having any emergencies after those hours must call 911 and will be taken to the hospital. The Camp America Aid Station is primarily responsible for treating Camp America residents. Their hours for sick call are Monday through Sunday 7a.m.-10a.m. and 1p.m.3p.m. However, there's someone available in the Aid Station 24 hours a day, seven days a week. In comparison to the hospital, the Aid Station is much smaller in size and manpower. However, their efficient work and skill enable them to treat an average of 15-20 patients daily without much delay. So, if you need aid, don't be afraid, and visit your local Aid Station. Theyll take care of you. Page 8 Page 9 Friday, October 4, 2002 Ouch! Navy HM3 David Roberts, MIUW 204, prepares a patients shot. When our finest dont feel so fine Army Sgt. Robin Bigalke, 43rd MP Brigade, rests her heavy head in the upstairs waiting area of the Joint Aid Station while she waits to be seen by a member of the staff. Navy Seaman Mike Brake, MIUW 204, signs in and awaits treatment. Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Navy HM2 Scott Rogoff, MIUW 204, examines fellow MIUW 204 Seaman Mike Brakes pained feet. Spc. Diana Klinker, 418th Transportation Co., has her temperature taken before being seen. The Red Cross in front of the Camp America Aid Station. Two heads are better than one... Navy HM2 Scott Rogoff, MIUW 204, and Navy HM3 David Roberts, MIUW 204, consult with one anothers expertise about a patients urine-dip test results.

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Troops stationed at Guantanamo Bay have little fear of injury from enemy fire, it's the smaller things that can put a soldier out of commission and impede mission capabilities here. Set up as a triage to treat sick patients but capable of sav ing lives is your neighborhood Aid Station. However, most patients who walk past the little red cross and enter the Aid Station are simply in need of fast, efficient medical assistance to get their bodies back to full mission capability. The Joint Aid Station located at Windward Loop is responsible for treating all sick call patients from Windward Loop, East Caravella, and Villamar housing areas. Their hours of operation are Monday through Friday 7a.m.4:30p.m. Patients having any emergencies after those hours must call 911 and will be taken to the hospital. The Camp America Aid Station is primarily responsible for treating Camp America residents. Their hours for sick call are Monday through Sunday 7a.m.-10a.m. and 1p.m.3p.m. However, there's someone available in the Aid Station 24 hours a day, seven days a week. In comparison to the hospital, the Aid Station is much smaller in size and manpower. However, their efficient work and skill enable them to treat an average of 15-20 patients daily without much delay. So, if you need aid, don't be afraid, and visit your local Aid Station. Theyll take care of you. Page 8 Page 9 Friday, October 4, 2002 Ouch! Navy HM3 David Roberts, MIUW 204, prepares a patients shot. When our finest dont feel so fine Army Sgt. Robin Bigalke, 43rd MP Brigade, rests her heavy head in the upstairs waiting area of the Joint Aid Station while she waits to be seen by a member of the staff. Navy Seaman Mike Brake, MIUW 204, signs in and awaits treatment. Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Navy HM2 Scott Rogoff, MIUW 204, examines fellow MIUW 204 Seaman Mike Brakes pained feet. Spc. Diana Klinker, 418th Transportation Co., has her temperature taken before being seen. The Red Cross in front of the Camp America Aid Station. Two heads are better than one... Navy HM2 Scott Rogoff, MIUW 204, and Navy HM3 David Roberts, MIUW 204, consult with one anothers expertise about a patients urine-dip test results.

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track, he said. I can let Dan and his people handle the day-to-day fuel operations. One of those people, Joel Hepburn, remembers the January madness well. As the operations chief for the Leeward Air Termi nals refueling needs, Hepburn handles every thing from inventory to data entry to fueling aircraft and teaching other workers to do it safely and quickly. With planes coming and going 24 hours a day, the fueling operation is on call at all hours too and Hepburn calls the detention operations early days the busiest of his life. This place was crazy, he said. In Janu ary, February and into March, planes were coming and going all the time, needing to be refueled and sent on so that more planes could land. It was the most amazing thing, the biggest challenge of my life. And Hepburn wouldnt have traded it for anything. I love this job, he said. I say its the most important job on the base. Because these planes are pretty much the only means of getting in or out. And if the aircraft dont have fuel, you dont go nowhere. And though he likes to deliver his service with a smile, joking with pilots and crew members while the JP5 flows, Hepburn takes his responsibility seriously. I personally try to set a standard on which I get respect, he said. When you get the call from the tower, you go out and do the job, and do it well. Thats it. Sometimes, there are a lot of planes and it will take a while to get to everybody. But my motto is, if a plane dont have to wait, it dont have to wait. Nobody gets grouchy waiting for fuel with me around. From what Ive heard from pilots and crews, they do an outstanding job, said Mike Samsal, Leewards Air Traffic Control coordi nator and the man whose call makes Hepburn jump. Very professional, very safety con scious and everybody still gets that home town welcome when they get here. Spend a day or two around fuelies, and you realize where that attitude comes from. Fuel is the blood of the military; these guys mission is to make sure the militarys heart keeps beating. And somewhere along the way, it gets into their blood too, and becomes a way of life. Ive been in fuel since 1967, said Antonis. I started out with the Air Force in Vietnam, then Thailand, and when I got out and became a contractor I went right back to Thailand, doing the same job at three times the money. From there it was Panama as a mechanic, then I came back to the U.S. for college, then back to Panama as the fuels manager from 1983 until I retired in 1997. And in 1999 I came out of retirement to take the job with KvaernerWillbros here. I owe everything I know to the Air Force, fuel-wise, he said. But Ive been work ing in gas stations since I was 14. I was a mechanic at Char lie Collins Chevy in Bayonne, N.J. I guess you could say I was born to do this it sure seems that way. Antonis opera tion got a little extra attention this week, at least, when the start of Fiscal Year 2003 on Oct. 1 and a procedural change that will now allow the JTFs to bill their fuel directly to DESC in Virginia instead of through GTMOs Navy leadership had JTF drivers bringing in their gas keys for re-formatting. And between FY03s fresh load of paperwork and the tanker of diesel due to arrive in the next few days, things are a little hectic around the office these days. But GTMO wont notice. Unleaded and diesel will still flow at the pumps, fuel trucks will still arrive to refill the generators that light up Camp Deltas spotlit nights, planes will still land, refuel and take off again. The countless engines of the detention operation will roar on, moving the mission and its people wherever they need to go. The only thing people want to know about fuel, says Trotter, who handles the operations preventive maintenance, is how much it costs. Which reminds him prices, set annually by the U.S. comptroller, are down this year. Diesel is $0.81 a gallon, down from $0.96; gasoline is $0.85, down from $1.22; and JP5 is $0.86, down from $1.02 in FY 02. Maybe this year, GTMOs fuelies will get a little glamor after all. Two Kvaerner-Willbros fuelies hand a hose to Coast Guardsmen on the USCG Confidence at Pier Charlie. Page 7 Friday, October 4, 2002 contractors makes GTMO go Kvaerner-Willbros employee Sunday Canoy closes the gate behind an entering visitor at the operations headquarters facility on Potter Ave. The United States