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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00068
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: September 13, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00068

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This Sept. 11, it was time to remember. JTF-160 and JTF-170 both chose 8:46 a.m., the time the first plane struck the first tower. The GTMO Fire Dept. chose 10:05 a.m. and 10:28 a.m., the times the towers fell and turned a rescue into a deathtrap. The chaplains chose the beginning and the end of this anniversary day, holding services of comfort and com memoration at 7:30 a.m. in the Camp America chapel and 6:00 p.m. at the Naval Base Chapel. All chose the symbols, signs and symptoms that have become so much a part of America since war and peace merged that terrible day: flags and salutes, prayers and pictures, bowed heads and hands on hearts. Tears. Tributes. Moments of silence. Words of remembrance and renewal. The purpose of our memorial day service is to remember the events of this day one year ago that ending and that beginning, Col. Donald Woolfolk, deputy commander of JTF170, told the audience at JTF-170s military ceremony outside its headquarters Wednesday morning. We gather to eulogize those who were killed and those who have suffered from that ending. We gather to renew our resolve to emerge at that beginning. Weve heard the ringing of the bells at 8:46 to commemorate the beginning of the war with the first attack. Weve listened to Taps to commemorate all those who were killed that day and those who have lost their lives in the battle since. Weve heard a chaplain speak words of comfort and healing, requests for grace and guidance, and prayers for the safety of our servicemembers deployed around the world. Each of these gestures is a comfort. And yet, when I pause and consider the enormity of it all, consider the death and destruction on that one terrible day, with the personal loss of comrades in the Pentagon, or comprehend the loss of families and friends in New York, I falter. Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2002, GTMO faltered too. Not in the JTF-160 detention operation that fights for Enduring Freedom by keeping Americas enemies off battlefields and its rep Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 9/11/02: A day to remember Friday, September 13, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 14 Story by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire GTMO honors the victims, the heroes, and the war on terrors opening shots Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Spc. Victor G. McKenna, J6 with JTF-160, returns the flag outside the Pink Palace to full-mast at sunset Wednesday. Flags were flown at half-mast in memory of the thousands who died in the attacks of Sept. 11. See 9/11/02, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 Page 9 Page 15 Page 16 Friday, September 13, 2002 Spc. Wascar Vizcaino, 43rd MP Brigade Q: So you work in the motor pool. What do you do there? A: I am a logistics specialist. I order parts for the vehicles of JTF-160 that need to be serviced. Q: How long have you been here? A: Three-and-a-half months. Q: How do you like it so far? A: Its the best bid Ive ever had. I think anybody would like it here. I get to have fun with the guys while we get a lot of work done. Q: What do you do for fun? A: Well, I play sports. I am a supreme ath lete. I weigh 185 pounds and I am 6-2 tall. Q: Do you have a nickname? A: Yeah. When I was on the mean streets of Providence, people used to call me Vic, the Gifted Kid, because, you know, Im good in sports. I beat a lot of peo ple and I got a lot of haters, even here at GTMO. Q: Why do people hate you because of your skills? A: Mostly because of the way I dress. Theyre scared of me. They think I am a thug, a bad boy. Im just misunderstood because of my hip-hop look. Q: How do you deal with that? A: I ignore those peo ple. Im very intellectual. I went to Johnson and Wales University back in Providence, R.I. Q: What was your major? A: Sports management. Im all about sports. Q: Besides sports, anything else you like? A: I like to watch gangster movies like Scarface, Goodfellas and Carlitos Way. Not to forget the funny ones like Happy Gilmore and Half-Baked. I like to party hard listening to Hip-Hop and Span ish music. For all you out there, I am a true Dominican. Thats why I got these moves. Q: Oh. So you dress like a thug, but you seem pleasant enough. Would you say you have a split personality? A: NO! Im just a nice kid in the inside, looking different. Look, I want to set the record straight that I am innocent for every thing theyre accusing me of. I didnt do it. Q: What are you talking about? A: Ive been in a couple of arguments since Ive been here. Im always a suspect because I have a bad-boy look. Im a good soldier. Im all about love. Q: All right, lets take it easy. What animal would you like to be? A: A dog. But not just any dog. Im talking about the one in the Taco Bell commercial. That dog is cool. He gets all the honeys. Yo quiero Taco Bell. Q: You know they fired him, right? How about your favorite actress? A: I guess Ill say Angelina Jolie. Q: Whats missing at GTMO? A: I wish we had more pool parties and of course more good-looking women. Q: Of course. How do you see yourself five years from now? A: Away from this island. Q: Are you planning on doing something wild before you leave GTMO? A: Im working now on a big production thats going to be at the Base Community Center. Its going to be wild something youve never seen at GTMO. Photo courtesy of Spc. Vizcaino Spc. Wascar Vizcaino in civilian attire, brandishing a tiki torch and his much talked about, yet misunderstood thug-like clothing. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Nobody beats The Viz Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Vizcaino, looking like the good soldier that he is.

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Page 2 Friday, September 13, 2002 Provost Marshals Office COMMNAVBASEGTMOINST 1710.10G, GTMO OUTDOOR RECREATION & WILDLIFE covers reg ulations governing the use of outdoor recreational facilities and the care of wildlife. It should be noted that except for fish ing, recreational hunting and trapping is strictly prohib ited. Also prohibited is the feeding, breeding, or keeping of iguanas, hutia (a.k.a. banana rats), chickens, and snakes. Spear fishing is permitted only for certain types of fish (check with the MWR Marina). Cocked spear guns are pro hibited while out of the water, while within 50 yards of Phillips Dive Pier, or while 50 feet of swimmers, snorkelers, and other divers not engaged in spear fishing. The use of chemicals, electrical current, traps, or explo sives for taking fish is prohibited. Fishing from boats is authorized. Shore fishing is authorized in all areas open to the public except Phillips Dive Pier. Fishermen should take care not to discard fishing lines into waters. Scoop nets may be used to land fish caught on hooks, or to catch small reef fish for aquariums. Bully nets are authorized to catch lobsters. The eating of mollusks (clams, oysters, snails, etc.) may be hazardous to your health due to sewage water. The Security Department and the Harbor Patrol are the designated GTMO Game Wardens, and are authorized to issue citations for any violations of the Outdoor Recreational Facilities and Wildlife. We encourage you to relax and enjoy yourself when you are off duty, but please do it within the established guidelines. Thank you. Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. One year ago, we believed that Islamic ter rorists declared war on the United States and our way of life. Actually, this war did not start last September, but has been going on for over a decade. It can be traced back to the Locker bee airline bombing, and even has roots in the Oklahoma City bombing. War has been declared on the freedoms that we have built the United States on for over two hundred years. Our lives have been permanently changed. We no longer feel safe when we travel, when we go to work, or conduct everyday life. And we no longer believe that our lives will not be touched by random violence. But the terrorists are learning the hard les son that many of the world's powers have learned before them. This country will not be paralyzed with fear because we are united to destroy this threat. The terrorists fail to realize the great strength of this country lies in its peo ple and the diversity they represent. No matter what terrorist group attacks us, they attack peo ple of their own religious beliefs, their own eth nic culture, their own race and gender. By doing so, they demonstrate that they are not motivated by some high religious ideal, but are only lawless murderers. What is important is that in this past year we as a nation have demonstrated we believe in the common law of man. You did not see this country resort to ethnic or religious persecu tion. You did not see radical parties rise from the ashes of the world trade center demanding we ignore our constitution. Instead, we took the fight to our enemies, and committed our selves to fight for freedom in Afghanistan. For those of us serving here in Guantanamo Bay, our war is about proving to the world that this country does abide by law in the treatment of the detainees. While the public debates the technicalities of how these people should be classified, we will continue to follow the tradi tions of humane treatment. For over 365 years we have been fighting wars as a people, and have demonstrated by our actions, that we hold ourselves to the highest standards. In other countries, these detainees would not be heard from again. Other countries have tortured our servicemen and women. But we as soldiers will preserve our American ideals. Every day I am very proud of the profes sionalism of all the soldiers, marines, sailors, airmen and coastguardsmen who perform their missions flawlessly in support of the Joint Task Force. We are proving to the world that each one of us believes in the importance of this mission. I thank you for your sacrifices and daily contributions. May God watch over us every day. By Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Special to The Wire 9/11/02: At war for one year Photo by Air Force Master Sgt. Michael E. Best JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus Multicultural Day Celebration Sunday, October 27, 2002 1-5 p.m. at Phillips Park Sponsored by Naval Station and Naval Hospital For more information, contact: Cathy Bautista 7-2450 Andrea Petrovanie 7-2033 I.D. Card Office Closure The base I.D. card office will be closed start ing 7 a.m. September 18 through 5 p.m. Sep tember 20, 2002 due to computer upgrades and training. I.D. card services will resume at 8:30 a.m. on September 23, 2002. All personnel with I.D. cards expiring between these dates are requested to come to the Personnel Support Detachment (PSD) for I.D. card updates. PNl (SW/AW) Crawford ext. 4494 or PNI Santiago ext. 4097. Page 15 Friday, September 13, 2002 114th MP Co.s battle with itself It was brother against brother, North against South, Cain against Abel. The War Eagles and the Chucks, both from the 114th Military Police Company, battling it out for flag-football supremacy on the gridiron of Cooper Field on Monday night. We have love for one another but this is war. We had to take care of business on the football field, said Army Sgt. John L. Hopson from the War Eagles. And so they did, beating their brethren the Chucks 19-12 in a defense-dominated game. The War Eagles constant pressure on the quarterback forced the Chucks into five inter ceptions in the game. If you put pressure on the quarterback he will eventually make a mistake. The pressure we put on him caused the interceptions, said Spc. Cammie L. Branch from the War Eagles. The War Eagles defense scored 12 of the 19 points in the win. Though there were heavy hearts on the field to see fellow 114th MPs go down to defeat, it was a good win, one that not only gave the the War Eagles bragging rights within the company but kept them in the Com manders Cup playoff hunt. The War Eagles record improved to 4-4 and they are confident with four games remaining. We are playing well now and we are going to continue for the rest of the season. Its all business from here on out. For the rest of the season we are going to play hard, prac tice and execute. We should be able to win the rest of our ballgames, said Hopson. The game was lopsided in the first half. It was all War Eagles 19-0. The War Eagles dominated the half with defense and special teams. They were going after the Chucks quarter back like jackals after their prey. I just felt I needed to get that quarterback. Every down we played I would go a hundred percent at him, said Branch. The War Eagles, using a zone-blitz defense, would send two and even three players after him, gambling on the QB making a mistake and not having enough time to find the open player. It worked to perfection. It felt good making two interceptions and taking them all the way for touchdowns, Army Sgt. Tony Smith said at halftime. I am coming with more pressure in the second half. I am not going to let up tonight. I am going all the way. The teams offensive production was nonexistent in this game. Both teams were strug gling and making mistakes that would hurt their opportunities to score. The edge in this game was the special teams. The War Eagles had two punt returns for over 30 yards and one returned all the way for a touchdown. The 60-yard touchdown punt return by Hopson was a show of pure will to score. He ran to the 40-yard line when he crossed the field looking for daylight. Then he found it, blowing by four defensive players to score another War Eagles touchdown. The ball came down wobbly, said Hop son. I just sat down on the play and read the coverage. I was patient, and when I saw a hole I opened it up and took it to the big house. This made the score 19-0. The game was in the bag at this point. The War Eagles defense let up in the last half and the Chucks were able to score two touchdowns to make the final score 19-12. It feels real good to beat the expansion team of the 114th MP Co., said Branch. Looking forward, the War Eagles defense can make or break the rest their Commanders Cup season. The guys look up to me for that defensive spark on the field, said Branch. I try to keep them motivated all the time. I keep them going and keep their spirits up no matter what is hap pening. It worked last week and this week, he said. Now its got to work from here on out. We made some mistakes but all in all we are doing a great job on the field. In the regular season their defense has been carrying them, but in the playoffs the War Eagles will definitely need more offensive power in their arsenal if they want to win it all. Our defense has been holding us up all season long. We need to throw the football deep and go and get it. That is what we are here for: to score points, said Spc. Bradley T. Wilkins. In the last four games of the regular season the War Eagles blitz-crazy defense should be something to reckon with. We had the Chucks beat from the begin ning of the game with our defense, said Smith. We force mistakes, and we take you out of your game. The league should look out for the War Eagles. Flag Football Standings CRUNCHING CENTRAL Naval Station 8-0 239th MP Co. 7-1 178th MP Co. 6-2 NCTAMS 5-3 Hood Ratz 4-3 MIUW 204 2-5 Cactus Curtain 1-6 Wildcats 0-8 MONSTROUS MIDWEST MCSF Co. 8-2 Buckeyes 6-2 Hospital 5-3 War Eagles 4-4 Gun Runners 4-5 Security 3-6 Chucks 2-6 JTF-170 2-6 Angry Beavers 1-7 Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Sgt.Tony Smith takes one of his two intercep tions all the way to the house for a touchdown. Army Sgt. John L. Hopson smokes by the defense as he returns a punt for 60 yards in the War Eagles 19-12 win over the Chucks.

