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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00070
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: September 27, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00070

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The American Dream is something that servicemembers fight to protect and preserve but at a price every servicemember knows freedom is not free. In the end, the price paid by servicemembers around the world seems minimal, because it is what makes America free! Being deployed here, you slowly begin to feel the frustration from the restrictions placed upon your freedom. What shall you wear to work this morning? Hmmmcould it be a camouflage suit? Your superior made what you consider an unfair decision; do you quit? How about telling them off? How about, NO! You will deal with it because youre a Soldier, Airman, Sailor, Marine, or Coast Guardsman. Your job often entails sacrificing your free dom for someone elses. There are those who may protest us being here, some reporters may speak negatively of our mission, and some may never even realize or care about the hard ships we face while being here. But, these are their rights because of you. So before you feel discouraged or lose sight of the honorable and noble cause you defend, take one moment to reflect on all those you help, and all those who would give their lives to live the American Dream. People flee their countries for a multitude of reasons. Some for political and others for personal rea sons, and some flee for their lives, said Lupe O. Beltran, pre screening officer, Immigration and Natural ization Services. Often Cubans attempt to swim to GTMO or cross through minefields. Some make the trek in one piece and some dont. But almost all do it with hopes of a bet ter life. A better life, a chance for happiness, and the opportunity to succeed, all of which is often taken for granted by those who have it at their fingertips. But, people from Cuba, Haiti, and other struggling countries will risk life, limb and all they have for that opportunity. All they are left with is their hope and a chance of landing on or near GTMO. When a refugee or Cuban migrant is inter cepted at sea by the Coast Guard near GTMO or greeted by an observant Marine patrolling the fenceline, they are picked up and brought in. Thats when the detailed interview is con ducted by GTMOs I.N.S. office. My business is human rights and my cus tomers are refugees. I interview all who make it this far, said Beltran. This interview process determines the Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Making the break for freedom Thursday, September 26, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 16 Story by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Refugees leave all behind in search of opportunities for a better life See MIGRANTS, page 3 A look inside... Page 4 P a ge 6 Page 11 Photo John R. Stanmeyer The 378-foot U.S. Coast Guard cutter Hamilton dwarfs a 10-foot sailboat carrying Haitian refugees off the coast of Haiti. Thousands of Haitians fled their homeland in makeshift boats in 1994 as U.S. vessels searched the waters to enforce "Operation Able Manner" July, 1994. Page 12 Thursday, September 26, 2002 Army Pvt. Edward Lang, 571st MP Co. Q: How long have you been in the Army? A: Almost a year now. Q: What made you join? A: Females of course! Q: Has it worked for you? A: Not at all... Q: Has the Army been everything that youve bar gained for? A: Well, besides the fact that Im living in a closet, yeah, its pretty much what I expected. Q: O.K. terriffic. What do you think about this impending hurricane, could it be the end of the world? A: Hard to say. Ive never been in one before. Q: Can you be more wrath ful than a hurricane could? A: Im capable of tearing some stuff up, so maybe. Q: You think you and your unit could form up along the beach and fight off the hurri cane with your weapons when it comes? A: Thats the most ridicu lous question Ive ever been asked. Q: You think your hooch will be any cleaner after the storm hits? A: Maybe, if its still there. Q: What do you think this hurricane will pump out on the Richter scale? A: Probably 80 percent. Q: So youre a pretty squared away soldier? A: You could say that. Havent gotten a negative counseling statement yet. Q: Whats youre best Basic Combat Training memory? A: When we fixed a broken T.V. and used a coat hanger for an antennae. We got to watch basketball games on CBS for the last two weeks. Q: What do you think of guarding the detainees? A: This is history, and Im glad to be a part of it. Q: So you like wak ing up to do your job? A: I like doing my job, but I could do with out the waking up part. Q: You like to do PT? A: Does anybody? Q: I see you smok ing cigarettes, think you could smoke a pack straight and then pass the two-mile run on a PT test? A: Maybe if these cigarettes had filters. Q: What do you like to do for fun? A: Every night me and my roomates throw a party at around 2030 hours...its called a sleeping party. Q: Anything you like to do when youre awake? A: I like to dance. I used to bust moves on the streets of Seattle for pocket change. Q: You must be rich from doing that? A: Actually, one time I had to pay a guy 10 cents just to even watch me. Q: Do you ever bust your moves out at the Windjammer? A: Theyre not ready for me. Theyre not even ready for my best back in the states. Q: Why dont you show us some of those moves right now? A: Sure. How about you take a picture? Q: Will you be dancing out side during the storm when it strikes? A: Probably not. I have not a death wish. Q: Think you could take Satan in a fight? A: All I would need is one good hit to get him down. Q: What is the sickest weapon you could build? A: I learned how to make a shank with a grinder once. Q: You seem to be a funny guy. A: I have no shame. Q: What do you see in your future? A: I think Im going to do that green to gold thing, become an officer. Maybe Ill do some police work in the civilian world. Well see though, as long as this hurri cane doesnt ruin my chances! Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Pvt. Edward Lang, a great addition to the Army. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Spoken like a true private, with no shame Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano As the sun sets, Lang shines bright as he begins to skillfully dance under the pale moonlight.

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Page 2 Thursday, September 26, 2002 JTF-160 Command Commander: Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Army Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Army Master Sgt. Enid Ramos-Mandell Editor-in-Chief: Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Multicultural Day Celebration Sunday, October 27, 2002 1-5 p.m. at Phillips Park Sponsored by Naval Station and Naval Hospital For more information, contact: Cathy Bautista 7-2450 Andrea Petrovanie 7-2033 Army Col. John J. Perrone, Jr. Joint Detainee Operations Group Commander Chaplains Corner Twenty years ago, I drove a cab for a living. When I arrived at 2:30 a.m., the building was dark except for a single light in a ground floor window. Under these circumstances, many drivers would just honk once or twice, wait a minute, then drive away. But I had seen too many impoverished people who depended on taxis as their only means of transportation. Unless a situation smelled of danger, I always went to the door. This passenger might be someone who needs my assistance, I reasoned to myself. So I walked to the door and knocked. Just a minute, answered a frail, elderly voice. I could hear something being dragged across the floor. After a long pause, the door opened. A small woman in her 80s stood before me. She was wearing a print dress and a pillbox hat with a veil pinned on it, like somebody out of a 1940s movie. By her side was a small nylon suitcase. The apartment looked as if no one had lived in it for years. All the furniture was covered with sheets. There were no clocks on the walls, no knickknacks or utensils on the counters. In the corner was a cardboard box filled with photos and glassware. Would you carry my bag out to the car? she said. I took the suitcase to the cab, then returned to assist the woman. She took my arm and we walked slowly toward the curb. She kept thanking me for my kindness. Its nothing, I told her. I just try to treat my passengers the way I would want my mother treated. Oh, youre such a good boy, she said. When we got in the cab, she gave me an address, then asked, Could you drive through downtown? Its not the shortest way, I answered quickly. Oh, I dont mind, she said. Im in no hurry. Im on my way to a hospice. I looked in the rearview mirror. Her eyes were glistening. I dont have any family left, she continued. The doctor says I dont have very long. I qui etly reached over and shut off the meter. What route would you like me to take? I asked. For the next two hours, we drove through the city. She showed me the building where she had once worked as an elevator oper ator. We drove through the neighborhood where she and her husband had lived when they were newlyweds. She had me pull up in front of a furniture warehouse that had once been a ball room where she had gone dancing as a girl. Sometimes shed ask me to slow down in front of a particular building or corner and would sit staring into the darkness, saying nothing. As the first hint of sun was creasing the horizon, she suddenly said, Im tired. Lets go now. We drove in silence to the address she had given me. It was a low building, like a small convalescent home, with a driveway that passed under a portico. Two orderlies came out to the cab as soon as we pulled up. They were solicitous and intent, watching her every move. They must have been expecting her. I opened the trunk and took the small suitcase to the door. The woman was already seated in a wheelchair. How much do I owe you? she asked, reaching into her purse. Nothing, I said. You have to make a living, she answered. There are other passengers, I responded. Almost without thinking, I bent and gave her a hug. She held onto me tightly. You gave an old woman a little moment of joy, she said. Thank you. I squeezed her hand, then walked into the dim morning light. Behind me, a door shut. It was the sound of the closing of a life. I didnt pick up any more passengers that shift. I drove aimlessly, lost in thought. For the rest of that day, I could hardly talk. What if that woman had gotten an angry driver, or one who was impatient to end his shift? What if I had refused to take the run, or had honked once, then driven away? On a quick review, I dont think that I have done anything more important in my life. Were conditioned to think that our lives revolve around great moments. But great moments often catch us unawarebeautifully wrapped in what others may consider a small one. PEOPLE MAY NOT REMEMBER EXACTLY WHAT YOU DID, OR WHAT YOU SAID; BUT, THEY WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL. Anonymous Submitted by Navy Lt. Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, USNR The Cab Ride As the time nears to prepare for redeployment we should take time to pause and reflect on the manner weve discharged our duties. Though duty descriptions differ from person to person and branch to branch, we are all playing a significant role in the Global War on Terrorism. Our mission has certainly not been an easy one but despite the challenges, our commitment remains undaunted. Throughout my daily contacts with both our civil ian and military counterparts, words of praise and thanks are commonplace. But, we must remember to stay focused; avoid becoming complacent. We must maintain the edge until our final day. Our job is not complete until we return to our various home/duty stations and complete the transition process. Leaders should begin the process of identify ing soldiers for recognition and preparing NCOERs and OERs. These are very important documents that have a major impact on a service members career. Soon, other service members will begin arriv ing at GTMO not only to replace JTF 160 but also to activate the new Joint Task Force GTMO. In order for this transition to be effective, we must remain committed to our daily duties. One of our final responsibilities is to teach your replacements what you know and give them the tools they need to have a successful tour as they serve our nation. As the JDOG Commander, its a sincere honor and privilege to serve with such dedicated and committed service members in our nations cause to rid the world of terrorism Page 11 Thursday, September 26, 2002 Upset in the tournament bracket The Hood Ratz, the under dogs, take the opening game of the tournament as the Marine Corps Security Force took an overwhelming defeat at 32-6. Eight Teams fight in a double elimination tournament to see who comes out victorious. The tournament action started with a bang Monday night as mother nature had her hands in the mix. Heavy rainfall trans formed Cooper field from grass and dirt to filthy mud and slop. Players felt they were in a mud bowl. It was very slippery on the field. It was tough running your pass routes. The cleats were no good in the mud, said Spc. William Whittenburg. The first game was an indica tion that anything can happen in a tournament and the first game was a good example. The seventh rank team Hood Ratz were able to upset the second ranked team MCSF Co. Hood Ratz drew first blood in the contest. They scored in the opening drive of the game and lead 6-0. MCSF Co came right back and scored six points of their own. After the scores, the defenses on both teams were not budging until the ending of the first half. With 1:28 remaining on the clock and at their own 18-yard line, the Hood Ratz went to a no huddle offense. Time was running out as the Hood Ratz were marching down the field when Army Sgt. James Stringfellow took the team to the MCSFs 20-yard line, he found an opening in the defense and took advantage as he connected with Whittenburg in the end zone. We were getting our yards by throwing short passes. They were playing off our wide receivers so we were picking them apart by throwing short 5-yard passes, said Stringfellow the Hood Ratz quarterback. It felt good putting my team in the lead, Stringfellow saw me open and threw the pass. I turned around and there was the football. Then I took it to the end zone for a touchdown, said Whittenburg. As the clock was winding down the scoreboard read 13-6. Hood Ratz opened the second half with the football and momen tum. Our defense and offense were both putting points on the board in this game, said Stringfellow. Hood Ratz were clinking on all cylinders. The game became a stalemate until MCSF Cos quar terback threw an interception that sealed the game for the Hood Ratz. The plan was to contain the MCSF Co.s QB and stay in front. I told the team I would do the rest. When he threw the ball, he didnt see me in zone coverage. I was able to pick off the ball and score a touchdown, said Army Sgt. David Ingram. This win puts them one step closer to the championship game Saturday night. I knew MCSF Co. was not ready for the Hood Ratz, said Wilikins. We still have Hospital and NAVSTA to take care of in the tournament. Lock your doors, no one is safe no more. The Hood Ratz are in town, said Wilkins. Stories and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Hood Ratz Spc Wascar Vizcaino and Army Pfc. Jamaal Wilkins work the wish bone offense to perfection in the win over Marine Corps Security Force Co. The 346th Military Police Company won the JTF-160 Commanders Cup out right with 2830 total points on Saturday. They won hands down. The second place team was 1000 points behind the 346th MP Co., which dominated the cup from when it started August 7 until it ended 21 September. The teams had to compete in an elevenevent tournament. The events were Eightball, Spades, Bowling, 5K Run, Table Tennis, Horseshoes, Volleyball, Chess, 7 on 7 Paint ball, Darts and the final event, Swimming. There were individual and team events. Each event was crucial to each team. The teams goals were to accumulate the most points possible in each event. The Commanders Cup was a team effort. We had the maximum people allowed in each event. I made sure we were able to score max imum points for our team, said Spc. Eric L. Blewett who is the teams captain. Each event had a minimum and a maxi mum amount of participants allowed. The 346th MP Co. used the rules to their advantage in the tournament. It felt great to win the Commanders Cup for the 346th MP Co. We just wanted to show that we could win this tournament. It felt great representing our home state of Kansas and win it all, said Blewett. It was no easy task for the 346th MP Co. to come out on top of the Commanders Cup standings and bring the prize home to Kansas. There was great competition in the Com manders Cup. We finished in first place in Darts, Horseshoes, and the Spades tournament we took control of the Commanders Cup after the Spades event (August 25). We took the lead and never looked back, said Blewett. Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus presents the first place trophy to Spc. Eric L. Blewett and members of the 346th Military Police Company for winning the Commanders Cup at the award ceremony Saturday. 346th MP Co. takes the Commanders Cup home