Coast Guard cutter Confidence pulls up to Pier Charlie for refueling. Page 10 Friday, October 4, 2002 The soldiers of this unit have a motto: You call, we haul. In addition to guarding the detainees in Camp Delta with an ever vigilant eye, these soldiers are also in charge of another very important task, a mission so far unique to the Joint Task Force operation. It is answering the call and actually bringing the detainees from the battlefield to their cells. Performing this mission is a unit of reservists from Columbus, Ohio, the globetrotting sol diers of the 342nd Military Police Company Escort Guard. Basically, our unit is responsible for trans porting enemy prisoners of war from one place to another, whether by vehicle, foot, rail or air, said Capt. Brent Haas, commander of the 342nd. For operation Enduring Freedom and the current global war on terrorism, were the first reserve unit to conduct trans-global detainee transportation. Our mission here is to escort the detainees from where theyre captured to Cuba, and we also perform guard duty inside of Camp Delta, said 1st Lt. Gregory Falkowski, pla toon leader with the 342nd. Since February, the soldiers of the 342nd have been going on escort missions to distant battlefields. Mobilized out of Fort Dix, N.J., originally only three-quarters of the unit came to GTMO. The rest went on escort missions based out of Fort Dix. But by May, it was decided that the entire company was needed to assist in the guard duties within Camp Delta, meaning that GTMO would become the units sole base of operations. Given the units concentration in the escort ing field, they are in a high priority category for deployments, making them quite valuable. Were a highly deployable unit, given that our focus is on a singular track, which is escorting prisoners, said Falkowski. Theyre only two escort guard units in the Army reserves, and were both here at GTMO. But the job of brining the detainees here is long and compli cated, involving long flights, foreign coun tries and the stress of landing in a combat zone. Once were in country, our focus is always on speed and accuracy, said Falkowski. Theres always the presence of possible enemy attacks, so when we get there, we do what we have to do and get back in the air as soon as we can. The average soldier in the unit has been on six missions, said Falkowski, and when not on escort missions, the 342nd works in Camp Delta, just like any other MP unit here. Our unit is a rare breed, said Staff Sgt. Edward Heckathorn of the 342nd. We do a lot, and this job can get very draining at times, not really physically but mentally. Those flights in the C-130s are pretty long, and then when we return its back to the long shifts at the camp. When a mission comes up, were pulled off the work schedule and we get to it, said Falkowski. But well find out with a two or three day notice if we have a mission. The sec retary of defense is the final approving authority on when we get them. The mission and the number of detainees will dictate how many teams will get called up, said Haas. But when that happens is really anyones guess. Todays soldier is bright and intelligent, and hes going to ask questions and want answers, he said. But you cant always give them the best answer. But the soldiers of the 342nd have done an outstand ing job with the mission that theyre tasked with. Their training is what helps them get the job done. During their stay at Fort Dix, the unit underwent special Air Force Raven train ing, which is an intensive two-week course that deals with all forms of aircraft security. The Raven training wasnt bad at all, said Spc. Brian Payne of the 342nd. We trained out on flight lines and had guys all shackled up, acting as detainees. The entire thing was very hands-on. The intensity of that training involved a lot of close quarter, non-lethal measures to deescalate any disturbances that can occur, said Haas. This training was paramount in the preparation of the air mission. Thankfully, the special instructions we received in regards to de-escalation have never come into play dur ing the actual missions. But its definitely bet ter to have it than not to. It was also a big thing to work with the Air Force, said Falkowski. We even had a cou ple guys go through the entire Raven school and become certified. There are only around 250 certified Ravens in the Air Force, and we had Army in there making history. The soldiers of the 342nd are also appre ciative of the historical significance of their mission and their role in the war on terrorism. Just thinking that were the ones doing it, were responsible for bringing the detainees here, makes you feel important, said Sgt. Michael M. Cox of the 342nd. This is a different kind of war, and we are making history, said Payne. Sure its a drag to be away from you family now, but to be able to tell your kids and grandkids down the road on what you did here, its an awesome experience. My kids are so proud of me, it really makes me feel great, said Heckathorn. And its great to be a part of military history. Im thankful that the Army has taken me places I would never have gone to on my own. You cant help but feel good about it. We take great pride in what we do, said Haas. Every mission done is done with 100 percent success. Ensuring the safety of the soldiers and detainees is also something for the entire camp to feel prideful about. And Haas is also proud of the fact that his unit continually comes through when the call comes. It shows that when reservists are called upon, reservists can do. Story and photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Military Police Escort Guards answer The 342nd MP Co. EG receives a briefing from JTF-160 Commanding Gen. RIck Baccus during a formation after their shift at Camp Delta is over. Army Capt. Brent Haas, commander of the 342nd MP Co. EG, exhibits extreme pride with the job performance of his unit and the success of their mission. The 342nd MP Co. EG: Making history during the global war on terrorism

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The 346th Military Police Company Escort Guard is a sister company of the 342nd MP Co. EG, said 1st Lt. Kenneth W. Bryan, the acting commander of the 346th MP Co. Formed in 1943 as an escort guard com pany, its primary mission is to plan and exe cute escort operations of enemy prisoners of war and U.S. prisoners in support of the corps theater of operations. This MP unit, from Hutchinson, Kan., has a long history of deployments and accom plishments. It has been drawing from its field experience and expertise to support operation Enduring Freedom by handling the detainees from the global war on terrorism. While the detainees are transported to GTMO by the 342nd, the 346th MP Co. EG has the task of escorting them from the Lee ward side to their quarters at Camp Delta and maintaining the watch. Our mission here falls into the military police standards. We provide guards for the detainees after we brought them to the camp for in-processing, said Bryan, who works the night shift with the ever-vigilant soldiers of his company at Camp Delta. Such has been the mission of the 346th since May 12. We came prepared for the mission, said 1st Sgt. Melvin Tipton, the companys top enlisted soldier. While we were at Fort Leav enworth for our annual training, we had to run a detention facility for six weeks. We had hands-on training. In addition, We have a lot of soldiers with correctional and law enforcement back grounds, said Tipton. It didnt take my sol diers too much time to adjust to what the mis sion requires of them. Although the mission-ready personnel of the 346th have not yet transported the detainees from overseas to GTMO, many of them seem to enjoy the escort mission from Leeward to Camp Delta. I got a taste of it, and I like it, said Sgt Ty Roberts, who now works the night shift and has been part of the escort team. I want to do more, he said. For Staff Sgt. Joel Andrews, this mission is a different animal. Andrews has been with the unit for 14 years. Since then he has seen a lot of EPW and POW movements. Here, we are working