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Page 14 Friday, September 13, 2002 All Fall Division Soccer rosters will be due on Friday, Sept. 20th. The Soccer season runs from Monday, Sept. 30th through Fri day, Nov. 8th. Contact Capt. Gormly at x5249 or Maj. Buchanan for more infor mation about MWR events. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. Mon day-Thursday, 6:15PM-7:15PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM-6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Flag Football Leagues, M-F, 6 PM, Cooper Field. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM4:00PM. Today, Friday, Sept. 13th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 7:00PM, 9-Pin No-Tap Bowling Tournament, Part IX, Marblehead Lanes. Saturday, Sept. 14th, 07:00AM-2:00 PM, Dawn Fishing Trip, Pelican Petes Marina. 08:00AM JTF-160 Commanders Cup Series Swim Tournament, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Sunday, Sept. 15th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 12:30PM JTF-160 Commanders Cup Series Horse shoe Tournament, Denich Gym. Monday, Sept. 16th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, Sept. 17th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Wednesday, Sept. 18th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1:00PM-1:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower Thursday, Sept. 19th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Creation relaxation for troops Nestled on the outskirts of Sherman Avenue just past the SEABEES garage there is a lit tle piece of relaxation heaven waiting for the hard-working troops (or anyone else) here on Guantanamo Bay: the Ceram ics and Pottery Shop. We get lots of troops in here, a lot of single people or geographical bachelors for the time being, said Diane Grewe, Ceramics and Pottery Shop manager. They seem a lot more relaxed when they leave the shop compared to when they walk in. The Ceramics and Pottery Shop opened two years ago as a pottery club with only 25 members. Within six months, according to Grewe, the shop had over 200 regular visitors. And its not just for troops. The Ceramics and Pottery Shop is open to the GTMO community at large, and has recently kicked off a series of classes with holiday themes that whole families can enjoy. The community had a spe cial interest in these classes, and that is why we decided to have them, said Grewe. The first class, which has already begun, is the Hal loween-themed Ghost on a Fence. It is a two-session class offered for adults on Sept. 7 and Sept. 21, from 8-10 a.m., and Sept. 9 and 16, 9-11 a.m. or 6-8 p.m. for ages 16 and up. These classes are stress relievers for me. It is a fun thing to do, and you get the chance to meet great people, said Sheryl M. Mays, spouse of a civilian contractor. For the kids, children aged 7-9 will be able to attend the Happy Face Pumpkin class Friday Sept. 20, from 5:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. The Ceramics and Pottery Shop even offers a parent-andchild (aged 4-6) Happy Face Pumpkin class that will be held on Sept. 30, 8-10 a.m. or 6-8 p.m. And for children ages 10-12 there will be a Light-up Kitten or Puppy with Pump kin class on Friday, Sept. 27 from 5:30-7:30 p.m., and a class held on Saturday Sept. 28 from 8-11 a.m. The next class that will be held is the Halloween Mugs class. This class is available to teens 13-17 years of age, start ing Monday, Sept. 23, 6-8p.m. There are 15 available slots in the adult classes, and 10 slots in the parentand-child classes, which adds up to 20 students, said Grewe. The ceramics classes range in prices from $5 to $20. During these classes students do more than just paint ceramic themes. They learn different painting tech niques. This month I am teaching dry-brushing and stippling techniques in the classes, Grewe said. And we will con tinue on with theme classes in the following months. This months theme is Halloween, October will have classes with a Thanksgiving theme, and in November the classes will have a Christmas theme. In addition to the ceramics classes, the shop also offers adult beginner pottery classes made up of two sessions. There are morning and evening classes available. The next class begins Sept. 18; call the shop at 4795 for more information. So come on down. Make something. Youll feel better. Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Sheryl M. Mays, ceramics student, puts the finishing touches on her project. John Hackett, Ceramics and Pot tery Shop employee, smoothes out the top of this light-house. Ceramic firemen: works in progress and one completed. Page 3 Friday, September 13, 2002 Responsible for Guantanamo Bays public safety, including firefight ing and medical emergencies here on base, the highly trained firefight ers of the GTMO Fire Department perform their duties with pride. From helping people who get pulled out to sea or trapped on a dangerous cliff to dealing with hazardous materials and burning brush, to saving peo ples property from the cruel kiss of flame, these hard workers have the training and the will to get the job done. GTMOs firefighters Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Raymond Walsh, a firefighter with the GTMO Fire Department, skillfully drives a fire truck out of the garage to perform a routine functions check on all of the equipment on the vehicle. Everard Fraser, firefighter Ive been working the job ten years, and the time has been going by real fast. Its a good community service. You meet a lot of good people out there. Steve Waltermon, assistant fire chief of the GTMO Fire Dept., mans the megaphone to make contact with his fellow firefighters inside the firehouse. Sheldon Spence, firefighter This job is very rewarding. You get rec ognized for doing a good job, and that feels great. Motivation is always high, and that keeps me going. Neville McDonald, firefighter I have a great job, and great people to work with. There is always something new to be learned. Its nice to always be giving back to the community. Steve Waltermon, assistant fire chief I started out as a firefighter in the Air Force in 1986 and worked my way up. This profession is a way of life. You have to really love what youre doing.

