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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00069
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: September 20, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00069

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PAGE 1

On September 10, 2001, Guantanamo Bay may have been described as a small, peaceful town with approximately 2,000 inhabitants. There was no traffic. There was no JTF, and its troops were not around to flood the streets and Navy Exchange. Humvees and deuce-and-ahalves did not frequently roll down Sherman Avenue, and detainees were never even heard of. Navy personnel and their families lived in GTMOs small tight-knit community; they went to work and their children went to school. However, the next morning everything was about to change, especially for GTMOs most innocent residents. September 11th sparked many changes and experiences for the children of GTMO, said Dawn MacFarland, English and Drama teacher at WT Sampson High School, GTMO. Michael Johnson, a 7th grade student at WT Sampson High School, remembers the things he saw change here after that day. For a little while, the scariest thing to me was whenever I saw a plane coming in, because I thought something bad was going to happen. And then, everything started to change here. We really couldnt do anything. We had a curfew and there was a lot of security. I had to carry my ID card all the time. These adjustments were just the beginning. They never expected the waves of people that were about to hit the island, especially not Americas most wanted. When they first brought the Taliban (what the children refer to the detainees as) here I was really scared. They were held in a camp that was really close to my house and at night I could hear them singing or mumbling or something, said Jacob Sporrer, 7th grade student at the high school. The singing and mumbling Sporrer refers to was the Muslim call to prayer. These kids are extremely resilient. I was probably more nervous about being here than them in the following weeks, said MacFar land. Its funny because while the detainees were being held at Camp X-ray, some children could hear them chanting throughout the day. The majority were more irritated with the noise than afraid of it. Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. GTMO kids: close to our mission Friday, September 20, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 15 Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Kids of Guantanamo Bay: adjust, adapt their new neighbors Dawn MacFarland, an English and Drama teacher at WT Sampson High School, and her 7th grade class during a class lesson. See KIDS, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 P a ge 8 Page 15 Page 16 Friday, September 20, 2002 Airman 1st Class Lynette Faulk Q: Lynette Faulk, this is your 15 minutes of fame! Tell me a lit tle bit about yourself. A: I work in J-3, Operations. Im stationed at Kirtland Air Force base in Albuquerque, New Mex ico. I was born in D.C., but raised in Maryland. Ive been in the Air Force for three years, come Octo ber. Q: And how long have you been at GTMO? A: Three weeks. I didnt know what to expect when I got here. This is my first deployment, but any time you go somewhere new theres an adjustment. Q: Lets start with something simple. Whats your favorite type of music? A: I mostly listen to R&B. Q: If you could have a song written about you, what musician would you want to compose it, who would perform it, and what would it be called? A: Id want Maya Angelou to write it, Alicia Keys to sing it, and it would be called, Lifes Lessons. Q: Say, how would your clos est friend describe you? A: Someone quiet at times, but very outgoing. Q: Hmm. Quite a contrast. So it takes people awhile to get to know you? A: Yes. Q: If you had to describe the single most valuable thing youve learned, what would it be? A: Oh... Ive learned not to take people and lessons for granted. Q: Hollywood is filming your story; what kind of film would it be and who would play you? A: Probably Pam Grier. It would be a drama. Q: Off the wall question you wake up tomorrow with a super power. What is it and what do you do with it? A: Oh, invisibility. Q: Would you spy on people? A: I wouldnt exactly call it spying ... Q: Okay, you just won the lot tery. What is the first thing you would do? A: Well, how much are we talk ing, here? I have to budget this! Q: One million dollars. A: I would set my mother and my sister up with anything they want first. Id take a couple of thousands for myself, then the rest for savings and charities and church. Q: Do you have famous or notable relatives or ancestors? A: I wish Marshall Faulk was related, but hes not. Q: Yeah, too bad. Whats your favorite meal? A: Male?? What kind of ques tion is this? Q: No, MEAL. A: Oh! Collard greens, yams, potato salad... I love food so much. Im making myself hungry. Q: Me too! Okay, name a film you could watch over and over. A: Friday. Not every day, all day, but you can never get tired of Friday. Q: Do you collect anything? A: Yes, shot glasses. I have about 25 right now from different countries and states. I get them from friends and family. Q: Heres a trip down memory lane what were your favorite childhood toys or games? A: I liked Sorry! I used to play with Barbie dolls and jacks. Q: If you were a plant, you would be: A: An aloe vera plant. It heals. Q: Oh, thats cute! Last ques tion. Any pieces of wisdom to pass on to your successor here at GTMO? A: Take everything in stride and learn from your experience. Pam Grier would play me in a movie. Airman 1st Class Lynette Faulk performing her admin duties at the JTF-160 HQ. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire Lifes lessons with lyrics by Lynette

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Page 2 Friday, September 20, 2002 Unit-Sponsored Events & Parties JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Multicultural Day Celebration Sunday, October 27, 2002 1-5 p.m. at Phillips Park Sponsored by Naval Station and Naval Hospital For more information, contact: Cathy Bautista 7-2450 Andrea Petrovanie 7-2033 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Did you hear on our last underway some thing like this on the mess decks? We may be pulling in three days early! Maybe... If you fell for that one, maybe you need... Then again, maybe not. Life is filled with maybes. Maybe this and maybe that. Our lives can seem out of con trol when so many things are unstable, when they change constantly in this ever-changing world. Wheres our security? And we dont mean the kind of security that walks around in camouflage! There once was a love song with the title Maybe. One of the lines was, Maybe if I pray, youll come back to me . oh, oh, oh, oh, Maybe, Maybe, Maybe, Maybe. Words like doubtful, unsure, hard to figure out, uncertain, or perhaps usually can replace our use of the word maybe. Maybe... There once lived a man in a far off land. This is no fairy tale. His name was Paschal. He was a philosopher. Thats someone who loves logic. He came up with what is known as Paschals Wager. Any gamblers out there should love this one. Basically, Paschals Wager goes like this. The game board has four possibilities: 1. God does not exist and you dont believe in God. 2. God does not exist and you believe in God. 3. God does exist and you believe in God. 4. God does exist and you dont believe in God. If you bet on 1, life has no ultimate mean ing or supernatural hope. Go with 2 and at least you led a good life that helped others. Choice 3 gets you big time everlasting happiness. Wager 4 gets you into hot water to say the least. Believing in God (2 & 3) is always better. No maybes about it! Submitted by Navy Lt. Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, USNR JTF-160 units approaching the end of their tours at GTMO will want to start planning ahead of time for farewell parties and events. To avoid conflicts coordinate and reserve facil ities such as beaches, parks, and equipment well in advance. Keep in mind that unit parties must be approved in writing by the chain of command, even if they are held at a private domicile. The senior Officer/NCO present is responsible for insuring that JTF-160 Policy Letter #1, Alco hol Consumption, and NAVBASE regulations are followed. The senior person will also insure that nonalcoholic beverages are available for nondrinkers, and provide a plan to monitor and minimize underage drinking. IAW COMNAVBASEGTMOINST 1710.10G, organizers of large events (Those with over 20 people participating) are required to notify NAVBASE Police in writing within 48 hrs prior to the event. Remember that JTF-160 has a zero toler ance alcohol abuse policy. Non-drinkers should be assigned as designated drivers. Think safety first! Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 Maybes JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. R. W. Funaro This week, Command Sgt. Maj. Funaro passes on the following reminder from Father Denis Edward O'Brien, USMC It Is The Soldier Its the soldier, not the reporter Who has given us freedom of the PRESS. Its the soldier, not the poet, Who has given us freedom of SPEECH. Its the soldier, not the campus ORGANIZER, Who has given us the freedom to DEMONSTRATE Its the soldier, not the lawyer, Who has given us the right to a FAIR TRIAL. Its the soldier who salutes the flag, Serves under the flag And whose coffin is draped by the flag, Who gives the protester The right to burn the flag. Page 15 Friday, September 20, 2002 Hood Ratz take down War Eagles Hood Ratz dominated the War Eagles 2613 on the gridiron Friday night. The Hood Ratz are now 6-3 and have just made it a tighter race in the Crunching Central Division. With only a couple games left in the regu lar season, there are five teams: NAVSTA, 239th MP Co., 178th MP Co., NCTAMS and Hood Ratz fighting for only four spots in the upcoming playoffs. Each game from here on out is crucial. Hood Ratz were determined to keep their playoff hopes alive by insuring a win. This would not be easy. They had to go through the War Eagles tough defense and ferocious pass rush. Hood Ratzs plan was to go deep in this game. The Hood Ratz took a 7-0 lead with a quarterback option. Hood Ratzs quarterback Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan took matters into his own hands. It was a good play by Ronan. He was bringing the ball down field when he knew that the War Eagles defense was closing in on him, said Spc. Wascar Vizcaino. After running 24 yards, Ronan saw me open on his right. He then tossed the ball to me and I was able to bring it home for a touch down, Vizcaino said. Ronan was able to see that play unfold with the War Eagles bearing down on him. This was not a designed play. All and all, good players make good plays. I was able to make a move on the defense and get free into the end zone for a touchdown, said Vizcaino. The Hood Ratz seemed more focused in this game. Hood Ratz scored again on a half back pass to the end zone for a touchdown. The score was now 13-0. We have been practicing that play all week. We felt confident coming into this game and we had something to prove to the War Eagles. So we put it to them, said Army Pfc. Jamaal Wilkins. War Eagles defense is something to reckon with in the league. Hood Ratz felt good with the newfound speed and athleticism. They believed they would fair better against the rest of the competition. We have new additions to the team, Viz caino and Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Dajuan Glover. We are better now and NAVSTA and NCTAMS need to look out in our division, said Wilkins. War Eagles would not roll over easy, their defense is their strength. An interception by Army Sgt. Tony Smith gave them brand new energy in the game. We are on our way back Baby, we are in the game, said Smith. After the interception, War Eagles struck fast and put six points on the scoreboard. They broke a run play that put them in the end zone. At 13-6, the doughnut was off the scoreboard. War Eagles were on the attack. They came at the Hood Ratz hard. They forced another turnover. This put the War Eagles in scoring position. One play at a time, that is the way we are going to be able to come back on the Hood Ratz. We are playing now the way we were supposed to be playing. We are planning to win this with 7:36 left on the clock, said Army Sgt. John L. Hopson. Momentum had shifted toward the War Eagles side. They seemed to have taken con trol of the game. As the War Eagles were marching down the field their quarterback made a crucial mis take. He threw an interception at the ten-yard line. This stopped the War Eagles drive cold and maybe their playoff chances. It was not easy keeping an eye on the quarterback. My job was to watch his every move on the field. I knew the play was com ing my way because I had seen that formation earlier in the game, said Glover. Hood Ratz were fortunate to have escaped with a win. They need to have that killer instinct and take advantage of the opportuni ties when they come. We are playing well right now. We just have to take out the teams when we have the chance and not let them hang around, said Ronan. They threw a couple of interceptions that could have cost them the game, but their defense stepped up; especially Glover, who had three interceptions in the game. He is playing well. He has a knack for the ball. He was able to read the quarterback all day. We are a better team now, said Vizcaino. We should be able to sweep all remaining games in the regular season and enter the play offs hot like fire. The game plan worked to perfection. They executed their plays and were able to benefit from the War Eagles mistakes in the game. We were able to use our trick plays in this game. We were able to take advantage of their cornerbacks all game long, Ronan said. We were trying to have fun in the game and win, he said. A big motivator in the game was that the War Eagles said they we going to win this game, but we proved them wrong. Flag Football Standings CRUNCHING CENTRAL x Naval Station 9-0 239th MP Co. 8-2 178th MP Co. 7-2 NCTAMS 7-3 Hood Ratz 6-3 MIUW 204 2-7 Cactus Curtain 1-8 Wildcats 0-9 MONSTROUS MIDWEST x MCSF Co. 9-2 x Buckeyes 7-3 x Hospital 6-4 War Eagles 5-5 Gun Runners 4-6 Chucks 4-6 Security 3-6 JTF-170 2-7 Angry Beavers 2-9 x clinched playoff berth Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan avoids the War Eagles rushing attack and scrambles from the pocket. Army Pfc. Jamaal Wilkins puts the moves on the War Eagles Defense as he scores a touchdown on the play.