as individuals. We go to work and come back to the hut, he said. When I was in the desert, on the battlefield, we transported a lot of EPWs, and we worked mostly as a group, he said as he remembers the stormy days of operation Desert Storm. Its still fun to do something different what a lot of people are not allowed to do, said Andrews. When it comes to the night shift, the sol diers see the change in different light. I like the night watch, said Sgt. David Arbuckle. Its quiet. Theres more cama raderie. We have time to learn more about each other. Roberts sees it differ ently. I think that at night, we miss the detainee contact. We are not feeding, showering and escorting the detainees. There is no action, he said. Some times we have to fight with boredom in the midst of the night. But MPs are multi-purpose. We do what we have to do, and we stay alert. As these self-motivat ing soldiers perform their duty beyond reproach, their first sergeant said he wants them to continue to hold their head high because theyve been entrusted with the watch of the detainees from the war. They are living American history, said Tipton. He also said he is proud of them for win ning the Commanders Cup. The Commanders Cup was a competition made up of 11 events. The soldiers of the 346th displayed esprit de corps by winning the overall competition by 1,000 points. Winning the Commanders Cup was a big accomplishment for my company, Tip ton said. Teamwork, Tipton said, is the leading asset of the company. And since this is the units first deployment after operation Desert Storm, many of the soldiers are working together for the first time. Its great to be part of this unit, said Pfc. Kari A. Moore, who has been with the unit for three years. When I first joined the unit, they wel comed me with open arms and made me one of them, she said. This is my first deploy ment with the 346th. Now, I am learning more about them, and theyre learning about me. Its a whole learning experience for me. Above all, Ive learned not to stress about things that used to bother me at home. There are bigger things to worry about. We are at war. I am proud and happy to be here, serving the country whose principles and lifestyle I believe in. Upholding truth, justice and the American way is nothing new to the 346th. Theyve maintained their legacy from escorting EPWs in the European and Pacific theaters of opera tion during World War II to bringing the detainees from the current war on terrorism to Page 11 Friday, October 4, 2002 the call and haul detainees to GTMO Story by Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Staff Sgt. Kenneth Browne of the 346th MP Co. EG skillfully handles the daily administrative duties of the company while his fellow soldiers slum ber after working their night shift at Camp Delta. The 346th MP Co. EG keeps a watchful eye on the detainees Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano As dusk approaches and the 346th MP Co. EG prepares to go on shift at Camp Delta, Army Staff Sgt. Drew Echols, operations NCO with the unit, exits the units headquarters to check on the readiness of the troops. Page 6 Friday, October 4, 2002 Blood may make the green grass grow, as your drill sergeant used to say, but its fuel, fuel, fuel that makes the vehicles go. And while few may give a second thought to the stuff when they fill up their cars, trucks, boats, helicopters and planes here at GTMO, for the hardy band of self-proclaimed fuelies at the Defense Energy Supply Center here, their job is not about getting noticed. In fact, its just the opposite. Its not a glamorous job, says Dan Anto nis, DESC Director here and head of contrac tor Kvaerner-Willbros fuel operation on base. The only time fuel gets any attention is when there isnt any. If we do our job right, fuelies are just...were just there. Their job, Antonis says, breaks down pretty simply: Get the stuff from the tankers to the tanks. The devil, as always, is in the details. We get all our fuel brought to GTMO by ocean-going tanker. The fuels officer here sends out a five-month slate our require ments for that time period and DESC arranges for a tanker to pick up the fuel and bring it here; a load comes in every three or four months. One load is usually about 175,000 barrels, Antonis says, and at 42 gallons to the barrel, thats almost 7.5 million gallons of unleaded, diesel and JP5 jet fuel that gets deposited into Antonis on-shore storage tanks here. Thats when Antonis and his deputy Ken Trotters crew of 17 Jamaican and Phillipino fuelies spring into action, first testing the batch in a laboratory to make sure it meets specifications, and then getting it out fast to whats known in the fuel business as the end user namely, everything on GTMO with a motor. The fuel that goes to Leeward side goes through the Cross-Bay Pipeline to the JP5 tank farm near the airport. On Windward side, the crew fills up its fleet of 21 trucks and takes the fuel everywhere it needs to go to Camp Delta to run the generators and the mobile light plants, to the fueling station where the govern ment vehicles fill up, to the NEX gas station by the Dowtown Lyceum, to the marina where Coast Guard patrol boats and MWR boats get theirs. To the hospitals. To the contractors out in the field. And to Antonis biggest customer, the desalinization plant, without which GTMO would have neither water nor power. And at the rate GTMO guzzles, the go juice can go pretty fast. The desalinization plant alone consumes some 700,000 gallons of diesel a month. GTMOs birds from civil ian jumbo jets and prop planes to miltary C6s and C130s used over 300,000 gallons of JP5 jet fuel in August. As for boats, the GTMO ferry uses about 15,000 gallons of diesel a month. Harbor Patrol goes through 10,000 gallons of gasoline for recreational boats and the Coast Guards 24-hours-a-day Boston Whaler patrol boats. On land, Camp Deltas generators alone use almost 6,000 gallons of diesel in a typical month, with diesel-powered vehicles from Humvees to deuce-and-a-halfs to Coast Guard cutters soaking up the rest, Antonis says. The swarm of vans, Jeep Cherokees, pickup trucks and other gasoline-operated vehicles on base go through nearly 80,000 gal lons of medium-grade unleaded. (POVs, filled up at private expense at the NEX gas station, are good for another 20,000.) It didnt used to be this way. Last year at this time, we would normally issue a total of around 42,000 gallons of product a month, Antonis said. That has doubled since you guys the JTF missions got here in January. We had a 100 percent increase for gasoline, a 15 per cent increase for diesel and a 30-40 percent increase for jet fuel. Dan and his crew have done an excellent job meeting the big increase in demand, said Larry Blackman, GTMO fuels officer, who oversees the contrac tors at KvaernerWillbros and makes sure all the fuel gets ordered thats needed. Before January, we were kind of a Sleepy Hollow around here. Thats one reason why my wife Diane and I shes a budget analyst for the housing depart ment wanted to do my twilight tour here before I retired. Then the JTFs showed up. Its still nowhere near what it was when I was fuels officer here before from to This base was really booming with Navy then. But its a heck of a lot busier than it was in December. Antonis competence and effciency have allowed Blackman to focus on another out growth of the detention operations arrival here: $55 million in ugrade and renovation projects to get GTMOs fuel facilities in tiptop shape for the long haul. Thats mostly what I do now; keep on top of those projects and make sure theyre on Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Fuels paradise: This crew of CW4 Joseph M. LeBlanc, a pilot with the Massachusetts Army National Guard, does the honors refueling his Miami-bound C-26 at Leeward Air Terminal. Ferdinand M. Catapang, one of the fuelies at Kvaerner-Willbros, tops off the gasoline tank at the self-service fueling station off Sherman Avenue. Joel Hepburn, Kvaerner-Willbros operations chief at Leeward Air Terminal, humps the hose and gets ready to fuel up GTMOs base helicopter.