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Page 4 Friday, September 13, 2002 This weeks question: Whats your favorite part in any military movie? Army Sgt 1st Class Charles K. Crosby, 342nd MP Co. The whole basic training scene in Full Metal Jacket. But nothing was said that I would much care to repeat. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Husniyah N. McNeill When the colonel says You want the truth; you cant handle the truth! in A Few Good Men. Army Spc. Ron C. Coen, 178th MP Co. Full Metal Jacket is a classic. The best part is when Gomer Pyle blows out his drill instruc tors brains. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Carol J. Nines, Security Harbor Defense The whole concept of We Were Soldiers was great. The officer in charge really cared about his troops. Army 1st Lt. Jonathan L. Adams 178th MP Co. The scene in Gettysburg where Colonel Chamber lain orders his troops to fix bayonets and charge. Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin One last salute A soldier pays a final 9/11 tribute just before sunset to the American flag flying near the Pink Palace on Wednes day. Flags at Guantanamo Bay were flown at half-mast Wednesday in honor of the thousands who died in the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. When sunset came at 7:06 p.m., in accordance with protocol, flags with nighttime spotlights on them were raised again to signify the passing of the tribute period. Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Across 1 Evening 4 Farmers ___ 8 Assumed 10 Capital of Switzerland 11 Asian country 13 El __ (Texas city) 14 Prissy 16 Choose 17 Genetic code 18 Oddball 19 Good grief! 21 Day of the week (abbr.) 22 Body of water 23 Movie star Taylor 24 Nervous system 25 Nichts 27 However 28 Chew 30 Festive 31 Billy or nanny 33 Narration 34 Blizzard 38 Burros 39 Lick Down 1 Flightless bird 2 Tub 3 Compass point 4 Air (prefix) 5 Licensed practical nurse 6 Advertisements 7 Prune 8 Drowse 9 Piece of land 10 Clensing 12 Tiny 13 Raining 15 Pink 18 Football assoc. 20 Owns 26 Country in SE Asia 27 Balsam 29 Scepter 30 Long fish 32 Also 33 Fiddle 35 Compass point 36 Winter sport 37 X Page 13 Friday, September 13, 2002 Answers to the September 6 puzzle DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, September 13 8 p.m. Stuart Little 2, PG 70 min 10 p.m. Triple X, PG13 114 min Saturday, September 14 8 p.m. Like Mike, PG 100 min 10 p.m. Reign of Fire, PG13 -108 min Sunday, September 15 8 p.m. The Widowmaker, PG 13 138 min Monday, September 16 8 p.m. Mr. Deeds, PG13 89 min Tuesday, September 17 8 p.m. Men in Black II, PG 13 91 min Wednesday, September 18 8 p.m. The Widowmaker, PG13 138 min Thursday, September 19 8 p.m. Crocodile Hunter, PG 89 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, September 13 8 p.m. Men in Black II, PG 13 91 min 10 p.m. Bat 21, PG13 105 min Saturday, September 14 8 p.m. Bad Company, PG13 117 min 10 p.m. Murder by the Numbers, R 120 min Sunday, September 15 8, 10 p.m. Windtalkers, R 133 min Monday, September 16 8 p.m. Mr. Deeds, PG13 91 min Tuesday, September 17 8 p.m. The Scorpion King, PG13 90 min Wednesday, September 18 8 p.m. Jason X, R 93 min Thursday, September 19 8, 10 p.m. Scream, R 111 min Time to Reflect by Army Staff Sgt. Edward Heckathorn There was a time in my life, When everything seemed right. But time would soon come to pass And then I would see the light. For all the wrong would be punished And the right would prevail. Then we would all hear cheers Of a welcome home "Hail!" For the many sacrifices we have all made By putting our lives on hold. To endure some vast experiences To a repetition of getting old. So reflect on all that you have seen And remember who has suffered while you give For we do it not for ourselves But for those who no longer live. Remembering those who died and the families and friends who suffered a great loss on Sept. 11, 2001.

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utation as a humane power intact. Not JTF170 in its interviews that cripple the global ter ror network and keep making America and its allies in civilization ever safer than they were this day last year. Not the Navy or the Coast Guard or the Marines in their mission: ringing GTMO with ships and boats rifles on towers that make this island a fortress of freedom. None of that faltered this Sept. 11 to fal ter in those duties would be to dishonor this war and those dead but we did. We did, in our minds and our hearts and our souls, in the parts of us that had time to stop and think and look back. No guard on the day shift at Camp Delta left his post to attend the 7:30 a.m. service at the Camp America chapel, or the 8:30 a.m. flag-raising at Camp Deltas outer ring; no critical detainee interview was canceled so that a mem ber of JTF-170 could pay his respects at the ringing of the bells. Those who had jobs to do did them, and paid their respects when they could. But many who were off-duty or whose duties as leaders include moments like these were there to participate as this corner of this military paid its official respects, not only to the victims of last year but to their champions in this one. Youre here, Lt. Col. Izzy Rommes, commander of the 160th MP Battalion, told the Camp America sol diers attending Wednesday mornings service. You dont just talk the talk, you walk the walk, and you serve this country well. The service quickly became an emotional one. After an opening prayer and the singing of the national anthem, JTF-160 Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Raymond A. Tetreault read from the Get tysburg Address. Then Amazing Grace wafted from a loudspeaker as a slide show showed image after image of death, tears, fear and destruction from the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Penta gon. The closing image was an etching of a soldier taking the American flag from a fireman. The caption: Ill take it from here. Then Army Capt. Sandra M. Orlandella, operations officer of the Joint Informa tion Bureau, stood in the uni form of her civilian occupation: that of an NYPD police officer. She was flanked by Army Capt. Scott A. McGaha of the 160th MP Battalion, a U.S. Marshal who served at Ground Zero. We are proud to represent the men and women who gave their all and made the ulti mate sacrifice on that horrible morning, Orlandella said, pointing out that while nearly 3,000 died in the WTC attacks, more than 25,000 were evacuated by the police, firefight ers and medical personnel who risked every thing to do their jobs. Jan Jones with the Public Works Department followed with a rendition of God Bless America, and then Col. John J. Perrone, Jr., commander of the Joint Operations Group, intro duced JTF160 Command ing Gen. Rick Baccus. The ter rorists are learning the hard lesson that many of the worlds powers have learned before them. This country will not be paralyzed with fear, Baccus said, in remarks he would repeat at JDOGs Camp Delta ceremony later. Every day I am proud of the professional ism of all the soldiers, Marines, sailors, air men and Coast Guardsmen who perform their mission flawlessly in support of the Joint Task Force. I thank you for your sacri fices and daily contri butions. May God watch over us every day. Army Chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill then led the audience in a non-denominational prayer. After Taps was played, the service ended, and Merrill invited those present to add to the reflections board near the exit. It was very touching, said Spc. Autumn Blewett, an escort guard with the 346th MP Co. It definitely hit home for me. A year ago, my husband and I were at Advanced Individ ual Training on rite of passage day, com pleting our training and getting pinned as MPs. It certainly was an eye-opener as to what was coming ahead. What came was a detention operation whose leadership felt compelled to pause and honor this day in a military way, with ritual and rite, with ceremony and solemnity. JTF-170s military members held an 8:30 a.m. formation, and held a post ing of colors by a ceremo nial color guard. At 8:46, the moment when Ameri can Airlines Flight 11 struck the first World Trade Center tower and launched a terrible day and a grim war, a bell was rung five times a tradition dating back to olden times when citizenry were alerted to emergencies by the sound. After Col. Woolfolks remarks, a conference room was dedicated, a plaque unveiled, and troops were dismissed. At Camp Delta, some 400 off-duty troops were in attendance representing every one of the MP com panies that walk the deten tion area as Perrone led a ceremonial raising of Stars and Stripes above Camp Deltas outer fence. It was a very moving ceremony, Perrone said. I thought there was a lot of pride and patriotism dis played. Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony B. Clayton of the 160th MP Battalion stood as Commander of Troops, leading the formation and helping with white gloves to raise the red, white and blue. The flag was then dropped to the symbolic half-mast and the national anthem was played. Taps brought the ceremony to 8:46 a.m., and all bowed their heads in a moment of silence. And then all in atten dance paid tribute as they will until next Sept. 11 by going back to work. Page 5 Friday, September 13, 2002 9/11/02, from page 1 LETTERS FRONT Page 12 Friday, September 13, 2002 Since 1999, Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) and General Mills Sales Inc., have sponsored the Letters to the Front letter-writing contest for the pur pose of letting concerned Americans show their support for troops stationed overseas. The contest is an offshoot of the long-running play Letters From the Front, which tours military bases each year. Army Maj. F. Lee Reynolds, the JTF-160 media support center chief, was working as the production stage manager for the show last year. Im very proud to have been a part of the process, says Reynolds. The show itself is very patriotic and in the aftermath of 9/11 it really boosted the morale of servicemembers and their families across the nation. We per formed at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., home of the B2 bombers, the evening before they took off on their first bombing missions over Afghanistan. Ive read many of the letters and have been inspired by the thoughtfulness of these children, and the pride and appreciation they have for what we as members of the military are doing. Depicted on this page are samples of the many heartfelt letters sent to servicemembers last year in the wake of the attacks against America. Compiled by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire LETTERS FRONT

PAGE 6

Page 6 Friday, September 13, 2002 Its a short walk, but a long highway, yells a well-padded Army Maj. Javier A. Reina, of the 43rd MP Brigade and Officer in Charge of non-lethal training, as a soldier attempts to pummel him with well-learned hand-to-hand combat skills. Welcome to the ongoing non-lethal training being conducted by the Military Police out at Camp America. This time, it was hand-to-hand combat train ing, being held at Marine Hill, which allows the MPs to be able to use barehanded skills as a first-line defense in a riot situation. This type of hand-to-hand combat is called empty hand techniques, where you must defend yourself if you have no time to reach for a weapon or no weapon is avail able, said Army Staff Sgt. Thomas J. McCarthy, 43rd MP Brigade, who works in Anti-Terrorism Force Protection for JTF-160 and teaches the non-lethal training. This type of training is based on riot con trol, and it is taken from both military and civilian law enforcement schools of training, said McCarthy. Were training here to use common strikes, which are not meant to maim anyone but to allow us to gain control. Especially in a riot situation, when people are uncontrol lable, non-com pliant and dont listen to verbal commands, empty hand techniques become invaluable. They allow us to stop a violent situation from escalating. The training was led by a master of com bat, Army Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd MP Brigade and the Noncommissioned Officer In Charge of the training, who passed along his extreme expertise on how empty hand techniques fit into the escalation of force. With the escalation of force, first there is the verbal warning, then the show of force and then after that, empty hand techniques come into play, said Vinacco. It is using the least amount of force on an individual. We train to strike areas of the body that are less vulnerable to perma nent damage. But in a pinch you got to do what you got to do, he said. And if the situ ation arises, the use of greater force can be justified because the MP has used the escalation of force. Safety is para mount, and proper training can allow an MP to hopefully end any violent situation early on. Helping them to achieve that goal is a newer concept to MP training, which is the use of pressure points as a means to gain con trol of a subject. Pressure-point training, which has been around for a while, is finally being injected into our MP training, said Vinacco. The pressure points were utilizing are the ones most accessible so when a person is not being compliant, we can strike them easily and inflict only temporary damage. You get them to endure a small amount of pain, and then youre able to better control them, said McCarthy. Pressure points are another trick in the bag for these guys to use, said Vinacco. If they need to restrain someone, its an option. If we dont need to hurt them, we wont hurt them. We dont want to kill anyone. This is nonlethal after all, said McCarthy. Even if they dont care for our safety, we still have to remain professional and keep their safety in mind. Story by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Army Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd MP Brigade, explains that the very first step in hand-tohand combat is a proper defensive fighting stance. Hand-to-hand combat training Using complete concentration, Army Pfc. Jerald D. Murphy, 452nd MP Det., demon strates the art of the arm block while Army Staff Sgt Thomas J. McCarthy, 43rd MP Brigade, looks on and helps to critique his style. After soaking up knowledge about hand-to-hand combat in the classroom, the troops step outside where the instructors let them experience what its all about. They came on the anniversary of 9/11 to watch us remember, to talk to the troops and talk about the detainees, to write humaninterest features for newspapers and put GTMO video on the evening news. They came from Canada and Italy, Miami and Washington, Los Angeles and New York. They came in num bers rarely seen here at GTMO, with 17 writers, photographers and broadcasters taking Wednes days full tour: the Camp America chapel, the Fire Dept., Camp Delta and the Naval Base Chapel. There was the usual frustration about the things they werent allowed to see, the usual grum bling about the questions that couldnt be answered. But also the usual sucesses that come when GTMO meets the press: Servicemembers doing interviews and telling their stories to media who want to make GTMO a story, and tell America and the world what we do and why were doing it. Thats why theyre here. Page 11 Friday, September 13, 2002 9/11/02: medias main event Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini AP reporter Paisley L. Dodds aims her tape recorder at JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus at the GTMO Fire Dept. Wednesday after the morning formations held by firefighters. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Associated Press leads the way: Cameraman Thomas Szypulski and Lynne Sladky set up for shots at the back entrance of the Camp America chapel after Wednesday mornings serv ice. The media also attended Wednesday evenings services at the Naval Base chapel. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Media support center chief Army Maj. F. Lee Reynolds and RAI TV (Italy) journal ist Antonella Delprino have a discussion of JTF-160s policies on press coverage. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin New York Times reporter Katharine Q. Seelye takes notes alongside Army Maj. Robert Wait of the 2/142 Infantry Co. during Wednesday mornings service at the Camp Amer ica chapel. Compiled by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire