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Page 3 Friday, September 20, 2002 The seven Navy personnel proudly working at GTMOs Naval Media Center perform their jobs with a passion. While their ulti mate goal is to put out community information for the people of GTMO, most of the time theyre playing a well-chosen selection of tunes from GTMOs grand archive of rare and diverse music. Hosting four live shows a day, they do their absolute best to keep you entertained while you carry on with your responsibili ties. From 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. is the Daybreaker Show playing Top 40. From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. is the Hod Rod Cafe playing classic rock music. From 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. is Urban Groove playing R+B and urban music, and from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., The Road Runner Show pumps out alternative music and hard rock. If at any time you desire a song to be played to help smooth out your day, call the stations request line at x2300. GTMOs Naval Media Center crew Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Navy JO3 Celeste R. Eneas frantically searches through GTMOs massive selection of the worlds greatest music for a requested tune during a commercial break in her radio program. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Navy JOSN Alexis R. Brown deftly entertains the personnel here by unspooling her sweet spiel into the microphone. J03 Celeste R. Eneas This job is really great. I live for music, so what better job to have than to be a disc jockey for the United States Navy. JO1 Kristin D. Loeding, station manager I love my job. Its the best. I get to meet a lot of people from the community, and I get to play some very good and pleasing music. JOSN Alexis R. Brown I love it, theres no better job in the Navy than being a journalist. My first tour here has been a real treat and also a learning experience. Page 14 Friday, September 20, 2002 Courtesy patrol: making your weekends just a little bit safer All Fall Division Soccer rosters will be due on Friday, Sept. 20th. The Soccer season runs from Monday, Sept. 30th through Fri day, Nov. 8th. Contact Capt. Gormly or Maj. Buchanan at x5249 for more infor mation about MWR events. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. Mon day-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM-6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Flag Football Leagues, M-F, 6 PM, Cooper Field. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM4:00PM. Today, Friday, Sept. 20th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Saturday, Sept. 21st, 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 11:30AM-2:00PM, JTF160 Commander's Cup Series Awards Ceremony and Closing Cook-Out. Sunday, Sept. 22nd 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 5:00PM, Chess Tournament IX, CBQ. Monday, Sept. 23rd 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, Sept. 24th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1:00PM-7:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower Wednesday, Sept. 25th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1:00PM-7:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower 7:00PM, 9-Ball Tournament, CBQ. Thursday, Sept. 26th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. The following events took place on the night of Saturday, September 14, 2002. Some names have been changed or omitted to protect the innocent. I check my e-mail and I groan the way you do when you get a jury duty summons. You tell yourself, okay, you knew it was going to happen sooner or later, so just deal with it. You have been selected for courtesy patrol duty. Great. Well, its not like I havent flagged down the air-conditioned van when I was too impatient to wait for the steaming hot bus on a Friday night. After the initial e-mail, I get two more e-mails in which the date Im supposed to serve has changed. It finally gets nailed down to Saturday, the 14th. On Friday the 13th, I get a brief call informing me to show up at the Windward Loop MWR building at 7 p.m. BDUs, soft cap, and pistol belt. Roger that. Two hours before show time Im sitting in front of the TV get ting my hair cornrowed when I get a call alerting me that the cour tesy van is in the shop. No! Im envisioning what the bumpy ride of a humvee will do to the delicate stomachs of tipsy soldiers. Fortunately, it works out. A van becomes available. All is well. Whew! I strap on my pistol belt and head down to the Windward Loop MWR Center. There I meet Navy Chief Petty Officer Tim Weisman, who is in charge tonight. He briefs me and the other three people. Were here to help people, he says. Our function is to inter vene before they have to come in contact with the authorities. The idea is, we step in if some one looks like they need a ride, or if they look like they need to sim mer down. Were supposed to keep people from spending a night in the brig. Cool. I grab some food from the Jerk House. When I come back, I fall into a conversation with a Marine who just got here yesterday. He laments that he was just starting to work on a new movie with the director of Dogma when he was called back to active duty. He talks about his own script. It sounds too imaginative for Holly wood. But, hey you never know. The night drags. The place shouldve been packed with the Windjam mer being booked for the Firemans Ball, but the huge rowdy crowd I expected never materializes. I count 50 people. A third of them leave at 9:45 p.m. to catch Reign of Fire at the Lyceum. Its 11:10 when I finally spot my first bonafide client. Hes bobbing and weaving like a boxer trying to fake out an opponent. We do the Jedi mind trick on him: You need a ride, friend. Yes, I need a ride! he responds with a happy smile. The trip out to Camp America takes all of 15 minutes, but it feels more like an hour. The guy in the seat behind me is hiccupping nonstop. I have the bucket ready. Im... fine, he keeps saying in a soft, child-like voice. We get to Camp A and look for someplace to park the van in close proximity of the soldiers SEAhut so we wont have to walk too far. The problem is, our friend is no longer speaking. He stumbles out of the van too quickly and sprawls onto the gravel before we have a chance to move. We carefully help him to his feet. They painted all the SEAhuts, plus things look different out here at night. I cant spot the one Im looking for. But fate protects those who overindulge at the Tiki Bar. I flag down a guy wandering back from the latrine. Hey, buddy, do you know where the [omitted] MP Co. is? Instead of answering, the guy comes closer and stares at our ine briated friend. Its then I notice that theyre both wearing shirts from the same university. You know this guy? I ask. Yes, Im his platoon ser geant, comes the careful reply. Is he in any trouble? Weisman and I assure him that nothing happened. No fights, he just needs to sleep this one out. We hand him over to his sergeant, who opens the door to their hooch. John Doe pitches forward and manages to right himself before doing any damage. We wish them all goodnight. We walk back to the van and prepare to ride back to the Tiki Bar to shut the place down and get the last stragglers home. Well, we had our good deed for the night, says Weisman. If we didnt have one, it wouldnt have been complete! I have to agree. Story by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko You look like you need a ride, son. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The letters S and P are a sight for sore eyes when you need a lift home from the Tiki Bar at midnight.

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Page 4 Friday, September 20, 2002 This weeks question: Whats one thing you had to learn the hard way? Army Sgt. Deborah Pacheco, Protocol Country Clearance, JTF-160 HQ Knowing what I want to do with my life when I grow up. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Troy Quinn, NCTAMS LANT Having to learn about women the hard way. Theyre so stubborn. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Cindy Laemmerhirt, Combat Camera, J-3 Having to come up with an answer to this ques tion is pretty hard. Spc. Terrence Styles, JTF-160 J-8 Looking people in the eye. Growing up on the streets, you cant let peo ple think youre scared. Army Staff Sgt. Guadalupe Carrillo, 2/142 Inf. Co. Joining the Army. I was drafted back in 1970, went to Vietnam, and Im still in. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Red flag for live rounds When you see a red flag raised high near one of the firing ranges here at GTMO, whether its blow ing in the wind or hanging still, this is meant to warn you that the firing range is active. Live rounds are being blasted off and you should stay away. At that moment, the range is a restricted area where only authorized personnel are welcome. If youre aware that you will be spending a day out on the range, be sure to have ear protection, because it could get quite loud. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Across 1 Metronome marking 4 Item 11 Blunder 12 Won 14 MGMs Lion 17 Surrender 18 __ con carne 19 Pen stuff 20 Simultaneous gunshots 22 Terminated 23 Fish basket 24 Smile scornfully 26 Mutilated 27 Lode yield 28 House parts 29 Cheat 30 River dam 31 Road (abbr.) 32 Radon (abbr.) 33 Treasure 34 Brand of cotton tipped sticks 35 Grassy areas 36 Nashville locale 37 Americium (abbr.) 38 A spinning toy (2 wds.) 39 Radar points 40 Comforter 41 Take to court 42 Enhance 44 Sad music 45 Jaded 46 Red planet 47 Fertile desert area 48 Mid-Eastern dwellers 49 Sounds 50 Roof overhang 51 Type of partnership 52 Type of water bird 53 Dinner drinks 54 Singing parts 55 Siggy 56 Contend 57 Jimmy 58 Encomium 59 Takes off 60 Unforgiving 61 Hints 62 Lords table 63 Capital of Tunisia 64 Torso 65 Mediterranean language 66 Fire irons 67 Day of the week (abbr.) 70 Fragrance 71 Southern European heath 72 Japanese city 73 Moved stealthily 75 Not any 76 Visitor 77 Rejoin 78 Whiten 79 Man 80 Scrimmage 81 Disarray 82 Rook 83 Laughter sound 84 United States (abbr.) 85 Baseball playing area 86 Stays in one places 87 Rascals 88 Work (abbr.) 89 State of being 90 Straightforward 91 Horse steerers 92 Instructor 93 Luau dish 94 Bun topping seed 96 Khaki cotton twill 97 Grog 98 Put on __ 99 Island nation 100 Swine 101 Speak 102 Kodak product 103 Ship initials 104 Sourly 107 Russian Marx 108 Lands 109 Sob Down 1 Portend 2 Poet Edgar Allen 3 Medium frequency 4 Uses a lever 5 Small brook 6 French yes 7 Deutschmark (abbr.) 8 Rising 9 Tribe heads 10 Belief 11 Heredity component 12 Topic 13 Danish krone (abbr.) 14 Thieves hideouts 15 Shade tree 16 Offers 17 Ground maize 18 Infant laryngitis 20 Holy person 21 Strangeness 22 Part of Colorado 23 Punctuation mark 24 Water vessels 25 Dozes 26 Cried like a cat 28 Merits 29 Pig pens 30 Loose curls 33 Spiritless 34 Oil change company 35 Decoys 39 Flat 40 Beneficiary 41 Flavor 43 Eastern Time 44 Paper towel brand 45 Incentive 46 Paired sock 48 Regions 49 Very big striped cat 50 Rock and Roll King 52 Brook 53 Inflict 54 Armor plate 55 Floras partner 56 Doctor 57 Slang 58 Feather 59 Flit 60 Little 61 Buddy 62 Get up 63 Work needs 64 Wedding item 65 Desire 66 Typing mistakes 67 Blemishes 68 Take flight 69 Tiny crawler 70 Misery 71 Hector 72 Poet 73 Slow tree mammal 74 Tan colors 76 Water birds 77 Rhinoceros nickname 78 Support 80 __ Vice (tv show) 81 Ables murderer 82 Furor 85 Heroic actions 86 Determines how heavy it is 87 Plunder 91 River 92 Hot embers 93 Medicine dose 95 Sister for short 96 Central processing unit 97 Cheese 98 Incorporeal 101 Choose 102 Remote 105 Near 106 Pennsylvania (abbr.) 107 Cubic centimeter Page 13 Friday, September 20, 2002 September 13th: DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, September 13 8 p.m. Country Bears, G 88 min 10 p.m. Reign of Fire, PG13 108 min Saturday, September 14 8 p.m. Eight Legged Freaks, PG13 99 min 10 p.m. Mr. Deeds, PG13 91 min Sunday, September 15 8 p.m. Men in Black II, PG13 91 min Monday, September 16 8 p.m. K19 the Widowmaker, PG13 91 min Tuesday, September 17 8 p.m. Crocodile Hunter, PG 89 min Wednesday, September 18 8 p.m. Country Bears, G 88 min Thursday, September 19 8 p.m. Eight Legged Freaks, PG13 99 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, September 13 8 p.m. Big Fat Liar, PG 88 min 10 p.m. Two Can Play That Game, R 91 min Saturday, September 14 8 p.m. Buffy the Vampire Slayer, PG13 86min 10 p.m. Hollywood SIgn, R 90 min Sunday, September 15 8, 10 p.m. Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones, PG -142 min Monday, September 16 8 p.m. The Shrink is In, PG13 91 min Tuesday, September 17 8 p.m. John Q, PG13 118 min Wednesday, September 18 8 p.m. Kiss of The Dragon, R 98 min Thursday, September 19 8, 10 p.m. Collateral Damage R 109 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris My morbid mind Can rewind To find The future. I can reverse The worst And bring good luck To those who are cursed. Most can not believe What I can conceive With my pen. I have the knowledge, power And wisdom of uncountable men ITS TRUE I can get you Stuck like glue, Sick like the flu, Or feel like new. ITS UP TO YOU Believe or deny Choose to die, Or choose to fly How ask why When the time is now? Im the powder in a bullet That makes the round go BLAUU! Mommy once said I was a nice boy; HEY MOM: LOOK AT ME NOW!

