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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00067
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: September 6, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00067

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Page 16 Friday, September 6, 2002 Sgt. 1st Class Arthur T. Martin Jr., 239th MP Co. Q: What is your mission here at GTMO? A: I work in food service. My soldiers and I are responsible for the feeding of detainees. Q: Hows the Army been treating you? A: My experiences in the Army have been excellent. Being able to adapt, and paying attention to detail are the keys to success. Q: You joined right out of high school? A: Yes I did. It was either the Army for col lege or bust. Q: So youre in this Army thing for the long haul? A: Yes, an extra pension is a must, thanks to Enron. Q: Tell us about that drill sergeant patch on your uniform. A: Well, I graduated from a reserve-com ponent drill sergeant school, but unfortunately I never went on the trail to train troops. But my skills were applied every day when I worked at the #2 boot camp program in the nation, I.M.P.A.C.T., straightening out kids. Q: What was the best thing about that? A: To see that you have made a positive change in someones life. Also having gradu ates moms coming up to you thanking you with a big hug and a kiss on the lips. Q: You still think about training troops? A: Yes, I have a strong passion to. Hope fully I will get a chance. Q: What sort of a drill sergeant would you make? A: Im like Major Payne. They might not like me, but they will respect me. Q: So your soldiers would have night mares about you. A: Yes, of course. Q: So, back in your basic training days, you must have been pretty squared away. A: I was platoon sergeant until I got caught eating a Jolly Rancher. They fired me and made me a road guard. Q: You must of been in top-notch shape back then, are you still a PT stud? A: Yes, of course. Q: How long can you do flutter kicks for? A: Until my abs develop a 12 pack. Q: Can you catch bullets with your teeth? A: No. I wouldnt even attempt to. Q: Can you dodge bullets like in The Matrix? A: Negative. If someone starts shooting at me, Im ducking and moving. Q: Thats the idea. So lets say you start running back home; where would that be? A: Baton Rouge, La. Q: Bad things are going on back there right now, with all of these serial killers running around. A: Theyd be no serial killers if I was back on the block. Me and the other 239th horse men, Leachman, Taylor and Horton, would round them up quick, fast and in a hurry. Q: So you must go to Mardi Gras? A: Yes, of course. I saw my first nice Manuckaduck there. Q: Right...is that one New Balance sneaker youre wearing and those two crutches you have within Army regulations? A: At ease. I got banged up playing flag football. But Im proud to say that the Black Sheep are 5-0 and counting. Ya heard me? Q: Well now, what do you do in your spare time? A: Watch TV, go out to Camp America to conversate with the horsemen and perform surgery. Q: Sure...so whats to come for you once you start collecting that Army pension? A: Law enforcement, on a drug task force. Q: Do think youll be the next Shaft? A: Yes, of course. Our bald heads have that same irresistible shine to them. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Sgt. 1st Class Arthur T. Martin Jr.: checking Pink Palace badges and keeping an eye out for those serial killers. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Ducking and moving with Drill Sgt. skill On the one hand, were all working that day, just like every other day, said Camp Americas assistant camp commandant, Staff Sgt. Janet Harnack of the 346th MP Co. On the other, it should never be an ordinary day. Such is the balance JTF-160 and JTF-170 are striking as the one-year anniversary of last years Sept. 11 terrorist attacks approaches. One year after hijacked planes full of jet fuel slammed into both World Trade Center tow ers and the Pentagon; one year after a fourth plane thought to be headed for the White House was heroically brought down in a Pennsylvania field by its self-sacrificing pas sengers; one year after thousands died and millions cried and the worlds most powerful nation was plunged into war with a shadowy network of terrorists, it is time to remember what we can never forget. Certainly the U.S. military has been honor ing Sept. 11 since the terrible morning itself. Reservists in New York City and Washington, D.C. reported for duty at city armories while dust and debris were still falling. National Guard members went to work establishing perimeters and guarding airports. The Penta gon dusted itself off, mourned its dead and began prosecuting a war on terror in Afghanistan, liberating a nation from a repressive government and hunting terrorists to the darkest corners of the deepest caves. And as 2001 turned to 2002, that war grew a rear guard here on Guantanamo Bay. A remote Caribbean naval base, once near to withering away, is teeming anew with ser vicemembers again, all working to operate and protect a detention operation that not only keeps our enemies off the battlefield but mines intelligence that saves American lives both military and civilian. Nearly 80 percent of the servicemembers here are reservists, with lives uprooted from jobs and homes and hometowns they honor Sept. 11 merely by calling GTMO home. So too do active-duty servicemembers, far from Fort Lewis in Washington state, Kirt land Air Force Base in New Mexico or any of the towns across America that active-duty units here call home. Operation Enduring Freedom is the U.S. militarys tribute to Sept. 11. In Guantanamo Bay, JTF-160 and JTF-170 are its missionar Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. GTMO gets ready to remember Friday, September 6, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 13 Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire How the detention opera tion will memorialize the awful day that spawned it. Members of the 239th Military Police Co. get ready to go on shift at Camp Delta last week. Like all members of JTF-160 and JTF-170 here, they will honor Sept. 11, 2002 simply by going to work. See 9/11/02, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 Page 10 Page 15

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Page 15 Friday, September 6, 2002 NAVSTA still perfect on gridiron Naval Station came from behind with a strong second half to beat 178th Military Police Company 23-9 Wednesday night at Cooper Field. 178th MP Co. stunned Naval Station with intense defensive play in the first half, playing very aggressively and taking Naval Station out of their game plan. In the first series of the game for Naval Sta tion, the elusive Navy Seaman Antonio Robinson, who is the quarterback for Naval Station, was sacked for a safety. Robinson is hard to stop and he is very quick, said Army Staff Sgt Joseph K. Ronan. But 178th MP Co. sacked him three times in the first half. Naval Station seemed shocked. The 178th was the first team to give them real competi tion in this flag football season. They were being tested. Naval Station was on the brink of losing their perfect season. This was unfamil iar territory for them. But Naval Station regrouped from that first series and scored on a sweep to take a 7-2 lead. But the 178ths wishbone offense, with its fast-running quarterback option plays, had Naval Station on their heels. A quarterback pitch to Army Staff Sgt. Tony Williams set up the 178 MP Co.s first touchdown of the game, putting them ahead by a score of 9-7. Then their defense stopped Naval Station from coming down the field and scoring. Naval Station was forced to punt the football back to the 178th, which returned it for 37 yards. That put them in good field position and gave them a chance to score before the half. Williams ran to the left to break a 20-yard play. That gave the MPs a first down and goal to go. With the clock running down, 178th MP Co. was threatening to put points on the board. But Naval Stations defense picked up and prevented them from scoring on their next two plays, and soon the 178th was in danger of running out of time. They came out of the huddle with no timeouts left, and by the time they got to the line of scrimmage and began to call an audible the referee had blown the whistle. The first half came to an end. 178th MP Co. knew they had just let a golden opportunity slip through their hands. They hadnt used the game clock wisely. This mistake could haunt them later in the game. But they were still ahead 9-7, the first time Naval Station had found themselves on the losing side at halftime. Would it be enough? Naval Station is a tough team and you have to score as many points as you can to beat them, said Ronan. To maintain the lead against Naval Station we have to stay rock-steady, said the 178th coach, Army Spc. George Lallas, at halftime. We need to keep the pressure up and keep hitting them hard. I was pleased with our per formance in the first half. We were able to minimize our mistakes and we need to con tinue play like this the whole game. Naval Station was only down by two and they didnt look worried on the sidelines. We need to hold them on defense and stop them from scoring. I need to stop throwing interceptions, said Robinson. They are a good team. This is the first test of the season for Naval Station. We plan to air the ball out and hit them hard in the second half. Even though 178th MP Co. didnt score at the end of the first half, they would have the football at the start of the second half, and felt as though they were still in control of the game. Their offense was clicking on all cylin ders until Robinson intercepted the ball. This play shifted the momentum of the game and seemed to light a fire under Naval Station. Robinson took charge and took his team downfield. But as they were in the red zone, Robinson throw an ill-advised pass that was almost picked off by the 178th. Robinson maintained his composure and on the next play he threw a strike to Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Goodwin for a touchdown. Catching that touchdown felt good, and it put us back on top. They were taking us out of our game plan, said Goodwin. Their quick option offense threw us off on defense but we were able to adjust. Now up 14-9, Naval Station was back in familiar territory. The 178th squad wasnt able to score on its next two drives, and Robinson was now on top of his game as he was picking apart the defense with precision passing. We had to use our two tight-end offense to open up the field, said Goodwin. Robinson was able to keep avoiding the constant pressure 178th MP Co. put on him and find the open man downfield. And when Robinson threw a 22-yard pass to Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jay S. Wojcik, it sealed the victory and kept Naval Stations undefeated season alive. Their record is now 7-0 and first place in their division. Flag Football Standings CRUNCHING CENTRAL Naval Station 7-0 239th MP Co. 6-0 178th MP Co. 4-2 NCTAMS 4-2 Hood Ratz 3-2 MIUW 204 2-3 Cactus Curtain 1-5 Wildcats 0-6 MONSTROUS MIDWEST Hospital 5-1 MCSF Co. 5-2 Buckeyes 4-2 Security 3-4 Chucks 2-4 War Eagles 2-4 Gun Runners 2-4 JTF-170 2-5 Angry Beavers 0-6 Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jay S. Wojcik blows by two defenders from 178th MP Co. for a 19-yard gain. Navy Seaman Antonio Robinson eludes the sack and runs for 15 yards in a win over 178th MP Co. Page 2 Friday, September 6, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Id read somewhere that at the Sept. 11 commemorations in New York City, former mayor Rudy Giuliani will be reading Abraham Lincolns Gettysburg Address. I found that very interesting. So I started researching