PAGE 7

Ive trained over 5,000 people in this stuff. I know it works, said Vinacco. During the next few weeks, we hope to train about 500 MPs, he said. Well be hold ing eleven of these eight hour blocks, which include classroom instructions, a written test, street simulations and extensive training out doors. And while every MP has had similar train ing, the empty hand technique course is meant to help the MPs look inward and hone their hand-to-hand combat skills. All of the MPs out here have been through MP school and have already covered most of this, said Vinacco. Were only teaching the basics here, and Im not looking for anyone to be Bruce Lee. But this training acts as a great refresher. It allows them to tweak and refine all of their skills in a more dynamic way. Were not out here to break you. Were here to make you, Reina told the students. You can punch air all day, but when you actu ally punch that bag, there is a difference. You have to be careful and do it knowing the proper techniques, or you will injure yourself. So its important that everyone here take these skills and continue to practice them. Practice does make perfect, and as Vinacco has stressed to his students, if they dont keep up on their skills, they will disap pear like a tooth being punched from a head. These types of skills are perishable, he said. If you dont practice them, you will lose them. And then when you need them, it wont be reflexive and second nature, and that could be the difference between surviving and dying. Overall, the MPs ongoing training has proven to be a suc cess, and according to the students, it hits hard. Today I am more deadly and more dead than yesterday, said Army Pvt. Sherart E. Derek, 571st MP Company. It was tough, but we learned a lot. The training will come in handy working gates and even on the road. Practice leads to perfection, and thats why we train all the time. This course was much like going through MP school all over again, said Spc. Mischelle A. Bradley, 346 MP Company. We refreshed some good stuff out there, it gave me confi dence, a reaffirmation of my abilities. The trainers were excellent. The knowledge they combined and the care for personal safety they displayed was great. This training is great, said Reina. The instructors each have their own way of teach ing, and combined theyve got some excellent training. These courses are demanding on the instructors, but they are representative of all of the MP units out in Camp America. And the soldiers love it. There has been an over whelming response in the amount of people that want to come to it. They want this training, so were going to give it to them, he said. Were not making them experts, were only teaching the basics, but you can see the increased confidence in them, thanks to this training. Were not the ones that will start a fight, said McCarthy, but we have to be able to fin ish it. This training helps us to do that. Page 7 Friday, September 13, 2002 helps troops pack extra punch Army Sgt. 1st Class Jeffrey Kingston, 43rd MP Brigade, gives a well-padded Army Maj. Javier A. Reina, 43rd MP Brigade, support from the rear while he accepts an elbow to the head from a highly moti vated soldier at the final obstacle on the hand-tohand combat course. Using his lightning fast reactions, Army Sgt. 1st. Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd MP Brigade, dodges a fierce blow thrown by fellow Non-lethal weapons instructor Army Staff Sgt. Thomas J. McCarthy, 43rd MP Brigade, to show the class how skill comes with much practice. In this Non-lethal Weapons Training hand-to-hand combat course, the punch-dummies fight back. Troops use the techniques they have learned over the course of the day to fight their way through different obstacles. Since the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush, federal and local elected officials, together with thousands of people from all over the United States and the world have set foot at the World Trade Center site to remember those who lost their lives. They have made speeches, mourned the dead and expressed their gratitude for the firefighters and the policemen who rushed into the collapsing towers to respond to their call of duty, which is to protect and save lives. Driven by the same feeling, more and more people have vis ited Ground Zero to bring some closure after witnessing on televi sion the events of that gloomy day now forever carved in the memory of our nation. My home is Brooklyn, NY. My civilian workplace is seven miles from downtown Manhattan. Like many others, I sadly watched the whole event as it unfolded live on television. Afterwards, I could not get off my mind the pile of debris mixed with human flesh and bones. I avoided downtown Manhattan, which reminded me of the nigthmare. But two weeks ago, while I was back in New York on leave from my duties here on Guantanamo Bay in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, I felt com pelled to finally visit the much talked-about Ground Zero. Weve talked about the events of Sept. 11 so much that weve barely realized 12 months have already gone by. I wanted to see what that year had brought. So one afternoon, in the middle of a Manhattan rush hour, I armed myself with a camera and headed to where it all started. After being away from New York for so long, when I got into the subway station I felt I was riding for the first time. I was like Alice in Wonderland. My eyes gazed at all the shining posters in the subway car as I reminisced of what Ive missed in the past months. But sud denly, it all changed when people stormed all over me in the overcrowded car. I was squeezed like a sandwich. On my right side was an old man playing the harmonica and singing old tunes from some Walt Disney cartoon. It didnt bother me, but the other riders mostly coming from work seemed to have had enough. We all felt relieved when the train reached the World Trade Center, its last stop. Like a tourist, I mingled through the crowd, being pushed and pulled by the flow of human traffic. I proceeded toward Church St., and from there I strolled down toward the fence surrounding the crash site, which is awaiting new construction now that all its debris has been cleared away. Only the construction workers and the security staff were allowed to enter the site, which is a large pit illuminated by high-intensity light poles. It looked as if the Twin Towers were never there. Tourists and local residents stood by the fence to get a good look at the site. Ground Zero was not as crowded as it used to be, but peo ple from all over the world could be heard as they spoke in their dif ferent languages and behaved like out-of-towners. Many of them were excited, but the mood was generally somber as they walked by and paused to remember the victims. I then went by the public view ing area where a ticket used to be needed to watch for only a few minutes. Now it is open to all. I fired up my camera and snapped a few shots. A police presence was visible, but the officers did not interfere with the crowd. After all, the New York Police and Fire Department have formed a new bond with New Yorkers. But as I toured Ground Zero, glimpses of the fallen airplanes crashing the towers went through my mind. I could imagine the innocents on those planes scream ing out loud and fighting for the lives in a struggle whose fate was already decided. I could remember seeing peo ple running and racing through the huge smoke that was coming from the crumbling towers. I could also picture the 200,000 tons of twisted steel wreckage and 600,000 square feet of shattered glass coming from 110 stories and crashing down on our some 3,000 heroes and victims, who have left pain and grief for their loved ones husbands, wives and children and co-workers. The collapse of the Twin Tow ers has left a big hole shaped like a newly dug grave in the heart of the Big Apple. In some ways it is dif ficult to look at. But having been at ground zero made me realize the purpose of my mission here at GTMO. It made me confront the reality of 9/11. We will never for get our heroes and lost souls. The site of New Yorks World Trade Center is now known as Ground Zero. Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Page 10 Friday, September 13, 2002 Adjacent to Ground Zero is St. Paul's Episcopal Chapel, which has become a memorial for the victims. Looking back a year at Ground Zero Tourists and local residents peeking through the fence surrounding the site where thousands of people died Sept. 11, 2001. Near the site, a sign from 9/11s heroes says thanks.

PAGE 8

They were ways to remember. Military ways like color guards and flag-raisings and playings of Taps. Civilian ways like mournful slide shows, sad songs, boards of reflection and moments of silence. Spiritual ways, of course: prayers and benedictions and blessings, and all the ways servicemembers and firefighters and guards and people, too, stopped a while to remember the bloody, fiery, ashen day that changed the world. Officers spoke and sergeants saluted. Chaplains blessed and talked of God. Privates and airmen and ensigns and lance corporals all remembered where they were, where they are now, and who they knew that would never be anywhere again. Some 3,000 lost, and less than that found. A nation awakened to war. A mili tary committed to mourning. Serving. Winning. Page 8 Page 9 Friday, September 13, 2002 Compiled by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire In memory of 9/11 Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris A color guard performs on the grounds of the JTF-170 headquarters Wednesday. Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Guantanamo Bay Fire Chief Francis A. Kruppa leads his firefighters in the second of two honorary formation at 10:15 a.m. and 10:28 a.m., the moments the two World Trade Center towers collapsed, killing 343 fellow firefighters inside. Photo by Air Force Master Sgt. Michael E. Best 1st Sgt. Richard Rodriguez, Jr. of the 2/142 Infantry Co. salutes the newly raised flag at Camp Delta during Wednesdays ceremony. Photo by Air Force Master Sgt. Michael E. Best Members of JTF-160 raise a ceremonial flag at Camp Delta Wednesday. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro signs the reflection board at the Camp America chapel after Wednesdays service.