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At first the thought of being near the detainees was very strange and scary to the children. I have only been here a month, but I did nt want to come because I knew the Taliban was here. I am not really worried about them any more, it is just kinda freaky to be so close to them, said Anthony Mays, an 8th grade student. Children from military families lead lives that are far from typical. Children are exposed to various situations and responsibili ties that many other kids are not. You only have one childhood, and although children here are limited in certain ways, they are also in a unique situation that allows them to experience things many other children will never have the chance to, said MacFarland. The sacrifices and experiences these children endure make them very mature in certain ways and very adaptable to new environments and situations. So, when the JTF landed on GTMO, the children adapted and adjusted. Theres a big difference from now and before the JTF arrived. There are a lot more people here now. Before, you were able to get into the bowling alley, and the commissary was filled with food. Now, it is always crowded and there is always a lot of traffic, said Darrine Crockton, a 7th grade student at WT Sampson High School. But, I think them coming was good because when the Taliban first arrived, I was scared. I thought they might break out of their cells and do something to us, but Im not anymore. And for some, the joint environment pro vided an opportunity to see all of the military branches at work. I think it is cool to see all the different serv ices here, and they always stop to give me a ride, said Johnson. The arrival of the JTF gave some children more confidence about the safety and security of themselves and their families. I feel safe here. I think they are being guarded well, said Nick Basel, a 9th grade student at WT Sampson High School. The JTFs presence is more than a security blanket. For some of the students, this presence gave them opportunites and lessons to learn. Other then it being a lot more crowded here, a good thing about everyone being down here is that now we have a lot more people vis iting the school and talking to us. We are sup posed to have someone come in and train us on different things, said Mercedes Coakley, a 9th grader at the high school. Although many feel safer, most are aware that a threat still exists here. The only thing I still get nervous about is with these detainees here, I think we are at higher risk of being attacked. But, my father tells me the mil itary is prepared and if anyone tried wed be ready, said Coakley. To some of the children, the politics sur rounding GTMO is not compre hendible. To them, the solu tions seem as simple as dealing with a schoolyard squabble. I think that we are being too nice to the Tal iban here because if that was us, where they came from they wouldve probably killed us, said Crockton. The sacrifices and experiences that the chil dren of GTMO made every day and will con tinue to make seem to reflect those of their parents. I think Americans and the press need to realize the extreme sacrifice that military mem bers and their families make for their freedom and their freedom of speech, MacFarland said. This is my second year here. Being a civilian with no real military exposure previous to this, I have developed a great appreciation for it and what it does for us. This was defi nitely an eye-opening experience. Page 5 Friday, September 20, 2002 KIDS, from page 1 Nicole Ludovici, 10th-grader, peeks in her locker in between classes in search of her class text book. Ms. Dawn MacFarland speaks to 7th-grade student Megan Heitman about a homework assignment. Abraham Muoz, an 8th grader, reads from his text book to complete his class assignment. 7th and 8th grade students hanging out and chatting over lunch. Page 12 Friday, September 20, 2002 This statue is located behind the lighthouse near Cable Beach. It Was completed in 1999 by Roberto Ferrar and Angono Rizal, Cuban and Philippine migrants. It was dedicated to all the Marines that protect democracy at GTMOs fenceline. Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire GTMO monuments: Pieces of the past In 1994, Operation Sea Signal began and GTMO opened its door to thousands of Haitian and Cuban migrants. This statue was erected by a migrant in honor of the troops that pro vided humanitarian aide and assistance for the migrants in need. It can be found across from the ceramics shop on Sherman Avenue. This roadside shrine, located on Sherman Avenue and Johnson road. It represents the patron saint of Cuba, Virgen de la Caridad Del Cobre. The story of the Virgen de la Caridad Del Cobre originated in 1604 in Cuba, when three men out fishing encountered a fierce storm that almost killed them, fortunately, they were saved by the Virgen de la Caridad Del Cobre. The Virgen de la Caridad Del Cobre plays a significant role in Cuban Culture. Gauntanamo Bay is the oldest U.S. base overseas. It has been around for almost 100 years and has been the staging ground for many historical events. A plethora of monuments can be found scattered around the base. Each one of them tells a little piece of GTMOs story. Placed on the hill across from the Combined Bachelor Quarters on Sherman Ave. in 1998 to commemorate the 100th year Anniversary of the Battle of Cuzco Wells. The Battle of Cuzco Wells was the first land battle of the Spanish American war, and the first U.S. land battle vic tory during the war.

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All summer long, the Downtown Lyceum Theater has been featuring a number of newly-released movies for all the people at GTMO. Many servicemembers and civilians from around the base took their kids to the the atre to check out these hot flicks as they were being played for the first time. They seem to have enjoyed them. These blockbuster hit movies such as: Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones, Men in Black II, The Sum of all Fears, SpiderMan and the recent Triple X were being played in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and in the United States at the same time. GTMO was able to get these movies because it is part of the First Run Overseas Theater (FROST) program. Therefore, the base receives brand new lab prints of these motion pictures in addition to the regular 35 mm movies, which are usually played eight weeks after their original release in the states. Getting these movies and coordinating the schedule for show times is the job of Devon E. Christie, the movie and program coordinator of GTMOs Morale, Welfare and Recreation program. I am sort of the middleman between NMPS and GTMO to get the movies. Once they come here, I have to schedule them for viewing on dates and times that are convenient for the residents of GTMO, said Christie. The reviews of the movies determine how soon they get to us. If the movie is a FROST, we get it at the same time its being run in the states, he said. NMPS, the Navy Motion Picture Service, based in Millington, Tenn., is the bridge between the movie production companies and the Navy bases all over the world. NMPS has been serving Navy installations since 1920. It supplies motion picture enter tainment on film and videocassettes to nearly 800 afloat and ashore commands in over 70 countries. According to Christie, NMPS screens all movies prior to procurement. The Classifica tion and Rating Administration (CARA) of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) rate all films. Movies are chosen for distribution solely based on their overall enter tainment value to the primary audience as stip ulated by the NMPS management guide. According to NMPS, commands may choose not to show a specific movie, but may not delete any part of a movie chosen for exhibition. This has not been an issue at GTMO. The management is more concerned about contractual arrangements to play the movies. All the movies we get are on contract for a period of time, which can be from 27 to 30 days, said Christie. We have to abide by the authorized play date. We cant play a movie before or after its authorized play date. So far, we havent had any problem with NMPS. Christie, who has been doing this job for three years, came to his office Monday, his day off, to make sure that everything was going smoothly. As he was reviewing a black binder, where he keeps the log for every movie acquired from NMPS, he was preparing the schedule for the movies that will be played in the next two weeks. In the midst of these tasks, he had to juggle between answering the ringing tele phone and giving instructions to one of his workers regarding movie prints that need to be picked up. You know, man, those 35 mm prints are heavy. But someone has to do this job, he said. For the most part, people are very content about what we play in the theater, said Christie. On occasion, I might get questions on whether or not I am getting a particular movie once its been advertised. Sometimes we get those movies, sometimes we dont. If the negotiation process for a movie takes too long, the movie gets to us very late or it falls through the cracks. Christie has to send to NMPS a monthly movie exhibition and attendance record. Do not be disturbed, he said, when you see somebody coming by you as youre watching a movie. We have to report to NMPS. This data is used by NMPS to determine if a movie has high patronage before releasing other authorized play dates. In addition to the 35 mm movies, which are projected at the Dowtown Lyceum, we have a huge variety of movies on 8 mm that are used for Camp Bulkeley and the CBQ, said Christie. Those movies were initially printed on 35 mm and shown at the Downtown Lyceum before they were transferred on 8mm tapes, he said. We have over 900 titles to choose from. We keep them up to three years. When it comes to MWR movies, the ser vicemembers here have no complaints. Air Force Airman 1st Class John Grant, who works at JTF-160 J-6, said he has been Downtown a few times to enjoy some flicks after a hard-working day. I like the outdoor theater, especially when the weather is fine he said. Its a different perspective. MWR is doing a very good job. They seem to get the movies not too long after theyve been released in the states. Thats great. Army Capt. James H. Gormly, JTF-160 civil affairs officer, said, I think overall, MWR is doing a fantastic job. They have a huge selection of movies, and Mr. Devon Christie is really working hard to get newly released movies for the troops. Page 11 Friday, September 20, 2002 Behind the scenes of GTMO movies Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire A look inside the Downtown Lyceum projection booth, where two 35 mm projectors are installed. One of them gets in motion to project the American national anthem before the feature presentation Monday night. The American flag projected on the big screen of the Downtown Lyceum as the national anthem was being played Monday night. Page 6 Friday, September 20, 2002 It can happen to you. Youre off from work, you have places to go, but unfortunately you have no vehicle to get you there. Thats when you must journey to the nearest bus stop, and after a reasonable wait, that long and yellow savior of a chariot will come to charter you as close as it can to your destination of choice. Providing the primary source of all trans portation operations conducted for Joint Task Force personnel are the efforts of the 418th Transportation Company, active duty Army soldiers from Fort Hood, Texas. They allow troopers strapped without their own wheels a way to get around GTMO more easily. Our main mission at GTMO is to trans port people where they need to go, said Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan, truck master with the 418th. Most soldiers cant live without those buses, said Sgt. 1st Class Eric Walker, detachment acting first sergeant with the 418th. Theyd be crying if we werent here. Even with an abundance of humvees rolling around the base and even the occa sional GTMO special, not everyone has the good fortune of having their own vehicle. Thats where the 418th comes in. People still have to ride the buses. Not everyone is blessed with having a humvee or a P.O.V, said Walker. And especially on Fri day or Saturday nights, if theyre drinking or what not, they wouldnt be driving anyway. To provide this service, it means long workdays. Every day starts at 0430 and ends at 0130 in the morning, said Ronan. The drivers shifts are pretty good, but we only get one day off every seven or so days. With over 20 personnel working three, sixhour shifts, driving the buses isnt all that bad, said Walker. Unfortunately, one of the biggest challenges that the bus drivers face can some times be the very people theyre serving. A negative to the job is sometimes when there are soldiers who are belligerent to the drivers; those who curse at them and get out of control, said Walker. Like on weekend nights, with people drinking too much, it can be dangerous. If it wasnt for us, a lot of people wouldnt be going anywhere, said Pfc. Diana Klinker, a bus driver with the 418th. Would they rather walk or ride the bus? Thats the way I look at it. The job can get tedious, and then there are those that like to complain a lot, said Ronan. This is free transportation that we are provid ing. People can get greedy, though, like want ing to get picked up or dropped off at non-authorized stops. We used to do that, but things got too carried away and people would take advantage, so now we only stop at authorized bus stops. But weve put up a lot of benches; we have them at the Loop, the NEX and a bunch out at Camp America, said Walker. And with the two joint task forces merging soon, theyre plans for an additional four stops to accommodate everyone. Now we have three buses that run to JTF160 headquarters all the way up to 1830, and weve added an extra bus going out to Camp America, said Ronan. Getting the people out of Camp America so they can better explore GTMO is an important aspect of their job, one that helps put their mis sion of helping people into better perspective. Those people dont have the option of just walking someplace, said Klinker. They rely on us to actually get them where they need to go. And thats a great feeling. Such a service as free transportation is unique for an operation like the Joint Task Forces, and the servicemembers deployed here are the ones who benefit from it, said Ronan. This is the only deployment Ive been on where there is a bus service, he said. If you were in Bosnia, there certainly wouldnt be one. Theres stuff to do here at GTMO, and we take people to the center of it. If you got to get around carrying a lot of gear, youre going to smile when you see that bus, said Walker. Otherwise, you could be walking with all of that equipment on. I mean, walk from Windward Loop to Marine Hill, and youll be sweating hard, even at night. Our transportation is here to help you. Possessing a fleet of buses, 5-ton trucks and tractors as well, keeping up on their mainte nance checks is a constant fight and a top pri ority for the 418th. But with the assistance of Kvaerner contractors and the Combined Maintenance Team working out of the motor pool next door, they make sure that if a bus inevitably bolos, that it gets rolling again in no time flat. These buses were made back in the s, and it seems that every day one of them goes down for some reason, said Ronan. But those guys in the motor pool are pretty good. Story and photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire 418th Transportation Co. gets Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan, truck master with the 418th Transportation Co., expertly checks the air pressure on a tire to a 5-ton truck. The bus service provided by the 418th Transportation Co. is here to make your life easier while at GTMO.