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migrants reasons for fleeing their homeland and whether that reason is meritorious enough to grant them protection in the form of nonrefoulment. In other words, not returning them to the country where they fear persecution, and by resettling them in a third country. I take my job very seriously; it can mean the difference between life and death to the people who come through my door, Beltran said. If they have a valid reason for fleeing, such as persecution, they will receive protec tion and will be resettled. Various factors such as language spoken, cultural background, rel atives in a particular third country, etc. deter mine which country the migrant will be placed in, although I am not involved with that phase of the process. The Department of State and the receiving country are the principal entities in the resettlement process, but are also assisted by various other organizations such as the International Organization for Migration, and the Red Cross. The voyage of migrants and refugees to GTMO has slowed down considerably since the early and mid 90s, when GTMO was home to approximately 21,000 Haitian refugees and 34,000 Cuban migrants. Those were the highest numbers during Operation Sea Signal. But, that doesnt mean that migrants and refugees dont attempt the dan gerous trip to GTMO on a daily basis. Speaking with these people, I understand why they want to come here, said Beltran. They seek freedom to choose their govern ment, job, and religion. They seek the Ameri can dream. They are in pursuit of happiness and democracy. Simple things to us, but mere dreams to them. The majority of refugees or migrants that make it to GTMO are Haitian and Cuban. Per haps this is due to close proximity of their homelands to the island. But why do these people flee their homes and countries with the possibility of losing it all? I understand that even though my parents were killed, my application for asylum may be denied. Then I would have to go back to Haiti...,said Louciana Miclisse, nine-year-old Haitian refugee, in an article entitled the Last in Line by Lilia Fernandez. Haiti is the third poorest country in the world. Crime is rampant and the streets are congested with people, cars, and trash. In Cuba, people are subject to blackouts on a daily basis, often for hours at a time. Water is available once a week for about six hours, and that is only at a trickle. Thus, hygiene is not nearly up to the standards Americans are used to. The average person living in Cuba can afford to buy a pair of shoes once every four to five years, and a one-month supply of food per person consists of what many Americans can consume in one day. Their monthly ration card provides them with a five-lb. bag of sugar, five-lb. bag of rice, one-lb. bag of beans, 1/4 lb. bag of pasta, six eggs, six ounces of soy and beef mix, and six ounces of sausage. Additionally, the regime presiding over the country has the power to detain anyone it feels is attempting to make changes that may threaten its authority. If the Cuban authorities feel that someone is attempting to make a change in the govern ment, they can detain them, harass them, and blacklist them from getting a job. And with no job, or option of free enterprise, that only leads them to crime, which will only land them back in jail, Beltran said. And the vicious cycle continues, leaving its people hopeless and filled with despair. Being stationed on GTMO during the Global War on Terrorism, holding ground of so many war combatants, and home of the controversy surrounding them and their human rights, one may wonder, what about the human rights of so many others with so much less? The detainees being held here receive three meals a day. They are free to pray to whom ever they choose. They receive good medical care. And what about the Cuban migrants? Back in Cuba, their own country, they arent treated half as well, and if they are jailed, they receive one bad meal a day, they dont receive medical attention, they dont have a controlled temperature environment, nor the most minimal hygiene facilities, not to mention the torture many of them endure said Beltran. Amidst all of the stress a servicemember endures and overcomes while being deployed anywhere around the world, it is to be known that what they protect and defend is a treas ured asset that many have died for, both ser vicemember and common man, all pursuing the same dream freedom! The price of freedom is not cheap but is certainly worth all the money in the world. Page 3 Thursday, September 26, 2002 MIGRANTS, from page 1 DoD photo by Cpl. Adrian Olguin, U.S. Marine Corps. Cuban migrants wait on a bus prior to boarding a plane which will take them from Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to Homestead Air Force Base, Fla., on Jan. 31, 1996. The Cubans are the last to leave the migrant processing center at Guantanamo Bay. Joint Task Force 160 was originally established on May 18, 1994, to provide humanitarian assistance to Haitians escaping political strife. A wave of Cuban migrants fol lowed in August of 1994. All Haitians and Cubans recovered at sea were transported to Guantanamo Bay. At its height in early October 1994, the tent city at Guantanamo Bay sheltered more than 46,000 Haitian and Cuban migrants. Photo Courtesy of Church Renewal International The crowded streets of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, October 2001. This downtown photo displays the typical hustle and bustle of people of this impoverished country as they flock to the marketplace to buy and sell goods. DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, September 27 8 p.m. Stuart Little 2, PG13 70 min 10 p.m. Eight Legged Freaks, PG13 99 min Saturday, September 28 8 p.m. Crocodile Hunter, PG 89 min 10 p.m. Men In Black II, PG13 91 min Sunday, September 29 8 p.m. Blood Work, R 111 min Monday, September 30 8 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG13 91 min Tuesday, October 1 8 p.m. Eight Legged Freaks, PG13 99 min Wednesday, October 2 8 p.m. K-19: The Widow Maker, PG13 140 min Thursday, October 3 8 p.m. Blood Work, R 111 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, September 27 8 p.m. American Outlaws, PG13 95 min 10 p.m. Dont Say A Word, R 110 min Saturday, September 28 8 p.m. Twister, PG13 96 min 10 p.m. We Were Soldiers, R 138 min Sunday, September 29 8, 10 p.m. The Hurricane, R 146 min Monday, September 30 8 p.m. Valentine, R 97 min Tuesday, October 1 8 p.m. Driven, PG13 118 min Wednesday, October 2 8 p.m. Die Hard, R 131 min Thursday, October 3 8, 10 p.m. Double Take, PG13 88 min September 20th Crossword Puzzle Answers Horoscopes: Week of September 30 October 6 Mar. 21 Apr. 19 Dont stifle your feelings on Monday, or theyll leak out some other way. You should feel more cen tered on Tuesday and Wednesday, and be able to speak your truth, take an active role in the situation and artic ulate yourself with a bold and fiery style. Whatever you become involved in seems to be exciting, playful and daring. Listen carefully to your body on Thursday and Friday, and dont ignore any warning signals, if a trip to sick call is needed then go! Its tempting to avoid your responsibilities, but that will only get you a counseling statement. Give over the weekend, and give selflessly. Jul. 23 Aug. 22 On Monday, you'll be in deep thought. You'll want to take action based upon your feelings and intuition, and you'll reject logical reasoning or practicality. Your heart is open wide on Tuesday and Wednesday, and you exude confidence and warmth. You are happiest when supplying support, advice and encouragement to others. You are more thrifty than usual on Thursday and Friday, so go ahead and splurge at the commissary or NEX. And since you don't like to talk about money problems, you prefer being alone, at least until you've figured out how to fix the situation. Nov. 22 Dec. 21 You may be rethinking a particular relationship on Monday, and have serious questions about whether you want to pursue it. Take some time and space to sort out your feelings. You should feel cheerful, ebullient and vivacious by Tuesday or Wednesday, the perfect time to do some PT. Housemates may get on your nerves with very little provocation on Thursday or Fri day. You aren't exactly at your best. Don't rush forward with the hope of bypassing the boring details. You should enjoy yourself over the weekend. Good con nections are made, and a good time is had by all. Apr. 20 May 20 Open all channels of communication on Monday, and be hospitable. Dine with friends and become a part of the discussion. Even though you prefer to melt into the furniture, force yourself to contribute. You can dis tinguish yourself on Tuesday and Wednesday by show ing your strengths at work, but don't be arrogant. You're most impressive when you let your talents and attrib utes speak for themselves. An amorous mood on Thursday and Friday brings out your affections. Spend time on self-improvement over the weekend. P.T., eat right, rest and relax. Aug. 23 Sep. 22 You are persuasive on Monday, and manage to get people to attend some mandatory fun function, or sup port some cause. You may be overwhelmed by being over tasked by your command Tuesday and Wednes day, but for the most part, it's all your own doing. The stars advise you to be flexible and do the best you can under the circumstances. You'll be amazed at what you're able to accomplish on Thursday and Friday. As the weekend approaches, you should watch out for impulsive buying. Steer yourself away from the NEX, Tiki Bar, and Windjammer. Dec. 22 Jan. 19 You could delegate until the cows come home on Monday, and that wouldn't be the worst thing in the world. Watch yourself when sharing your household products with housemates on Wednesday. At this time, people often overstep their bounds and make unrea sonable demands. You can be diplomatic without being two-faced. Thursday, Look at the details, devote some time to research and be conscientious. Check your email with vigilance; someone long-distance may have the perfect solution to your woes. Take a break from work over the weekend. You deserve to rest and relax! May 21 Jun. 21 You are apt to be tight with money on Monday and moody if you're unable to purchase something you've had your heart set on. Put things into perspec tive do you really need another GTMO outfit? When you're feeling more lighthearted on Tuesday or Wednesday, try to surround yourself with people famil iar, maybe someone from your unit. They are sure to keep your mood upbeat. You are full of advice on Thursday and Friday, but nobody seems to want it. You are happy to start new projects over the weekend, but your energy may wax and wane. Sep. 23 Oct. 22 Trying to get straight answers out of people in your chain of command may be impossible; nobody wants to hurt anyone's feelings. Awaken your creativity on Tuesday and Wednesday, and engage in activities where you can take a leadership role. People look up to you when you know what you're talking about. Your conscience gets the better of you on Thursday or Fri day. By the weekend, you should be feeling free and very much alive. Your appreciation of beauty allows you to see things that make everyday, ordinary things appear exquisite. Jan. 20 Feb. 18 Health issues may take precedence over every thing else as the week begins. It may be extremely frus trating to have to cancel plans, and be on profile but your body is trying to tell you something. You're open to experimenting with alternative forms of healing on Tuesday and Wednesday. You could be responsive to new and profound ideas and make sudden changes in your eating, exercise and work habits. Be especially careful when dealing with others in business matters on Thursday or Friday. You continue to be open to new ideas and new experiences over the weekend. Jun. 22 Jul. 22 You prefer staying home and taking care of house hold duties on Monday, a GI party may be just what the doctor ordered. You may feel like tackling a really big job, like buffing the floors. Tuesday and Wednesday brings out your poise and charisma, and even a little bit of flamboyance. However, you may regret being extravagant if you impulsively spend large amounts of money at the NEX. Your practical side reemerges on Thursday and Friday. It may be difficult to make deci sions over the weekend. Try to be flexible when deal ing with housemates on Sunday. Oct. 23 Nov. 21 Your innate intuitive abilities to break down boundaries and encourage troops around you to moti vate themselves to do an outstanding job on Monday. Go with the flow, and you'll get what you want. A cri sis on the job on Tuesday or Wednesday could prompt you to act erratic. Don't push your luck and get out of control. Be sympathetic to a friend in need on Thurs day or Friday. Confronted with a difficult decision over the weekend, your best bet would be to toss ideas back and forth and think through all the pros and cons care fully. Don't be stubborn., do the right thing. Feb. 19 Mar. 20 The mystery of life intrigues you more than ever on Monday. Provide yourself with opportunities for creative expression; a trip to the ceramics shop, enter tain others with your music, poetry or laughter. Be a lit tle self-protective on Tuesday or Wednesday. You have a tendency to blindly help those in need without realiz ing what you're getting yourself into. You may have strong opinions on Thursday and Friday. Restrain your self, remember, you are a professional. Over the week end think about your needs seriously, assess your future goals and act with good conscience. *for entertainment purposes only Page 10 Thursday, September 26, 2002