PAGE 12

gone, said Sgt. Tony Bennings of 2/142s sec ond platoon. We were ready for the worst, but of course, not much ended up happening. It was good how we reacted so fast, said Army Pfc. Keith N. West of the 571st MP. Co. If the storm did strike, our SEAhuts would have probably ended up somewhere in com munist Cuba. It might have happened. But tropical storms often change, well, like the weather, and on Thursday the storm started to dissipate, become disorganized and take a more southerly route. And so the troops packed their freshly unpacked bags, moved back out to the Camp and were gone Friday morning as fast as they had come. It only took the troops a mere three hours to move all their stuff in, and another three hours to move it all back out, said Santorella. No matter how you look at it, it was an awe some move for the amount of people we had moving that much gear. An amazing logistical feat it might have been, but not everyone was thrilled by the apparent false alarm. They gave us just a taste of paradise by let ting us stay in the Loop, but then they took it right back away, said Bennings. Before long, however, paradise for these troops would be found again. On Friday at 7 p.m., another weather warn ing emerged. The storm had abruptly changed direction, and was now heading due north in our direction and regaining strength along the way. By Saturday at around 2 a.m., the troops out at Camp America got the word that the storm had gained some momentum taking a bold route right at them. This time, the storm was to hit even harder, and Tropical Storm Condition One was quickly put into effect. House restric tions were set, the NEX was closed, boats were pulled from the waters, vehicles were tied down and only essential per sonnel were to be work ing out of a single contingency headquar ters at Bulkeley Hall. Round Two looked to be the big one, and once again the troops had to quickly pack their stuff and move back to sturdier shelter. The second time was chaotic, said Army Sgt. 1st Class David J. Bleger of the 346 MP. Co. We received zero notice. We stowed away our unnecessary gear, packed up the Conexes (shipping containers) and took what we needed back to the Loop. We boarded the doors on our SEAhuts and left everything in place. The storm had started tracking North and heading right toward us, so to be safe over sorry, we moved the troops back to the Loop, said Funaro. Everything was in place for some pretty severe impact, said Timothy Valle, Navy Chief Petty Officer in Charge of the Meteorol ogy Detachment here at GTMO. So everyone sat around Saturday keeping posted to updated weather bulletins on the tel evision and awaiting the storms destructive wrath to strike. By 8 p.m., Lili was 95 miles south-southwest of GTMO with 50 mph sus tained winds, and was expected to strengthen before its arrival here, according to the National Weather Service. The storm was moving Northwest at 5 mph, and National Hurricane Center forecast ers expected Lili near Cubas southern coast by late Saturday or the early hours of Sunday. We were ahead of the game by tracking the storm, said Sgt. 1st Class Phillip O. Blackman of the 114th MP. Co. Even if we had to move back and fourth a hundred times, it would have been all right because it all comes down to keeping the soldiers safe. While people were bracing for the worst, they were only treated to a few heavy rain showers throughout Saturday afternoon with winds gusting only up to 40 knots, rather than the tumultuous, roof-ripping storm that was thought to be coming. By Sunday morning, the storm redirected and tracked a more southwestern path, and it was clear that Tropical Storm Lili was not going to lay GTMO to waste. The storm con dition was lowered, the NEX and McDonalds reopened, and it was back to normal business on base. By Monday morning, the troops from Camp America were on their way back to their homes by the sea. There would be no more Saturdays spent in recliners in front of college football, no more backyard barbecues, but going home is never all bad. Some soldiers were happy to get back to Camp America, said Funaro. That is their comfort zone. It was nice at the Loop, but Im happy to be back at Camp America with all of my own people, said West. Most people living at the Loop were sup portive of the mission and sympathetic toward us, said Sgt. M. Hebert of the 239th MP Co. Im proud of how 99% of the people received their guests, said Funaro. All ser vicemembers got to meet new people, and that aspect was extremely successful. It means a lot for the soldiers from Camp America to make new friends. Most of JTF-160 welcomed the com pany, said Santorella. They knew they were coming back, and their doors were opened for them. This experience prepared us like a fire drill would in case the real deal ever happens. Elsewhere, however, Tropical Storm Lili did indeed prove to be the real deal. On Tues day, having bypassed GTMO, the storm uprooted trees and destroyed homes in Western Cuba before moving on to batter Lousisiana this week. Im happy the storm didnt hit us, said Funaro. But it was a good adventure for our servicemembers. It was the newness of the experience that created the camaraderie that we had. All the moves were only a small inconvenience considering the safety factors. In the end, Tropical Storm Lili missed. No SEAhuts blew away. No power outages occurred. No hurricane baskets were distrib uted. Few people even got wet. All was well on GTMO, save for a lone deuce-and-a-half that got stuck in the mud. Mother Nature may have spared us this time but the hurricane season isnt over yet. But thanks to Lilis near misses, well be ready next time. Page 5 Friday, October 4, 2002 STORM, from page 1 Behold: The often talked about, yet rarely seen, hur ricane basket that supplies only the bare essentials. Sgt. Raymond Foster from the 297th Transportation Company removes a freshly loaded Conex from the Loop before moving it back out to Camp A. Were holding things down infantry style, said Sgt. Tony Bennings of the 2/124 INF. Co, as he and his troops unload their truck for the second time out at Camp A. Second platoon leads the way, he roared. Page 12 Friday, October 4, 2002 One of the seven wonders of the ancient world was the Light house of Alexandria, in Pharos, Egypt. Its light guided seafarers approaching the bay from 290 B.C. to 1480 A.D. The Windward Point light house at the southeastern end of Guantanamo Bay is a much hum bler structure with a shorter history than the one in ancient Egypt, but to Cuban-American Coast Guard PS3 William Papi Farias, this lit tle lighthouse still qualifies as a wonder. Theres something romantic about a lighthouse, says Farias, who works with Coast Guard Port Security Unit 307. At the same time, a lighthouse conjures a sense of history. To live in a lighthouse would be a dream. Id like to retire to one. Farias has had a long-standing love affair with lighthouses, instilled in him by his father, who was a merchant marine in Cuba. As a child, he wanted to follow in his fathers footsteps and have a career that tied in to his love of the sea. Fate dictated that he wouldnt end up in the Cuban Merchant Marines, though he would get to strengthen his ties to the ocean in another way. Like many Cuban families in the 1950s, the Farias family found themselves having to pull up stakes and leave the country when Fidel Castro rose to power. My brother and I were actually born in Queens, New York, explains Farias. The family moved back to Cuba when I was only a few months old. Then we had to leave again when I was 9 years old. In 1959, the Farias family fled Cuba for Miami. Later, they moved to Tampa. Despite all of the upheaval in his early life, Farias never forgot his desire to connect with his fam ilys nautical past. He has served in the Navy and the Coast Guard for 24 years and has traveled exten sively. Ironically, now that his tenure with the military is almost up, his travels have brought him back almost to where he began. Because of his deployment to Guantanamo, Farias has returned to the land of his forefathers for the first time in over forty years. At first, merely being back on Cuban soil was enough, but gradually Farias started to become enamored of the idea of leaving something of him self behind when he departs the island. Inspiration struck one day in June when Farias and fellow Coast Guard QM3 Melissa Steinman were out on their vessel patrolling the waters of the bay. They hap pened to cruise within sight of the Windward Point lighthouse and realized that it had become sadly neglected. It was then that Farias became a man on a mission. Farias and Steinman put their heads together and by the Fourth of July they had drafted and sub mitted a comprehensive proposal to PSU 307s command for the renovation of the lighthouse. The name of the endeavor? Operation P.R.I.D.E. The acronym stands for Pride in yourself, Respect for all others, Integrity always, Devotion to duty, and Encouragement for the future, says Farias. Farias envi sioned that the lighthouse renova tion project would make GTMO just a little bit better than when we arrived. The proposal, which had to get the approval of the Public Works Department and the base Safety Officer, to name a few agencies and individuals, detailed the equipment needed for the job, how the work would be scheduled and how Farias would go about getting the manpower needed to complete the task. We had to go through