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Especially those Air Force mechanics, who are trained to work on every type of vehicle. They really help us out over there. They know their stuff. I mean, we had only brought two mechan ics down with us, and then because we were strapped for people we had to make them drivers, he said. We have a bunch of aug mentees working with us. Like the 342nd MP Co. will rotate a driver every week. And we had nine mechanics from the motor pool come over to help us. One augmentee, Spc. Melissa Chin of the 297th Transportation Co. from Ft. Hood, Texas, was there from the start. She came down with the 418th when they hit the ground here in the end of June to assist in their mission. I adapted pretty well, theyre good peo ple here, said Chin. I never drove a bus before, so its been pretty different. But its definitely one of the bet ter deployments Ive been on. And while running a bus service may seem like enough work, the 418th is also in charge of side quests. In addition to running the buses, we also have extra missions that we skillfully perform, said Walker. We supply water out to Camp America, Camp Bulkeley and Camp Delta. We also pick up the detainees dirty laun dry from Camp America and turn it to the cleaners, and then bring the clean laundry back. Another extremely important extra mission of the 418th is conducting all movement of the detainees when they arrive to GTMO. Theyre the ones behind the wheels of those fabled green buses that bring the detainees to their new home at Camp Delta. Thats an important job, said Ronan. We do two or three rehearsals before it actu ally even happens, so were ready for them when they come. We have our soldiers acting as detainees, actually shackled, so we can get the full life training. Constant training is what keeps a unit always mission ready, no matter what that mission may be. The 418th is no exception. Our unit gets deployed a lot, so were always out in the field and doing training, said Walker. Back home in Fort Hood, we dont even run buses, we haul fuel for airports. Before coming down here, we had to go through bus driving classes and do a lot of training. But after driving huge tankers, driv ing a bus was pretty natural. And getting people from point A to point B comes natural to the soldiers of the 418th, who despite any odds, stay focused on the impor tance of their mission while at GTMO. Its a very important job here, said Spc. Hunero Castanellanos, a bus driver with the 418th. Sometimes some people dont appre ciate the bus drivers and everything, but were doing a pretty good job here. Were helping people out. Behold: Members of the 418th Transportation Co. proudly stand tall before their majestic fleet of buses and 5-ton trucks. Page 7 Friday, September 20, 2002 people where they need to go Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Walker, detachment first sergeant with the 418th Transportation Co., skillfully checks the juice on one of the units quality buses. Spc. Melissa Chin, an augmentee with the 418th Transportation Co., operates a powerful forklift. She is much valued, for she is the only forklift operator in the unit. Page 10 Friday, September 20, 2002 There will be a Hepatitis A and B immunization program held from Sept. 30 through Oct. 2 in the new chapel at Camp America. Prevention is better than reac tion, said Navy Cmdr. James K. Radike, head of infectious dis eases here at GTMO. Thats why we strongly advocated for this immunization program to be held for the troopers of JTF-160. This program is unit-specific due to the amount of vaccine we have at this point, said Sgt. 1st Class Earl A. Manning, 160th Military Police Battalion, non commissioned officer in charge of the Joint Aid Station, and organizer of the program. First things first, we have to focus on those who are at the highest risk, said Manning. And they are the MPs inside of the wire. A primary mission down here at GTMO is force protection, said Radike. This includes being physically safe from the detainees and also protecting the troopers from potential infections. We gathered information on the detainees and found out sev eral of them have chronic Hepati tis infections, he said. Now we must take it to the next step in protection. Active duty servicemembers should have received the Hepati tis A vaccination back in boot camp, said Radike. However, some reservists may not have received it by virtue of their reserve status. Its hit or miss with them, and we want to be good stewards and make sure everyone is protected. The Hepatitis B vaccination is not usually given to troopers unless theyre in the medical field, said Radike. However, given the unique mission of the JTF-160 being a detention center, we recommended that all guards and troopers in direct contact with the detainees be protected as well. Hepatitis B is not uncommon with guards because there is always a potential for violence within their job field, said Radike. Hepatitis A is a viral infection that infects 1.4 million people worldwide every year. Most people can conquer the infection without having any life time consequences causing them to suffer and pay. The virus can be shed in feces, loose stools, and passed along by poor hand washing. A common mode of infection is by eating uncooked food, which has been prepared by an infected worker. Hepatitis A is transmitted from bad hygiene, said Radike. The virus is very contagious and can be spread off of dirty, unwashed hands. Even from eating at a salad bar, there is potential of catching the virus, he added. We all eat together, so everyone is vulnera ble to Hepatitis A. The virus incubates for approximately a month, showing minimum to no symptoms at all before an individual gets sick. Some people can have a pro longed illness lasting several weeks before resolving. During the incubation period, the virus can still be passed on to others in close living arrange ments. If you are infected, you will be unable to perform your mission, said Radike. Being conta gious, youd have to be held away from the other troopers because of the close living space availi ble here. If one person gets sick, everyone will get sick. Symptoms can include malaise, flulike symp toms, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea and jaundice. However, there is a very effective vac cine available to prevent this disease. It requires a two-shot series; the last one is to be given no earlier than six months after the first one, said Radike. After the first shot, there is generally 90 percent protection against the virus. After the second shot, the protection is driven up to 99 per cent or better. All it takes is two shots for one kill, said Radike. The ben efits are life long, and they replace the old, painful shots of the past. Hepatitis B is a different virus. It also attacks the liver like its milder cousin Hepatitis A, but this virus is more virulent and has a much higher chance for causing death and becoming a chronic infection in its victims. With 300 million chronic carri ers of this infection worldwide, 5,000 U.S. citizens will die from its wrath this year, said Radike. Unlike Hepatitis A, this virus is spread by having sex with some body who is actively or chroni cally infected, or being exposed to the blood of someone who is infected by the virus. You dont know how youll grow up, and you never know who youll have sex with, said Radike. However, troopers, there is a vaccine that can completely pre vent any worries about this, he said. Its a three-shot series over a period of six months, but it could be stretched longer. The first shot gives you 50 per cent protection. After the second shot, youre 75 percent protected and after the third and final shot, youll have over 95 percent pro tection against the virus. The needles are a small price to pay when the vaccination is life long, said Radike. Overall, the vaccination pro gram for Hepatitis A and B is a logical step in the protection of all troopers here at GTMO. Its also a worthwhile experi ence here and now because the vaccine for both Hepatitis A and B on the outside would cost over one hundred dollars each for both complete series. This vaccination program is a good thing, Radike said. It is an overdue thing. Information on the Hepatitis A and B immunization program and vaccinations for the rest of the JTF-160 servicemembers will be forthcoming. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Navy Cmdr. James K. Radike, head of infectious diseases here at GTMO, thinks the Hepatitis immunization program is a must, for he yearns for the protection of all troopers on base. Story by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Prevention is better than a reaction Photo courtesy of Corel Gallery The minor pain from the needles is temporary, but the protection is everlasting.

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A gathering of GTMO residents with a passion for motorcycles took place Sun day at 9 a.m. in the parking lot of the Navy Exchange. Navy Cmdr. William G. Thompson, JTF Inspector General, and Navy Lt. Ruth Goldberg, a social worker at the Naval Hospital, organized the event. The gathering consisted of ten bikers who wanted to show support of Operation Enduring Freedom, as well as get together and have some fun. The event began with a briefing by Base Safety Director, Dave Nelson, then the gang saddled up and cruised down to Phillips Park to practice riding together in a loose formation. Once the bikers got the hang of moving like a team, they turned around and headed back past the NEX and down Sherman Ave. to the Northeast Gate. Once there, Marine Gunnery Sgt. John D. Banzhof gave the group a wealth of information about the history of the border between the naval base and communist Cuba. Things were going smoothly for the group until just past Camp X-Ray. One of the bikers got a flat and had to pull over. I mustve ran over a nail, lamented David Boykin, who works at new car sales at the NEX. I just got this bike fixed, too! Boykins new friends helped him lift the bike into the back of The Wires humvee. Within five minutes Boykin was back at his home in Nob Hill. Neighbors came out to help him get the motorcycle off the humvee and into his driveway where he would later change the tire. One of the other bikers kidded Boykin about getting the flat on purpose to avoid giving out some t-shirts, as hed promised. Boykin kept his word, however. He jumped into his car and headed back to the NEX parking lot where the day began. Those who had waited for him were rewarded with white cotton t-shirts with the famous Harley logo. Boykin had some Exchange New Car Sales shirts to dis tribute as well. Im pleased with the turnout, said Thompson at the conclusion of the event. We only briefly advertised this. Due to the pleasant experience had by all, its a safe bet that the motorcycle enthusiasts of GTMO can look forward to future opportunities to cruise together. Page 8 Page 9 Friday, September 20, 2002 Base Safety Director Dave Nelson leads the pack back to Sherman Ave. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin David Boykin (r) with the Harley Davidson t-shirt he gave to Navy Lt. Ruth Goldberg (l). Cruising down the GTMO highways The bikers proudly show off their rides. L to R: Dave Nelson, Mrs. Victoria Thompson, Navy Cmdr. William Thompson, Curtis Wright, Chris Peterson, Navy Lt. Ruth Goldberg, Donnell Daniel, David Boykin, John McNew, David Raposo and Joyce M. Fricker. David Boykin of NEX New Car Sales gets a little help from his friends after his bike rolls over a nail. Boykin says that Jose Lopez, a Cuban refugee, rode this very bike over the border to freedom in 1980. He and the previous owner are now pen pals. MWRs Athletic Director, Donnell Daniel, David Boykin, John McNew and David Raposo line up their bikes and get ready to roll out. Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire Navy Lt. Ruth Goldberg loves to customize and accessorize her bike. Note the studs.