it, and came across this letter a man named David Wills invitation to President Lincoln to come and deliver a few appropriate remarks to Gettysburg to dedicate the cemetery that had been built there. As we ask ourselves, why commemorate? I think Wills explains it very well. It will be a source of great gratification to the many widows and orphans that have been made almost friendless by the Great Battle here, to have you here personally; and it will kindle anew in the breasts of the Comrades of these brave dead, who are now in the tented field or nobly meeting the foe in the front, a confidence that they who sleep in death on the Battle Field are not forgotten by those highest in Authority; and they will feel that, should their fate be the same, their remains will not be uncared for. Lincoln, of course, accepted the invitation and delivered on November 19, 1863 one of the most famous speeches in history, all the more remarkable for its brevity and concise beauty. As Lincoln said: It is...for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead we take increased devo tion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Raymond A. Tetreault. Time is passing quickly for JTF-160 units deployed at GTMO, but a predictable pattern of daily routines has taken over. It can be easy at times to lose focus of our mission, which is to guard and detain those who would otherwise be free to plan and wage terrorist attacks against the U.S. Whether you realize it or not, everyone here mechanics, bus drivers, infantry, military police, and clerks has an important job in sup port of the war against terrorism. We are not in Afghanistan, but it doesn't make our jobs any less important or dangerous. A lucky few have the privilege from time to time of enjoying their weekends off by relaxing at one of the base clubs over a few drinks. But consuming alcoholic beverages at GTMO is a privilege not to be abused. It is disconcerting to find that Drunk and Dis orderly behavior still occurs among JTF-160 per sonnel, even those who have been here for a while. We have stated in this column many times in the past that this is in direct violation of Policy Letter #1: Alcohol Consumption, and NAVBASE regulations. Regardless of your branch of service, if you are a member of JTF-160 who is arrested for a Drunk & Disorderly incident and found to be in violation of the Alcohol Consumption policy, I can guarantee you that you will face UCMJ pro ceedings. The main reason we are here is to do our job. With all due consideration, our mission comes first and everything else is secondary. Remember that the reputation you make for yourself while you are here will follow you to your next assign ment. Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 Lessons from Gettysburg JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. A message from Chief of Staff of the Army, Gen. Eric K. Shinseki: On 11 September, 2001, without warn ing or reason, the forces of hatred and fear attacked America. We all remember the pain and anger we felt in the after math of those attacks as we honored fallen comrades, colleagues, dear friends, and loved ones who had been lost. Some who survived will live in agony for the rest of their lives. We embraced all of their families during the pain of their bereavement. In remembrance of the sac rifices made that day, we will pause on 11 September, 2002 for a moment of silence and quiet reflection at each installation and garrison throughout the Army. The times for this observance will be coordi nated by each major command. Our nation has provided and contin ues to provide the world leadership needed to bring to justice those responsi ble for these terrible attacks. In the year since, the Army, in concert with other services and our allies, has devoted itself to winning the global war on terrorism, providing stability in those regions of the world important to us, and training to defend the United States and its interests. These commitments have not been with out further sacrifice by soldiers who have gone into harms way on our behalf. The Army remains on point for the nation, as it has for over 227 years. By protecting and preserving our way of life, soldiers are keeping faith with all Ameri cans. The Army is strong; it is ready. Sec retary White and I, as well as the rest of the Army leadership, are privileged by your service and inspired by your exam ples of loyalty, duty, honor, and integrity. Your courage, selfless service, and respect for one another, and for others, make us the great Army that we are and enable us to fulfill our contract with the American people to fight and win our nations wars, decisively. So as we pause this 11 September to remember the sacrifices of so many dur ing those attacks in Washington, in New York City, and in Pennsylvania it is appropriate that we reflect on what it means to be an American. God bless each and every one of you, God bless this magnificent Army of ours, and God bless America.

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Page 3 Friday, September 6, 2002 This is the reason why we are all here at GTMO. Camp Delta, which houses detainees from the global war on terrorism, is also the workplace for the Mili tary Police companies that guard them. While the camp is guarded 24 hours a day, seven days a week, the early day shift currently performed by the active-duty 571st MP Co. from Fort Lewis, Wash. has its own challenges. Operating under the heat of the sun, these MPs must wake up the detainees, feed them two of their three meals and ensure that theyre humanely treated and remain well-behaved. Their job is demanding, their professionalism heroic. Their work is what shall be placed in the annals of history. The guards at Camp Delta perform their duties with the highest degree of professionalism, representing the best of the U.S. Camp Delta guards: day shift Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Camp Delta, as seen from the media observation point, represents the soul of the JTF-160 and JTF-170 missions here at Guantanamo bay. The guards that toil away within the fences are the pulse of this operation. Hour after hour, day after day, they carry the weight of the detention operation upon their proud shoulders. Sgt. Robert Kearbey, 571st MP Co. I am glad to be a part of something as historical as this. Were making a difference out here. Its something to tell your grandkids about. Pfc. Tawaiski Lanier, 571st MP Co. Its an all-right job. The hardest thing is overcoming the heat. But the pride is what keeps me going throughout this mission. Spc. Tim Schlecht, 571st MP Co. Its been a real unique experience. The challenge comes with not becoming complacent. I try to make the best of it, though. Pvt. Edward Lang, 571st MP Co. The job is fun. I mean, look at what were doing here. This is a truly worthwhile mission, and Im happy to be a part of it. Page 14 Friday, September 6, 2002 Contact Capt. Gormly at x5249 for more information about MWR events. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Peli can Petes Marina. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. MWF, 5:30PM-6:30PM, Tues. & Thurs. 6:15PM-7:15PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM-6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Flag Football Leagues, M-F, 6 PM, Cooper Field. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM-4:00PM. Today, Friday, September 6th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Saturday, September 7th, 06:30AM, Commanders Cup Run, Denich Gym. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Sunday, September 8th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Monday, September 9th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, September 10th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Wednesday, September 11th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 7:00PM, Round Two, Darts Tournament, CBQ. 7:00PM-8:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower Thursday, September 12th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Find yourself at Bulkeley movies Deep within the bowels of Guantanamo Bay exists a gem in the rough that it seems few are willing to find. Ask about it, and most people will question its existence. It is a sanctuary, a place for calm and individual reflection, a space where one can be thankful to be deployed here. A place where one can some times come to view old action movies from the sthe Camp Bulke ley movie the ater. Wire edi tor Spc. Frank Pellegrini and myself dis covered this amazing forum of film two weeks ago, when we attended a showing of a wrongly forgotten classic: a lit tle Arnold Schwarzenegger action piece known as Com mando. Rolling in a Humvee, we set out in search of this fabled GTMO movie theater, not knowing if its existence was mere myth. But after searching through a maze of dirt roads out at Camp Bulkeley, we eventually realized that the leg end was indeed real. As we approached this lost but now found theater, it was as if we had discovered an oasis in the desert. Was it mere illusion? At first sight, the place seemed abandoned, but the appearance of a lonely MWR worker by the projectionist booth reas sured us that this was no mirage. Besides us, only two other enlightened individuals were in attendance. Only seconds after settling into our spacious seats, up front near the low-slung screen, our nearly private screening began. As Commando burst upon the screen, Pellegrini and I were taken back to a Golden Age of cinema, a time when great, cheesy action movies of a higher caliber roamed the planet. Having not seen this movie since I was a kid, the experi ence of seeing it again on a big screen was only enhanced by the magnificent beauty that was this sultry GTMO night. Every slick one-liner (Please dont disturb my friend. Hes dead tired.) was punctuated by an arc of light ning splintering the sky. The steel drums so prevalent in the James Horner soundtrack were enhanced by the foreboding sound of distant thunder. It was an hour-and-a-half of unadulterated entertainment, and when the credits started to roll, we shook hands heartily and told each other how glad we were to have come. How we had been here at GTMO for three months (and change) and never paid a visit to this fine theater, escaped us both. It goes to show, that on a base that is pretty much one long road, if you look hard enough you can still discover new treasure. The sometimes older selec tion of movies that play at the Bulkeley movie theater is a nice change of pace from the as current-as-they-get cinema fare offered at the Downtown Lyceum Theater. (Although The Sum of all Fears was hardly current by the end of its long run.) And the apparent lack of visitors to this out-ofthe-way spot makes it a nice getaway from the large crowds that can sometimes plague GTMOs better-known theater. But Camp Bulkeley, like the theater that hides within it, is a site that the tourists apparently have yet to find. A suburb of the more famous Camp Amer ica, it is located down the road from Camp Delta, and it is the home of only one unit the 178th Military Police Com pany, National Guard members out of Monroe, Ga. So if you ever happen to find yourself out there near Camp Bulkeley after the sun goes down, you know the spot to check out. Of course it helps if a vin tage action movie starring Arnold Schwarzenegger is playing, but even a flick of lesser quality can benefit from the atmosphere out at the serene and secluded Camp Bulkeley. Its definitely worth the effort to discover, if for the experience alone. Story and photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire The majestic Bulkeley movie theater. By day, it looks abandoned, nestled on grounds that have seen better-maintained days. But every night twice a night it comes alive.