PAGE 9

They were ways to remember. Military ways like color guards and flag-raisings and playings of Taps. Civilian ways like mournful slide shows, sad songs, boards of reflection and moments of silence. Spiritual ways, of course: prayers and benedictions and blessings, and all the ways servicemembers and firefighters and guards and people, too, stopped a while to remember the bloody, fiery, ashen day that changed the world. Officers spoke and sergeants saluted. Chaplains blessed and talked of God. Privates and airmen and ensigns and lance corporals all remembered where they were, where they are now, and who they knew that would never be anywhere again. Some 3,000 lost, and less than that found. A nation awakened to war. A mili tary committed to mourning. Serving. Winning. Page 8 Page 9 Friday, September 13, 2002 Compiled by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire In memory of 9/11 Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris A color guard performs on the grounds of the JTF-170 headquarters Wednesday. Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Guantanamo Bay Fire Chief Francis A. Kruppa leads his firefighters in the second of two honorary formation at 10:15 a.m. and 10:28 a.m., the moments the two World Trade Center towers collapsed, killing 343 fellow firefighters inside. Photo by Air Force Master Sgt. Michael E. Best 1st Sgt. Richard Rodriguez, Jr. of the 2/142 Infantry Co. salutes the newly raised flag at Camp Delta during Wednesdays ceremony. Photo by Air Force Master Sgt. Michael E. Best Members of JTF-160 raise a ceremonial flag at Camp Delta Wednesday. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro signs the reflection board at the Camp America chapel after Wednesdays service.

PAGE 10

Ive trained over 5,000 people in this stuff. I know it works, said Vinacco. During the next few weeks, we hope to train about 500 MPs, he said. Well be hold ing eleven of these eight hour blocks, which include classroom instructions, a written test, street simulations and extensive training out doors. And while every MP has had similar train ing, the empty hand technique course is meant to help the MPs look inward and hone their hand-to-hand combat skills. All of the MPs out here have been through MP school and have already covered most of this, said Vinacco. Were only teaching the basics here, and Im not looking for anyone to be Bruce Lee. But this training acts as a great refresher. It allows them to tweak and refine all of their skills in a more dynamic way. Were not out here to break you. Were here to make you, Reina told the students. You can punch air all day, but when you actu ally punch that bag, there is a difference. You have to be careful and do it knowing the proper techniques, or you will injure yourself. So its important that everyone here take these skills and continue to practice them. Practice does make perfect, and as Vinacco has stressed to his students, if they dont keep up on their skills, they will disap pear like a tooth being punched from a head. These types of skills are perishable, he said. If you dont practice them, you will lose them. And then when you need them, it wont be reflexive and second nature, and that could be the difference between surviving and dying. Overall, the MPs ongoing training has proven to be a suc cess, and according to the students, it hits hard. Today I am more deadly and more dead than yesterday, said Army Pvt. Sherart E. Derek, 571st MP Company. It was tough, but we learned a lot. The training will come in handy working gates and even on the road. Practice leads to perfection, and thats why we train all the time. This course was much like going through MP school all over again, said Spc. Mischelle A. Bradley, 346 MP Company. We refreshed some good stuff out there, it gave me confi dence, a reaffirmation of my abilities. The trainers were excellent. The knowledge they combined and the care for personal safety they displayed was great. This training is great, said Reina. The instructors each have their own way of teach ing, and combined theyve got some excellent training. These courses are demanding on the instructors, but they are representative of all of the MP units out in Camp America. And the soldiers love it. There has been an over whelming response in the amount of people that want to come to it. They want this training, so were going to give it to them, he said. Were not making them experts, were only teaching the basics, but you can see the increased confidence in them, thanks to this training. Were not the ones that will start a fight, said McCarthy, but we have to be able to fin ish it. This training helps us to do that. Page 7 Friday, September 13, 2002 helps troops pack extra punch Army Sgt. 1st Class Jeffrey Kingston, 43rd MP Brigade, gives a well-padded Army Maj. Javier A. Reina, 43rd MP Brigade, support from the rear while he accepts an elbow to the head from a highly moti vated soldier at the final obstacle on the hand-tohand combat course. Using his lightning fast reactions, Army Sgt. 1st. Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd MP Brigade, dodges a fierce blow thrown by fellow Non-lethal weapons instructor Army Staff Sgt. Thomas J. McCarthy, 43rd MP Brigade, to show the class how skill comes with much practice. In this Non-lethal Weapons Training hand-to-hand combat course, the punch-dummies fight back. Troops use the techniques they have learned over the course of the day to fight their way through different obstacles. Since the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush, federal and local elected officials, together with thousands of people from all over the United States and the world have set foot at the World Trade Center site to remember those who lost their lives. They have made speeches, mourned the dead and expressed their gratitude for the firefighters and the policemen who rushed into the collapsing towers to respond to their call of duty, which is to protect and save lives. Driven by the same feeling, more and more people have vis ited Ground Zero to bring some closure after witnessing on televi sion the events of that gloomy day now forever carved in the memory of our nation. My home is Brooklyn, NY. My civilian workplace is seven miles from downtown Manhattan. Like many others, I sadly watched the whole event as it unfolded live on television. Afterwards, I could not get off my mind the pile of debris mixed with human flesh and bones. I avoided downtown Manhattan, which reminded me of the nigthmare. But two weeks ago, while I was back in New York on leave from my duties here on Guantanamo Bay in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, I felt com pelled to finally visit the much talked-about Ground Zero. Weve talked about the events of Sept. 11 so much that weve barely realized 12 months have already gone by. I wanted to see what that year had brought. So one afternoon, in the middle of a Manhattan rush hour, I armed myself with a camera and headed to where it all started. After being away from New York for so long, when I got into the subway station I felt I was riding for the first time. I was like Alice in Wonderland. My eyes gazed at all the shining posters in the subway car as I reminisced of what Ive missed in the past months. But sud denly, it all changed when people stormed all over me in the overcrowded car. I was squeezed like a sandwich. On my right side was an old man playing the harmonica and singing old tunes from some Walt Disney cartoon. It didnt bother me, but the other riders mostly coming from work seemed to have had enough. We all felt relieved when the train reached the World Trade Center, its last stop. Like a tourist, I mingled through the crowd, being pushed and pulled by the flow of human traffic. I proceeded toward Church St., and from there I strolled down toward the fence surrounding the crash site, which is awaiting new construction now that all its debris has been cleared away. Only the construction workers and the security staff were allowed to enter the site, which is a large pit illuminated by high-intensity light poles. It looked as if the Twin Towers were never there. Tourists and local residents stood by the fence to get a good look at the site. Ground Zero was not as crowded as it used to be, but peo ple from all over the world could be heard as they spoke in their dif ferent languages and behaved like out-of-towners. Many of them were excited, but the mood was generally somber as they walked by and paused to remember the victims. I then went by the public view ing area where a ticket used to be needed to watch for only a few minutes. Now it is open to all. I fired up my camera and snapped a few shots. A police presence was visible, but the officers did not interfere with the crowd. After all, the New York Police and Fire Department have formed a new bond with New Yorkers. But as I toured Ground Zero, glimpses of the fallen airplanes crashing the towers went through my mind. I could imagine the innocents on those planes scream ing out loud and fighting for the lives in a struggle whose fate was already decided. I could remember seeing peo ple running and racing through the huge smoke that was coming from the crumbling towers. I could also picture the 200,000 tons of twisted steel wreckage and 600,000 square feet of shattered glass coming from 110 stories and crashing down on our some 3,000 heroes and victims, who have left pain and grief for their loved ones husbands, wives and children and co-workers. The collapse of the Twin Tow ers has left a big hole shaped like a newly dug grave in the heart of the Big Apple. In some ways it is dif ficult to look at. But having been at ground zero made me realize the purpose of my mission here at GTMO. It made me confront the reality of 9/11. We will never for get our heroes and lost souls. The site of New Yorks World Trade Center is now known as Ground Zero. Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Page 10 Friday, September 13, 2002 Adjacent to Ground Zero is St. Paul's Episcopal Chapel, which has become a memorial for the victims. Looking back a year at Ground Zero Tourists and local residents peeking through the fence surrounding the site where thousands of people died Sept. 11, 2001. Near the site, a sign from 9/11s heroes says thanks.