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A gathering of GTMO residents with a passion for motorcycles took place Sun day at 9 a.m. in the parking lot of the Navy Exchange. Navy Cmdr. William G. Thompson, JTF Inspector General, and Navy Lt. Ruth Goldberg, a social worker at the Naval Hospital, organized the event. The gathering consisted of ten bikers who wanted to show support of Operation Enduring Freedom, as well as get together and have some fun. The event began with a briefing by Base Safety Director, Dave Nelson, then the gang saddled up and cruised down to Phillips Park to practice riding together in a loose formation. Once the bikers got the hang of moving like a team, they turned around and headed back past the NEX and down Sherman Ave. to the Northeast Gate. Once there, Marine Gunnery Sgt. John D. Banzhof gave the group a wealth of information about the history of the border between the naval base and communist Cuba. Things were going smoothly for the group until just past Camp X-Ray. One of the bikers got a flat and had to pull over. I mustve ran over a nail, lamented David Boykin, who works at new car sales at the NEX. I just got this bike fixed, too! Boykins new friends helped him lift the bike into the back of The Wires humvee. Within five minutes Boykin was back at his home in Nob Hill. Neighbors came out to help him get the motorcycle off the humvee and into his driveway where he would later change the tire. One of the other bikers kidded Boykin about getting the flat on purpose to avoid giving out some t-shirts, as hed promised. Boykin kept his word, however. He jumped into his car and headed back to the NEX parking lot where the day began. Those who had waited for him were rewarded with white cotton t-shirts with the famous Harley logo. Boykin had some Exchange New Car Sales shirts to dis tribute as well. Im pleased with the turnout, said Thompson at the conclusion of the event. We only briefly advertised this. Due to the pleasant experience had by all, its a safe bet that the motorcycle enthusiasts of GTMO can look forward to future opportunities to cruise together. Page 8 Page 9 Friday, September 20, 2002 Base Safety Director Dave Nelson leads the pack back to Sherman Ave. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin David Boykin (r) with the Harley Davidson t-shirt he gave to Navy Lt. Ruth Goldberg (l). Cruising down the GTMO highways The bikers proudly show off their rides. L to R: Dave Nelson, Mrs. Victoria Thompson, Navy Cmdr. William Thompson, Curtis Wright, Chris Peterson, Navy Lt. Ruth Goldberg, Donnell Daniel, David Boykin, John McNew, David Raposo and Joyce M. Fricker. David Boykin of NEX New Car Sales gets a little help from his friends after his bike rolls over a nail. Boykin says that Jose Lopez, a Cuban refugee, rode this very bike over the border to freedom in 1980. He and the previous owner are now pen pals. MWRs Athletic Director, Donnell Daniel, David Boykin, John McNew and David Raposo line up their bikes and get ready to roll out. Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire Navy Lt. Ruth Goldberg loves to customize and accessorize her bike. Note the studs.

PAGE 10

Especially those Air Force mechanics, who are trained to work on every type of vehicle. They really help us out over there. They know their stuff. I mean, we had only brought two mechan ics down with us, and then because we were strapped for people we had to make them drivers, he said. We have a bunch of aug mentees working with us. Like the 342nd MP Co. will rotate a driver every week. And we had nine mechanics from the motor pool come over to help us. One augmentee, Spc. Melissa Chin of the 297th Transportation Co. from Ft. Hood, Texas, was there from the start. She came down with the 418th when they hit the ground here in the end of June to assist in their mission. I adapted pretty well, theyre good peo ple here, said Chin. I never drove a bus before, so its been pretty different. But its definitely one of the bet ter deployments Ive been on. And while running a bus service may seem like enough work, the 418th is also in charge of side quests. In addition to running the buses, we also have extra missions that we skillfully perform, said Walker. We supply water out to Camp America, Camp Bulkeley and Camp Delta. We also pick up the detainees dirty laun dry from Camp America and turn it to the cleaners, and then bring the clean laundry back. Another extremely important extra mission of the 418th is conducting all movement of the detainees when they arrive to GTMO. Theyre the ones behind the wheels of those fabled green buses that bring the detainees to their new home at Camp Delta. Thats an important job, said Ronan. We do two or three rehearsals before it actu ally even happens, so were ready for them when they come. We have our soldiers acting as detainees, actually shackled, so we can get the full life training. Constant training is what keeps a unit always mission ready, no matter what that mission may be. The 418th is no exception. Our unit gets deployed a lot, so were always out in the field and doing training, said Walker. Back home in Fort Hood, we dont even run buses, we haul fuel for airports. Before coming down here, we had to go through bus driving classes and do a lot of training. But after driving huge tankers, driv ing a bus was pretty natural. And getting people from point A to point B comes natural to the soldiers of the 418th, who despite any odds, stay focused on the impor tance of their mission while at GTMO. Its a very important job here, said Spc. Hunero Castanellanos, a bus driver with the 418th. Sometimes some people dont appre ciate the bus drivers and everything, but were doing a pretty good job here. Were helping people out. Behold: Members of the 418th Transportation Co. proudly stand tall before their majestic fleet of buses and 5-ton trucks. Page 7 Friday, September 20, 2002 people where they need to go Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Walker, detachment first sergeant with the 418th Transportation Co., skillfully checks the juice on one of the units quality buses. Spc. Melissa Chin, an augmentee with the 418th Transportation Co., operates a powerful forklift. She is much valued, for she is the only forklift operator in the unit. Page 10 Friday, September 20, 2002 There will be a Hepatitis A and B immunization program held from Sept. 30 through Oct. 2 in the new chapel at Camp America. Prevention is better than reac tion, said Navy Cmdr. James K. Radike, head of infectious dis eases here at GTMO. Thats why we strongly advocated for this immunization program to be held for the troopers of JTF-160. This program is unit-specific due to the amount of vaccine we have at this point, said Sgt. 1st Class Earl A. Manning, 160th Military Police Battalion, non commissioned officer in charge of the Joint Aid Station, and organizer of the program. First things first, we have to focus on those who are at the highest risk, said Manning. And they are the MPs inside of the wire. A primary mission down here at GTMO is force protection, said Radike. This includes being physically safe from the detainees and also protecting the troopers from potential infections. We gathered information on the detainees and found out sev eral of them have chronic Hepati tis infections, he said. Now we must take it to the next step in protection. Active duty servicemembers should have received the Hepati tis A vaccination back in boot camp, said Radike. However, some reservists may not have received it by virtue of their reserve status. Its hit or miss with them, and we want to be good stewards and make sure everyone is protected. The Hepatitis B vaccination is not usually given to troopers unless theyre in the medical field, said Radike. However, given the unique mission of the JTF-160 being a detention center, we recommended that all guards and troopers in direct contact with the detainees be protected as well. Hepatitis B is not uncommon with guards because there is always a potential for violence within their job field, said Radike. Hepatitis A is a viral infection that infects 1.4 million people worldwide every year. Most people can conquer the infection without having any life time consequences causing them to suffer and pay. The virus can be shed in feces, loose stools, and passed along by poor hand washing. A common mode of infection is by eating uncooked food, which has been prepared by an infected worker. Hepatitis A is transmitted from bad hygiene, said Radike. The virus is very contagious and can be spread off of dirty, unwashed hands. Even from eating at a salad bar, there is potential of catching the virus, he added. We all eat together, so everyone is vulnera ble to Hepatitis A. The virus incubates for approximately a month, showing minimum to no symptoms at all before an individual gets sick. Some people can have a pro longed illness lasting several weeks before resolving. During the incubation period, the virus can still be passed on to others in close living arrange ments. If you are infected, you will be unable to perform your mission, said Radike. Being conta gious, youd have to be held away from the other troopers because of the close living space availi ble here. If one person gets sick, everyone will get sick. Symptoms can include malaise, flulike symp toms, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea and jaundice. However, there is a very effective vac cine available to prevent this disease. It requires a two-shot series; the last one is to be given no earlier than six months after the first one, said Radike. After the first shot, there is generally 90 percent protection against the virus. After the second shot, the protection is driven up to 99 per cent or better. All it takes is two shots for one kill, said Radike. The ben efits are life long, and they replace the old, painful shots of the past. Hepatitis B is a different virus. It also attacks the liver like its milder cousin Hepatitis A, but this virus is more virulent and has a much higher chance for causing death and becoming a chronic infection in its victims. With 300 million chronic carri ers of this infection worldwide, 5,000 U.S. citizens will die from its wrath this year, said Radike. Unlike Hepatitis A, this virus is spread by having sex with some body who is actively or chroni cally infected, or being exposed to the blood of someone who is infected by the virus. You dont know how youll grow up, and you never know who youll have sex with, said Radike. However, troopers, there is a vaccine that can completely pre vent any worries about this, he said. Its a three-shot series over a period of six months, but it could be stretched longer. The first shot gives you 50 per cent protection. After the second shot, youre 75 percent protected and after the third and final shot, youll have over 95 percent pro tection against the virus. The needles are a small price to pay when the vaccination is life long, said Radike. Overall, the vaccination pro gram for Hepatitis A and B is a logical step in the protection of all troopers here at GTMO. Its also a worthwhile experi ence here and now because the vaccine for both Hepatitis A and B on the outside would cost over one hundred dollars each for both complete series. This vaccination program is a good thing, Radike said. It is an overdue thing. Information on the Hepatitis A and B immunization program and vaccinations for the rest of the JTF-160 servicemembers will be forthcoming. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Navy Cmdr. James K. Radike, head of infectious diseases here at GTMO, thinks the Hepatitis immunization program is a must, for he yearns for the protection of all troopers on base. Story by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Prevention is better than a reaction Photo courtesy of Corel Gallery The minor pain from the needles is temporary, but the protection is everlasting.