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Page 4 Friday, September 6, 2002 This weeks question: How would you describe the United States military in one word? Navy Chief John Dupee, Naval Base chief harbor pilot Unequaled. David Walsh, civilian, retired NYPD Awesome. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Andrew Painter, USCG Cutter Bear Adaptable. Army Pfc. Hollister L. Robinson, 342nd Mili tary Police Company Strong-willed. Air Force Tech Sgt. Nickey Crider, J4 Dedicated. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Showing appreciation Capt. William W. Elliott, U.S. Marine Corps, presented troops of the motor pool with certificates of appreciation and Marine Corps coins for all their hard work and sup port to the Marine Corps mission here Monday. Theyve been a big help, said Sgt. Douglas E. Card well, USMC Security Forces. The Marines have over forty vehicles and few mechanics. The troops down at the motor pool have helped us to maintain our vehicles by supplying man power, parts, and labor. They help us keep the mis sion rolling. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Across 1 Cast metal 5 Except 9 Seldom 13 Display 14 Hurry 15 Blot (2 wds.) 16 Fish stories 17 Removes the water 18 Artery 19 Smart 21 Squabble 23 Genetic code 24 Heptad 25 Colorless liquor 29 Pigsty 30 Matte 32 Whichever 33 Oak seed 36 Lamenting poetry 37 Central nervous system 38 Treaty organization 39 Genetic identical 40 Buckeye State 41 Km/h 42 Thunderous sounds 43 Prayer position 44 Downwind 45 Volcano 46 Pastry 47 Fallible 49 Fasten 50 Pig meat 53 Noodle 55 Three of a kind 57 Confuse 60 Black 62 Duke 63 Pain reliever brand 64 Rolled chocolate candy brand 65 Region 66 Gaiety 67 Tinted 68 Tinter Down 1 Loafed 2 Prevail 3 End 4 Snack 5 Enact 6 __ Gras 7 Stiff 8 Screen 9 House toppers 10 April (abbr.) 11 Furrow 12 Government agency 15 Freedom from danger 20 Poetic evening 22 Visualization 26 Save 27 Red headed orphan 28 Household cleaner brand 29 Affirmative 30 Regional plant life 31 Optical device 33 Foot joint 34 Leap 35 The one left 36 Vivacity 39 Terra __ (type of clay) 40 Single 42 Go back on a promise 43 Chinese gooseberry 46 Anise-flavored liqueur 48 Aloft 49 Lifted 50 Old 51 Fit in 52 Shiny balloon material 54 Goody two shoes 56 Usher 57 Container 58 Annex 59 Charge 61 Lad Page 13 Friday, September 6, 2002 Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Answers to the August 30 puzzle DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, September 6 8 p.m. Crocodile Hunter, PG 89 min 10 p.m. Mr. Deeds, PG-13 91 min Saturday, September 7 8 p.m. Men in Black 2, PG-13 91 min 10 p.m. Triple X, PG-13 114 min Sunday, September 8 8 p.m. Minority Report, PG-13 140 min Monday, September 9 8 p.m. Reign of Fire, PG-13 108 min Tuesday, September 10 8 p.m. Like Mike, PG 100 min Wednesday, September 11 8 p.m. Crocodile Hunter, PG 89 min Thursday, September 12 8 p.m. Men in Black 2, PG-13 91min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, September 6 8 p.m. Crimson Tide, R 117 min 10 p.m. Exit Wounds, R 101 min Saturday, September 7 8 p.m. Saving Silverman, PG-13 92 min 10 p.m. Reindeer Games, R 104 min Sunday, September 8 8, 10 p.m. Mission Impossible 2, R 126 min Monday, September 9 8 p.m. Three Kings, R 95 min Tuesday, September 10 8 p.m. Chain of Command, R 102 min Wednesday, September 11 8 p.m. Hamburger Hill, R -112 min Thursday, September 12 8, 10 p.m. Money Kings, R 96 min It was a horrible day When they darkened our sky, Dropped us down to our knees, and us asking why? What did we do To deserve this pain? You cut into our hearts And shaved your name. They chose wrong To do what they did, Of us our courage and unity They can never rid. It was a big mistake When they attacked our towers, Now feel the wrath Of the United States powers. As high as the towers stood, We will stand Well fight with our lives To defend this land.

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ies; Camp Delta and Camp America, the Pink Palace and the Head Shed and the Child Development Center are its shrines. Every one here is paying homage every day to the blood spilled that September morning with sacrifices of their own. Certainly no one here is likely to forget; it is why they are here. But Sept. 11 struck us in a special way. Not just as soldiers, but as people. This event was personalized. It wasn't an attack by a nation, or an army, but of individ uals, upon individuals, said Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Raymond A. Tetreault. The people who died on that day didn't consider them selves at war when they went to work that day. Neither did America. All that changed, and we all feel vulnerable in a new way. It's an event that has touched all our lives, he said, besides being the reason that we're all here. And so at 7:30 a.m. in the Camp America chapel and 6:00 p.m. in the Naval Base chapel, Tetreault and Army Chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill will represent JTF160s spiritual side with non-denomina tional services held in memory of the attacks. Both services will feature a slide presentation of Sept. 11 images and remarks by NYPD officer Sandra M. Orlandella, an Army Capt. serving as opera tions officer at the Joint Information Bureau. The morning service will feature comments from JTF-160 Commanding (Brig.) Gen. Rick Baccus; Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn, base commander, and JTF-170 Commanding (Maj.) Gen. Michael Dunlavey will speak at the evening service. Attendees are invited to linger and share recollections of the day. It's more spiritual than religious, said Tetreault. But in the aftermath of the attacks, it was to churches and synagogues and mosques that people turned for some kind of solace and meaning and sharing. We realize that this anniversary may be difficult for some people, and we want to provide some of that here as well as remembering the lives that were lost that day. But for the com mands of JTF-160 and JTF-170, whose mis sions honor that day every day, it is equally important to take a few moments from work to remember in a military way the first sacrifices of this war. Sept. 11 marks the first anniversary of the cowardly acts that killed thousands of innocent people and plunged our nation and this military into a global war, said Lt. Col. Dennis H. Fink, JTF-170 public affairs offi cer. The least we can do is take a little time from our day to reflect on those terrible acts. And so at exactly 8:46 a.m., the moment that the first plane struck the first tower, JTF170 will hold a formation outside its head quarters at the Child Development Center. Bells will be tolled and Taps played, fol lowed by what Fink called a brief and fit ting memorial service. Simultaneously, JTF-160's Joint Detention Operations Group will raise the American flag at Camp Delta and hold a moment of silence and short ceremony of its own, includ ing comments from JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus. Yes, this whole operation is a commemo ration in itself, said Army Col. John J. Per rone, Jr., JDOG commander. "It's a real testament to the American will. But I think we also need to take some time to reflect on that day in history. It really has changed the world, and the fact that we're here on active duty is evidence of that. Also deserving of remembrance is a differ ent kind of soldier killed in that surprise attack the firefighters whose sacred duty it was to rush up the World Trade Center stair ways when everyone else was rushing down. At 10:05 a.m. and 10:28 a.m., the moments when the two towers collapsed, members of the civilian GTMO Fire Dept. will hold their own tribute in conjunction with fire departments the world over, forming up outside GTMO's four fire stations and sounding the traditional salute to firefighters fallen three sets of five bells, followed by a moment of silence. We're doing this because 343 of the peo ple that died that day more than 10 percent of the total were firefighters, said GTMO Fire Chief Francis C. Kruppa. Thats proba bly the largest non-military group that's ever died in a single attack. And they were all in there with one goal to save somebody else. So its extremely important that firefighters all over the world remember this event. And so Sept. 11, 2002 will be in most ways little different than any other Wednesday in the life of this detention operation. MP com panies will go on and off shift at Camp Delta, take detainees to and from interrogations, play their part supporting this war on terror as they have since this operation began. Infantrymen and Port Security Units will keep perimeters and shores safe and secure. Support staffs and command chains will try to keep the detention operation and its troops well-fed, fully cared-for and fairly paid. But now and then throughout the day, at the times we all know all too well, the mis sion will pause. Soldiers and sailors, airmen and Marines, Coast Guardsmen and firefight ers, JTF-160 and JTF-170 alike will stop to honor the dead and remember the fallen of that terrible day, and remind ourselves one more time: This is why were here. Page 5 Friday, September 6, 2002 9/11/02, from page 1 Another day in the life of Camp America. By all appearances, Sept. 11, 2002 will likely be no different. Members of the 239th MP Co. form up last week before heading to Camp Delta to work the swing shift. The 342nd MP Co. shows its colors on a hooch door at Camp America. For the members of the 114th Military Police Company, the MP stands for multi purpose. Since June 10th, the 114th has been here at GTMO performing the task that they were assigned to do to the best of their abilities. But it wasnt familiar. Our responsibilities on this mission are different than we have done in the past, said Capt. Robert R. Bartran, commander of the 114th, a National Guard unit from Clinton, Miss. We are com monly tasked as combat MPs in a combat environment, but here at GTMO, the roles have been reversed and our MPs are being used as corrections officers. The soldiers of the 114th have been trained as 95 Bravos, which are military police officers who deal with both law-and-order and combat, said Bartran. In this mission here, the soldiers are mostly being used as 95 Charlies, who are corrections officers. We previously had the training to build and operate a temporary holding facility in a combat zone during a wartime operation, but this detention facility is built here with a more permanent structure, said Bartran. The detention facility here is a little more secured than most of us expected, said Spc. Edward M. Herring. But being that we have a squared-away unit, we will be able to adapt to the changes. The unit has had previous training in the apprehending and transporting of detainees, said Bartran. But in the past, we would turn the individuals over to a correctional facility. Here we are actually running the