four or five logistical meetings, says Farias, but we finally got the goahead a few months after we thought of the idea. By September 21, the approvals were done, the materials had been gathered and the project was ready to get underway. Farias planned to start by replacing the termite-weakened doors of the old garage next to the museum on the grounds of the lighthouse. Once that structure was in satisfactory condition, it would serve as a stor age area for the paint, brushes, scraping tools and other needed equipment. Unfortunately, Mother Nature didnt cooperate. Heavy rains deterred the dozens of people who had responded to the ads for vol unteers he had placed on 103.1 The Blitz. Undaunted, Farias and Stein man went out in the torrential rain that day and started the long process of scraping and sanding. Warnings about Tropical Storm Lili on September 25 postponed work yet again, though the day ultimately turned out to be sunny. Finally, on September 27, Farias and five of his friends from PSU307 came out and began to make some real progress. The structural engineers in the group took out their buzz saws and started making new garage doors while Papi donned a white pro tective suit and breathing appara tus and started chipping through the accumulated paint on the museum. The lighthouse itself will be the last item to be dealt with. Farias estimates that there are at least seven to eight layers of paint to go through before they reach the actual metal surface. For that task, a 1500 psi pressure washer will be used to blast off the old paint and rust with concentrated streams of water. Farias expects to leave Guan tanamo in a few months, so he knows that Operation PRIDE wont be completed by him. Still, he feels satisfaction in having put the project in motion. This is a chance to restore a piece of Coast Guard history, plus unite all the services through vol unteerism, says Farias. We will truly be united for GTMO. Coast Guard PS3 William Papi Farias dons his protective scraping suit. Papi Farias, surveying the bay from the top of the lighthouse. Built in 1903, the tower is 60 ft. of riveted iron with a cupola made of copper. The weather vane has directional symbols in Spanish (i.e. O for oeste, or west). The light at the end of the bay Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire A Cuban-American expatriate returns to the land of his birth, determined to leave his mark on Guantanamo Bay

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Page 4 Friday, October 4, 2002 The storm that never showed When GTMO heard that Tropical Storm Lili might stop in for a visit, GTMO got ready! Employees at the Marina pulled over 34 boats out of the water in anticipation of her fury. But after it was determined Lili wasnt going to blow through our neighborhood it was time for GTMO to get back to normal. Marina employee Colin Williams took part in returning over 34 boats to the water last Thursday. Oh, well. Better safe than sunk. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko This weeks question: Were you worried about Tropical Storm Lili? Sgt. 1st Class Anthony M. Williams, 178th Mili tary Police Company Whatever would happen happened. I had no wor ries. I was just going to ride it out. We were going to work through it one way or another. Bob Barkley, civilian, Kvaerner Been here for years, and Ive seen it before. If it came, Id be ready. No dancing in the storm though. I might be old, but Im not stupid. Air Force Staff Sgt. David Wright, Joint Task Force 170 I took all precautions to ensure that my house mates would be safe from the ravages of the storm. We were ready to respond, if need be. Navy Seaman Appren tice John D. Rose, Detention Hospital 20 I planned to go for it and board up all the windows. I stocked up on water. You cant drink rain water, you know, because its not purified. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Josh J. Cooley, Joint Task Force 170 Like my name says, I was going to play it coolly Someone was going to have to be responsible, so I stocked up on essentials like water and food. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Page 13 Friday, October 4, 2002 DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, October 4 8 p.m. Adventures of Pluto Nash, PG13 96 min 10 p.m Austin Powers 3, PG13 91 min Saturday, October 5 8 p.m. The Country Bears, G 88 min 10 p.m. Blood Work, R 111 min Sunday, October 6 8 p.m. K-19 Widowmaker, PG13 138 min Monday, October 7 8 p.m. Adventures of Pluto Nash, PG13 96 min Tuesday, October 8 8 p.m. Signs, PG13 107 min Wednesday, October 9 8 p.m. Blood Work, R 111 min Thursday, October 10 8 p.m. Signs, PG13 107 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, October 4 8 p.m. Frequency, PG13 117 min 10 p.m. Eraser, R 101 min Saturday, October 5 8 p.m. Charlies Angels, PG13 98 min 10 p.m. Shaft, R 100 min Sunday, October 6 8, 10 p.m. A Beautiful Mind, PG13 135 min Monday, October 7 8 p.m. Sleepy Hollow, R 100 min Tuesday, October 8 8 p.m. Chill Factor, R 102 min Wednesday, October 9 8 p.m. Meet the Parents, PG13 108 min Thursday, October 10 8, 10 p.m. Lucky Numbers, R 108 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris *Horoscopes: Week of October 7 October 13 Mar. 21 Apr. 19 Getting comfortable in GTMO is difficult for the Ram on Monday and Tuesday, and you're likely to get upset when even the tiniest detail of your plan goes awry. Spend time on your own as much as possible in the beginning of the week, Aries. Although you think you're doing the right thing by being honest and telling it like it is on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, the people around you may view your comments as just plain insensitive and unprofessional. It's possible to tell the truth in a tactful way. If you need help ask for it. People are more than willing to assist you. Jul. 23 Aug. 22 You know a lot more than you're letting on this Monday and Tuesday, which makes it difficult for those around you to get the job done. Although you should always be informed, there's certainly no need not to keep everyone else from knowing whats going on. Enjoy good times with friends, family or romantic partner midweek, when all of your troubles seem to fade into the background. You know that you have to do the right thing in order to maintain any sense of selfrespect on Saturday and Sunday, so do yourself a favor and steer clear of the party scene! Nov. 22 Dec. 21 You may not be worried about the who, what, where and when aspects of life on Monday and Tues day, but you're definitely pondering why things hap pen. Pencil in some time to spend in a quiet place thinking about the meaning of it all, Sagittarius. Even if you don't come up with the answers, you'll find a cer tain peace in contemplation. On Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, your mood becomes much more jovial, which makes parties and social events jump to the top of your priority list. But don't spend too much money at the Tiki Bar or you'll regret it. Apr. 20 May 20 Emotions run deep on Monday and Tuesday, and your passion for your current partner or secret crush is undeniable. With any luck, they'll feel the same way about you! Tending to financial matters takes up most of your time midweek, so be prepared to crunch the numbers and work with figures until you get it right. Review your LES'! When you talk on Saturday and Sunday, people listen. This is a good time to demon strate your leadership skills. Taking a trip to the gym for some extra PT can do nothing but further motivate you for the upcoming week. Aug. 23 Sep. 22 Once you make up your mind on Monday and Tuesday, no one else has even the slightest chance of changing it. While some would call you stubborn, you insist that you're simply self-assured. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday find you in a daredevil mood, but remember Safety first. Running through the streets at night with out your reflective belt will only get you hurt. If you budget your time correctly, perhaps you can get the boring tasks out of the way in time to pursue the adventures after all. If you're single and looking, the weekend is the best time at meeting someone new. Dec. 22 Jan. 19 Put all of your ammo on the table before you make your final decision on Monday and Tuesday. It's impor tant to pay attention to detail, you never know where the answer may be. Even though your mood has been a bit pessimistic lately, Friday you believe in the impos sible. Replace the word 'alright' in your vocabulary with 'outstanding' and watch what a difference positive thinking can make in your life. While your friend is ready to leave GTMO earlier than expected, you're just getting started. Don't feel guilty about envying them -your time will come soon enough! May 21 Jun. 21 Your moves are calculated as you attempt to reach your PT goals on Monday and Tuesday. You use every available resource to your advantage in the beginning of the week, which further advances your quest for the absolute body. You want what's best for your friends and family on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, but you need to resist the urge to preach your set of values to your fellow troops. It might be difficult to watch them struggle, but it's important to let them learn from their own mistakes. Although you're happy to remain at home relaxing on Saturday and Sunday. Sep. 23 Oct. 22 You feel that what's yours is yours on Monday and Tuesday, and you really