PAGE 11

Page 6 Friday, September 13, 2002 Its a short walk, but a long highway, yells a well-padded Army Maj. Javier A. Reina, of the 43rd MP Brigade and Officer in Charge of non-lethal training, as a soldier attempts to pummel him with well-learned hand-to-hand combat skills. Welcome to the ongoing non-lethal training being conducted by the Military Police out at Camp America. This time, it was hand-to-hand combat train ing, being held at Marine Hill, which allows the MPs to be able to use barehanded skills as a first-line defense in a riot situation. This type of hand-to-hand combat is called empty hand techniques, where you must defend yourself if you have no time to reach for a weapon or no weapon is avail able, said Army Staff Sgt. Thomas J. McCarthy, 43rd MP Brigade, who works in Anti-Terrorism Force Protection for JTF-160 and teaches the non-lethal training. This type of training is based on riot con trol, and it is taken from both military and civilian law enforcement schools of training, said McCarthy. Were training here to use common strikes, which are not meant to maim anyone but to allow us to gain control. Especially in a riot situation, when people are uncontrol lable, non-com pliant and dont listen to verbal commands, empty hand techniques become invaluable. They allow us to stop a violent situation from escalating. The training was led by a master of com bat, Army Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd MP Brigade and the Noncommissioned Officer In Charge of the training, who passed along his extreme expertise on how empty hand techniques fit into the escalation of force. With the escalation of force, first there is the verbal warning, then the show of force and then after that, empty hand techniques come into play, said Vinacco. It is using the least amount of force on an individual. We train to strike areas of the body that are less vulnerable to perma nent damage. But in a pinch you got to do what you got to do, he said. And if the situ ation arises, the use of greater force can be justified because the MP has used the escalation of force. Safety is para mount, and proper training can allow an MP to hopefully end any violent situation early on. Helping them to achieve that goal is a newer concept to MP training, which is the use of pressure points as a means to gain con trol of a subject. Pressure-point training, which has been around for a while, is finally being injected into our MP training, said Vinacco. The pressure points were utilizing are the ones most accessible so when a person is not being compliant, we can strike them easily and inflict only temporary damage. You get them to endure a small amount of pain, and then youre able to better control them, said McCarthy. Pressure points are another trick in the bag for these guys to use, said Vinacco. If they need to restrain someone, its an option. If we dont need to hurt them, we wont hurt them. We dont want to kill anyone. This is nonlethal after all, said McCarthy. Even if they dont care for our safety, we still have to remain professional and keep their safety in mind. Story by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Army Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd MP Brigade, explains that the very first step in hand-tohand combat is a proper defensive fighting stance. Hand-to-hand combat training Using complete concentration, Army Pfc. Jerald D. Murphy, 452nd MP Det., demon strates the art of the arm block while Army Staff Sgt Thomas J. McCarthy, 43rd MP Brigade, looks on and helps to critique his style. After soaking up knowledge about hand-to-hand combat in the classroom, the troops step outside where the instructors let them experience what its all about. They came on the anniversary of 9/11 to watch us remember, to talk to the troops and talk about the detainees, to write humaninterest features for newspapers and put GTMO video on the evening news. They came from Canada and Italy, Miami and Washington, Los Angeles and New York. They came in num bers rarely seen here at GTMO, with 17 writers, photographers and broadcasters taking Wednes days full tour: the Camp America chapel, the Fire Dept., Camp Delta and the Naval Base Chapel. There was the usual frustration about the things they werent allowed to see, the usual grum bling about the questions that couldnt be answered. But also the usual sucesses that come when GTMO meets the press: Servicemembers doing interviews and telling their stories to media who want to make GTMO a story, and tell America and the world what we do and why were doing it. Thats why theyre here. Page 11 Friday, September 13, 2002 9/11/02: medias main event Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini AP reporter Paisley L. Dodds aims her tape recorder at JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus at the GTMO Fire Dept. Wednesday after the morning formations held by firefighters. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Associated Press leads the way: Cameraman Thomas Szypulski and Lynne Sladky set up for shots at the back entrance of the Camp America chapel after Wednesday mornings serv ice. The media also attended Wednesday evenings services at the Naval Base chapel. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Media support center chief Army Maj. F. Lee Reynolds and RAI TV (Italy) journal ist Antonella Delprino have a discussion of JTF-160s policies on press coverage. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin New York Times reporter Katharine Q. Seelye takes notes alongside Army Maj. Robert Wait of the 2/142 Infantry Co. during Wednesday mornings service at the Camp Amer ica chapel. Compiled by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire

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utation as a humane power intact. Not JTF170 in its interviews that cripple the global ter ror network and keep making America and its allies in civilization ever safer than they were this day last year. Not the Navy or the Coast Guard or the Marines in their mission: ringing GTMO with ships and boats rifles on towers that make this island a fortress of freedom. None of that faltered this Sept. 11 to fal ter in those duties would be to dishonor this war and those dead but we did. We did, in our minds and our hearts and our souls, in the parts of us that had time to stop and think and look back. No guard on the day shift at Camp Delta left his post to attend the 7:30 a.m. service at the Camp America chapel, or the 8:30 a.m. flag-raising at Camp Deltas outer ring; no critical detainee interview was canceled so that a mem ber of JTF-170 could pay his respects at the ringing of the bells. Those who had jobs to do did them, and paid their respects when they could. But many who were off-duty or whose duties as leaders include moments like these were there to participate as this corner of this military paid its official respects, not only to the victims of last year but to their champions in this one. Youre here, Lt. Col. Izzy Rommes, commander of the 160th MP Battalion, told the Camp America sol diers attending Wednesday mornings service. You dont just talk the talk, you walk the walk, and you serve this country well. The service quickly became an emotional one. After an opening prayer and the singing of the national anthem, JTF-160 Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Raymond A. Tetreault read from the Get tysburg Address. Then Amazing Grace wafted from a loudspeaker as a slide show showed image after image of death, tears, fear and destruction from the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Penta gon. The closing image was an etching of a soldier taking the American flag from a fireman. The caption: Ill take it from here. Then Army Capt. Sandra M. Orlandella, operations officer of the Joint Informa tion Bureau, stood in the uni form of her civilian occupation: that of an NYPD police officer. She was flanked by Army Capt. Scott A. McGaha of the 160th MP Battalion, a U.S. Marshal who served at Ground Zero. We are proud to represent the men and women who gave their all and made the ulti mate sacrifice on that horrible morning, Orlandella said, pointing out that while nearly 3,000 died in the WTC attacks, more than 25,000 were evacuated by the police, firefight ers and medical personnel who risked every thing to do their jobs. Jan Jones with the Public Works Department followed with a rendition of God Bless America, and then Col. John J. Perrone, Jr., commander of the Joint Operations Group, intro duced JTF160 Command ing Gen. Rick Baccus. The ter rorists are learning the hard lesson that many of the worlds powers have learned before them. This country will not be paralyzed with fear, Baccus said, in remarks he would repeat at JDOGs Camp Delta ceremony later. Every day I am proud of the professional ism of all the soldiers, Marines, sailors, air men and Coast Guardsmen who perform their mission flawlessly in support of the Joint Task Force. I thank you for your sacri fices and daily contri butions. May God watch over us every day. Army Chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill then led the audience in a non-denominational prayer. After Taps was played, the service ended, and Merrill invited those present to add to the reflections board near the exit. It was very touching, said Spc. Autumn Blewett, an escort guard with the 346th MP Co. It definitely hit home for me. A year ago, my husband and I were at Advanced Individ ual Training on rite of passage day, com pleting our training and getting pinned as MPs. It certainly was an eye-opener as to what was coming ahead. What came was a detention operation whose leadership felt compelled to pause and honor this day in a military way, with ritual and rite, with ceremony and solemnity. JTF-170s military members held an 8:30 a.m. formation, and held a post ing of colors by a ceremo nial color guard. At 8:46, the moment when Ameri can Airlines Flight 11 struck the first World Trade Center tower and launched a terrible day and a grim war, a bell was rung five times a tradition dating back to olden times when citizenry were alerted to emergencies by the sound. After Col. Woolfolks remarks, a conference room was dedicated, a plaque unveiled, and troops were dismissed. At Camp Delta, some 400 off-duty troops were in attendance representing every one of the MP com panies that walk the deten tion area as Perrone led a ceremonial raising of Stars and Stripes above Camp Deltas outer fence. It was a very moving ceremony, Perrone said. I thought there was a lot of pride and patriotism dis played. Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony B. Clayton of the 160th MP Battalion stood as Commander of Troops, leading the formation and helping with white gloves to raise the red, white and blue. The flag was then dropped to the symbolic half-mast and the national anthem was played. Taps brought the ceremony to 8:46 a.m., and all bowed their heads in a moment of silence. And then all in atten dance paid tribute as they will until next Sept. 11 by going back to work. Page 5 Friday, September 13, 2002 9/11/02, from page 1 LETTERS FRONT Page 12 Friday, September 13, 2002 Since 1999, Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) and General Mills Sales Inc., have sponsored the Letters to the Front letter-writing contest for the pur pose of letting concerned Americans show their support for troops stationed overseas. The contest is an offshoot of the long-running play Letters From the Front, which tours military bases each year. Army Maj. F. Lee Reynolds, the JTF-160 media support center chief, was working as the production stage manager for the show last year. Im very proud to have been a part of the process, says Reynolds. The show itself is very patriotic and in the aftermath of 9/11 it really boosted the morale of servicemembers and their families across the nation. We per formed at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., home of the B2 bombers, the evening before they took off on their first bombing missions over Afghanistan. Ive read many of the letters and have been inspired by the thoughtfulness of these children, and the pride and appreciation they have for what we as members of the military are doing. Depicted on this page are samples of the many heartfelt letters sent to servicemembers last year in the wake of the attacks against America. Compiled by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire LETTERS FRONT

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Page 4 Friday, September 13, 2002 This weeks question: Whats your favorite part in any military movie? Army Sgt 1st Class Charles K. Crosby, 342nd MP Co. The whole basic training scene in Full Metal Jacket. But nothing was said that I would much care to repeat. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Husniyah N. McNeill When the colonel says You want the truth; you cant handle the truth! in A Few Good Men. Army Spc. Ron C. Coen, 178th MP Co. Full Metal Jacket is a classic. The best part is when Gomer Pyle blows out his drill instruc tors brains. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Carol J. Nines, Security Harbor Defense The whole concept of We Were Soldiers was great. The officer in charge really cared about his troops. Army 1st Lt. Jonathan L. Adams 178th MP Co. The scene in Gettysburg where Colonel Chamber lain orders his troops to fix bayonets and charge. Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin One last salute A soldier pays a final 9/11 tribute just before sunset to the American flag flying near the Pink Palace on Wednes day. Flags at Guantanamo Bay were flown at half-mast Wednesday in honor of the thousands who died in the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. When sunset came at 7:06 p.m., in accordance with protocol, flags with nighttime spotlights on them were raised again to signify the passing of the tribute period. Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Across 1 Evening 4 Farmers ___ 8 Assumed 10 Capital of Switzerland 11 Asian country 13 El __ (Texas city) 14 Prissy 16 Choose 17 Genetic code 18 Oddball 19 Good grief! 21 Day of the week (abbr.) 22 Body of water 23 Movie star Taylor 24 Nervous system 25 Nichts 27 However 28 Chew 30 Festive 31 Billy or nanny 33 Narration 34 Blizzard 38 Burros 39 Lick Down 1 Flightless bird 2 Tub 3 Compass point 4 Air (prefix) 5 Licensed practical nurse 6 Advertisements 7 Prune 8 Drowse 9 Piece of land 10 Clensing 12 Tiny 13 Raining 15 Pink 18 Football assoc. 20 Owns 26 Country in SE Asia 27 Balsam 29 Scepter 30 Long fish 32 Also 33 Fiddle 35 Compass point 36 Winter sport 37 X Page 13 Friday, September 13, 2002 Answers to the September 6 puzzle DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, September 13 8 p.m. Stuart Little 2, PG 70 min 10 p.m. Triple X, PG13 114 min Saturday, September 14 8 p.m. Like Mike, PG 100 min 10 p.m. Reign of Fire, PG13 -108 min Sunday, September 15 8 p.m. The Widowmaker, PG 13 138 min Monday, September 16 8 p.m. Mr. Deeds, PG13 89 min Tuesday, September 17 8 p.m. Men in Black II, PG 13 91 min Wednesday, September 18 8 p.m. The Widowmaker, PG13 138 min Thursday, September 19 8 p.m. Crocodile Hunter, PG 89 min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, September 13 8 p.m. Men in Black II, PG 13 91 min 10 p.m. Bat 21, PG13 105 min Saturday, September 14 8 p.m. Bad Company, PG13 117 min 10 p.m. Murder by the Numbers, R 120 min Sunday, September 15 8, 10 p.m. Windtalkers, R 133 min Monday, September 16 8 p.m. Mr. Deeds, PG13 91 min Tuesday, September 17 8 p.m. The Scorpion King, PG13 90 min Wednesday, September 18 8 p.m. Jason X, R 93 min Thursday, September 19 8, 10 p.m. Scream, R 111 min Time to Reflect by Army Staff Sgt. Edward Heckathorn There was a time in my life, When everything seemed right. But time would soon come to pass And then I would see the light. For all the wrong would be punished And the right would prevail. Then we would all hear cheers Of a welcome home "Hail!" For the many sacrifices we have all made By putting our lives on hold. To endure some vast experiences To a repetition of getting old. So reflect on all that you have seen And remember who has suffered while you give For we do it not for ourselves But for those who no longer live. Remembering those who died and the families and friends who suffered a great loss on Sept. 11, 2001.