facility. Since the soldiers of the 114th would be performing unfamiliar tasks, extra training was required so the servicemembers would be able to perform their duties to the highest standard. To prepare for this deploy ment, two soldiers were sent to Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri to become qualified instructors of Non-lethal weapons, said Bar tran. Also, five high-speed noncommissioned officers were sent to Fort Knox, Kentucky to cross train as 95Cs to learn about opera tions in a correctional facility and the proper han dling of detainees. We spent some time in the classroom train ing before we were activated, said Sgt. Kevin G. Burr. Some of the members from our unit were sent out for extra training. When they came back, we spent some time going over dif ferent things about how to deal with the detainees. They were sent to these schools to learn and become certi fied, so that they could come back and pass that infor mation on to the remainder of the com pany, said Bartran. The train ing gave us a good inside look, said Burr. We were able to put it to good use here at GTMO. Such operations here at GTMO are 24 hours a day and seven days a week. Since they arrived, the 114th MP Co. has been responsi ble for working the overnight shift. The night shift is good, said Bartran. Theres less work to be done while the detainees are asleep. The overnight working condi tions arent so bad because the heat is down, and everything is pretty much calm, said Herring. The best thing about it is that you go to work one day, and after you finish, its another calendar day down. One downside to working the overnight shift is the construction being done on much of Camp America when the sun is out. Its not so hard to adapt to a schedule such as working the overnight shift, said Burr. The biggest disadvantage is trying to sleep through all of the banging during the day. For the soldiers of the 114th MP Co., the mission didnt start here at GTMO when they received their orders to be acti vated. Weve been activated since January, said Burr. We spent five months at Fort Campbell, Ken tucky, conducting law and order. Back then, we just had a possibil ity of going somewhere else Our duties over at Fort Camp bell were basic, said Henning. Our responsibilities here at GTMO are different, and I am proud to be here doing this. When we got here to GTMO, I think we had a pretty good idea what to expect, said Bartran. Its just very eye-opening knowing that we are looking into the faces of the worlds terrorists. Im excited to be here doing more than law and order, said Burr. I am proud to have joined the fight for freedom, and I think most of the unit feels that way; especially now, as the one-year anniversary of Sept. 11 nears. Just like all other deployments, this tour is going to end someday, and the 114th cant claim to be too upset at the prospect. Were not there yet, but we have hit the halfway mark, said Bartran. Up to this point we have been doing a great job and show ing much professionalism. Times clicking by pretty fast, said Herring. I think every one is looking forward to going home to their families. Some people might complain about the conditions here, but overall, we should all be glad for what we got, said Burr. The days go by slow here at GTMO, but the weeks go by fast, said Bartran. But while theyre waiting to ship back home, these MPs will continue to stay up and keep an ever-vigilant eye on the detainees while you sleep. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The 114th MP Co. holds a formation at Camp America before transporting over to Camp Delta to perform their vital mission. Story by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Soldiers of the 114th MP Co. load onto a bus that will transport them to Camp Delta to perform their nightly guard duty shifts. All night long for the 114th MP Co. Photo courtesy of 114th MP Co. Capt. Robert R. Bartran, commander of the 114th MP Co. Page 12 Friday, September 6, 2002

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Page 6 Friday, September 6, 2002 Youd be surprised how much care you can dispense without entering the cell, says Navy Cmdr. Lilly Fotiadis, the Senior Nurse Corps Officer at Fleet Hospital 20 or, as its known in GTMO, Detention Hospital in Camp Delta. Fotiadis is the division officer for the Camp Delta detainee clinic which ministers to the medical needs of the hundreds of detainees now being held at Guantanamo Bay as part of Americas war on terrorism. The cautious way that members of the hos pitals staff have had to dispense care is only one of the many things to which theyve had to adapt since the hospital started operating here in late January. According to a press release issued by JTF160, the construction of the structure now known as Detention Hospital originally required over 180 people from Camp Lejeune, N.C. It took 17 SEABEES from Construction Battalion 423 to clear and pre pare the land for the hospital in three days of intense 24-hour operations beginning January 18. Tents went up in one day and the International Standards Organization (ISO) containers were unpacked, expanded and organized into rooms and stor age areas fit for labs, wash rooms and examination rooms. A mere 26 days elapsed between the time the warning order was issued to the unit and the time the first patient was admitted to the hospital on January 30, 2002. We can see several detainees at one time in the clinic, says Fotiadis. The hospital has an Acute Care Ward capable of holding eight detainees, with an expansion potential of 3640 detainees. The capabilities of the mobile hospital are impressive for a structure of such a small size. The fleet hospital is capable of handling General Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Internal Medicine, Infectious Disease, Family Practice, Mental Health, Physical Therapy, Radiology, Laboratory, and Pharmacy. As of August 13, there had been 8,941 outpatient visits and 65 admitted patients. The hospital is run by its Officer in Charge, Navy Cmdr. Jaime Carroll. Fotiadis is in a naval reserve unit attached to Naval Hospital (NH), Camp Lejeune. She was recalled to Lejeune in Jan uary, and then sent here in April to care for detainees. Fotiadis says she received no special training for this assignment, and when her rotation started, she didnt quite know what to expect. I have never worked in a prison or other maximum secu rity environment before, said Fotiadis. The closest experi ence was taking care of the inebriated patients seen in the Emergency Room of the civilian hospital where I work when I am not on active duty. Carroll stresses safety and security for her staff. In the hands of someone who means harm, a pen, a stethoscope, or even a paperclip could become a weapon, so nothing should be left lying about. Its just human nature to forget that the patients may be dangerous, says Carroll. Theres def initely teamwork between the medics and the MPs. We dont do anything medical without an MP with us. Our primary pro tection when exam ining detainees or passing medications is our wonderful security force. We never approach any detainee without a guard standing right by our side. In the cellblocks we never go to the detainee. Never do we put our hands in the door opening. You can take vital signs, dis pense medication, and administer eye drops and ear drops without entering the detainees cells, says Fotiadis. I did not have clear cut expectations prior Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire This seemingly humble tent is the Detention Hospitals casualty receiving entrance. Charting a smooth course: (L to R) Navy Cmdrs. Jaime Carroll and Lilly Fotiadis. As they prepare to move to a new facility, Fleet Hospital 20 keeps treating the enemy with pride I must always remind myself of just what they are capable of. Security is always the first thing on our minds. Navy Cmdr. Lilly Fotiadis Senior Nurse Corps Officer Navy Senior Chief Marshall W. Adkins: We have to watch out for each other at all times. Detention Hospital: Caring for Camp Americas stewards are working on that too. While the new barracks are being built, were doing renova tions on the SEAhuts, said Staff Sgt. Janet Harnack, assistant camp commandant and a mem ber of the 346th MO Co. out of Hutchinson, Kan. Were strengthening the floors and caulking the insides to prevent leaking now that hurricane sea son seems to be here. Were put ting fans above the air-conditioning units to help cir culate the air better. And were putting 3 coats of white paint on the outside. Thatll help reflect the sun and keep them cooler. On the one hand, Harnack said, no one came to GTMO expecting luxury. From what theyd seen on television of the detention operations first six months, her unit was expecting just what those arriving in Janu ary had gotten: GP Mediums under the hot Caribbean sun. On the other, this operation is here to stay. And while operating within the military necessities of being housed in formation condi tions this is a deployment, and any quarters of Camp Delta guards need to be squad-sized and sited near the action JTF160 aims to make life here as liveable as possible. This is about quality of life, Harnack said. The troops here have a very important mission on the ground here, and if we can help with their quality of life thats one less thing they have to worry about. For Moskowitz, a former SEABEE with 18 years in the Navy, Camp Alpha North is just the latest in a long list of projects that have marked the detention operations evolution from an expeditionary, plan-as-you-go mission to something more established and more permanent. Since first coming to GTMO in December, hes served as the construction point man for both the JTF and GTMOs Navy over seers, and as such has supervised just about every construction project associated with the JTF missions: Camp America 1, 2, and 3. Camp X-Ray and Camp Delta (and the ongoing Delta Two), the old Fleet Hospital and the new Detainee Hospital. You name it, I was involved in it, Moskowitz said. Its been a lot of work, but Im proud to serve. This is an important mis sion. Were realizing were going to be here a while. So were try ing to do the best we can for the troops that are here. Page 11 Friday, September 6, 2002 with new barracks, facelift The new SEAhut: Floor diagram of one room of the planned Camp America North hard barracks. Each room will be a SEAhut-sized 16 feet by 32 feet, with six bunk beds, 12 wall lockers, 4 overhead lights and an in-house commode and sink. Brown & Root workers measure out ground for Camp America North and drive in a stake to mark the spot. A work in progress: Brown & Root workers weld and paint joints on the frame of a Camp America North barracks-to-be. This structure is currently scheduled to be completed in October. All except the windows: A structure approximating the new hard barracks at Camp America North.