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Page 4 Thursday, September 26, 2002 Facing the unknown, and not knowing whats to come is the Army way, said Army Capt. Jason C. Beaty, the commander of the 2/142 Infantry Company. I think some of our troops were surprised when they found out we were coming here. When we were activated, our initial impression was homeland defense in participation of Operation Noble Eagle. Now a part of Operation Enduring Free dom, the infantrymen of the 2/142 Infantry Company, guardsmen from Texas, are here to provide security within Camp Delta and the surrounding perimeter. Weve been activated since May, said 1st Sgt. Richard Rodriguez Jr. We mobilized at Fort Hood, Texas where we went through some new, updated training to get us well pre pared for this mission. We got more than we were bargaining for, said Spc. Jason A. Cruz. We thought we were going to be defending the states, then we ended up here in Cuba. A lot of jaws dropped when we found out our mission was going to be here at GTMO, said Sgt. Jose Vasquez. I think we came in thinking things were going to be worse than they were. We got the routine down fast and mellowed out all the initial craziness. Once settled in, the infantrymen quickly took charge of a myriad of responsibilities all meant to provide the utmost security for Camp Delta. We are responsible for manning the tow ers in Camp Delta, securing the check points and performing mounted and un-mounted patrols twenty four hours a day, seven days a week on this mission here, said Rodriguez. We have to secure the perimeter and always be sure of whats coming in or going out. We also supply assistance to the military police inside of the wire. Members within the unit, rotate throughout the different duties after working three days on a single task. Mounted patrols, which are performed in Humvees, cover a wide area of the outer perimeters roads and trails. While out on mounted patrols, were the Mavericks, said Sgt. Jose Vasquez. It beats working the checkpoints where we bake out in the sun. The un-mounted patrols are performed on foot, covering the hard-to-reach places that cannot be accessed by vehicles. Sometimes it gets tough working through the different conditions, said Cruz. But its all worth it because Im proud to wear this uniform. And ensuring that those who enter the area have proper identification is a requirement at all of the different check points that these sol diers must keep up on. Its a tough job keeping accountabil ity of everyone passing through the different points, said Rodriguez. But everyone has to play according to the rules. Perhaps the hardest job is that of guarding Camp Delta up in the numerous towers. In the towers, its hot, but we deal with it because were infantry, said Spc. Michael Ramirez. We have to keep a vital eye on whats going on inside the wire, but at the same time, were also watching the outside. We have to make sure no one is leaving with any souvenirs. Were always watching the detainees very closely, said Ramirez. They might look and act timid now, but later on, theyd try to bite you if they could. Even after only three days of the same assigned task, after a period of time, the job still seems to get extremely repetitive. Its hard not to become complacent per forming the same tasks over and over again, said Beaty. But even being overworked and understaffed, these troops are doing a great Story by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire 2/142 Infantry Company leads Spc. Robert Lara Jr. skillfully performs an identification check on all individuals try ing to gain entrance to Camp America. Spc. Guadalupe Bravo, an all-American soldier with the 2/142 Infantry Company, holds a firm grip on his 50caliber machine gun while scanning his surroundings with his eagle eyes while partaking in a mounted patrol. High atop a hill, Spc. James E. Rawls scans over the sea for any suspicious air or water vessels. Tae Kwon Do helps keep GTMO servicembers in good shape MWR is offering sailing classes and monthly meetings for anyone interested in Mate A/Skip per B (Centerboard) Qualifications on the Hunters and Zumas. All together it will consist of six session classes. Three sessions will be held in the classroom and three sessions will be held on the water. Any questions concerning these sailing classes, please contact Capt. Gormly at #5249 or Maj. Buchanan at #5255. Daily free daytime & evening lessons for sailing, kayaking, and motor boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Advanced step aerobics classes, Denich Gym, Mon day, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae Kwon Do classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 spinning classes, Denich Gym. Monday-Fri day, 6:30PM-7:30PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM6:15PM, Tuesday & Thursday. Flag Football leagues, Monday-Friday, 6 PM, Cooper Field. 75 bowling, Marblehead Lanes, Monday-Friday 1PM-4PM. Today, Friday, Sept. 27th 6AM-6PM, Open swim, Marine Hill Pool. 6AM-8AM, 10AM-6PM, Open swim, Windjammer Pool. 11AM-7PM, Open swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:30PM-12AM Night fishing trip, Pelican's Pete's Marina. Saturday, Sept. 28th 6AM-8AM, 10AM-6PM Open swim, Windjammer Pool. 6AM-6PM, Open swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10AM-6PM Open swim, Deer Point Pool. 6AM MWR 50 Mile bike race; the Bike Shak near the Paintball Range is the starting point. 7PM 9-Pin No-Tap, Marblehead Lanes. Sunday, Sept. 29th 6AM-8AM, 10AM-6PM, Open swim, Windjammer Pool. 6AM-6PM, Open swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10AM-6PM Open swim, Deer Point Pool. Monday, Sept. 30th 6AM-6PM, Open swim, Marine Hill Pool. 6AM-8AM, 10AM-6PM, Open swim, Windjammer Pool. 11AM-7PM, Open swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, October 1st 6AM-6PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10AM-8PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11AM-7PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1PM-7PM, Climbing classes, Rappel Tower Wednesday, October 2nd 6AM-6PM, Open swim, Marine Hill Pool. 6AM-8AM, 10AM-6PM, Open swim, Windjammer Pool. 11AM-7PM, Open swim, Deer Point Pool. 1PM-7PM, Climbing classes, Rappel Tower Thursday, October 3rd 6AM-6PM, Open swim, Marine Hill Pool. 6AM-8AM, 10AM-6PM, Open swim, Windjammer Pool. 11AM-7PM, Open swim, Deer Point Pool. 7PM Monopoly Night, CBQ. Many of the servicemembers who come to GTMO have pledged to get the best out of this deployment while serving Opera tion Enduring Freedom at Guan tanamo Bay, Cuba. They have worked different shifts to support Joint Task Force 160. But during their free time, they have decided to learn something new or take on a physical activity that can help them improve their physique while they are here. The discipline that Tae Kwon Do teaches has attracted many of them. Spc. Rhonda Reed, from the 342nd Military Police Company, muscled through her first Tae Kwon Do class Monday. I decided to take Tae Kwon Do because I heard its a good workout, she said. Today is my first lesson. I wanted to get a feel of what its all about. I guess Im going to be fine because I was able to keep up with the other students. Reed said she was recommended by Army Sgt. Joel OBradovic, who is from her company. I recommended this class to Spc. Reed because of the bene fits I got out of it, said OBradovic. I think Tae Kwon Do combined with the other P.T. that Ive done with my com pany has helped me maintained my over all physical fitness, he said. On my last P.T. test, I improved by 30 points. I was able to add to my push-up repetitions, max out my sit-ups and dropped my run time by two minutes, added OBradovic. This is a good program. I rec ommend it to both males and females, he said as he regained his composure from the first part of his workout. The Tae Kwon Do class meets Monday through Friday at 7p.m. at the Marine Hill Aerobics Room. This Monday, the classes were led by Matthew Brittle Jr., a firstdegree black belt. Brittle started the class with some stretches, crunches, pushups and body builders before the heavy kicks. All of the students seemed to have enjoyed the workout. Anybody is welcome to attend Tae Kwon Do classes. Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire The Hispanic Heritage Dinner Dance Please join us in a celebration of Hispanic heritage on Saturday, September 28th from 6 p.m. until midnight at the Windjammer. The program will consist of a dinner buffet and cultural performances reflecting this years theme of Hispanic Americans: Strength in Unity, Faith, and Diversity. Tickets are now on sale for the dinner program. $12 for adults and $6 for children. For more information, please call SKC Marcia Cunningham at x72035 Right: Army Sgt. Joel OBradovic, from the 342nd Military Police Company, performs a high-stretched kick at the same time as his opponent at the Tae Kwon Do class held Monday at the Marine Hill Aerobics room. Spc. Rhonda Reed, a soldier from the 342nd MP Company, fully extends her leg for a high-level kick. Page 9 Thursday, September 26, 2002