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Page 14 Friday, September 13, 2002 All Fall Division Soccer rosters will be due on Friday, Sept. 20th. The Soccer season runs from Monday, Sept. 30th through Fri day, Nov. 8th. Contact Capt. Gormly at x5249 or Maj. Buchanan for more infor mation about MWR events. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. Mon day-Thursday, 6:15PM-7:15PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM-6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Flag Football Leagues, M-F, 6 PM, Cooper Field. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM4:00PM. Today, Friday, Sept. 13th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 7:00PM, 9-Pin No-Tap Bowling Tournament, Part IX, Marblehead Lanes. Saturday, Sept. 14th, 07:00AM-2:00 PM, Dawn Fishing Trip, Pelican Petes Marina. 08:00AM JTF-160 Commanders Cup Series Swim Tournament, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Sunday, Sept. 15th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 12:30PM JTF-160 Commanders Cup Series Horse shoe Tournament, Denich Gym. Monday, Sept. 16th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, Sept. 17th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Wednesday, Sept. 18th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1:00PM-1:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower Thursday, Sept. 19th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Creation relaxation for troops Nestled on the outskirts of Sherman Avenue just past the SEABEES garage there is a lit tle piece of relaxation heaven waiting for the hard-working troops (or anyone else) here on Guantanamo Bay: the Ceram ics and Pottery Shop. We get lots of troops in here, a lot of single people or geographical bachelors for the time being, said Diane Grewe, Ceramics and Pottery Shop manager. They seem a lot more relaxed when they leave the shop compared to when they walk in. The Ceramics and Pottery Shop opened two years ago as a pottery club with only 25 members. Within six months, according to Grewe, the shop had over 200 regular visitors. And its not just for troops. The Ceramics and Pottery Shop is open to the GTMO community at large, and has recently kicked off a series of classes with holiday themes that whole families can enjoy. The community had a spe cial interest in these classes, and that is why we decided to have them, said Grewe. The first class, which has already begun, is the Hal loween-themed Ghost on a Fence. It is a two-session class offered for adults on Sept. 7 and Sept. 21, from 8-10 a.m., and Sept. 9 and 16, 9-11 a.m. or 6-8 p.m. for ages 16 and up. These classes are stress relievers for me. It is a fun thing to do, and you get the chance to meet great people, said Sheryl M. Mays, spouse of a civilian contractor. For the kids, children aged 7-9 will be able to attend the Happy Face Pumpkin class Friday Sept. 20, from 5:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. The Ceramics and Pottery Shop even offers a parent-andchild (aged 4-6) Happy Face Pumpkin class that will be held on Sept. 30, 8-10 a.m. or 6-8 p.m. And for children ages 10-12 there will be a Light-up Kitten or Puppy with Pump kin class on Friday, Sept. 27 from 5:30-7:30 p.m., and a class held on Saturday Sept. 28 from 8-11 a.m. The next class that will be held is the Halloween Mugs class. This class is available to teens 13-17 years of age, start ing Monday, Sept. 23, 6-8p.m. There are 15 available slots in the adult classes, and 10 slots in the parentand-child classes, which adds up to 20 students, said Grewe. The ceramics classes range in prices from $5 to $20. During these classes students do more than just paint ceramic themes. They learn different painting tech niques. This month I am teaching dry-brushing and stippling techniques in the classes, Grewe said. And we will con tinue on with theme classes in the following months. This months theme is Halloween, October will have classes with a Thanksgiving theme, and in November the classes will have a Christmas theme. In addition to the ceramics classes, the shop also offers adult beginner pottery classes made up of two sessions. There are morning and evening classes available. The next class begins Sept. 18; call the shop at 4795 for more information. So come on down. Make something. Youll feel better. Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Sheryl M. Mays, ceramics student, puts the finishing touches on her project. John Hackett, Ceramics and Pot tery Shop employee, smoothes out the top of this light-house. Ceramic firemen: works in progress and one completed. Page 3 Friday, September 13, 2002 Responsible for Guantanamo Bays public safety, including firefight ing and medical emergencies here on base, the highly trained firefight ers of the GTMO Fire Department perform their duties with pride. From helping people who get pulled out to sea or trapped on a dangerous cliff to dealing with hazardous materials and burning brush, to saving peo ples property from the cruel kiss of flame, these hard workers have the training and the will to get the job done. GTMOs firefighters Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Raymond Walsh, a firefighter with the GTMO Fire Department, skillfully drives a fire truck out of the garage to perform a routine functions check on all of the equipment on the vehicle. Everard Fraser, firefighter Ive been working the job ten years, and the time has been going by real fast. Its a good community service. You meet a lot of good people out there. Steve Waltermon, assistant fire chief of the GTMO Fire Dept., mans the megaphone to make contact with his fellow firefighters inside the firehouse. Sheldon Spence, firefighter This job is very rewarding. You get rec ognized for doing a good job, and that feels great. Motivation is always high, and that keeps me going. Neville McDonald, firefighter I have a great job, and great people to work with. There is always something new to be learned. Its nice to always be giving back to the community. Steve Waltermon, assistant fire chief I started out as a firefighter in the Air Force in 1986 and worked my way up. This profession is a way of life. You have to really love what youre doing.