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to arriving here, continued Fotiadis. I had some concerns about taking care of these dangerous people. Once around them, they seemed less scary. But looks can be deceiving, and I must always remind myself of just what these people are capable of. Security is always the first thing on our minds when approaching any detainee, regardless of how harmless they appear. Navy Senior Chief Marshall W. Adkins, whose focus is maintaining discipline in the enlisted ranks, concurs. Im always walking behind people and checking things out, he says. Despite the need for vigilance in dealing with these special patients, Adkins feels that the Naval hospital corpsmen who have been assigned here are going to take with them valuable lessons to their next duty station, and he offers them lots of advice. Its different than Lejeune, where youre dealing with regular patients who are coming in because their ankle hurts. The junior corps men here have to deal with more than that with the detainees. Like I always tell them, its a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Embrace it! Theyll probably never have a chance to give this kind of care again. And not only that. Theyre doing it for their country too. Theyve got pride in the United States and the medical care we give. Though the detainees are not considered POWs, the hospital has been operating under the tenets of the Third Geneva Convention of 1949, which protects those interred and guar antees them medical care. And the care given to the detainees in GTMO is quite extensive. When the detainees undergo in processing, they are escorted to various screening stations. They take showers, and then are deloused. A basic medical assessment is conducted, and a chest X-ray is taken to check for tuberculosis. Detainees wear medical masks during in-pro cessing to protect themselves, and others, from this disease. Detainees are screened for other infectious diseases as well: malaria, hepatitis B and C, HIV, and Leishmaniasis a parasitic disease transmitted by the bite of some species of sand flies. Medical care is available 24 hours a day, though there is a daily sick call established that is not unlike what servicemembers are famil iar with. The International Committee of the Red Cross has free access to the hospital, and they check to see if detainees have medical care, adequate water and a proper diet. The detainee medical mission has shifted from a high inpatient rate with multiple ortho pedic surgeries most of the incoming detainees were coming from battlefield situa tions to an outpatient focus centered largely on dispensing necessary medication. Sixty-one surgical procedures have been performed, all with informed written consent. Most surgery has been associated with orthopedic injuries as a result of gunshot wounds and shrap nel. Many detainees initially required long hospitalization for osteomyelitis, a bone infection that occurs at sites of bone penetrated by trauma. Surgical excision of dead tis sue is required in conjunction with antibiotics to treat this condition. Perhaps the most unusual surgical interven tion here involved treatment of a detainee suf fering from a shrapnel wound. The detainee, says Carroll, had some shrapnel in the back of his eye that had blinded him and he was having pain. It sounds appalling, but removing the eye eliminated the pain he was having, after which he was fitted with a prosthesis, said Carroll. He and the ophthalmologist developed a very interesting relationship. Obviously, its very traumatic for anyone to have his eye removed. The detainee wanted to have tea with the doctor after the surgery was over. The detainee was in X-Ray at that time. The physi cian was a human being, as was the detainee. If there is anything Carroll stresses more than safety and security, its professionalism. So attachments with the patients are not encouraged. Nevertheless, the staff strives to provide compassionate care, albeit in a profes sional way. We dont want any 18-year-old or 19year-old or 50-year-old sent on this mis sion and told he or she can no longer be a compassionate person, says Carroll. Despite stress associated with the job (some workers have had water thrown on them or have been spat on), morale is high among the hospital corpsmen. According to Adkins, many have opted to stay past their normal rotation. When they stay, we in the command like it too, says Adkins. Thats one less body we have to worry about training every few months. Theyre 18 and 19 years old, says Adkins, and theyre dealing with detainees. They never thought in their wildest dreams that they would be standing in front of these types of patients, giving them medical care. Look at them now. Theyre doing it and theyre doing an outstanding job with the lead ership of Cmdr. Fotiadis. And soon, the staff of the Detention Hospi tal will be getting an upgrade to a new facility, based on the needs of the mission. The current facility was always supposed to be temporary, says Navy Chief Petty Offi cer Mark W. Nuth, who is in charge of public works for the hospital. The new, hardened facility will open on September 15th, and will differ from the cur rent building in that it is designed to withstand high winds, and will be roomier than the cur rent structure, said Nuth. Fotiadis, who will depart not long after the establishment of the new facility, had some positive words at the end of her 6-month deployment. Whoever takes my place needs to be flex ible and approach every situation with an open mind. No one in Navy medical history has had a mission such as this one. Most of the items in the Detainee Hospital, such as these stretchers, are readily collapsible. In case of destructive weather, the entire structure can be broken down into its component parts and stored until the danger has passed. Page 7 Friday, September 6, 2002 terror s detainees carefully Navy HM3 Sherrice L. McKay checks for active and latent TB in the patients. McKay is one of the staff members who opted to extend her stay at GTMO. Camp A settles in for long haul Page 10 Friday, September 6, 2002 Every military operation, just like every relationship, must eventually face a question of committment. The participants must ask themselves: Are we in this for the long haul, and if so, isnt it time to start preparing more permanent accomodations? JTF-160 is making that com mittment to the MPs and infantrymen that staff its Camp Delta detention operation, having recently begun construction on Camp Alpha North, a new hardened barracks area across Windmill Beach Rd. The senior command recog nized that this mission is no longer expeditionary. There will be a long life to it and as such they recognized the need for more robust, or longer-lasting, and more comfortable berthing for the troops, said Navy Cmdr. Michael Moskowitz, the chief JTF engineer here and also the man on the ground for the Nor folk, Va.-based Naval Facilities Atlantic Division (LANTDIV), which ultimately orders all con struction projects for the base. You have to remember, in December this whole detention operation here was put together in a very big hurry, and nobody was sure how long it would last, Moskowitz said. Tents, like the ones at Freedom Heights, are the first step in any expeditionary sit uation. Then with the switch from Camp X-Ray to Camp Delta came the SEAhuts at Camp America. Those are standard contingency construction in a sit uation you figure is semi-perma nent get it down now, figure the rest out later. Now we know more what were doing and that its going to be for a while, and so theres a strong interest in upgrading qual ity of life for the troops while theyre here. And so comes Camp Alpha North. Moskowitz credits JTF160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus with working with U.S. Southern Command, NAVBASE GTMO and making newer, more permanent, more comfortable living quarters a reality for the troops that make the detention operation run at its most funda mental level. He really made it happen on the ground, Moskowitz said. Two structures one sched uled to be completed by contrac tor Brown & Root (They do good work, says Moskowitz) in October and the other in Novem ber will house a total of 612 soldiers in 51 rooms. In terms of dimensions and the number of troops per room, the new quarters wont be much different from SEAhuts. Each room will still measure 16 feet by 32 feet and house 12 servicemembers in six bunk beds. But there will be advantages to the permanent version more insulation to keep heat out and cool in, firmer floors, less probablility of the rain coming in through weary plywood. There will be less exterior maintenance required. Then theres the most reliable sign of an increase in civilization indoor plumbing. Each 12person unit will have its own toi let and sink, and each larger structure will have a gang shower unit and latrine area. In other words, no more crunching across the gravel in the middle of the night when Nature calls. Its somewhere in the middle between tents like Freedom Heights and a hotel-type garrison environment, said Moskowitz. These are still military forma tion conditions. Theyve got to be squad-sized barracks, which is why theyre still holding 12 apiece, and theyve got to be sited so theyre right next to the action. But its still a step up from the SEAhuts. For some. With more than a thousand troops already man ning the Delta detention opera tion, which troops will get the upgrade to Camp America North and who will stay behind? Moskowitz says JTF-160 hopes that wont be a problem for too long. Technically, theres nothing else programmed to be built right now, he said. But its highly likely that therell be additional programming, especially if the mission here continues to expand. As monies come in to do that, the master plan is that all the troops will have the same type of billeting. But by then, most of the sol diers currently living in Camp Americas SEAhuts will have left for home and presumably softer beds. Must they simply stare across the road as contruc tion workers erect fancy new digs in which theyll never live? Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Two SEAhuts with a new coat of white paint (white will help reflect sunlight and keep the SEAhuts cooler) stand out from the yet-to-be-painted camp commandants hut at the front edge of Camp America. Navy Cmdr. Michael Moskowitz, cen ter, discusses plans for a project with two Army colleagues. Brown & Root workers put a coat of sun-reflecting white paint on the SEAhuts at Camp America.

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, September 6, 2002 Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Photo by Spencer Platt/ Getty Images Terror strikes the United States as both towers of the World Trade Center are destroyed by two hijacked airplanes. Photo by Kelly Price/ Rueters People flee down Broadway as the World Trade Centers north tower collapses. Photo by Rich Lipski/ Washington Post Smoke pours from the west wing of the Pentagon after it was hit by a third hijacked airplane. Lest we forget Photo by Paul Morse/ White House Firefighters take a moment to unfurl the flag over the scarred Pentagon as inspiration for fellow rescue workers searching through the debris Sept. 12. Photo by Doug Mills/ AP President Bush puts an arm around firefighter Bob Beckwith during a tour of the World Trade Center devastion. September 11, 2001 began just like any other day, but will be remembered as the 21st centurys Day of Infamy. When both towers of the World Trade Center plus the Pentagon were hit by hijacked airplanes, the result became the most horrifying attack ever on U.S. soil. Still one year later, the effects of that day still sit fresh in the minds of all Americans. Photo by Joe Raedle/ Getty Images Firefighter Tony James remembers Rev. Mychal Judge, a chaplain who lost his life while ministering to firefighters during the collapse of the World Trade Center.

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, September 6, 2002 Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Photo by Spencer Platt/ Getty Images Terror strikes the United States as both towers of the World Trade Center are destroyed by two hijacked airplanes. Photo by Kelly Price/ Rueters People flee down Broadway as the World Trade Centers north tower collapses. Photo by Rich Lipski/ Washington Post Smoke pours from the west wing of the Pentagon after it was hit by a third hijacked airplane. Lest we forget Photo by Paul Morse/ White House Firefighters take a moment to unfurl the flag over the scarred Pentagon as inspiration for fellow rescue workers searching through the debris Sept. 12. Photo by Doug Mills/ AP President Bush puts an arm around firefighter Bob Beckwith during a tour of the World Trade Center devastion. September 11, 2001 began just like any other day, but will be remembered as the 21st centurys Day of Infamy. When both towers of the World Trade Center plus the Pentagon were hit by hijacked airplanes, the result became the most horrifying attack ever on U.S. soil. Still one year later, the effects of that day still sit fresh in the minds of all Americans. Photo by Joe Raedle/ Getty Images Firefighter Tony James remembers Rev. Mychal Judge, a chaplain who lost his life while ministering to firefighters during the collapse of the World Trade Center.