PAGE 5

job. Despite any shortcomings in numbers, these infantrymen make up the difference with their intense training, which allows them to know their jobs like professionals. Our training at Fort Hood was very intense, said Staff Sgt. James Vasquez. It got us up to par. We knew what to expect when we got here, and we were ready. Being infantrymen, we were trained this way, so there are no complaints. The training at Fort Hood specified in areas such as riot control and cell extractions, said Rodriguez. Now here at GTMO, every one in the 2/142 will go through Non-Lethal Munitions training, so theyll be better off dur ing any riot-type situations. Were packing ammo in our weapons, so we all must be quali fied, said Rodriguez. Our weapons training includes but is not limited to 50 caliber, shotgun, M-16, 9 millimeter and sniper training. With the weapons were stacking, we can really reach out and touch someone. These highly motivated soldiers have definitely touched success as well, for they always get the job done right from the start. We were completely ready to take over after the second day we were here, said Staff Sgt. Vasquez. And by now, were ready enough to hand it over and go back to our home station. The 2/142 is a collaboration of different companies, said Rodriguez. We have troops from North, South and Central Texas all work ing together here. Its been an interesting experience coming together with the other companies and form ing one unit, said Spc. Robert Lara Jr., because everyone had their own opinion. We all came together to form one family. Out on a mission like this, all you need is a good atti tude to stay alive. We are the one and only unit here per forming this mission, said Rodriguez. In regard to Camp Delta, we are the first line of defense. The mission requirements for the troops here are demanding day in and day out, said Beaty. We ask a lot from them, and they give us a lot in return. Day after day, morale must fight to win. Sometimes the conditions get tough, said Staff Sgt. Vasquez. Morale goes up and down, but the mis sion can not and does not get effected by that. You have to be out there with the troops to get a feel for things and see how things are, said Rodriguez. Its very important to show support to the troops. Our command ing general and bat talion commander came here to GTMO to show us support, said Cruz. They were here to boost our morale and help us get through the rest of our stay. It gets tough being so far away from home, said Lara. But calling home and talk ing to the family helps to keep morale up. I cant wait to get back to Texas, where the land doesnt end, said Sgt. Vasquez. Its the soldiers who are out there, doing the work day after day, said Beaty. Its com mon for morale to go up and down, but I think were in good shape. No matter what, these noble infantrymen proudly serve their country, and Beaty could nt be more pleased with their performance. We have great troops doing an outstanding job, he said. I couldnt ask for any more. Capt. Jason C. Beaty, commander of the 2/142 Infantry Company (r), and com pany 1st Sgt. Richard Rodrigues Jr., want GTMO followers to know who was here. Page 5 Thursday, September 26, 2002 the way securing Camp Delta Spc. Joe Garcia uses all of his concentration to maintain his 50-calibers ammuni tion while securing a stationary, low-profile and elevated fighting position. Spc. Luis D. Salazar radios back to his command to release his latest, expertly gathered information. Spc. Jason A. Cruz creeps through some brush while performing a foot patrol through the backland. Page 8 Thursday, September 26, 2002 For the past two years, service members and civilians, married or single, assigned to GTMO have been finding comfort in a special place, where they enjoy good conversation and free cof fee. This place, which has different meanings for its various patrons, is known as the Iguana Crossing Coffee House. Located at Chapel Hill, next to to the base chapel, the Iguana Crossing has a picture of an iguana crossing sign boldly dis played on the entrance inviting people passing by to come in. Its a place for people to get away in a non-alcoholic environ ment, said Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, the base Protestant chap lain. Everything is free. We have cappuccino, decaf coffee, milk, cream, liquid chocolate, baked goods and snack items. Its a real coffee bar. Leave your rank at the door, she said. The Iguana Crossing is more of a place for socializing, talking and playing games. For some of the patrons, the coffee house is a quiet place to go and meet new people, said Navy Seaman Apprentice Harry Stall ter, who works with base security. Navy Chief Petty Officer Zoe Picard, who works at the J-3 sec tion of JTF-160 Headquarters, said that the Iguana Crossing is not just a place to drink coffee. It has a deeper meaning. For me, its a way to meet the diverse com munity serving at GTMO, she said. Her associa tion with the Iguana Crossing allowed her to meet the MPs serving at Camp Delta, she said. Ive also met DOD teachers, other instructors, FBI agents who work here, civil ians and high school stu dents. Like Picard, Stallter cant help talking about his unfor gettable experi ences by coming to this place. By coming here, Ive met with college professors and many important people whom Ive got good advice from. As a young seaman, Ive learned a lot, espe cially from Chief Picard, who is a senior enlisted, said Stallter. We got people of all ages middle-aged like me and young people like Harry, said Picard. The Iguana Crossing is manned only by volunteers. It was established in November 2000. To keep this place going, we need volunteers, said Bush. People can bring things and sign their name on a clipboard to vol unteer. Many servicemembers have already volunteered to serve at the coffee bar of the Iguana Crossing. Last Saturday, the shift was manned by Army Maj. Michael S. Merrill, the Protes tant chaplain at Camp America and Army Sgt. 1st Class Digna Rosario, both from the 160th Military Police Battalion, now attached to JTF-160. Ive volun teered a dozen times. I see it as a way to give back to the community, said Picard. When I volun teer, I ask the people who come in: How was your day at work? and What can I do for you? as to make them feel more comfort able. I try to make a conscien tious effort to provide customer service, proudly said Picard. Stallter added, During my shift, if someone new comes in, Ill cut off my conversation, turn to him and say: hey, how are you doing? The Iguana Crossing is not only for religious people. I am not a religious person, said Picard. But I come here and I volunteer. Believers and non-believers are welcome, said Bush. Come and check it out. So far, we have a fairly con sistent response from the people who rotate with JTF-160. But, we always need volunteers, said Bush. The chaplain said she is in the process of finding a coordinator for special events to help make the place more interesting and enjoyable. Such events might include poetry reading or a soiree with a musician or a talent. If you want to volunteer for the Iguana Crossing, call Chaplain Bush at x2323. The Iguana Crossing Coffee House is open Monday, Wednes day, Friday and Saturday from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Army Maj. Michael S. Merrill, chaplain of Camp America Protestant service, gently pours some coffee in a cup for Army Sgt. 1st Class Digna Rosario Saturday night. They are both from 160th MPBN. Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Iguana Crossing Coffee House, special hideout for socializing at GTMO Left, Valerie Jones and Earlene Helms helping out at the Iguana Crossing Coffee House after the Protestant service Sunday. The place was filled with adults and kids enjoying the house specialties. Chaplain Sharon Bush pointing to the clipboard for volunteers to sign on.

PAGE 6

As the winds of Tropical Storm Lili move toward GTMO, Camp America soldiers move toward Wind ward Loop and East Caravella. Thats right: yesterday morning the Loop and Caravella were busy! Troops from Camp America packed up their belongings, moved out, and moved in. They unloaded deuce-anda-halves, carrying rucksacks, cots, and water. The troops were fully pre pared for whatever power Lilis punch will pack on GTMO. Lili is expected to hit ground today at 3 p.m. She brings with her winds that at times may gust up to 90 miles per hour. But GTMO is ready! The duration of their stay in their new homes all depends of the inten sity and duration of Lili. So until she blows on by, the SEAhuts at Camp America will be barren, and those liv ing at the Loop and Caravella will have a little more company. Page 6 Page 7 Thursday, September 26, 2002 Army Sgt. Michael M. Cox, 342nd MP Co. walks through Windward Loop with his cot to his hurricane proof home. Spc. David Moore, 114th MP Company, lends a hand or a forklift to help out. He unloaded cots off a deuce-and-a-half for his fellow troops to use during their stay. Lili brings em in from the field A soldier from the 2/142nd infantry Co. seems to have packed it all! Troops from the 2/142nd infantry Co. came prepared, unloading coolers of water, and sleeping bags for the hurricane. Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire And the deuce-and-a-halves keep on rolling in! Troops from Camp America were transported to their temporary hurricane-proof housing at Windward Loop and East Caravella. Army Staff Sgt. Janet Harnack, 346th MP Company, discusses the new living arrangements of Camp America soldiers with Navy Petty Officer Andy Trinh, Naval station housing.