don't want to share it. This is a good time to work on being more generous, Libra, especially if your housemates are in need. Your life feels particularly balanced on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, which is exactly the way you like things to be. Go out on a limb and share your ideas with your section midweek. The responses are bound to be better than you could have even dared to anticipate. An old memory or someone from your past jolts you out of your normal, happy rhythm on Saturday or Sunday. Jan. 20 Feb. 18 GTMO slows down on Monday, leaving you with a lot of time on your hands. Even though you might not be comfortable with the silence that this period of pri vacy brings, try to use it wisely. You're so anxious to get back into the social swing of things on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday that you'll probably be open to inviting new members to your group that you might not have considered before. This is a wise move, Aquarius, as all groups and teams benefit from diversity. And you can find a unit from almost any state here, remem berit don't GTMO better than this! Jun. 22 Jul. 22 You normally love a good mystery, but you are more likely to shy away from the unknown than you are to run toward it on Monday and Tuesday. If you're not feeling comfort in your own living area on Wednes day, Thursday and Friday, don't hesitate to call a meet ing and to make yourself feel better. Reading, taking a quiet walk by the Marina or getting away to the Lee ward side are all ways you can contribute to your own well-being. Your work schedule may conflict with your personal life on Saturday and Sunday. Don't forget the mission comes first, Cancer! Oct. 23 Nov. 21 As the week begins, you feel powerful, energetic and confident enough in your abilities to do anything you put your mind to and are tasked to do. By Wednes day, however, pressure from your family or section may cause you to give in to something you don't nec essarily want to do. Trust your instincts midweek, Scor pio. If your heart is saying no, don't let your voice say yes. Although you are determined to win the battle on Saturday and Sunday, you probably can't count on the opposition to put up much of a fight. In fact, the two of you may even actually be on the same side! Feb. 19 Mar. 20 Examine everything in detail before coming up with your final analysis on Monday. It's better to be cer tain when you go to your command than to base your decisions on guesswork. Your commander or comrade feels they know what is best for you on Wednesday, but you couldn't agree with them less. Are you reject ing their advice because you truly believe that it's wrong, or because you don't like being told what to do? Throw out that stubborn attitude and do the right thing. An NCO or chaplain can be most helpful to you this weekend, especially if your problem feels hopeless. *for entertainment purposes only I am an American Soldier A protector of the greatest nation on Earth I always wanted this, since birth Stood tall and fought hard to show what Id be worth Thats what I wanted, so thats where I am because I started to root off and grow from my stem. It took a while, to find my direction But now I back my selection with my countrys affection I accepted fate with my arms opened wide So Ill live for the moment and take life in stride My teams The One When Im wearing BDUs, Im not thinking about fun RED, WHITE and BLUE, and these colors dont run

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Page 3 Friday, October 4, 2002 Pharmacy Technicians Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Mike Latimer We are here on a mission. That is what is important. We are profes sional and we are here to do a job. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Tamika Richardson What I like the most is interacting with people. I see them come to the phar macy sick and in a couple of days they are well and walking around the NEX. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Yokasta H. Bisono After a patient has a long day at the hospital and they are not feeling well, it is easy for them to get aggravated. So we do our best to make them feel better. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Paul Henderson I love working with my fellow com rades at the pharmacy. They make it fun and enjoyable to come to work. This is the best job in the Navy. The Naval Hospitals pharmacy is manned by four petty officers. They are the last line in the war against infections. The pharmacy is in charge of all the medication on the island. From a minor headache to a severe infec tion, they have what you need to alleviate your pain. The technicians take their job very seriously. We always check one another to make sure the pre scriptions are filled out right, because if we make a mistake, a patient can lose his life, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Mike Latimer. The Navy puts them through rigorous training to become qualified. The training is intense and long for those who hope to become pharmacy technicians. They train for six months and must memorize 1,200 different drugs along with all the side effects of the drugs, their contra-indications, generic names and what the drugs look like before they can make the grade and be classified A pharmacy technician sometimes has to work long hours doing rounds in the hospital. They are on call 24 hours, but for those who need a routine prescription filled, the pharmacys operational hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday to Friday. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Paul Henderson stays busy at the Navy Hospitals pharmacy measuring out medicine for GTMO residents. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Yokasta H. Bisono prepares an IV to be adminis tered to a patient admitted to the Navy Hospital before she goes on rounds. Page 14 Friday, October 4, 2002 The Wire Survey Let us know what you think! All Fall Division Soccer rosters will be due on Friday, Sept. 20th. The Soccer season runs from Monday, Sept. 30th through Fri day, Nov. 8th. Contact Capt. Gormly or Maj. Buchanan at x5249 for more infor mation about MWR events. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. Mon day-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM-6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Flag Football Leagues, M-F, 6 PM, Cooper Field. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM4:00PM. Today, Friday, October 4th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Saturday, October 5th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 11:30AM-2:00PM, JTF160 Commander's Cup Series Awards Ceremony and Closing Cook-Out. Sunday, October 6th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 5:00PM, Chess Tournament IX, CBQ. Monday, October 7th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, October 8th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1:00PM-7:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower Wednesday, October 9th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1:00PM-7:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower 7:00PM, 9-Ball Tournament, CBQ. Thursday, October 10th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Optional information: AGE: ______ RANK/GRADE: ______ SERVICE: ______ AFFILIATION: Dependent______ DOD Civ ______ Other ______ Servicemember_____ Answer on a scale of 1 through 5 where it applies. 1Outstanding 2Excellent 3Very Good 4Needs Improvement 5No Interest Give us your thoughts on the following questions: 1. How would you rate The Wire as a whole? 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 2. How are we representing the Armed Services? 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 4. What would you like to see more of/less of in The Wire? Comments:__________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ 5. If you could change anything in The Wire what would it be and why? Comments:__________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ 6. How do you rate each of the following columns: Chaplains Corner: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Commanders Corner: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Command Sergeant Majors Corner: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Man on the Street: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ In Brief: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Sports: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ 15 Minutes of Fame: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Profession of the Week: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Crossword Puzzle: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Movie Schedule: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Horoscope: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Provost Marshals Corner 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Frustrated Poetry Corner: 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Frustrated Chef 1____ 2_____ 3 _____ 4______ 5______ MWR Watch 1____ 2_____ 3_____ 4______ 5______ Additional comments and suggestions, including stories you particularly liked or disliked: _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ NOTE: Please drop your survey off at one of the boxes located in following places by October 10, 2002: 1. The NEX 2. The Seaside Galley 3. Windward Loop Housing Your comments and ideas are important to us!