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to arriving here, continued Fotiadis. I had some concerns about taking care of these dangerous people. Once around them, they seemed less scary. But looks can be deceiving, and I must always remind myself of just what these people are capable of. Security is always the first thing on our minds when approaching any detainee, regardless of how harmless they appear. Navy Senior Chief Marshall W. Adkins, whose focus is maintaining discipline in the enlisted ranks, concurs. Im always walking behind people and checking things out, he says. Despite the need for vigilance in dealing with these special patients, Adkins feels that the Naval hospital corpsmen who have been assigned here are going to take with them valuable lessons to their next duty station, and he offers them lots of advice. Its different than Lejeune, where youre dealing with regular patients who are coming in because their ankle hurts. The junior corps men here have to deal with more than that with the detainees. Like I always tell them, its a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Embrace it! Theyll probably never have a chance to give this kind of care again. And not only that. Theyre doing it for their country too. Theyve got pride in the United States and the medical care we give. Though the detainees are not considered POWs, the hospital has been operating under the tenets of the Third Geneva Convention of 1949, which protects those interred and guar antees them medical care. And the care given to the detainees in GTMO is quite extensive. When the detainees undergo in processing, they are escorted to various screening stations. They take showers, and then are deloused. A basic medical assessment is conducted, and a chest X-ray is taken to check for tuberculosis. Detainees wear medical masks during in-pro cessing to protect themselves, and others, from this disease. Detainees are screened for other infectious diseases as well: malaria, hepatitis B and C, HIV, and Leishmaniasis a parasitic disease transmitted by the bite of some species of sand flies. Medical care is available 24 hours a day, though there is a daily sick call established that is not unlike what servicemembers are famil iar with. The International Committee of the Red Cross has free access to the hospital, and they check to see if detainees have medical care, adequate water and a proper diet. The detainee medical mission has shifted from a high inpatient rate with multiple ortho pedic surgeries most of the incoming detainees were coming from battlefield situa tions to an outpatient focus centered largely on dispensing necessary medication. Sixty-one surgical procedures have been performed, all with informed written consent. Most surgery has been associated with orthopedic injuries as a result of gunshot wounds and shrap nel. Many detainees initially required long hospitalization for osteomyelitis, a bone infection that occurs at sites of bone penetrated by trauma. Surgical excision of dead tis sue is required in conjunction with antibiotics to treat this condition. Perhaps the most unusual surgical interven tion here involved treatment of a detainee suf fering from a shrapnel wound. The detainee, says Carroll, had some shrapnel in the back of his eye that had blinded him and he was having pain. It sounds appalling, but removing the eye eliminated the pain he was having, after which he was fitted with a prosthesis, said Carroll. He and the ophthalmologist developed a very interesting relationship. Obviously, its very traumatic for anyone to have his eye removed. The detainee wanted to have tea with the doctor after the surgery was over. The detainee was in X-Ray at that time. The physi cian was a human being, as was the detainee. If there is anything Carroll stresses more than safety and security, its professionalism. So attachments with the patients are not encouraged. Nevertheless, the staff strives to provide compassionate care, albeit in a profes sional way. We dont want any 18-year-old or 19year-old or 50-year-old sent on this mis sion and told he or she can no longer be a compassionate person, says Carroll. Despite stress associated with the job (some workers have had water thrown on them or have been spat on), morale is high among the hospital corpsmen. According to Adkins, many have opted to stay past their normal rotation. When they stay, we in the command like it too, says Adkins. Thats one less body we have to worry about training every few months. Theyre 18 and 19 years old, says Adkins, and theyre dealing with detainees. They never thought in their wildest dreams that they would be standing in front of these types of patients, giving them medical care. Look at them now. Theyre doing it and theyre doing an outstanding job with the lead ership of Cmdr. Fotiadis. And soon, the staff of the Detention Hospi tal will be getting an upgrade to a new facility, based on the needs of the mission. The current facility was always supposed to be temporary, says Navy Chief Petty Offi cer Mark W. Nuth, who is in charge of public works for the hospital. The new, hardened facility will open on September 15th, and will differ from the cur rent building in that it is designed to withstand high winds, and will be roomier than the cur rent structure, said Nuth. Fotiadis, who will depart not long after the establishment of the new facility, had some positive words at the end of her 6-month deployment. Whoever takes my place needs to be flex ible and approach every situation with an open mind. No one in Navy medical history has had a mission such as this one. Most of the items in the Detainee Hospital, such as these stretchers, are readily collapsible. In case of destructive weather, the entire structure can be broken down into its component parts and stored until the danger has passed. Page 7 Friday, September 6, 2002 terror s detainees carefully Navy HM3 Sherrice L. McKay checks for active and latent TB in the patients. McKay is one of the staff members who opted to extend her stay at GTMO. Camp A settles in for long haul Page 10 Friday, September 6, 2002 Every military operation, just like every relationship, must eventually face a question of committment. The participants must ask themselves: Are we in this for the long haul, and if so, isnt it time to start preparing more permanent accomodations? JTF-160 is making that com mittment to the MPs and infantrymen that staff its Camp Delta detention operation, having recently begun construction on Camp Alpha North, a new hardened barracks area across Windmill Beach Rd. The senior command recog nized that this mission is no longer expeditionary. There will be a long life to it and as such they recognized the need for more robust, or longer-lasting, and more comfortable berthing for the troops, said Navy Cmdr. Michael Moskowitz, the chief JTF engineer here and also the man on the ground for the Nor folk, Va.-based Naval Facilities Atlantic Division (LANTDIV), which ultimately orders all con struction projects for the base. You have to remember, in December this whole detention operation here was put together in a very big hurry, and nobody was sure how long it would last, Moskowitz said. Tents, like the ones at Freedom Heights, are the first step in any expeditionary sit uation. Then with the switch from Camp X-Ray to Camp Delta came the SEAhuts at Camp America. Those are standard contingency construction in a sit uation you figure is semi-perma nent get it down now, figure the rest out later. Now we know more what were doing and that its going to be for a while, and so theres a strong interest in upgrading qual ity of life for the troops while theyre here. And so comes Camp Alpha North. Moskowitz credits JTF160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus with working with U.S. Southern Command, NAVBASE GTMO and making newer, more permanent, more comfortable living quarters a reality for the troops that make the detention operation run at its most funda mental level. He really made it happen on the ground, Moskowitz said. Two structures one sched uled to be completed by contrac tor Brown & Root (They do good work, says Moskowitz) in October and the other in Novem ber will house a total of 612 soldiers in 51 rooms. In terms of dimensions and the number of troops per room, the new quarters wont be much different from SEAhuts. Each room will still measure 16 feet by 32 feet and house 12 servicemembers in six bunk beds. But there will be advantages to the permanent version more insulation to keep heat out and cool in, firmer floors, less probablility of the rain coming in through weary plywood. There will be less exterior maintenance required. Then theres the most reliable sign of an increase in civilization indoor plumbing. Each 12person unit will have its own toi let and sink, and each larger structure will have a gang shower unit and latrine area. In other words, no more crunching across the gravel in the middle of the night when Nature calls. Its somewhere in the middle between tents like Freedom Heights and a hotel-type garrison environment, said Moskowitz. These are still military forma tion conditions. Theyve got to be squad-sized barracks, which is why theyre still holding 12 apiece, and theyve got to be sited so theyre right next to the action. But its still a step up from the SEAhuts. For some. With more than a thousand troops already man ning the Delta detention opera tion, which troops will get the upgrade to Camp America North and who will stay behind? Moskowitz says JTF-160 hopes that wont be a problem for too long. Technically, theres nothing else programmed to be built right now, he said. But its highly likely that therell be additional programming, especially if the mission here continues to expand. As monies come in to do that, the master plan is that all the troops will have the same type of billeting. But by then, most of the sol diers currently living in Camp Americas SEAhuts will have left for home and presumably softer beds. Must they simply stare across the road as contruc tion workers erect fancy new digs in which theyll never live? Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Two SEAhuts with a new coat of white paint (white will help reflect sunlight and keep the SEAhuts cooler) stand out from the yet-to-be-painted camp commandants hut at the front edge of Camp America. Navy Cmdr. Michael Moskowitz, cen ter, discusses plans for a project with two Army colleagues. Brown & Root workers put a coat of sun-reflecting white paint on the SEAhuts at Camp America.