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All summer long, the Downtown Lyceum Theater has been featuring a number of newly-released movies for all the people at GTMO. Many servicemembers and civilians from around the base took their kids to the the atre to check out these hot flicks as they were being played for the first time. They seem to have enjoyed them. These blockbuster hit movies such as: Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones, Men in Black II, The Sum of all Fears, SpiderMan and the recent Triple X were being played in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and in the United States at the same time. GTMO was able to get these movies because it is part of the First Run Overseas Theater (FROST) program. Therefore, the base receives brand new lab prints of these motion pictures in addition to the regular 35 mm movies, which are usually played eight weeks after their original release in the states. Getting these movies and coordinating the schedule for show times is the job of Devon E. Christie, the movie and program coordinator of GTMOs Morale, Welfare and Recreation program. I am sort of the middleman between NMPS and GTMO to get the movies. Once they come here, I have to schedule them for viewing on dates and times that are convenient for the residents of GTMO, said Christie. The reviews of the movies determine how soon they get to us. If the movie is a FROST, we get it at the same time its being run in the states, he said. NMPS, the Navy Motion Picture Service, based in Millington, Tenn., is the bridge between the movie production companies and the Navy bases all over the world. NMPS has been serving Navy installations since 1920. It supplies motion picture enter tainment on film and videocassettes to nearly 800 afloat and ashore commands in over 70 countries. According to Christie, NMPS screens all movies prior to procurement. The Classifica tion and Rating Administration (CARA) of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) rate all films. Movies are chosen for distribution solely based on their overall enter tainment value to the primary audience as stip ulated by the NMPS management guide. According to NMPS, commands may choose not to show a specific movie, but may not delete any part of a movie chosen for exhibition. This has not been an issue at GTMO. The management is more concerned about contractual arrangements to play the movies. All the movies we get are on contract for a period of time, which can be from 27 to 30 days, said Christie. We have to abide by the authorized play date. We cant play a movie before or after its authorized play date. So far, we havent had any problem with NMPS. Christie, who has been doing this job for three years, came to his office Monday, his day off, to make sure that everything was going smoothly. As he was reviewing a black binder, where he keeps the log for every movie acquired from NMPS, he was preparing the schedule for the movies that will be played in the next two weeks. In the midst of these tasks, he had to juggle between answering the ringing tele phone and giving instructions to one of his workers regarding movie prints that need to be picked up. You know, man, those 35 mm prints are heavy. But someone has to do this job, he said. For the most part, people are very content about what we play in the theater, said Christie. On occasion, I might get questions on whether or not I am getting a particular movie once its been advertised. Sometimes we get those movies, sometimes we dont. If the negotiation process for a movie takes too long, the movie gets to us very late or it falls through the cracks. Christie has to send to NMPS a monthly movie exhibition and attendance record. Do not be disturbed, he said, when you see somebody coming by you as youre watching a movie. We have to report to NMPS. This data is used by NMPS to determine if a movie has high patronage before releasing other authorized play dates. In addition to the 35 mm movies, which are projected at the Dowtown Lyceum, we have a huge variety of movies on 8 mm that are used for Camp Bulkeley and the CBQ, said Christie. Those movies were initially printed on 35 mm and shown at the Downtown Lyceum before they were transferred on 8mm tapes, he said. We have over 900 titles to choose from. We keep them up to three years. When it comes to MWR movies, the ser vicemembers here have no complaints. Air Force Airman 1st Class John Grant, who works at JTF-160 J-6, said he has been Downtown a few times to enjoy some flicks after a hard-working day. I like the outdoor theater, especially when the weather is fine he said. Its a different perspective. MWR is doing a very good job. They seem to get the movies not too long after theyve been released in the states. Thats great. Army Capt. James H. Gormly, JTF-160 civil affairs officer, said, I think overall, MWR is doing a fantastic job. They have a huge selection of movies, and Mr. Devon Christie is really working hard to get newly released movies for the troops. Page 11 Friday, September 20, 2002 Behind the scenes of GTMO movies Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire A look inside the Downtown Lyceum projection booth, where two 35 mm projectors are installed. One of them gets in motion to project the American national anthem before the feature presentation Monday night. The American flag projected on the big screen of the Downtown Lyceum as the national anthem was being played Monday night. Page 6 Friday, September 20, 2002 It can happen to you. Youre off from work, you have places to go, but unfortunately you have no vehicle to get you there. Thats when you must journey to the nearest bus stop, and after a reasonable wait, that long and yellow savior of a chariot will come to charter you as close as it can to your destination of choice. Providing the primary source of all trans portation operations conducted for Joint Task Force personnel are the efforts of the 418th Transportation Company, active duty Army soldiers from Fort Hood, Texas. They allow troopers strapped without their own wheels a way to get around GTMO more easily. Our main mission at GTMO is to trans port people where they need to go, said Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan, truck master with the 418th. Most soldiers cant live without those buses, said Sgt. 1st Class Eric Walker, detachment acting first sergeant with the 418th. Theyd be crying if we werent here. Even with an abundance of humvees rolling around the base and even the occa sional GTMO special, not everyone has the good fortune of having their own vehicle. Thats where the 418th comes in. People still have to ride the buses. Not everyone is blessed with having a humvee or a P.O.V, said Walker. And especially on Fri day or Saturday nights, if theyre drinking or what not, they wouldnt be driving anyway. To provide this service, it means long workdays. Every day starts at 0430 and ends at 0130 in the morning, said Ronan. The drivers shifts are pretty good, but we only get one day off every seven or so days. With over 20 personnel working three, sixhour shifts, driving the buses isnt all that bad, said Walker. Unfortunately, one of the biggest challenges that the bus drivers face can some times be the very people theyre serving. A negative to the job is sometimes when there are soldiers who are belligerent to the drivers; those who curse at them and get out of control, said Walker. Like on weekend nights, with people drinking too much, it can be dangerous. If it wasnt for us, a lot of people wouldnt be going anywhere, said Pfc. Diana Klinker, a bus driver with the 418th. Would they rather walk or ride the bus? Thats the way I look at it. The job can get tedious, and then there are those that like to complain a lot, said Ronan. This is free transportation that we are provid ing. People can get greedy, though, like want ing to get picked up or dropped off at non-authorized stops. We used to do that, but things got too carried away and people would take advantage, so now we only stop at authorized bus stops. But weve put up a lot of benches; we have them at the Loop, the NEX and a bunch out at Camp America, said Walker. And with the two joint task forces merging soon, theyre plans for an additional four stops to accommodate everyone. Now we have three buses that run to JTF160 headquarters all the way up to 1830, and weve added an extra bus going out to Camp America, said Ronan. Getting the people out of Camp America so they can better explore GTMO is an important aspect of their job, one that helps put their mis sion of helping people into better perspective. Those people dont have the option of just walking someplace, said Klinker. They rely on us to actually get them where they need to go. And thats a great feeling. Such a service as free transportation is unique for an operation like the Joint Task Forces, and the servicemembers deployed here are the ones who benefit from it, said Ronan. This is the only deployment Ive been on where there is a bus service, he said. If you were in Bosnia, there certainly wouldnt be one. Theres stuff to do here at GTMO, and we take people to the center of it. If you got to get around carrying a lot of gear, youre going to smile when you see that bus, said Walker. Otherwise, you could be walking with all of that equipment on. I mean, walk from Windward Loop to Marine Hill, and youll be sweating hard, even at night. Our transportation is here to help you. Possessing a fleet of buses, 5-ton trucks and tractors as well, keeping up on their mainte nance checks is a constant fight and a top pri ority for the 418th. But with the assistance of Kvaerner contractors and the Combined Maintenance Team working out of the motor pool next door, they make sure that if a bus inevitably bolos, that it gets rolling again in no time flat. These buses were made back in the s, and it seems that every day one of them goes down for some reason, said Ronan. But those guys in the motor pool are pretty good. Story and photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire 418th Transportation Co. gets Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan, truck master with the 418th Transportation Co., expertly checks the air pressure on a tire to a 5-ton truck. The bus service provided by the 418th Transportation Co. is here to make your life easier while at GTMO.

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At first the thought of being near the detainees was very strange and scary to the children. I have only been here a month, but I did nt want to come because I knew the Taliban was here. I am not really worried about them any more, it is just kinda freaky to be so close to them, said Anthony Mays, an 8th grade student. Children from military families lead lives that are far from typical. Children are exposed to various situations and responsibili ties that many other kids are not. You only have one childhood, and although children here are limited in certain ways, they are also in a unique situation that allows them to experience things many other children will never have the chance to, said MacFarland. The sacrifices and experiences these children endure make them very mature in certain ways and very adaptable to new environments and situations. So, when the JTF landed on GTMO, the children adapted and adjusted. Theres a big difference from now and before the JTF arrived. There are a lot more people here now. Before, you were able to get into the bowling alley, and the commissary was filled with food. Now, it is always crowded and there is always a lot of traffic, said Darrine Crockton, a 7th grade student at WT Sampson High School. But, I think them coming was good because when the Taliban first arrived, I was scared. I thought they might break out of their cells and do something to us, but Im not anymore. And for some, the joint environment pro vided an opportunity to see all of the military branches at work. I think it is cool to see all the different serv ices here, and they always stop to give me a ride, said Johnson. The arrival of the JTF gave some children more confidence about the safety and security of themselves and their families. I feel safe here. I think they are being guarded well, said Nick Basel, a 9th grade student at WT Sampson High School. The JTFs presence is more than a security blanket. For some of the students, this presence gave them opportunites and lessons to learn. Other then it being a lot more crowded here, a good thing about everyone being down here is that now we have a lot more people vis iting the school and talking to us. We are sup posed to have someone come in and train us on different things, said Mercedes Coakley, a 9th grader at the high school. Although many feel safer, most are aware that a threat still exists here. The only thing I still get nervous about is with these detainees here, I think we are at higher risk of being attacked. But, my father tells me the mil itary is prepared and if anyone tried wed be ready, said Coakley. To some of the children, the politics sur rounding GTMO is not compre hendible. To them, the solu tions seem as simple as dealing with a schoolyard squabble. I think that we are being too nice to the Tal iban here because if that was us, where they came from they wouldve probably killed us, said Crockton. The sacrifices and experiences that the chil dren of GTMO made every day and will con tinue to make seem to reflect those of their parents. I think Americans and the press need to realize the extreme sacrifice that military mem bers and their families make for their freedom and their freedom of speech, MacFarland said. This is my second year here. Being a civilian with no real military exposure previous to this, I have developed a great appreciation for it and what it does for us. This was defi nitely an eye-opening experience. Page 5 Friday, September 20, 2002 KIDS, from page 1 Nicole Ludovici, 10th-grader, peeks in her locker in between classes in search of her class text book. Ms. Dawn MacFarland speaks to 7th-grade student Megan Heitman about a homework assignment. Abraham Muoz, an 8th grader, reads from his text book to complete his class assignment. 7th and 8th grade students hanging out and chatting over lunch. Page 12 Friday, September 20, 2002 This statue is located behind the lighthouse near Cable Beach. It Was completed in 1999 by Roberto Ferrar and Angono Rizal, Cuban and Philippine migrants. It was dedicated to all the Marines that protect democracy at GTMOs fenceline. Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire GTMO monuments: Pieces of the past In 1994, Operation Sea Signal began and GTMO opened its door to thousands of Haitian and Cuban migrants. This statue was erected by a migrant in honor of the troops that pro vided humanitarian aide and assistance for the migrants in need. It can be found across from the ceramics shop on Sherman Avenue. This roadside shrine, located on Sherman Avenue and Johnson road. It represents the patron saint of Cuba, Virgen de la Caridad Del Cobre. The story of the Virgen de la Caridad Del Cobre originated in 1604 in Cuba, when three men out fishing encountered a fierce storm that almost killed them, fortunately, they were saved by the Virgen de la Caridad Del Cobre. The Virgen de la Caridad Del Cobre plays a significant role in Cuban Culture. Gauntanamo Bay is the oldest U.S. base overseas. It has been around for almost 100 years and has been the staging ground for many historical events. A plethora of monuments can be found scattered around the base. Each one of them tells a little piece of GTMOs story. Placed on the hill across from the Combined Bachelor Quarters on Sherman Ave. in 1998 to commemorate the 100th year Anniversary of the Battle of Cuzco Wells. The Battle of Cuzco Wells was the first land battle of the Spanish American war, and the first U.S. land battle vic tory during the war.