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Page 2 Friday, October 4, 2002 Warnings for Swimmers & Snorkelers JTF-160 Command Commander: Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Army Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Army Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. UPDATE Army Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Foraker, reserve military policeman with the 342nd MP Co., has been missing since 1:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24. His wallet and clothing were discovered along the perimeter of Camp America. A search is still underway. 2nd Lt. Matthew Larrison has been appointed Summary Court Officer to handle Staff Sgt. Forakers affairs here. Anyone with relevant business should call Larrison at x3150. Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Encountering the Holy Spirit can be thrilling and powerful. But what if such times werent reserved just for certain moments in your life? It is possible to experience the Holy Spirits presence and revival frequently if you run after the Holy Spirit to follow where He leads. Here are some ways you can follow the Holy Spirits lead: Decide that you truly want to go where the Spirit leads you. If youre struggling with fear, remember that Gods love and wisdom will always cause Him to act in your best interests. Think and pray about what is currently hin dering your intimacy with God. Ask God to reveal sin that you need to confess, then con fess it and ask for the grace you need to over come it. Make worship a priority in your life. Arrange your schedule so that you have the time for focused, frequent worship. Sacrifice whatever else you need to so that you have room for God in all areas of your life. Con serve your time and energy to devote to His purposes. Claim your identity in Christ. Dont look for your identity anywhere else. Ask God to show you how He sees you, then have confi dence in Him to help you stay focused on His purposes for your life. Fight complacency in your life. Dont settle for living for God only part of time; strive to do so all the time. Pursue the constant growth that God wants for you. Be prepared to be surprised. God may bring about unexpected situations in your life, and youll be transformed in ways that change the core of who you are as a person. Humble yourself regularly before God. Seek His holiness, not self-righteousness. When you attend a church service, look for God to express Himself rather than seeking to express yourself. Pursue forgiveness and reconciliation with others with whom youve been in any type of conflict. Strive for unity in the body of Christ. [By Whitley Hopler, www.crosswalk.com. Adapted from Follow the Fire, by Steve Gray.] Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR Guantanamo Bay waters are subject to strong, varying, tidal and oceanic currents, and dangerous marine life. COMNAVBASEGTMOINST 1710.10G states that if you swim or snorkel in open waters, you do so at your own risk. Please exercising extreme cau tion; lifeguards are not on duty. Swimming and snorkeling is authorized within 50 yards of any shoreline, except in industrial areas, marinas, or within the immediate area of the Windward and Lee ward ferry landings. Unless swimming or snorkeling within 50 yards from the shoreline of Philips Dive Pier or any public beach, a dive flag buoy shall be employed. Avoid swimming or snorkeling during inclement weather or hurricane warnings. Swimming is not authorized anywhere near the shoreline of Radio Range. REMEMBER: Swimming alone is against regulations. Use the buddy system. -Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 Follow the Holy Spirits Lead JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. R. W. Funaro I would like to publicly thank all the Windward Loop and East Caravella residents who went out of their way to accommodate the Camp America troops during the last destructive-weather evacua tions this past week. The stories continue to pour in about how many of you went out and bought extra food and cleared out living room space for your guests. Of course we had the stiffs that think they own the housing area and became belligerent with their guests, telling them what they could not do. But we wont waste print on them. Many new friendships have been created because of the posi tive attitude of taking care of fel low servicemembers. The Camp America residents in many cases reciprocated with their own gen erosity. This showed the true spirit of the service values. Thanks again for pitching in to take care of our own. Page 15 Friday, October 4, 2002 NAVSTA, playing like champions NAVSTA kept rolling in the playoffs by beating the 342nd MP Co. Buckeyes 20-12 Monday at Cooper Field. NAVSTAs record is still unblemished in the flag football league. This victory puts them one step closer to their fourth championship crown in a row. They are focused and deter mined to win the title with a per fect record. However, the win over the Buckeyes was not easy. The Buckeyes pushed NAVSTA into uncharted waters in the first half, able to shut down NAVSTAs high-powered run ning offense, which is their bread and butter. NAVSTA led by only 7-6 by half time. Spectators were in shock! They were used to seeing NAVSTA bulldoze though the competition, but this time it was n't happening. The Buckeyes were an all around good team. They stopped us from playing our game. We were making too many mistakes on the field, said Navy Seaman Antonio Robinson. They knew the mistakes on the field were keeping the Buckeyes in the game. Not only were they one point behind but also they were building confidence as the game kept going. At halftime NAVSTA looked stoic and concerned on the side lines as they were discussing how to beat the Buckeyes defense. When the two teams met on the gridiron to start the second half, the crowd knew something had to give. Was it going to be NAVSTAs perfect season or was it going to be the Buckeyes' defense? NAVSTA had to change their strategy in the second half if they wanted to win. Their usual run ning offense tactics were shut down. We were turning the ball over in the first half, but when we fig ured out the Buckeyes defense strategy we started scoring points. We started throwing the ball more and opening up the field. This made their defense vulnerable, said Robinson. NAVSTA forced the Buckeyes to cover them man-to-man. They began to spread themselves out all over the field. This opened up the field and made more passing possible. So they launched a pass attack. Many teams have not seen NAVSTAs passing offense because their running offense is often enough to win. We started playing our game in the second half, throwing more instead of just running, said Robinson. Robinson and Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Balton D. Hill connected for a touchdown to make the score 13-6. That was not a designed play, said Hill. We improvised and ran our own pass routes. I have to give the credit to Robin son; if there is an open man he will find him. Scoring that touch down and putting my team on top felt good. What we really want is to have an undefeated season. That score changed the momentum of the game. NAVSTA was back in control. NAVSTA and the Buckeyes each scored another touchdown, but it was too little, too late for the Buckeyes. The game clock ran out on them. The final score was 20-12. NAVSTA sent another team to the losing bracket of the tourna ment. We are still undefeated in the season. That is what keeps us strongly motivated to win. The games are getting tougher as we go deeper in the tournament. The competition is better now because losing a game could end your sea son, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Goodwin. The Buckeyes played hard and valiantly, but NAVSTA was too strong. The Buckeyes defense was very good. We were tested in that game, but Naval Station beats an Army team again. You will see us in the upcoming championship game, said Robinson. NAVSTA says it is playing for much more than a title this year. They are playing for domination. They want to create something like the Yankees, Duke Univer sity or UCLA when coach John Wooden led his team to ten straight NCAA titles. NAVSTA wants to start a dynasty. We want to keep the champi onship trophy where it belongs... with NAVSTA, said Hill. We have won three straight years and we are looking for number four. We want to keep that tradition growing. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Goodwin catches a pass at the 10 yard-line, then spins away from a Buckeye defender and takes the football in for a touchdown putting NAVSTA in the lead for good. They won 20-12 over the Buckeyes. NAVSTAs unstoppable quarterback Navy Seaman Antonio Robinson, right, smokes by the Buckeyes defense as he runs for a 23-yard gain.