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Page 6 Friday, September 6, 2002 Youd be surprised how much care you can dispense without entering the cell, says Navy Cmdr. Lilly Fotiadis, the Senior Nurse Corps Officer at Fleet Hospital 20 or, as its known in GTMO, Detention Hospital in Camp Delta. Fotiadis is the division officer for the Camp Delta detainee clinic which ministers to the medical needs of the hundreds of detainees now being held at Guantanamo Bay as part of Americas war on terrorism. The cautious way that members of the hos pitals staff have had to dispense care is only one of the many things to which theyve had to adapt since the hospital started operating here in late January. According to a press release issued by JTF160, the construction of the structure now known as Detention Hospital originally required over 180 people from Camp Lejeune, N.C. It took 17 SEABEES from Construction Battalion 423 to clear and pre pare the land for the hospital in three days of intense 24-hour operations beginning January 18. Tents went up in one day and the International Standards Organization (ISO) containers were unpacked, expanded and organized into rooms and stor age areas fit for labs, wash rooms and examination rooms. A mere 26 days elapsed between the time the warning order was issued to the unit and the time the first patient was admitted to the hospital on January 30, 2002. We can see several detainees at one time in the clinic, says Fotiadis. The hospital has an Acute Care Ward capable of holding eight detainees, with an expansion potential of 3640 detainees. The capabilities of the mobile hospital are impressive for a structure of such a small size. The fleet hospital is capable of handling General Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Internal Medicine, Infectious Disease, Family Practice, Mental Health, Physical Therapy, Radiology, Laboratory, and Pharmacy. As of August 13, there had been 8,941 outpatient visits and 65 admitted patients. The hospital is run by its Officer in Charge, Navy Cmdr. Jaime Carroll. Fotiadis is in a naval reserve unit attached to Naval Hospital (NH), Camp Lejeune. She was recalled to Lejeune in Jan uary, and then sent here in April to care for detainees. Fotiadis says she received no special training for this assignment, and when her rotation started, she didnt quite know what to expect. I have never worked in a prison or other maximum secu rity environment before, said Fotiadis. The closest experi ence was taking care of the inebriated patients seen in the Emergency Room of the civilian hospital where I work when I am not on active duty. Carroll stresses safety and security for her staff. In the hands of someone who means harm, a pen, a stethoscope, or even a paperclip could become a weapon, so nothing should be left lying about. Its just human nature to forget that the patients may be dangerous, says Carroll. Theres def initely teamwork between the medics and the MPs. We dont do anything medical without an MP with us. Our primary pro tection when exam ining detainees or passing medications is our wonderful security force. We never approach any detainee without a guard standing right by our side. In the cellblocks we never go to the detainee. Never do we put our hands in the door opening. You can take vital signs, dis pense medication, and administer eye drops and ear drops without entering the detainees cells, says Fotiadis. I did not have clear cut expectations prior Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire This seemingly humble tent is the Detention Hospitals casualty receiving entrance. Charting a smooth course: (L to R) Navy Cmdrs. Jaime Carroll and Lilly Fotiadis. As they prepare to move to a new facility, Fleet Hospital 20 keeps treating the enemy with pride I must always remind myself of just what they are capable of. Security is always the first thing on our minds. Navy Cmdr. Lilly Fotiadis Senior Nurse Corps Officer Navy Senior Chief Marshall W. Adkins: We have to watch out for each other at all times. Detention Hospital: Caring for Camp Americas stewards are working on that too. While the new barracks are being built, were doing renova tions on the SEAhuts, said Staff Sgt. Janet Harnack, assistant camp commandant and a mem ber of the 346th MO Co. out of Hutchinson, Kan. Were strengthening the floors and caulking the insides to prevent leaking now that hurricane sea son seems to be here. Were put ting fans above the air-conditioning units to help cir culate the air better. And were putting 3 coats of white paint on the outside. Thatll help reflect the sun and keep them cooler. On the one hand, Harnack said, no one came to GTMO expecting luxury. From what theyd seen on television of the detention operations first six months, her unit was expecting just what those arriving in Janu ary had gotten: GP Mediums under the hot Caribbean sun. On the other, this operation is here to stay. And while operating within the military necessities of being housed in formation condi tions this is a deployment, and any quarters of Camp Delta guards need to be squad-sized and sited near the action JTF160 aims to make life here as liveable as possible. This is about quality of life, Harnack said. The troops here have a very important mission on the ground here, and if we can help with their quality of life thats one less thing they have to worry about. For Moskowitz, a former SEABEE with 18 years in the Navy, Camp Alpha North is just the latest in a long list of projects that have marked the detention operations evolution from an expeditionary, plan-as-you-go mission to something more established and more permanent. Since first coming to GTMO in December, hes served as the construction point man for both the JTF and GTMOs Navy over seers, and as such has supervised just about every construction project associated with the JTF missions: Camp America 1, 2, and 3. Camp X-Ray and Camp Delta (and the ongoing Delta Two), the old Fleet Hospital and the new Detainee Hospital. You name it, I was involved in it, Moskowitz said. Its been a lot of work, but Im proud to serve. This is an important mis sion. Were realizing were going to be here a while. So were try ing to do the best we can for the troops that are here. Page 11 Friday, September 6, 2002 with new barracks, facelift The new SEAhut: Floor diagram of one room of the planned Camp America North hard barracks. Each room will be a SEAhut-sized 16 feet by 32 feet, with six bunk beds, 12 wall lockers, 4 overhead lights and an in-house commode and sink. Brown & Root workers measure out ground for Camp America North and drive in a stake to mark the spot. A work in progress: Brown & Root workers weld and paint joints on the frame of a Camp America North barracks-to-be. This structure is currently scheduled to be completed in October. All except the windows: A structure approximating the new hard barracks at Camp America North.

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ies; Camp Delta and Camp America, the Pink Palace and the Head Shed and the Child Development Center are its shrines. Every one here is paying homage every day to the blood spilled that September morning with sacrifices of their own. Certainly no one here is likely to forget; it is why they are here. But Sept. 11 struck us in a special way. Not just as soldiers, but as people. This event was personalized. It wasn't an attack by a nation, or an army, but of individ uals, upon individuals, said Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Raymond A. Tetreault. The people who died on that day didn't consider them selves at war when they went to work that day. Neither did America. All that changed, and we all feel vulnerable in a new way. It's an event that has touched all our lives, he said, besides being the reason that we're all here. And so at 7:30 a.m. in the Camp America chapel and 6:00 p.m. in the Naval Base chapel, Tetreault and Army Chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill will represent JTF160s spiritual side with non-denomina tional services held in memory of the attacks. Both services will feature a slide presentation of Sept. 11 images and remarks by NYPD officer Sandra M. Orlandella, an Army Capt. serving as opera tions officer at the Joint Information Bureau. The morning service will feature comments from JTF-160 Commanding (Brig.) Gen. Rick Baccus; Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn, base commander, and JTF-170 Commanding (Maj.) Gen. Michael Dunlavey will speak at the evening service. Attendees are invited to linger and share recollections of the day. It's more spiritual than religious, said Tetreault. But in the aftermath of the attacks, it was to churches and synagogues and mosques that people turned for some kind of solace and meaning and sharing. We realize that this anniversary may be difficult for some people, and we want to provide some of that here as well as remembering the lives that were lost that day. But for the com mands of JTF-160 and JTF-170, whose mis sions honor that day every day, it is equally important to take a few moments from work to remember in a military way the first sacrifices of this war. Sept. 11 marks the first anniversary of the cowardly acts that killed thousands of innocent people and plunged our nation and this military into a global war, said Lt. Col. Dennis H. Fink, JTF-170 public affairs offi cer. The least we can do is take a little time from our day to reflect on those terrible acts. And so at exactly 8:46 a.m., the moment that the first plane struck the first tower, JTF170 will hold a formation outside its head quarters at the Child Development Center. Bells will be tolled and Taps played, fol lowed by what Fink called a brief and fit ting memorial service. Simultaneously, JTF-160's Joint Detention Operations Group will raise the American flag at Camp Delta and hold a moment of silence and short ceremony of its own, includ ing comments from JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus. Yes, this whole operation is a commemo ration in itself, said Army Col. John J. Per rone, Jr., JDOG commander. "It's a real testament to the American will. But I think we also need to take some time to reflect on that day in history. It really has changed the world, and the fact that we're here on active duty is evidence of that. Also deserving of remembrance is a differ ent kind of soldier killed in that surprise attack the firefighters whose sacred duty it was to rush up the World Trade Center stair ways when everyone else was rushing down. At 10:05 a.m. and 10:28 a.m., the moments when the two towers collapsed, members of the civilian GTMO Fire Dept. will hold their own tribute in conjunction with fire departments the world over, forming up outside GTMO's four fire stations and sounding the traditional salute to firefighters fallen three sets of five bells, followed by a moment of silence. We're doing this because 343 of the peo ple that died that day more than 10 percent of the total were firefighters, said GTMO Fire Chief Francis C. Kruppa. Thats proba bly the largest non-military group that's ever died in a single attack. And they were all in there with one goal to save somebody else. So its extremely important that firefighters all over the world remember this event. And so Sept. 11, 2002 will be in most ways little different than any other Wednesday in the life of this detention operation. MP com panies will go on and off shift at Camp Delta, take detainees to and from interrogations, play their part supporting this war on terror as they have since this operation began. Infantrymen and Port Security Units will keep perimeters and shores safe and secure. Support staffs and command chains will try to keep the detention operation and its troops well-fed, fully cared-for and fairly paid. But now and then throughout the day, at the times we all know all too well, the mis sion will pause. Soldiers and