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Page 2 Friday, September 13, 2002 Provost Marshals Office COMMNAVBASEGTMOINST 1710.10G, GTMO OUTDOOR RECREATION & WILDLIFE covers reg ulations governing the use of outdoor recreational facilities and the care of wildlife. It should be noted that except for fish ing, recreational hunting and trapping is strictly prohib ited. Also prohibited is the feeding, breeding, or keeping of iguanas, hutia (a.k.a. banana rats), chickens, and snakes. Spear fishing is permitted only for certain types of fish (check with the MWR Marina). Cocked spear guns are pro hibited while out of the water, while within 50 yards of Phillips Dive Pier, or while 50 feet of swimmers, snorkelers, and other divers not engaged in spear fishing. The use of chemicals, electrical current, traps, or explo sives for taking fish is prohibited. Fishing from boats is authorized. Shore fishing is authorized in all areas open to the public except Phillips Dive Pier. Fishermen should take care not to discard fishing lines into waters. Scoop nets may be used to land fish caught on hooks, or to catch small reef fish for aquariums. Bully nets are authorized to catch lobsters. The eating of mollusks (clams, oysters, snails, etc.) may be hazardous to your health due to sewage water. The Security Department and the Harbor Patrol are the designated GTMO Game Wardens, and are authorized to issue citations for any violations of the Outdoor Recreational Facilities and Wildlife. We encourage you to relax and enjoy yourself when you are off duty, but please do it within the established guidelines. Thank you. Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. One year ago, we believed that Islamic ter rorists declared war on the United States and our way of life. Actually, this war did not start last September, but has been going on for over a decade. It can be traced back to the Locker bee airline bombing, and even has roots in the Oklahoma City bombing. War has been declared on the freedoms that we have built the United States on for over two hundred years. Our lives have been permanently changed. We no longer feel safe when we travel, when we go to work, or conduct everyday life. And we no longer believe that our lives will not be touched by random violence. But the terrorists are learning the hard les son that many of the world's powers have learned before them. This country will not be paralyzed with fear because we are united to destroy this threat. The terrorists fail to realize the great strength of this country lies in its peo ple and the diversity they represent. No matter what terrorist group attacks us, they attack peo ple of their own religious beliefs, their own eth nic culture, their own race and gender. By doing so, they demonstrate that they are not motivated by some high religious ideal, but are only lawless murderers. What is important is that in this past year we as a nation have demonstrated we believe in the common law of man. You did not see this country resort to ethnic or religious persecu tion. You did not see radical parties rise from the ashes of the world trade center demanding we ignore our constitution. Instead, we took the fight to our enemies, and committed our selves to fight for freedom in Afghanistan. For those of us serving here in Guantanamo Bay, our war is about proving to the world that this country does abide by law in the treatment of the detainees. While the public debates the technicalities of how these people should be classified, we will continue to follow the tradi tions of humane treatment. For over 365 years we have been fighting wars as a people, and have demonstrated by our actions, that we hold ourselves to the highest standards. In other countries, these detainees would not be heard from again. Other countries have tortured our servicemen and women. But we as soldiers will preserve our American ideals. Every day I am very proud of the profes sionalism of all the soldiers, marines, sailors, airmen and coastguardsmen who perform their missions flawlessly in support of the Joint Task Force. We are proving to the world that each one of us believes in the importance of this mission. I thank you for your sacrifices and daily contributions. May God watch over us every day. By Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Special to The Wire 9/11/02: At war for one year Photo by Air Force Master Sgt. Michael E. Best JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus Multicultural Day Celebration Sunday, October 27, 2002 1-5 p.m. at Phillips Park Sponsored by Naval Station and Naval Hospital For more information, contact: Cathy Bautista 7-2450 Andrea Petrovanie 7-2033 I.D. Card Office Closure The base I.D. card office will be closed start ing 7 a.m. September 18 through 5 p.m. Sep tember 20, 2002 due to computer upgrades and training. I.D. card services will resume at 8:30 a.m. on September 23, 2002. All personnel with I.D. cards expiring between these dates are requested to come to the Personnel Support Detachment (PSD) for I.D. card updates. PNl (SW/AW) Crawford ext. 4494 or PNI Santiago ext. 4097. Page 15 Friday, September 13, 2002 114th MP Co.s battle with itself It was brother against brother, North against South, Cain against Abel. The War Eagles and the Chucks, both from the 114th Military Police Company, battling it out for flag-football supremacy on the gridiron of Cooper Field on Monday night. We have love for one another but this is war. We had to take care of business on the football field, said Army Sgt. John L. Hopson from the War Eagles. And so they did, beating their brethren the Chucks 19-12 in a defense-dominated game. The War Eagles constant pressure on the quarterback forced the Chucks into five inter ceptions in the game. If you put pressure on the quarterback he will eventually make a mistake. The pressure we put on him caused the interceptions, said Spc. Cammie L. Branch from the War Eagles. The War Eagles defense scored 12 of the 19 points in the win. Though there were heavy hearts on the field to see fellow 114th MPs go down to defeat, it was a good win, one that not only gave the the War Eagles bragging rights within the company but kept them in the Com manders Cup playoff hunt. The War Eagles record improved to 4-4 and they are confident with four games remaining. We are playing well now and we are going to continue for the rest of the season. Its all business from here on out. For the rest of the season we are going to play hard, prac tice and execute. We should be able to win the rest of our ballgames, said Hopson. The game was lopsided in the first half. It was all War Eagles 19-0. The War Eagles dominated the half with defense and special teams. They were going after the Chucks quarter back like jackals after their prey. I just felt I needed to get that quarterback. Every down we played I would go a hundred percent at him, said Branch. The War Eagles, using a zone-blitz defense, would send two and even three players after him, gambling on the QB making a mistake and not having enough time to find the open player. It worked to perfection. It felt good making two interceptions and taking them all the way for touchdowns, Army Sgt. Tony Smith said at halftime. I am coming with more pressure in the second half. I am not going to let up tonight. I am going all the way. The teams offensive production was nonexistent in this game. Both teams were strug gling and making mistakes that would hurt their opportunities to score. The edge in this game was the special teams. The War Eagles had two punt returns for over 30 yards and one returned all the way for a touchdown. The 60-yard touchdown punt return by Hopson was a show of pure will to score. He ran to the 40-yard line when he crossed the field looking for daylight. Then he found it, blowing by four defensive players to score another War Eagles touchdown. The ball came down wobbly, said Hop son. I just sat down on the play and read the coverage. I was patient, and when I saw a hole I opened it up and took it to the big house. This made the score 19-0. The game was in the bag at this point. The War Eagles defense let up in the last half and the Chucks were able to score two touchdowns to make the final score 19-12. It feels real good to beat the expansion team of the 114th MP Co., said Branch. Looking forward, the War Eagles defense can make or break the rest their Commanders Cup season. The guys look up to me for that defensive spark on the field, said Branch. I try to keep them motivated all the time. I keep them going and keep their spirits up no matter what is hap pening. It worked last week and this week, he said. Now its got to work from here on out. We made some mistakes but all in all we are doing a great job on the field. In the regular season their defense has been carrying them, but in the playoffs the War Eagles will definitely need more offensive power in their arsenal if they want to win it all. Our defense has been holding us up all season long. We need to throw the football deep and go and get it. That is what we are here for: to score points, said Spc. Bradley T. Wilkins. In the last four games of the regular season the War Eagles blitz-crazy defense should be something to reckon with. We had the Chucks beat from the begin ning of the game with our defense, said Smith. We force mistakes, and we take you out of your game. The league should look out for the War Eagles. Flag Football Standings CRUNCHING CENTRAL Naval Station 8-0 239th MP Co. 7-1 178th MP Co. 6-2 NCTAMS 5-3 Hood Ratz 4-3 MIUW 204 2-5 Cactus Curtain 1-6 Wildcats 0-8 MONSTROUS MIDWEST MCSF Co. 8-2 Buckeyes 6-2 Hospital 5-3 War Eagles 4-4 Gun Runners 4-5 Security 3-6 Chucks 2-6 JTF-170 2-6 Angry Beavers 1-7 Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Sgt.Tony Smith takes one of his two intercep tions all the way to the house for a touchdown. Army Sgt. John L. Hopson smokes by the defense as he returns a punt for 60 yards in the War Eagles 19-12 win over the Chucks.

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This Sept. 11, it was time to remember. JTF-160 and JTF-170 both chose 8:46 a.m., the time the first plane struck the first tower. The GTMO Fire Dept. chose 10:05 a.m. and 10:28 a.m., the times the towers fell and turned a rescue into a deathtrap. The chaplains chose the beginning and the end of this anniversary day, holding services of comfort and com memoration at 7:30 a.m. in the Camp America chapel and 6:00 p.m. at the Naval Base Chapel. All chose the symbols, signs and symptoms that have become so much a part of America since war and peace merged that terrible day: flags and salutes, prayers and pictures, bowed heads and hands on hearts. Tears. Tributes. Moments of silence. Words of remembrance and renewal. The purpose of our memorial day service is to remember the events of this day one year ago that ending and that beginning, Col. Donald Woolfolk, deputy commander of JTF170, told the audience at JTF-170s military ceremony outside its headquarters Wednesday morning. We gather to eulogize those who were killed and those who have suffered from that ending. We gather to renew our resolve to emerge at that beginning. Weve heard the ringing of the bells at 8:46 to commemorate the beginning of the war with the first attack. Weve listened to Taps to commemorate all those who were killed that day and those who have lost their lives in the battle since. Weve heard a chaplain speak words of comfort and healing, requests for grace and guidance, and prayers for the safety of our servicemembers deployed around the world. Each of these gestures is a comfort. And yet, when I pause and consider the enormity of it all, consider the death and destruction on that one terrible day, with the personal loss of comrades in the Pentagon, or comprehend the loss of families and friends in New York, I falter. Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2002, GTMO faltered too. Not in the JTF-160 detention operation that fights for Enduring Freedom by keeping Americas enemies off battlefields and its rep Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 9/11/02: A day to remember Friday, September 13, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 14 Story by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire GTMO honors the victims, the heroes, and the war on terrors opening shots Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Spc. Victor G. McKenna, J6 with JTF-160, returns the flag outside the Pink Palace to full-mast at sunset Wednesday. Flags were flown at half-mast in memory of the thousands who died in the attacks of Sept. 11. See 9/11/02, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 Page 9 Page 15 Page 16 Friday, September 13, 2002 Spc. Wascar Vizcaino, 43rd MP Brigade Q: So you work in the motor pool. What do you do there? A: I am a logistics specialist. I order parts for the vehicles of JTF-160 that need to be serviced. Q: How long have you been here? A: Three-and-a-half months. Q: How do you like it so far? A: Its the best bid Ive ever had. I think anybody would like it here. I get to have fun with the guys while we get a lot of work done. Q: What do you do for fun? A: Well, I play sports. I am a supreme ath lete. I weigh 185 pounds and I am 6-2 tall. Q: Do you have a nickname? A: Yeah. When I was on the mean streets of Providence, people used to call me Vic, the Gifted Kid, because, you know, Im good in sports. I beat a lot of peo ple and I got a lot of haters, even here at GTMO. Q: Why do people hate you because of your skills? A: Mostly because of the way I dress. Theyre scared of me. They think I am a thug, a bad boy. Im just misunderstood because of my hip-hop look. Q: How do you deal with that? A: I ignore those peo ple. Im very intellectual. I went to Johnson and Wales University back in Providence, R.I. Q: What was your major? A: Sports management. Im all about sports. Q: Besides sports, anything else you like? A: I like to watch gangster movies like Scarface, Goodfellas and Carlitos Way. Not to forget the funny ones like Happy Gilmore and Half-Baked. I like to party hard listening to Hip-Hop and Span ish music. For all you out there, I am a true Dominican. Thats why I got these moves. Q: Oh. So you dress like a thug, but you seem pleasant enough. Would you say you have a split personality? A: NO! Im just a nice kid in the inside, looking different. Look, I want to set the record straight that I am innocent for every thing theyre accusing me of. I didnt do it. Q: What are you talking about? A: Ive been in a couple of arguments since Ive been here. Im always a suspect because I have a bad-boy look. Im a good soldier. Im all about love. Q: All right, lets take it easy. What animal would you like to be? A: A dog. But not just any dog. Im talking about the one in the Taco Bell commercial. That dog is cool. He gets all the honeys. Yo quiero Taco Bell. Q: You know they fired him, right? How about your favorite actress? A: I guess Ill say Angelina Jolie. Q: Whats missing at GTMO? A: I wish we had more pool parties and of course more good-looking women. Q: Of course. How do you see yourself five years from now? A: Away from this island. Q: Are you planning on doing something wild before you leave GTMO? A: Im working now on a big production thats going to be at the Base Community Center. Its going to be wild something youve never seen at GTMO. Photo courtesy of Spc. Vizcaino Spc. Wascar Vizcaino in civilian attire, brandishing a tiki torch and his much talked about, yet misunderstood thug-like clothing. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Nobody beats The Viz Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Vizcaino, looking like the good soldier that he is.