PAGE 7

As the winds of Tropical Storm Lili move toward GTMO, Camp America soldiers move toward Wind ward Loop and East Caravella. Thats right: yesterday morning the Loop and Caravella were busy! Troops from Camp America packed up their belongings, moved out, and moved in. They unloaded deuce-anda-halves, carrying rucksacks, cots, and water. The troops were fully pre pared for whatever power Lilis punch will pack on GTMO. Lili is expected to hit ground today at 3 p.m. She brings with her winds that at times may gust up to 90 miles per hour. But GTMO is ready! The duration of their stay in their new homes all depends of the inten sity and duration of Lili. So until she blows on by, the SEAhuts at Camp America will be barren, and those liv ing at the Loop and Caravella will have a little more company. Page 6 Page 7 Thursday, September 26, 2002 Army Sgt. Michael M. Cox, 342nd MP Co. walks through Windward Loop with his cot to his hurricane proof home. Spc. David Moore, 114th MP Company, lends a hand or a forklift to help out. He unloaded cots off a deuce-and-a-half for his fellow troops to use during their stay. Lili brings em in from the field A soldier from the 2/142nd infantry Co. seems to have packed it all! Troops from the 2/142nd infantry Co. came prepared, unloading coolers of water, and sleeping bags for the hurricane. Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire And the deuce-and-a-halves keep on rolling in! Troops from Camp America were transported to their temporary hurricane-proof housing at Windward Loop and East Caravella. Army Staff Sgt. Janet Harnack, 346th MP Company, discusses the new living arrangements of Camp America soldiers with Navy Petty Officer Andy Trinh, Naval station housing.

PAGE 8

job. Despite any shortcomings in numbers, these infantrymen make up the difference with their intense training, which allows them to know their jobs like professionals. Our training at Fort Hood was very intense, said Staff Sgt. James Vasquez. It got us up to par. We knew what to expect when we got here, and we were ready. Being infantrymen, we were trained this way, so there are no complaints. The training at Fort Hood specified in areas such as riot control and cell extractions, said Rodriguez. Now here at GTMO, every one in the 2/142 will go through Non-Lethal Munitions training, so theyll be better off dur ing any riot-type situations. Were packing ammo in our weapons, so we all must be quali fied, said Rodriguez. Our weapons training includes but is not limited to 50 caliber, shotgun, M-16, 9 millimeter and sniper training. With the weapons were stacking, we can really reach out and touch someone. These highly motivated soldiers have definitely touched success as well, for they always get the job done right from the start. We were completely ready to take over after the second day we were here, said Staff Sgt. Vasquez. And by now, were ready enough to hand it over and go back to our home station. The 2/142 is a collaboration of different companies, said Rodriguez. We have troops from North, South and Central Texas all work ing together here. Its been an interesting experience coming together with the other companies and form ing one unit, said Spc. Robert Lara Jr., because everyone had their own opinion. We all came together to form one family. Out on a mission like this, all you need is a good atti tude to stay alive. We are the one and only unit here per forming this mission, said Rodriguez. In regard to Camp Delta, we are the first line of defense. The mission requirements for the troops here are demanding day in and day out, said Beaty. We ask a lot from them, and they give us a lot in return. Day after day, morale must fight to win. Sometimes the conditions get tough, said Staff Sgt. Vasquez. Morale goes up and down, but the mis sion can not and does not get effected by that. You have to be out there with the troops to get a feel for things and see how things are, said Rodriguez. Its very important to show support to the troops. Our command ing general and bat talion commander came here to GTMO to show us support, said Cruz. They were here to boost our morale and help us get through the rest of our stay. It gets tough being so far away from home, said Lara. But calling home and talk ing to the family helps to keep morale up. I cant wait to get back to Texas, where the land doesnt end, said Sgt. Vasquez. Its the soldiers who are out there, doing the work day after day, said Beaty. Its com mon for morale to go up and down, but I think were in good shape. No matter what, these noble infantrymen proudly serve their country, and Beaty could nt be more pleased with their performance. We have great troops doing an outstanding job, he said. I couldnt ask for any more. Capt. Jason C. Beaty, commander of the 2/142 Infantry Company (r), and com pany 1st Sgt. Richard Rodrigues Jr., want GTMO followers to know who was here. Page 5 Thursday, September 26, 2002 the way securing Camp Delta Spc. Joe Garcia uses all of his concentration to maintain his 50-calibers ammuni tion while securing a stationary, low-profile and elevated fighting position. Spc. Luis D. Salazar radios back to his command to release his latest, expertly gathered information. Spc. Jason A. Cruz creeps through some brush while performing a foot patrol through the backland. Page 8 Thursday, September 26, 2002 For the past two years, service members and civilians, married or single, assigned to GTMO have been finding comfort in a special place, where they enjoy good conversation and free cof fee. This place, which has different meanings for its various patrons, is known as the Iguana Crossing Coffee House. Located at Chapel Hill, next to to the base chapel, the Iguana Crossing has a picture of an iguana crossing sign boldly dis played on the entrance inviting people passing by to come in. Its a place for people to get away in a non-alcoholic environ ment, said Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, the base Protestant chap lain. Everything is free. We have cappuccino, decaf coffee, milk, cream, liquid chocolate, baked goods and snack items. Its a real coffee bar. Leave your rank at the door, she said. The Iguana Crossing is more of a place for socializing, talking and playing games. For some of the patrons, the coffee house is a quiet place to go and meet new people, said Navy Seaman Apprentice Harry Stall ter, who works with base security. Navy Chief Petty Officer Zoe Picard, who works at the J-3 sec tion of JTF-160 Headquarters, said that the Iguana Crossing is not just a place to drink coffee. It has a deeper meaning. For me, its a way to meet the diverse com munity serving at GTMO, she said. Her associa tion with the Iguana Crossing allowed her to meet the MPs serving at Camp Delta, she said. Ive also met DOD teachers, other instructors, FBI agents who work here, civil ians and high school stu dents. Like Picard, Stallter cant help talking about his unfor gettable experi ences by coming to this place. By coming here, Ive met with college professors and many important people whom Ive got good advice from. As a young seaman, Ive learned a lot, espe cially from Chief Picard, who is a senior enlisted, said Stallter. We got people of all ages middle-aged like me and young people like Harry, said Picard. The Iguana Crossing is manned only by volunteers. It was established in November 2000. To keep this place going, we need volunteers, said Bush. People can bring things and sign their name on a clipboard to vol unteer. Many servicemembers have already volunteered to serve at the coffee bar of the Iguana Crossing. Last Saturday, the shift was manned by Army Maj. Michael S. Merrill, the Protes tant chaplain at Camp America and Army Sgt. 1st Class Digna Rosario, both from the 160th Military Police Battalion, now attached to JTF-160. Ive volun teered a dozen times. I see it as a way to give back to the community, said Picard. When I volun teer, I ask the people who come in: How was your day at work? and What can I do for you? as to make them feel more comfort able. I try to make a conscien tious effort to provide customer service, proudly said Picard. Stallter added, During my shift, if someone new comes in, Ill cut off my conversation, turn to him and say: hey, how are you doing? The Iguana Crossing is not only for religious people. I am not a religious person, said Picard. But I come here and I volunteer. Believers and non-believers are welcome, said Bush. Come and check it out. So far, we have a fairly con sistent response from the people who rotate with JTF-160. But, we always need volunteers, said Bush. The chaplain said she is in the process of finding a coordinator for special events to help make the place more interesting and enjoyable. Such events might include poetry reading or a soiree with a musician or a talent. If you want to volunteer for the Iguana Crossing, call Chaplain Bush at x2323. The Iguana Crossing Coffee House is open Monday, Wednes day, Friday and Saturday from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Army Maj. Michael S. Merrill, chaplain of Camp America Protestant service, gently pours some coffee in a cup for Army Sgt. 1st Class Digna Rosario Saturday night. They are both from 160th MPBN. Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Iguana Crossing Coffee House, special hideout for socializing at GTMO Left, Valerie Jones and Earlene Helms helping out at the Iguana Crossing Coffee House after the Protestant service Sunday. The place was filled with adults and kids enjoying the house specialties. Chaplain Sharon Bush pointing to the clipboard for volunteers to sign on.