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Page 4 Friday, September 20, 2002 This weeks question: Whats one thing you had to learn the hard way? Army Sgt. Deborah Pacheco, Protocol Country Clearance, JTF-160 HQ Knowing what I want to do with my life when I grow up. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Troy Quinn, NCTAMS LANT Having to learn about women the hard way. Theyre so stubborn. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Cindy Laemmerhirt, Combat Camera, J-3 Having to come up with an answer to this ques tion is pretty hard. Spc. Terrence Styles, JTF-160 J-8 Looking people in the eye. Growing up on the streets, you cant let peo ple think youre scared. Army Staff Sgt. Guadalupe Carrillo, 2/142 Inf. Co. Joining the Army. I was drafted back in 1970, went to Vietnam, and Im still in. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Red flag for live rounds When you see a red flag raised high near one of the firing ranges here at GTMO, whether its blow ing in the wind or hanging still, this is meant to warn you that the firing range is active. Live rounds are being blasted off and you should stay away. At that moment, the range is a restricted area where only authorized personnel are welcome. If youre aware that you will be spending a day out on the range, be sure to have ear protection, because it could get quite loud. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Across 1 Metronome marking 4 Item 11 Blunder 12 Won 14 MGMs Lion 17 Surrender 18 __ con carne 19 Pen stuff 20 Simultaneous gunshots 22 Terminated 23 Fish basket 24 Smile scornfully 26 Mutilated 27 Lode yield 28 House parts 29 Cheat 30 River dam 31 Road (abbr.) 32 Radon (abbr.) 33 Treasure 34 Brand of cotton tipped sticks 35 Grassy areas 36 Nashville locale 37 Americium (abbr.) 38 A spinning toy (2 wds.) 39 Radar points 40 Comforter 41 Take to court 42 Enhance 44 Sad music 45 Jaded 46 Red planet 47 Fertile desert area 48 Mid-Eastern dwellers 49 Sounds 50 Roof overhang 51 Type of partnership 52 Type of water bird 53 Dinner drinks 54 Singing parts 55 Siggy 56 Contend 57 Jimmy 58 Encomium 59 Takes off 60 Unforgiving 61 Hints 62 Lords table 63 Capital of Tunisia 64 Torso 65 Mediterranean language 66 Fire irons 67 Day of the week (abbr.) 70 Fragrance 71 Southern European heath 72 Japanese city 73 Moved stealthily 75 Not any 76 Visitor 77 Rejoin 78 Whiten 79 Man 80 Scrimmage 81 Disarray 82 Rook 83 Laughter sound 84 United States (abbr.) 85 Baseball playing area 86 Stays in one places 87 Rascals 88 Work (abbr.) 89 State of being 90 Straightforward 91 Horse steerers 92 Instructor 93 Luau dish 94 Bun topping seed 96 Khaki cotton twill 97 Grog 98 Put on __ 99 Island nation 100 Swine 101 Speak 102 Kodak product 103 Ship initials 104 Sourly 107 Russian Marx 108 Lands 109 Sob Down 1 Portend 2 Poet Edgar Allen 3 Medium frequency 4 Uses a lever 5 Small brook 6 French yes 7 Deutschmark (abbr.) 8 Rising 9 Tribe heads 10 Belief 11 Heredity component 12 Topic 13 Danish krone (abbr.) 14 Thieves hideouts 15 Shade tree 16 Offers 17 Ground maize 18 Infant laryngitis 20 Holy person 21 Strangeness 22 Part of Colorado 23 Punctuation mark 24 Water vessels 25 Dozes 26 Cried like a cat 28 Merits 29 Pig pens 30 Loose curls 33 Spiritless 34 Oil change company 35 Decoys 39 Flat 40 Beneficiary 41 Flavor 43 Eastern Time 44 Paper towel brand 45 Incentive 46 Paired sock 48 Regions 49 Very big striped cat 50 Rock and Roll King 52 Brook 53 Inflict 54 Armor plate 55 Floras partner 56 Doctor 57 Slang 58 Feather 59 Flit 60 Little 61 Buddy 62 Get up 63 Work needs 64 Wedding item 65 Desire 66 Typing mistakes 67 Blemishes 68 Take flight 69 Tiny crawler 70 Misery 71 Hector 72 Poet 73 Slow tree mammal 74 Tan colors 76 Water birds 77 Rhinoceros nickname 78 Support 80 __ Vice (tv show) 81 Ables murderer 82 Furor 85 Heroic actions 86 Determines how heavy it is 87 Plunder 91 River 92 Hot embers 93 Medicine dose 95 Sister for short 96 Central processing unit 97 Cheese 98 Incorporeal 101 Choose 102 Remote 105 Near 106 Pennsylvania (abbr.) 107 Cubic centimeter Page 13 Friday, September 20, 2002 September 13th: DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, September 13 8 p.m. Country Bears, G 88 min 10 p.m. Reign of Fire, PG13 108 min Saturday, September 14 8 p.m. Eight Legged Freaks, PG13 99 min 10 p.m. Mr. Deeds, PG13 91 min Sunday, September 15 8 p.m. Men in Black II, PG13 91 min Monday, September 16 8 p.m. K19 the Widowmaker, PG13 91 min Tuesday, September 17 8 p.m. Crocodile Hunter, PG 89 min Wednesday, September 18 8 p.m. Country Bears, G 88 min Thursday, September 19 8 p.m. Eight Legged Freaks, PG13 99 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, September 13 8 p.m. Big Fat Liar, PG 88 min 10 p.m. Two Can Play That Game, R 91 min Saturday, September 14 8 p.m. Buffy the Vampire Slayer, PG13 86min 10 p.m. Hollywood SIgn, R 90 min Sunday, September 15 8, 10 p.m. Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones, PG -142 min Monday, September 16 8 p.m. The Shrink is In, PG13 91 min Tuesday, September 17 8 p.m. John Q, PG13 118 min Wednesday, September 18 8 p.m. Kiss of The Dragon, R 98 min Thursday, September 19 8, 10 p.m. Collateral Damage R 109 min Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris My morbid mind Can rewind To find The future. I can reverse The worst And bring good luck To those who are cursed. Most can not believe What I can conceive With my pen. I have the knowledge, power And wisdom of uncountable men ITS TRUE I can get you Stuck like glue, Sick like the flu, Or feel like new. ITS UP TO YOU Believe or deny Choose to die, Or choose to fly How ask why When the time is now? Im the powder in a bullet That makes the round go BLAUU! Mommy once said I was a nice boy; HEY MOM: LOOK AT ME NOW!

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Page 3 Friday, September 20, 2002 The seven Navy personnel proudly working at GTMOs Naval Media Center perform their jobs with a passion. While their ulti mate goal is to put out community information for the people of GTMO, most of the time theyre playing a well-chosen selection of tunes from GTMOs grand archive of rare and diverse music. Hosting four live shows a day, they do their absolute best to keep you entertained while you carry on with your responsibili ties. From 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. is the Daybreaker Show playing Top 40. From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. is the Hod Rod Cafe playing classic rock music. From 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. is Urban Groove playing R+B and urban music, and from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., The Road Runner Show pumps out alternative music and hard rock. If at any time you desire a song to be played to help smooth out your day, call the stations request line at x2300. GTMOs Naval Media Center crew Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Navy JO3 Celeste R. Eneas frantically searches through GTMOs massive selection of the worlds greatest music for a requested tune during a commercial break in her radio program. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Navy JOSN Alexis R. Brown deftly entertains the personnel here by unspooling her sweet spiel into the microphone. J03 Celeste R. Eneas This job is really great. I live for music, so what better job to have than to be a disc jockey for the United States Navy. JO1 Kristin D. Loeding, station manager I love my job. Its the best. I get to meet a lot of people from the community, and I get to play some very good and pleasing music. JOSN Alexis R. Brown I love it, theres no better job in the Navy than being a journalist. My first tour here has been a real treat and also a learning experience. Page 14 Friday, September 20, 2002 Courtesy patrol: making your weekends just a little bit safer All Fall Division Soccer rosters will be due on Friday, Sept. 20th. The Soccer season runs from Monday, Sept. 30th through Fri day, Nov. 8th. Contact Capt. Gormly or Maj. Buchanan at x5249 for more infor mation about MWR events. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. Mon day-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM-6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Flag Football Leagues, M-F, 6 PM, Cooper Field. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM4:00PM. Today, Friday, Sept. 20th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Saturday, Sept. 21st, 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 11:30AM-2:00PM, JTF160 Commander's Cup Series Awards Ceremony and Closing Cook-Out. Sunday, Sept. 22nd 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 5:00PM, Chess Tournament IX, CBQ. Monday, Sept. 23rd 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, Sept. 24th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1:00PM-7:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower Wednesday, Sept. 25th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1:00PM-7:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower 7:00PM, 9-Ball Tournament, CBQ. Thursday, Sept. 26th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. The following events took place on the night of Saturday, September 14, 2002. Some names have been changed or omitted to protect the innocent. I check my e-mail and I groan the way you do when you get a jury duty summons. You tell yourself, okay, you knew it was going to happen sooner or later, so just deal with it. You have been selected for courtesy patrol duty. Great. Well, its not like I havent flagged down the air-conditioned van when I was too impatient to wait for the steaming hot bus on a Friday night. After the initial e-mail, I get two more e-mails in which the date Im supposed to serve has changed. It finally gets nailed down to Saturday, the 14th. On Friday the 13th, I get a brief call informing me to show up at the Windward Loop MWR building at 7 p.m. BDUs, soft cap, and pistol belt. Roger that. Two hours before show time Im sitting in front of the TV get ting my hair cornrowed when I get a call alerting me that the cour tesy van is in the shop. No! Im envisioning what the bumpy ride of a humvee will do to the delicate stomachs of tipsy soldiers. Fortunately, it works out. A van becomes available. All is well. Whew! I strap on my pistol belt and head down to the Windward Loop MWR Center. There I meet Navy Chief Petty Officer Tim Weisman, who is in charge tonight. He briefs me and the other three people. Were here to help people, he says. Our function is to inter vene before they have to come in contact with the authorities. The idea is, we step in if some one looks like they need a ride, or if they look like they need to sim mer down. Were supposed to keep people from spending a night in the brig. Cool. I grab some food from the Jerk House. When I come back, I fall into a conversation with a Marine who just got here yesterday. He laments that he was just starting to work on a new movie with the director of Dogma when he was called back to active duty. He talks about his own script. It sounds too imaginative for Holly wood. But, hey you never know. The night drags. The place shouldve been packed with the Windjam mer being booked for the Firemans Ball, but the huge rowdy crowd I expected never materializes. I count 50 people. A third of them leave at 9:45 p.m. to catch Reign of Fire at the Lyceum. Its 11:10 when I finally spot my first bonafide client. Hes bobbing and weaving like a boxer trying to fake out an opponent. We do the Jedi mind trick on him: You need a ride, friend. Yes, I need a ride! he responds with a happy smile. The trip out to Camp America takes all of 15 minutes, but it feels more like an hour. The guy in the seat behind me is hiccupping nonstop. I have the bucket ready. Im... fine, he keeps saying in a soft, child-like voice. We get to Camp A and look for someplace to park the van in close proximity of the soldiers SEAhut so we wont have to walk too far. The problem is, our friend is no longer speaking. He stumbles out of the van too quickly and sprawls onto the gravel before we have a chance to move. We carefully help him to his feet. They painted all the SEAhuts, plus things look different out here at night. I cant spot the one Im looking for. But fate protects those who overindulge at the Tiki Bar. I flag down a guy wandering back from the latrine. Hey, buddy, do you know where the [omitted] MP Co. is? Instead of answering, the guy comes closer and stares at our ine briated friend. Its then I notice that theyre both wearing shirts from the same university. You know this guy? I ask. Yes, Im his platoon ser geant, comes the careful reply. Is he in any trouble? Weisman and I assure him that nothing happened. No fights, he just needs to sleep this one out. We hand him over to his sergeant, who opens the door to their hooch. John Doe pitches forward and manages to right himself before doing any damage. We wish them all goodnight. We walk back to the van and prepare to ride back to the Tiki Bar to shut the place down and get the last stragglers home. Well, we had our good deed for the night, says Weisman. If we didnt have one, it wouldnt have been complete! I have to agree. Story by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko You look like you need a ride, son. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The letters S and P are a sight for sore eyes when you need a lift home from the Tiki Bar at midnight.