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With the hurricane season hanging around GTMO from the start of June until the end of November, the personnel assigned here must be well prepared for any extreme weather conditions. Or not so extreme. On September 25th, many of the servicemembers assigned here felt the first effects of this years hurricane season when Tropical Storm Lili was approaching from the south, picking up velocity and seemingly headed right in our direction. For such situations, there are guide lines that must be followed to keep us safe from the ravages of any brewing storm. There are five categories associ ated with a coming storm, ranging from Condition Five (the normal GTMO rou tine) to Condition One, where destruc tive winds are expected within 12 hours. The threat condition the base is in deter mines what actions should and should not be taken by servicemembers. In an 8 a.m. weather warning issued on the 25th by the National Hurricane Center, Lili was expected to hit GTMO head on, so action was called for all per sonnel living out at Camp America in SEAhuts to be evacuated from their wooden homes and moved into better storm-prepared housing at Windward Loop. Just in case. The houses in Windward Loop arent hurricane proof, but they are hurri cane resistant, said Navy Chief Eugene Santorella, Naval Station Housing. The strength of these houses are much more likely to handle the harsh conditions of a storm than Camp Americas SEAhuts. This wasnt an exercise, said JTF160s Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Funaro. We got to demonstrate our destructive weather plan. If the wind got really heavy, we didnt want to take a chance of a roof caving in on a SEAhut out at the Camp. We got the word during the early hours of Wednesday that we were going to be moving into the Loop, said Sgt. Raymond C. Hardie of the 2/142 Infantry Company. Me and three other Non-Commissioned Officers were moved in to stay with three Army Cap tains. They showed us great hospitality and made us feel right at home. When they told us a storm was com ing and we had to move out, we were Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The GTMO storm that hardly was Friday, October 4, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 17 Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Tropical storm Lili cries wolf twice, and the residents of GTMO react in a moments notice As the storm generated, the troops of Guantanamo Bay geared up to face the predicted onslaught of Tropical Storm Lili head on. See STORM, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 P a ge 8 Page 15 Page 16 Friday, October 4, 2002 With Army Staff Sgt. Veronica D. Sims Q: What do you want people who read this to know about you after reading your 15 minutes of fame? A: Hmm. Well, I want people to know that even though I have a mean walk, I am a really sweet person with a warm and tender heart. Q: Okay, so are you ready to reveal the real Staff Sgt. Veronica D. Sims and begin your 15 min utes of fame? A: I've been ready! Q: Where on this glorious GTMO do you work, and what unit are you from? A: I am with the 160 MP Bat talion out of Tallahassee, Fla., and I work at the Detention Hospital. I basically provide security to the hospital staff and detainees. Q: And how do you feel about working so closely with the detainees? A: Well as a civilian I work in a federal prison so I am used to this kind of work environment. Q: But, there must be a lot of differences between the two, right? A: Oh of course, for starters I work with female inmates back in the civilian world. Also, there are a lot of dos and donts working with the detainees. I have to watch what I say and do a lot more. For exam ple at my job back in the states if an inmate asks me to get them anything, a water or just anything, I would never do it. It would be looked at as showing favorites. But here things are different. Q: Enough about work, consid ering I am sure that is what your busy with the majority of your time here. Tell me, what do you do for fun? A: I run. After I work a 12-hour shift, you can find me running. Q: Running for the hills I bet. A: Just running away a stressful day. Q: Is there anything else you enjoy doing? A: Other than working out, I like to go to the movies and just chill out with my roommates. Q: Ah, housemates! They can be your best friends or your worst enemies. And how about yours? A: I've got a good group. In fact, every Thursday night we cook dinner and thank God for making it through the week. And we drink a lot of apple juice. Q: Lucky lady, six females in two rooms could mean war. But anyway, what is the weirdest thing you've seen since you've been here? A: Banana rats! I do not take them well. And they travel in herds. Q: We're definitely outnum bered. Well, other than wiping out the ever-increasing hordes of banana rats roaming the streets, what would you like to change about GTMO? A: Transportation. Every house or SEAhut should have their own vehicle. No offense to the bus driv ers. Q: Keep it up and you'll never get a ride. If you could talk to any one about to deploy here, what would you tell him or her? A: I'd tell them to catch a ride on the GTMO Queen because it don't GTMO better than that. Oh, and to bring plenty of mosquito repellant. And a pair of shades wouldn't hurt. Q: How do you feel being involved in history in the making? A: Being here for this mission I realized that maybe I can make a difference. I might not be thrilled to be down here, but knowing that the people at home appreciate us, and that what we're doing here will impact the people of the future, leaves me with a good feeling. Q: Spoken like a true soldier. A: Thanks. Q: What will you remember most about GTMO when you leave? A: The fun I had with the peo ple who helped me get through the most horrible of days. And, to say I was a part of a good cause, once all the stress and frustration of it is behind me. Q: And in closing, you'd like to say...? A: First, I'd like to say keep God first. Live, love, for today because tomorrow is not prom ised. And, finally, a glass of apple juice a day keeps the bull$%#@ away! Catch a ride on the GTMO Queen because it dont GTMO better than that.. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire All bark, no bite: GTMOs sweetest soldier