PAGE 9

Page 4 Thursday, September 26, 2002 Facing the unknown, and not knowing whats to come is the Army way, said Army Capt. Jason C. Beaty, the commander of the 2/142 Infantry Company. I think some of our troops were surprised when they found out we were coming here. When we were activated, our initial impression was homeland defense in participation of Operation Noble Eagle. Now a part of Operation Enduring Free dom, the infantrymen of the 2/142 Infantry Company, guardsmen from Texas, are here to provide security within Camp Delta and the surrounding perimeter. Weve been activated since May, said 1st Sgt. Richard Rodriguez Jr. We mobilized at Fort Hood, Texas where we went through some new, updated training to get us well pre pared for this mission. We got more than we were bargaining for, said Spc. Jason A. Cruz. We thought we were going to be defending the states, then we ended up here in Cuba. A lot of jaws dropped when we found out our mission was going to be here at GTMO, said Sgt. Jose Vasquez. I think we came in thinking things were going to be worse than they were. We got the routine down fast and mellowed out all the initial craziness. Once settled in, the infantrymen quickly took charge of a myriad of responsibilities all meant to provide the utmost security for Camp Delta. We are responsible for manning the tow ers in Camp Delta, securing the check points and performing mounted and un-mounted patrols twenty four hours a day, seven days a week on this mission here, said Rodriguez. We have to secure the perimeter and always be sure of whats coming in or going out. We also supply assistance to the military police inside of the wire. Members within the unit, rotate throughout the different duties after working three days on a single task. Mounted patrols, which are performed in Humvees, cover a wide area of the outer perimeters roads and trails. While out on mounted patrols, were the Mavericks, said Sgt. Jose Vasquez. It beats working the checkpoints where we bake out in the sun. The un-mounted patrols are performed on foot, covering the hard-to-reach places that cannot be accessed by vehicles. Sometimes it gets tough working through the different conditions, said Cruz. But its all worth it because Im proud to wear this uniform. And ensuring that those who enter the area have proper identification is a requirement at all of the different check points that these sol diers must keep up on. Its a tough job keeping accountabil ity of everyone passing through the different points, said Rodriguez. But everyone has to play according to the rules. Perhaps the hardest job is that of guarding Camp Delta up in the numerous towers. In the towers, its hot, but we deal with it because were infantry, said Spc. Michael Ramirez. We have to keep a vital eye on whats going on inside the wire, but at the same time, were also watching the outside. We have to make sure no one is leaving with any souvenirs. Were always watching the detainees very closely, said Ramirez. They might look and act timid now, but later on, theyd try to bite you if they could. Even after only three days of the same assigned task, after a period of time, the job still seems to get extremely repetitive. Its hard not to become complacent per forming the same tasks over and over again, said Beaty. But even being overworked and understaffed, these troops are doing a great Story by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire 2/142 Infantry Company leads Spc. Robert Lara Jr. skillfully performs an identification check on all individuals try ing to gain entrance to Camp America. Spc. Guadalupe Bravo, an all-American soldier with the 2/142 Infantry Company, holds a firm grip on his 50caliber machine gun while scanning his surroundings with his eagle eyes while partaking in a mounted patrol. High atop a hill, Spc. James E. Rawls scans over the sea for any suspicious air or water vessels. Tae Kwon Do helps keep GTMO servicembers in good shape MWR is offering sailing classes and monthly meetings for anyone interested in Mate A/Skip per B (Centerboard) Qualifications on the Hunters and Zumas. All together it will consist of six session classes. Three sessions will be held in the classroom and three sessions will be held on the water. Any questions concerning these sailing classes, please contact Capt. Gormly at #5249 or Maj. Buchanan at #5255. Daily free daytime & evening lessons for sailing, kayaking, and motor boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Advanced step aerobics classes, Denich Gym, Mon day, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae Kwon Do classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 spinning classes, Denich Gym. Monday-Fri day, 6:30PM-7:30PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM6:15PM, Tuesday & Thursday. Flag Football leagues, Monday-Friday, 6 PM, Cooper Field. 75 bowling, Marblehead Lanes, Monday-Friday 1PM-4PM. Today, Friday, Sept. 27th 6AM-6PM, Open swim, Marine Hill Pool. 6AM-8AM, 10AM-6PM, Open swim, Windjammer Pool. 11AM-7PM, Open swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:30PM-12AM Night fishing trip, Pelican's Pete's Marina. Saturday, Sept. 28th 6AM-8AM, 10AM-6PM Open swim, Windjammer Pool. 6AM-6PM, Open swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10AM-6PM Open swim, Deer Point Pool. 6AM MWR 50 Mile bike race; the Bike Shak near the Paintball Range is the starting point. 7PM 9-Pin No-Tap, Marblehead Lanes. Sunday, Sept. 29th 6AM-8AM, 10AM-6PM, Open swim, Windjammer Pool. 6AM-6PM, Open swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10AM-6PM Open swim, Deer Point Pool. Monday, Sept. 30th 6AM-6PM, Open swim, Marine Hill Pool. 6AM-8AM, 10AM-6PM, Open swim, Windjammer Pool. 11AM-7PM, Open swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, October 1st 6AM-6PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10AM-8PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11AM-7PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1PM-7PM, Climbing classes, Rappel Tower Wednesday, October 2nd 6AM-6PM, Open swim, Marine Hill Pool. 6AM-8AM, 10AM-6PM, Open swim, Windjammer Pool. 11AM-7PM, Open swim, Deer Point Pool. 1PM-7PM, Climbing classes, Rappel Tower Thursday, October 3rd 6AM-6PM, Open swim, Marine Hill Pool. 6AM-8AM, 10AM-6PM, Open swim, Windjammer Pool. 11AM-7PM, Open swim, Deer Point Pool. 7PM Monopoly Night, CBQ. Many of the servicemembers who come to GTMO have pledged to get the best out of this deployment while serving Opera tion Enduring Freedom at Guan tanamo Bay, Cuba. They have worked different shifts to support Joint Task Force 160. But during their free time, they have decided to learn something new or take on a physical activity that can help them improve their physique while they are here. The discipline that Tae Kwon Do teaches has attracted many of them. Spc. Rhonda Reed, from the 342nd Military Police Company, muscled through her first Tae Kwon Do class Monday. I decided to take Tae Kwon Do because I heard its a good workout, she said. Today is my first lesson. I wanted to get a feel of what its all about. I guess Im going to be fine because I was able to keep up with the other students. Reed said she was recommended by Army Sgt. Joel OBradovic, who is from her company. I recommended this class to Spc. Reed because of the bene fits I got out of it, said OBradovic. I think Tae Kwon Do combined with the other P.T. that Ive done with my com pany has helped me maintained my over all physical fitness, he said. On my last P.T. test, I improved by 30 points. I was able to add to my push-up repetitions, max out my sit-ups and dropped my run time by two minutes, added OBradovic. This is a good program. I rec ommend it to both males and females, he said as he regained his composure from the first part of his workout. The Tae Kwon Do class meets Monday through Friday at 7p.m. at the Marine Hill Aerobics Room. This Monday, the classes were led by Matthew Brittle Jr., a firstdegree black belt. Brittle started the class with some stretches, crunches, pushups and body builders before the heavy kicks. All of the students seemed to have enjoyed the workout. Anybody is welcome to attend Tae Kwon Do classes. Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire The Hispanic Heritage Dinner Dance Please join us in a celebration of Hispanic heritage on Saturday, September 28th from 6 p.m. until midnight at the Windjammer. The program will consist of a dinner buffet and cultural performances reflecting this years theme of Hispanic Americans: Strength in Unity, Faith, and Diversity. Tickets are now on sale for the dinner program. $12 for adults and $6 for children. For more information, please call SKC Marcia Cunningham at x72035 Right: Army Sgt. Joel OBradovic, from the 342nd Military Police Company, performs a high-stretched kick at the same time as his opponent at the Tae Kwon Do class held Monday at the Marine Hill Aerobics room. Spc. Rhonda Reed, a soldier from the 342nd MP Company, fully extends her leg for a high-level kick. Page 9 Thursday, September 26, 2002