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Page 2 Friday, September 20, 2002 Unit-Sponsored Events & Parties JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Multicultural Day Celebration Sunday, October 27, 2002 1-5 p.m. at Phillips Park Sponsored by Naval Station and Naval Hospital For more information, contact: Cathy Bautista 7-2450 Andrea Petrovanie 7-2033 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Did you hear on our last underway some thing like this on the mess decks? We may be pulling in three days early! Maybe... If you fell for that one, maybe you need... Then again, maybe not. Life is filled with maybes. Maybe this and maybe that. Our lives can seem out of con trol when so many things are unstable, when they change constantly in this ever-changing world. Wheres our security? And we dont mean the kind of security that walks around in camouflage! There once was a love song with the title Maybe. One of the lines was, Maybe if I pray, youll come back to me . oh, oh, oh, oh, Maybe, Maybe, Maybe, Maybe. Words like doubtful, unsure, hard to figure out, uncertain, or perhaps usually can replace our use of the word maybe. Maybe... There once lived a man in a far off land. This is no fairy tale. His name was Paschal. He was a philosopher. Thats someone who loves logic. He came up with what is known as Paschals Wager. Any gamblers out there should love this one. Basically, Paschals Wager goes like this. The game board has four possibilities: 1. God does not exist and you dont believe in God. 2. God does not exist and you believe in God. 3. God does exist and you believe in God. 4. God does exist and you dont believe in God. If you bet on 1, life has no ultimate mean ing or supernatural hope. Go with 2 and at least you led a good life that helped others. Choice 3 gets you big time everlasting happiness. Wager 4 gets you into hot water to say the least. Believing in God (2 & 3) is always better. No maybes about it! Submitted by Navy Lt. Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, USNR JTF-160 units approaching the end of their tours at GTMO will want to start planning ahead of time for farewell parties and events. To avoid conflicts coordinate and reserve facil ities such as beaches, parks, and equipment well in advance. Keep in mind that unit parties must be approved in writing by the chain of command, even if they are held at a private domicile. The senior Officer/NCO present is responsible for insuring that JTF-160 Policy Letter #1, Alco hol Consumption, and NAVBASE regulations are followed. The senior person will also insure that nonalcoholic beverages are available for nondrinkers, and provide a plan to monitor and minimize underage drinking. IAW COMNAVBASEGTMOINST 1710.10G, organizers of large events (Those with over 20 people participating) are required to notify NAVBASE Police in writing within 48 hrs prior to the event. Remember that JTF-160 has a zero toler ance alcohol abuse policy. Non-drinkers should be assigned as designated drivers. Think safety first! Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 Maybes JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. R. W. Funaro This week, Command Sgt. Maj. Funaro passes on the following reminder from Father Denis Edward O'Brien, USMC It Is The Soldier Its the soldier, not the reporter Who has given us freedom of the PRESS. Its the soldier, not the poet, Who has given us freedom of SPEECH. Its the soldier, not the campus ORGANIZER, Who has given us the freedom to DEMONSTRATE Its the soldier, not the lawyer, Who has given us the right to a FAIR TRIAL. Its the soldier who salutes the flag, Serves under the flag And whose coffin is draped by the flag, Who gives the protester The right to burn the flag. Page 15 Friday, September 20, 2002 Hood Ratz take down War Eagles Hood Ratz dominated the War Eagles 2613 on the gridiron Friday night. The Hood Ratz are now 6-3 and have just made it a tighter race in the Crunching Central Division. With only a couple games left in the regu lar season, there are five teams: NAVSTA, 239th MP Co., 178th MP Co., NCTAMS and Hood Ratz fighting for only four spots in the upcoming playoffs. Each game from here on out is crucial. Hood Ratz were determined to keep their playoff hopes alive by insuring a win. This would not be easy. They had to go through the War Eagles tough defense and ferocious pass rush. Hood Ratzs plan was to go deep in this game. The Hood Ratz took a 7-0 lead with a quarterback option. Hood Ratzs quarterback Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan took matters into his own hands. It was a good play by Ronan. He was bringing the ball down field when he knew that the War Eagles defense was closing in on him, said Spc. Wascar Vizcaino. After running 24 yards, Ronan saw me open on his right. He then tossed the ball to me and I was able to bring it home for a touch down, Vizcaino said. Ronan was able to see that play unfold with the War Eagles bearing down on him. This was not a designed play. All and all, good players make good plays. I was able to make a move on the defense and get free into the end zone for a touchdown, said Vizcaino. The Hood Ratz seemed more focused in this game. Hood Ratz scored again on a half back pass to the end zone for a touchdown. The score was now 13-0. We have been practicing that play all week. We felt confident coming into this game and we had something to prove to the War Eagles. So we put it to them, said Army Pfc. Jamaal Wilkins. War Eagles defense is something to reckon with in the league. Hood Ratz felt good with the newfound speed and athleticism. They believed they would fair better against the rest of the competition. We have new additions to the team, Viz caino and Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Dajuan Glover. We are better now and NAVSTA and NCTAMS need to look out in our division, said Wilkins. War Eagles would not roll over easy, their defense is their strength. An interception by Army Sgt. Tony Smith gave them brand new energy in the game. We are on our way back Baby, we are in the game, said Smith. After the interception, War Eagles struck fast and put six points on the scoreboard. They broke a run play that put them in the end zone. At 13-6, the doughnut was off the scoreboard. War Eagles were on the attack. They came at the Hood Ratz hard. They forced another turnover. This put the War Eagles in scoring position. One play at a time, that is the way we are going to be able to come back on the Hood Ratz. We are playing now the way we were supposed to be playing. We are planning to win this with 7:36 left on the clock, said Army Sgt. John L. Hopson. Momentum had shifted toward the War Eagles side. They seemed to have taken con trol of the game. As the War Eagles were marching down the field their quarterback made a crucial mis take. He threw an interception at the ten-yard line. This stopped the War Eagles drive cold and maybe their playoff chances. It was not easy keeping an eye on the quarterback. My job was to watch his every move on the field. I knew the play was com ing my way because I had seen that formation earlier in the game, said Glover. Hood Ratz were fortunate to have escaped with a win. They need to have that killer instinct and take advantage of the opportuni ties when they come. We are playing well right now. We just have to take out the teams when we have the chance and not let them hang around, said Ronan. They threw a couple of interceptions that could have cost them the game, but their defense stepped up; especially Glover, who had three interceptions in the game. He is playing well. He has a knack for the ball. He was able to read the quarterback all day. We are a better team now, said Vizcaino. We should be able to sweep all remaining games in the regular season and enter the play offs hot like fire. The game plan worked to perfection. They executed their plays and were able to benefit from the War Eagles mistakes in the game. We were able to use our trick plays in this game. We were able to take advantage of their cornerbacks all game long, Ronan said. We were trying to have fun in the game and win, he said. A big motivator in the game was that the War Eagles said they we going to win this game, but we proved them wrong. Flag Football Standings CRUNCHING CENTRAL x Naval Station 9-0 239th MP Co. 8-2 178th MP Co. 7-2 NCTAMS 7-3 Hood Ratz 6-3 MIUW 204 2-7 Cactus Curtain 1-8 Wildcats 0-9 MONSTROUS MIDWEST x MCSF Co. 9-2 x Buckeyes 7-3 x Hospital 6-4 War Eagles 5-5 Gun Runners 4-6 Chucks 4-6 Security 3-6 JTF-170 2-7 Angry Beavers 2-9 x clinched playoff berth Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan avoids the War Eagles rushing attack and scrambles from the pocket. Army Pfc. Jamaal Wilkins puts the moves on the War Eagles Defense as he scores a touchdown on the play.

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On September 10, 2001, Guantanamo Bay may have been described as a small, peaceful town with approximately 2,000 inhabitants. There was no traffic. There was no JTF, and its troops were not around to flood the streets and Navy Exchange. Humvees and deuce-and-ahalves did not frequently roll down Sherman Avenue, and detainees were never even heard of. Navy personnel and their families lived in GTMOs small tight-knit community; they went to work and their children went to school. However, the next morning everything was about to change, especially for GTMOs most innocent residents. September 11th sparked many changes and experiences for the children of GTMO, said Dawn MacFarland, English and Drama teacher at WT Sampson High School, GTMO. Michael Johnson, a 7th grade student at WT Sampson High School, remembers the things he saw change here after that day. For a little while, the scariest thing to me was whenever I saw a plane coming in, because I thought something bad was going to happen. And then, everything started to change here. We really couldnt do anything. We had a curfew and there was a lot of security. I had to carry my ID card all the time. These adjustments were just the beginning. They never expected the waves of people that were about to hit the island, especially not Americas most wanted. When they first brought the Taliban (what the children refer to the detainees as) here I was really scared. They were held in a camp that was really close to my house and at night I could hear them singing or mumbling or something, said Jacob Sporrer, 7th grade student at the high school. The singing and mumbling Sporrer refers to was the Muslim call to prayer. These kids are extremely resilient. I was probably more nervous about being here than them in the following weeks, said MacFar land. Its funny because while the detainees were being held at Camp X-ray, some children could hear them chanting throughout the day. The majority were more irritated with the noise than afraid of it. Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. GTMO kids: close to our mission Friday, September 20, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 15 Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Kids of Guantanamo Bay: adjust, adapt their new neighbors Dawn MacFarland, an English and Drama teacher at WT Sampson High School, and her 7th grade class during a class lesson. See KIDS, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 P a ge 8 Page 15 Page 16 Friday, September 20, 2002 Airman 1st Class Lynette Faulk Q: Lynette Faulk, this is your 15 minutes of fame! Tell me a lit tle bit about yourself. A: I work in J-3, Operations. Im stationed at Kirtland Air Force base in Albuquerque, New Mex ico. I was born in D.C., but raised in Maryland. Ive been in the Air Force for three years, come Octo ber. Q: And how long have you been at GTMO? A: Three weeks. I didnt know what to expect when I got here. This is my first deployment, but any time you go somewhere new theres an adjustment. Q: Lets start with something simple. Whats your favorite type of music? A: I mostly listen to R&B. Q: If you could have a song written about you, what musician would you want to compose it, who would perform it, and what would it be called? A: Id want Maya Angelou to write it, Alicia Keys to sing it, and it would be called, Lifes Lessons. Q: Say, how would your clos est friend describe you? A: Someone quiet at times, but very outgoing. Q: Hmm. Quite a contrast. So it takes people awhile to get to know you? A: Yes. Q: If you had to describe the single most valuable thing youve learned, what would it be? A: Oh... Ive learned not to take people and lessons for granted. Q: Hollywood is filming your story; what kind of film would it be and who would play you? A: Probably Pam Grier. It would be a drama. Q: Off the wall question you wake up tomorrow with a super power. What is it and what do you do with it? A: Oh, invisibility. Q: Would you spy on people? A: I wouldnt exactly call it spying ... Q: Okay, you just won the lot tery. What is the first thing you would do? A: Well, how much are we talk ing, here? I have to budget this! Q: One million dollars. A: I would set my mother and my sister up with anything they want first. Id take a couple of thousands for myself, then the rest for savings and charities and church. Q: Do you have famous or notable relatives or ancestors? A: I wish Marshall Faulk was related, but hes not. Q: Yeah, too bad. Whats your favorite meal? A: Male?? What kind of ques tion is this? Q: No, MEAL. A: Oh! Collard greens, yams, potato salad... I love food so much. Im making myself hungry. Q: Me too! Okay, name a film you could watch over and over. A: Friday. Not every day, all day, but you can never get tired of Friday. Q: Do you collect anything? A: Yes, shot glasses. I have about 25 right now from different countries and states. I get them from friends and family. Q: Heres a trip down memory lane what were your favorite childhood toys or games? A: I liked Sorry! I used to play with Barbie dolls and jacks. Q: If you were a plant, you would be: A: An aloe vera plant. It heals. Q: Oh, thats cute! Last ques tion. Any pieces of wisdom to pass on to your successor here at GTMO? A: Take everything in stride and learn from your experience. Pam Grier would play me in a movie. Airman 1st Class Lynette Faulk performing her admin duties at the JTF-160 HQ. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire Lifes lessons with lyrics by Lynette