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migrants reasons for fleeing their homeland and whether that reason is meritorious enough to grant them protection in the form of nonrefoulment. In other words, not returning them to the country where they fear persecution, and by resettling them in a third country. I take my job very seriously; it can mean the difference between life and death to the people who come through my door, Beltran said. If they have a valid reason for fleeing, such as persecution, they will receive protec tion and will be resettled. Various factors such as language spoken, cultural background, rel atives in a particular third country, etc. deter mine which country the migrant will be placed in, although I am not involved with that phase of the process. The Department of State and the receiving country are the principal entities in the resettlement process, but are also assisted by various other organizations such as the International Organization for Migration, and the Red Cross. The voyage of migrants and refugees to GTMO has slowed down considerably since the early and mid 90s, when GTMO was home to approximately 21,000 Haitian refugees and 34,000 Cuban migrants. Those were the highest numbers during Operation Sea Signal. But, that doesnt mean that migrants and refugees dont attempt the dan gerous trip to GTMO on a daily basis. Speaking with these people, I understand why they want to come here, said Beltran. They seek freedom to choose their govern ment, job, and religion. They seek the Ameri can dream. They are in pursuit of happiness and democracy. Simple things to us, but mere dreams to them. The majority of refugees or migrants that make it to GTMO are Haitian and Cuban. Per haps this is due to close proximity of their homelands to the island. But why do these people flee their homes and countries with the possibility of losing it all? I understand that even though my parents were killed, my application for asylum may be denied. Then I would have to go back to Haiti...,said Louciana Miclisse, nine-year-old Haitian refugee, in an article entitled the Last in Line by Lilia Fernandez. Haiti is the third poorest country in the world. Crime is rampant and the streets are congested with people, cars, and trash. In Cuba, people are subject to blackouts on a daily basis, often for hours at a time. Water is available once a week for about six hours, and that is only at a trickle. Thus, hygiene is not nearly up to the standards Americans are used to. The average person living in Cuba can afford to buy a pair of shoes once every four to five years, and a one-month supply of food per person consists of what many Americans can consume in one day. Their monthly ration card provides them with a five-lb. bag of sugar, five-lb. bag of rice, one-lb. bag of beans, 1/4 lb. bag of pasta, six eggs, six ounces of soy and beef mix, and six ounces of sausage. Additionally, the regime presiding over the country has the power to detain anyone it feels is attempting to make changes that may threaten its authority. If the Cuban authorities feel that someone is attempting to make a change in the govern ment, they can detain them, harass them, and blacklist them from getting a job. And with no job, or option of free enterprise, that only leads them to crime, which will only land them back in jail, Beltran said. And the vicious cycle continues, leaving its people hopeless and filled with despair. Being stationed on GTMO during the Global War on Terrorism, holding ground of so many war combatants, and home of the controversy surrounding them and their human rights, one may wonder, what about the human rights of so many others with so much less? The detainees being held here receive three meals a day. They are free to pray to whom ever they choose. They receive good medical care. And what about the Cuban migrants? Back in Cuba, their own country, they arent treated half as well, and if they are jailed, they receive one bad meal a day, they dont receive medical attention, they dont have a controlled temperature environment, nor the most minimal hygiene facilities, not to mention the torture many of them endure said Beltran. Amidst all of the stress a servicemember endures and overcomes while being deployed anywhere around the world, it is to be known that what they protect and defend is a treas ured asset that many have died for, both ser vicemember and common man, all pursuing the same dream freedom! The price of freedom is not cheap but is certainly worth all the money in the world. Page 3 Thursday, September 26, 2002 MIGRANTS, from page 1 DoD photo by Cpl. Adrian Olguin, U.S. Marine Corps. Cuban migrants wait on a bus prior to boarding a plane which will take them from Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to Homestead Air Force Base, Fla., on Jan. 31, 1996. The Cubans are the last to leave the migrant processing center at Guantanamo Bay. Joint Task Force 160 was originally established on May 18, 1994, to provide humanitarian assistance to Haitians escaping political strife. A wave of Cuban migrants fol lowed in August of 1994. All Haitians and Cubans recovered at sea were transported to Guantanamo Bay. At its height in early October 1994, the tent city at Guantanamo Bay sheltered more than 46,000 Haitian and Cuban migrants. Photo Courtesy of Church Renewal International The crowded streets of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, October 2001. This downtown photo displays the typical hustle and bustle of people of this impoverished country as they flock to the marketplace to buy and sell goods. DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, September 27 8 p.m. Stuart Little 2, PG13 70 min 10 p.m. Eight Legged Freaks, PG13 99 min Saturday, September 28 8 p.m. Crocodile Hunter, PG 89 min 10 p.m. Men In Black II, PG13 91 min Sunday, September 29 8 p.m. Blood Work, R 111 min Monday, September 30 8 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG13 91 min Tuesday, October 1 8 p.m. Eight Legged Freaks, PG13 99 min Wednesday, October 2 8 p.m. K-19: The Widow Maker, PG13 140 min Thursday, October 3 8 p.m. Blood Work, R 111 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, September 27 8 p.m. American Outlaws, PG13 95 min 10 p.m. Dont Say A Word, R 110 min Saturday, September 28 8 p.m. Twister, PG13 96 min 10 p.m. We Were Soldiers, R 138 min Sunday, September 29 8, 10 p.m. The Hurricane, R 146 min Monday, September 30 8 p.m. Valentine, R 97 min Tuesday, October 1 8 p.m. Driven, PG13 118 min Wednesday, October 2 8 p.m. Die Hard, R 131 min Thursday, October 3 8, 10 p.m. Double Take, PG13 88 min September 20th Crossword Puzzle Answers Horoscopes: Week of September 30 October 6 Mar. 21 Apr. 19 Dont stifle your feelings on Monday, or theyll leak out some other way. You should feel more cen tered on Tuesday and Wednesday, and be able to speak your truth, take an active role in the situation and artic ulate yourself with a bold and fiery style. Whatever you become involved in seems to be exciting, playful and daring. Listen carefully to your body on Thursday and Friday, and dont ignore any warning signals, if a trip to sick call is needed then go! Its tempting to avoid your responsibilities, but that will only get you a counseling statement. Give over the weekend, and give selflessly. Jul. 23 Aug. 22 On Monday, you'll be in deep thought. You'll want to take action based upon your feelings and intuition, and you'll reject logical reasoning or practicality. Your heart is open wide on Tuesday and Wednesday, and you exude confidence and warmth. You are happiest when supplying support, advice and encouragement to others. You are more thrifty than usual on Thursday and Friday, so go ahead and splurge at the commissary or NEX. And since you don't like to talk about money problems, you prefer being alone, at least until you've figured out how to fix the situation. Nov. 22 Dec. 21 You may be rethinking a particular relationship on Monday, and have serious questions about whether you want to pursue it. Take some time and space to sort out your feelings. You should feel cheerful, ebullient and vivacious by Tuesday or Wednesday, the perfect time to do some PT. Housemates may get on your nerves with very little provocation on Thursday or Fri day. You aren't exactly at your best. Don't rush forward with the hope of bypassing the boring details. You should enjoy yourself over the weekend. Good con nections are made, and a good time is had by all. Apr. 20 May 20 Open all channels of communication on Monday, and be hospitable. Dine with friends and become a part of the discussion. Even though you prefer to melt into the furniture, force yourself to contribute. You can dis tinguish yourself on Tuesday and Wednesday by show ing your strengths at work, but don't be arrogant. You're most impressive when you let your talents and attrib utes speak for themselves. An amorous mood on Thursday and Friday brings out your affections. Spend time on self-improvement over the weekend. P.T., eat right, rest and relax. Aug. 23 Sep. 22 You are persuasive on Monday, and manage to get people to attend some mandatory fun function, or sup port some cause. You may be overwhelmed by being over tasked by your command Tuesday and Wednes day, but for the most part, it's all your own doing. The stars advise you to be flexible and do the best you can under the circumstances. You'll be amazed at what you're able to accomplish on Thursday and Friday. As the weekend approaches, you should watch out for impulsive buying. Steer yourself away from the NEX, Tiki Bar, and Windjammer. Dec. 22 Jan. 19 You could delegate until the cows come home on Monday, and that wouldn't be the worst thing in the world. Watch yourself when sharing your household products with housemates on Wednesday. At this time, people often overstep their bounds and make unrea sonable demands. You can be diplomatic without being two-faced. Thursday, Look at the details, devote some time to research and be conscientious. Check your email with vigilance; someone long-distance may have the perfect solution to your woes. Take a break from work over the weekend. You deserve to rest and relax! May 21 Jun. 21 You are apt to be tight with money on Monday and moody if you're unable to purchase something you've had your heart set on. Put things into perspec tive do you really need another GTMO outfit? When you're feeling more lighthearted on Tuesday or Wednesday, try to surround yourself with people famil iar, maybe someone from your unit. They are sure to keep your mood upbeat. You are full of advice on Thursday and Friday, but nobody seems to want it. You are happy to start new projects over the weekend, but your energy may wax and wane. Sep. 23 Oct. 22 Trying to get straight answers out of people in your chain of command may be impossible; nobody wants to hurt anyone's feelings. Awaken your creativity on Tuesday and Wednesday, and engage in activities where you can take a leadership role. People look up to you when you know what you're talking about. Your conscience gets the better of you on Thursday or Fri day. By the weekend, you should be feeling free and very much alive. Your appreciation of beauty allows you to see things that make everyday, ordinary things appear exquisite. Jan. 20 Feb. 18 Health issues may take precedence over every thing else as the week begins. It may be extremely frus trating to have to cancel plans, and be on profile but your body is trying to tell you something. You're open to experimenting with alternative forms of healing on Tuesday and Wednesday. You could be responsive to new and profound ideas and make sudden changes in your eating, exercise and work habits. Be especially careful when dealing with others in business matters on Thursday or Friday. You continue to be open to new ideas and new experiences over the weekend. Jun. 22 Jul. 22 You prefer staying home and taking care of house hold duties on Monday, a GI party may be just what the doctor ordered. You may feel like tackling a really big job, like buffing the floors. Tuesday and Wednesday brings out your poise and charisma, and even a little bit of flamboyance. However, you may regret being extravagant if you impulsively spend large amounts of money at the NEX. Your practical side reemerges on Thursday and Friday. It may be difficult to make deci sions over the weekend. Try to be flexible when deal ing with housemates on Sunday. Oct. 23 Nov. 21 Your innate intuitive abilities to break down boundaries and encourage troops around you to moti vate themselves to do an outstanding job on Monday. Go with the flow, and you'll get what you want. A cri sis on the job on Tuesday or Wednesday could prompt you to act erratic. Don't push your luck and get out of control. Be sympathetic to a friend in need on Thurs day or Friday. Confronted with a difficult decision over the weekend, your best bet would be to toss ideas back and forth and think through all the pros and cons care fully. Don't be stubborn., do the right thing. Feb. 19 Mar. 20 The mystery of life intrigues you more than ever on Monday. Provide yourself with opportunities for creative expression; a trip to the ceramics shop, enter tain others with your music, poetry or laughter. Be a lit tle self-protective on Tuesday or Wednesday. You have a tendency to blindly help those in need without realiz ing what you're getting yourself into. You may have strong opinions on Thursday and Friday. Restrain your self, remember, you are a professional. Over the week end think about your needs seriously, assess your future goals and act with good conscience. *for entertainment purposes only Page 10 Thursday, September 26, 2002

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Page 2 Thursday, September 26, 2002 JTF-160 Command Commander: Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Army Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Army Master Sgt. Enid Ramos-Mandell Editor-in-Chief: Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Multicultural Day Celebration Sunday, October 27, 2002 1-5 p.m. at Phillips Park Sponsored by Naval Station and Naval Hospital For more information, contact: Cathy Bautista 7-2450 Andrea Petrovanie 7-2033 Army Col. John J. Perrone, Jr. Joint Detainee Operations Group Commander Chaplains Corner Twenty years ago, I drove a cab for a living. When I arrived at 2:30 a.m., the building was dark except for a single light in a ground floor window. Under these circumstances, many drivers would just honk once or twice, wait a minute, then drive away. But I had seen too many impoverished people who depended on taxis as their only means of transportation. Unless a situation smelled of danger, I always went to the door. This passenger might be someone who needs my assistance, I reasoned to myself. So I walked to the door and knocked. Just a minute, answered a frail, elderly voice. I could hear something being dragged across the floor. After a long pause, the door opened. A small woman in her 80s stood before me. She was wearing a print dress and a pillbox hat with a veil pinned on it, like somebody out of a 1940s movie. By her side was a small nylon suitcase. The apartment looked as if no one had lived in it for years. All the furniture was covered with sheets. There were no clocks on the walls, no knickknacks or utensils on the counters. In the corner was a cardboard box filled with photos and glassware. Would you carry my bag out to the car? she said. I took the suitcase to the cab, then returned to assist the woman. She took my arm and we walked slowly toward the curb. She kept thanking me for my kindness. Its nothing, I told her. I just try to treat my passengers the way I would want my mother treated. Oh, youre such a good boy, she said. When we got in the cab, she gave me an address, then asked, Could you drive through downtown? Its not the shortest way, I answered quickly. Oh, I dont mind, she said. Im in no hurry. Im on my way to a hospice. I looked in the rearview mirror. Her eyes were glistening. I dont have any family left, she continued. The doctor says I dont have very long. I qui etly reached over and shut off the meter. What route would you like me to take? I asked. For the next two hours, we drove through the city. She showed me the building where she had once worked as an elevator oper ator. We drove through the neighborhood where she and her husband had lived when they were newlyweds. She had me pull up in front of a furniture warehouse that had once been a ball room where she had gone dancing as a girl. Sometimes shed ask me to slow down in front of a particular building or corner and would sit staring into the darkness, saying nothing. As the first hint of sun was creasing the horizon, she suddenly said, Im tired. Lets go now. We drove in silence to the address she had given me. It was a low building, like a small convalescent home, with a driveway that passed under a portico. Two orderlies came out to the cab as soon as we pulled up. They were solicitous and intent, watching her every move. They must have been expecting her. I opened the trunk and took the small suitcase to the door. The woman was already seated in a wheelchair. How much do I owe you? she asked, reaching into her purse. Nothing, I said. You have to make a living, she answered. There are other passengers, I responded. Almost without thinking, I bent and gave her a hug. She held onto me tightly. You gave an old woman a little moment of joy, she said. Thank you. I squeezed her hand, then walked into the dim morning light. Behind me, a door shut. It was the sound of the closing of a life. I didnt pick up any more passengers that shift. I drove aimlessly, lost in thought. For the rest of that day, I could hardly talk. What if that woman had gotten an angry driver, or one who was impatient to end his shift? What if I had refused to take the run, or had honked once, then driven away? On a quick review, I dont think that I have done anything more important in my life. Were conditioned to think that our lives revolve around great moments. But great moments often catch us unawarebeautifully wrapped in what others may consider a small one. PEOPLE MAY NOT REMEMBER EXACTLY WHAT YOU DID, OR WHAT YOU SAID; BUT, THEY WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL. Anonymous Submitted by Navy Lt. Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, USNR The Cab Ride As the time nears to prepare for redeployment we should take time to pause and reflect on the manner weve discharged our duties. Though duty descriptions differ from person to person and branch to branch, we are all playing a significant role in the Global War on Terrorism. Our mission has certainly not been an easy one but despite the challenges, our commitment remains undaunted. Throughout my daily contacts with both our civil ian and military counterparts, words of praise and thanks are commonplace. But, we must remember to stay focused; avoid becoming complacent. We must maintain the edge until our final day. Our job is not complete until we return to our various home/duty stations and complete the transition process. Leaders should begin the process of identify ing soldiers for recognition and preparing NCOERs and OERs. These are very important documents that have a major impact on a service members career. Soon, other service members will begin arriv ing at GTMO not only to replace JTF 160 but also to activate the new Joint Task Force GTMO. In order for this transition to be effective, we must remain committed to our daily duties. One of our final responsibilities is to teach your replacements what you know and give them the tools they need to have a successful tour as they serve our nation. As the JDOG Commander, its a sincere honor and privilege to serve with such dedicated and committed service members in our nations cause to rid the world of terrorism Page 11 Thursday, September 26, 2002 Upset in the tournament bracket The Hood Ratz, the under dogs, take the opening game of the tournament as the Marine Corps Security Force took an overwhelming defeat at 32-6. Eight Teams fight in a double elimination tournament to see who comes out victorious. The tournament action started with a bang Monday night as mother nature had her hands in the mix. Heavy rainfall trans formed Cooper field from grass and dirt to filthy mud and slop. Players felt they were in a mud bowl. It was very slippery on the field. It was tough running your pass routes. The cleats were no good in the mud, said Spc. William Whittenburg. The first game was an indica tion that anything can happen in a tournament and the first game was a good example. The seventh rank team Hood Ratz were able to upset the second ranked team MCSF Co. Hood Ratz drew first blood in the contest. They scored in the opening drive of the game and lead 6-0. MCSF Co came right back and scored six points of their own. After the scores, the defenses on both teams were not budging until the ending of the first half. With 1:28 remaining on the clock and at their own 18-yard line, the Hood Ratz went to a no huddle offense. Time was running out as the Hood Ratz were marching down the field when Army Sgt. James Stringfellow took the team to the MCSFs 20-yard line, he found an opening in the defense and took advantage as he connected with Whittenburg in the end zone. We were getting our yards by throwing short passes. They were playing off our wide receivers so we were picking them apart by throwing short 5-yard passes, said Stringfellow the Hood Ratz quarterback. It felt good putting my team in the lead, Stringfellow saw me open and threw the pass. I turned around and there was the football. Then I took it to the end zone for a touchdown, said Whittenburg. As the clock was winding down the scoreboard read 13-6. Hood Ratz opened the second half with the football and momen tum. Our defense and offense were both putting points on the board in this game, said Stringfellow. Hood Ratz were clinking on all cylinders. The game became a stalemate until MCSF Cos quar terback threw an interception that sealed the game for the Hood Ratz. The plan was to contain the MCSF Co.s QB and stay in front. I told the team I would do the rest. When he threw the ball, he didnt see me in zone coverage. I was able to pick off the ball and score a touchdown, said Army Sgt. David Ingram. This win puts them one step closer to the championship game Saturday night. I knew MCSF Co. was not ready for the Hood Ratz, said Wilikins. We still have Hospital and NAVSTA to take care of in the tournament. Lock your doors, no one is safe no more. The Hood Ratz are in town, said Wilkins. Stories and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Hood Ratz Spc Wascar Vizcaino and Army Pfc. Jamaal Wilkins work the wish bone offense to perfection in the win over Marine Corps Security Force Co. The 346th Military Police Company won the JTF-160 Commanders Cup out right with 2830 total points on Saturday. They won hands down. The second place team was 1000 points behind the 346th MP Co., which dominated the cup from when it started August 7 until it ended 21 September. The teams had to compete in an elevenevent tournament. The events were Eightball, Spades, Bowling, 5K Run, Table Tennis, Horseshoes, Volleyball, Chess, 7 on 7 Paint ball, Darts and the final event, Swimming. There were individual and team events. Each event was crucial to each team. The teams goals were to accumulate the most points possible in each event. The Commanders Cup was a team effort. We had the maximum people allowed in each event. I made sure we were able to score max imum points for our team, said Spc. Eric L. Blewett who is the teams captain. Each event had a minimum and a maxi mum amount of participants allowed. The 346th MP Co. used the rules to their advantage in the tournament. It felt great to win the Commanders Cup for the 346th MP Co. We just wanted to show that we could win this tournament. It felt great representing our home state of Kansas and win it all, said Blewett. It was no easy task for the 346th MP Co. to come out on top of the Commanders Cup standings and bring the prize home to Kansas. There was great competition in the Com manders Cup. We finished in first place in Darts, Horseshoes, and the Spades tournament we took control of the Commanders Cup after the Spades event (August 25). We took the lead and never looked back, said Blewett. Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus presents the first place trophy to Spc. Eric L. Blewett and members of the 346th Military Police Company for winning the Commanders Cup at the award ceremony Saturday. 346th MP Co. takes the Commanders Cup home

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The American Dream is something that servicemembers fight to protect and preserve but at a price every servicemember knows freedom is not free. In the end, the price paid by servicemembers around the world seems minimal, because it is what makes America free! Being deployed here, you slowly begin to feel the frustration from the restrictions placed upon your freedom. What shall you wear to work this morning? Hmmmcould it be a camouflage suit? Your superior made what you consider an unfair decision; do you quit? How about telling them off? How about, NO! You will deal with it because youre a Soldier, Airman, Sailor, Marine, or Coast Guardsman. Your job often entails sacrificing your free dom for someone elses. There are those who may protest us being here, some reporters may speak negatively of our mission, and some may never even realize or care about the hard ships we face while being here. But, these are their rights because of you. So before you feel discouraged or lose sight of the honorable and noble cause you defend, take one moment to reflect on all those you help, and all those who would give their lives to live the American Dream. People flee their countries for a multitude of reasons. Some for political and others for personal rea sons, and some flee for their lives, said Lupe O. Beltran, pre screening officer, Immigration and Natural ization Services. Often Cubans attempt to swim to GTMO or cross through minefields. Some make the trek in one piece and some dont. But almost all do it with hopes of a bet ter life. A better life, a chance for happiness, and the opportunity to succeed, all of which is often taken for granted by those who have it at their fingertips. But, people from Cuba, Haiti, and other struggling countries will risk life, limb and all they have for that opportunity. All they are left with is their hope and a chance of landing on or near GTMO. When a refugee or Cuban migrant is inter cepted at sea by the Coast Guard near GTMO or greeted by an observant Marine patrolling the fenceline, they are picked up and brought in. Thats when the detailed interview is con ducted by GTMOs I.N.S. office. My business is human rights and my cus tomers are refugees. I interview all who make it this far, said Beltran. This interview process determines the Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Making the break for freedom Thursday, September 26, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 16 Story by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Refugees leave all behind in search of opportunities for a better life See MIGRANTS, page 3 A look inside... Page 4 P a ge 6 Page 11 Photo John R. Stanmeyer The 378-foot U.S. Coast Guard cutter Hamilton dwarfs a 10-foot sailboat carrying Haitian refugees off the coast of Haiti. Thousands of Haitians fled their homeland in makeshift boats in 1994 as U.S. vessels searched the waters to enforce "Operation Able Manner" July, 1994. Page 12 Thursday, September 26, 2002 Army Pvt. Edward Lang, 571st MP Co. Q: How long have you been in the Army? A: Almost a year now. Q: What made you join? A: Females of course! Q: Has it worked for you? A: Not at all... Q: Has the Army been everything that youve bar gained for? A: Well, besides the fact that Im living in a closet, yeah, its pretty much what I expected. Q: O.K. terriffic. What do you think about this impending hurricane, could it be the end of the world? A: Hard to say. Ive never been in one before. Q: Can you be more wrath ful than a hurricane could? A: Im capable of tearing some stuff up, so maybe. Q: You think you and your unit could form up along the beach and fight off the hurri cane with your weapons when it comes? A: Thats the most ridicu lous question Ive ever been asked. Q: You think your hooch will be any cleaner after the storm hits? A: Maybe, if its still there. Q: What do you think this hurricane will pump out on the Richter scale? A: Probably 80 percent. Q: So youre a pretty squared away soldier? A: You could say that. Havent gotten a negative counseling statement yet. Q: Whats youre best Basic Combat Training memory? A: When we fixed a broken T.V. and used a coat hanger for an antennae. We got to watch basketball games on CBS for the last two weeks. Q: What do you think of guarding the detainees? A: This is history, and Im glad to be a part of it. Q: So you like wak ing up to do your job? A: I like doing my job, but I could do with out the waking up part. Q: You like to do PT? A: Does anybody? Q: I see you smok ing cigarettes, think you could smoke a pack straight and then pass the two-mile run on a PT test? A: Maybe if these cigarettes had filters. Q: What do you like to do for fun? A: Every night me and my roomates throw a party at around 2030 hours...its called a sleeping party. Q: Anything you like to do when youre awake? A: I like to dance. I used to bust moves on the streets of Seattle for pocket change. Q: You must be rich from doing that? A: Actually, one time I had to pay a guy 10 cents just to even watch me. Q: Do you ever bust your moves out at the Windjammer? A: Theyre not ready for me. Theyre not even ready for my best back in the states. Q: Why dont you show us some of those moves right now? A: Sure. How about you take a picture? Q: Will you be dancing out side during the storm when it strikes? A: Probably not. I have not a death wish. Q: Think you could take Satan in a fight? A: All I would need is one good hit to get him down. Q: What is the sickest weapon you could build? A: I learned how to make a shank with a grinder once. Q: You seem to be a funny guy. A: I have no shame. Q: What do you see in your future? A: I think Im going to do that green to gold thing, become an officer. Maybe Ill do some police work in the civilian world. Well see though, as long as this hurri cane doesnt ruin my chances! Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Pvt. Edward Lang, a great addition to the Army. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Spoken like a true private, with no shame Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano As the sun sets, Lang shines bright as he begins to skillfully dance under the pale moonlight.