sailors, airmen and Marines, Coast Guardsmen and firefight ers, JTF-160 and JTF-170 alike will stop to honor the dead and remember the fallen of that terrible day, and remind ourselves one more time: This is why were here. Page 5 Friday, September 6, 2002 9/11/02, from page 1 Another day in the life of Camp America. By all appearances, Sept. 11, 2002 will likely be no different. Members of the 239th MP Co. form up last week before heading to Camp Delta to work the swing shift. The 342nd MP Co. shows its colors on a hooch door at Camp America. For the members of the 114th Military Police Company, the MP stands for multi purpose. Since June 10th, the 114th has been here at GTMO performing the task that they were assigned to do to the best of their abilities. But it wasnt familiar. Our responsibilities on this mission are different than we have done in the past, said Capt. Robert R. Bartran, commander of the 114th, a National Guard unit from Clinton, Miss. We are com monly tasked as combat MPs in a combat environment, but here at GTMO, the roles have been reversed and our MPs are being used as corrections officers. The soldiers of the 114th have been trained as 95 Bravos, which are military police officers who deal with both law-and-order and combat, said Bartran. In this mission here, the soldiers are mostly being used as 95 Charlies, who are corrections officers. We previously had the training to build and operate a temporary holding facility in a combat zone during a wartime operation, but this detention facility is built here with a more permanent structure, said Bartran. The detention facility here is a little more secured than most of us expected, said Spc. Edward M. Herring. But being that we have a squared-away unit, we will be able to adapt to the changes. The unit has had previous training in the apprehending and transporting of detainees, said Bartran. But in the past, we would turn the individuals over to a correctional facility. Here we are actually running the facility. Since the soldiers of the 114th would be performing unfamiliar tasks, extra training was required so the servicemembers would be able to perform their duties to the highest standard. To prepare for this deploy ment, two soldiers were sent to Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri to become qualified instructors of Non-lethal weapons, said Bar tran. Also, five high-speed noncommissioned officers were sent to Fort Knox, Kentucky to cross train as 95Cs to learn about opera tions in a correctional facility and the proper han dling of detainees. We spent some time in the classroom train ing before we were activated, said Sgt. Kevin G. Burr. Some of the members from our unit were sent out for extra training. When they came back, we spent some time going over dif ferent things about how to deal with the detainees. They were sent to these schools to learn and become certi fied, so that they could come back and pass that infor mation on to the remainder of the com pany, said Bartran. The train ing gave us a good inside look, said Burr. We were able to put it to good use here at GTMO. Such operations here at GTMO are 24 hours a day and seven days a week. Since they arrived, the 114th MP Co. has been responsi ble for working the overnight shift. The night shift is good, said Bartran. Theres less work to be done while the detainees are asleep. The overnight working condi tions arent so bad because the heat is down, and everything is pretty much calm, said Herring. The best thing about it is that you go to work one day, and after you finish, its another calendar day down. One downside to working the overnight shift is the construction being done on much of Camp America when the sun is out. Its not so hard to adapt to a schedule such as working the overnight shift, said Burr. The biggest disadvantage is trying to sleep through all of the banging during the day. For the soldiers of the 114th MP Co., the mission didnt start here at GTMO when they received their orders to be acti vated. Weve been activated since January, said Burr. We spent five months at Fort Campbell, Ken tucky, conducting law and order. Back then, we just had a possibil ity of going somewhere else Our duties over at Fort Camp bell were basic, said Henning. Our responsibilities here at GTMO are different, and I am proud to be here doing this. When we got here to GTMO, I think we had a pretty good idea what to expect, said Bartran. Its just very eye-opening knowing that we are looking into the faces of the worlds terrorists. Im excited to be here doing more than law and order, said Burr. I am proud to have joined the fight for freedom, and I think most of the unit feels that way; especially now, as the one-year anniversary of Sept. 11 nears. Just like all other deployments, this tour is going to end someday, and the 114th cant claim to be too upset at the prospect. Were not there yet, but we have hit the halfway mark, said Bartran. Up to this point we have been doing a great job and show ing much professionalism. Times clicking by pretty fast, said Herring. I think every one is looking forward to going home to their families. Some people might complain about the conditions here, but overall, we should all be glad for what we got, said Burr. The days go by slow here at GTMO, but the weeks go by fast, said Bartran. But while theyre waiting to ship back home, these MPs will continue to stay up and keep an ever-vigilant eye on the detainees while you sleep. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The 114th MP Co. holds a formation at Camp America before transporting over to Camp Delta to perform their vital mission. Story by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Soldiers of the 114th MP Co. load onto a bus that will transport them to Camp Delta to perform their nightly guard duty shifts. All night long for the 114th MP Co. Photo courtesy of 114th MP Co. Capt. Robert R. Bartran, commander of the 114th MP Co. Page 12 Friday, September 6, 2002

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Page 4 Friday, September 6, 2002 This weeks question: How would you describe the United States military in one word? Navy Chief John Dupee, Naval Base chief harbor pilot Unequaled. David Walsh, civilian, retired NYPD Awesome. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Andrew Painter, USCG Cutter Bear Adaptable. Army Pfc. Hollister L. Robinson, 342nd Mili tary Police Company Strong-willed. Air Force Tech Sgt. Nickey Crider, J4 Dedicated. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Showing appreciation Capt. William W. Elliott, U.S. Marine Corps, presented troops of the motor pool with certificates of appreciation and Marine Corps coins for all their hard work and sup port to the Marine Corps mission here Monday. Theyve been a big help, said Sgt. Douglas E. Card well, USMC Security Forces. The Marines have over forty vehicles and few mechanics. The troops down at the motor pool have helped us to maintain our vehicles by supplying man power, parts, and labor. They help us keep the mis sion rolling. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Across 1 Cast metal 5 Except 9 Seldom 13 Display 14 Hurry 15 Blot (2 wds.) 16 Fish stories 17 Removes the water 18 Artery 19 Smart 21 Squabble 23 Genetic code 24 Heptad 25 Colorless liquor 29 Pigsty 30 Matte 32 Whichever 33 Oak seed 36 Lamenting poetry 37 Central nervous system 38 Treaty organization 39 Genetic identical 40 Buckeye State 41 Km/h 42 Thunderous sounds 43 Prayer position 44 Downwind 45 Volcano 46 Pastry 47 Fallible 49 Fasten 50 Pig meat 53 Noodle 55 Three of a kind 57 Confuse 60 Black 62 Duke 63 Pain reliever brand 64 Rolled chocolate candy brand 65 Region 66 Gaiety 67 Tinted 68 Tinter Down 1 Loafed 2 Prevail 3 End 4 Snack 5 Enact 6 __ Gras 7 Stiff 8 Screen 9 House toppers 10 April (abbr.) 11 Furrow 12 Government agency 15 Freedom from danger 20 Poetic evening 22 Visualization 26 Save 27 Red headed orphan 28 Household cleaner brand 29 Affirmative 30 Regional plant life 31 Optical device 33 Foot joint 34 Leap 35 The one left 36 Vivacity 39 Terra __ (type of clay) 40 Single 42 Go back on a promise 43 Chinese gooseberry 46 Anise-flavored liqueur 48 Aloft 49 Lifted 50 Old 51 Fit in 52 Shiny balloon material 54 Goody two shoes 56 Usher 57 Container 58 Annex 59 Charge 61 Lad Page 13 Friday, September 6, 2002 Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Answers to the August 30 puzzle DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, September 6 8 p.m. Crocodile Hunter, PG 89 min 10 p.m. Mr. Deeds, PG-13 91 min Saturday, September 7 8 p.m. Men in Black 2, PG-13 91 min 10 p.m. Triple X, PG-13 114 min Sunday, September 8 8 p.m. Minority Report, PG-13 140 min Monday, September 9 8 p.m. Reign of Fire, PG-13 108 min Tuesday, September 10 8 p.m. Like Mike, PG 100 min Wednesday, September 11 8 p.m. Crocodile Hunter, PG 89 min Thursday, September 12 8 p.m. Men in Black 2, PG-13 91min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, September 6 8 p.m. Crimson Tide, R 117 min 10 p.m. Exit Wounds, R 101 min Saturday, September 7 8 p.m. Saving Silverman, PG-13 92 min 10 p.m. Reindeer Games, R 104 min Sunday, September 8 8, 10 p.m. Mission Impossible 2, R 126 min Monday, September 9 8 p.m. Three Kings, R 95 min Tuesday, September 10 8 p.m. Chain of Command, R 102 min Wednesday, September 11 8 p.m. Hamburger Hill, R -112 min Thursday, September 12 8, 10 p.m. Money Kings, R 96 min It was a horrible day When they darkened our sky, Dropped us down to our knees, and us asking why? What did we do To deserve this pain? You cut into our hearts And shaved your name. They chose wrong To do what they did, Of us our courage and unity They can never rid. It was a big mistake When they attacked our towers, Now feel the wrath Of the United States powers. As high as the towers stood, We will stand Well fight with our lives To defend this land.

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Page 3 Friday, September 6, 2002 This is the reason why we are all here at GTMO. Camp Delta, which houses detainees from the global war on terrorism, is also the workplace for the Mili tary Police companies that guard them. While the camp is guarded 24 hours a day, seven days a week, the early day shift currently performed by the active-duty 571st MP Co. from Fort Lewis, Wash. has its own challenges. Operating under the heat of the sun, these MPs must wake up the detainees, feed them two of their three meals and ensure that theyre humanely treated and remain well-behaved. Their job is demanding, their professionalism heroic. Their work is what shall be placed in the annals of history. The guards at Camp Delta perform their duties with the highest degree of professionalism, representing the best of the U.S. Camp Delta guards: day shift Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Camp Delta, as seen from the media observation point, represents the soul of the JTF-160 and JTF-170 missions here at Guantanamo bay. The guards that toil away within the fences are the pulse of this operation. Hour after hour, day after day, they carry the weight of the detention operation upon their proud shoulders. Sgt. Robert Kearbey, 571st MP Co. I am glad to be a part of something as historical as this. Were making a difference out here. Its something to tell your grandkids about. Pfc. Tawaiski Lanier, 571st MP Co. Its an all-right job. The hardest thing is overcoming the heat. But the pride is what keeps me going throughout this mission. Spc. Tim Schlecht, 571st MP Co. Its been a real unique experience. The challenge comes with not becoming complacent. I try to make the best of it, though. Pvt. Edward Lang, 571st MP Co. The job is fun. I mean, look at what were doing here. This is a truly worthwhile mission, and Im happy to be a part of it. Page 14 Friday, September 6, 2002 Contact Capt. Gormly at x5249 for more information about MWR events. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Peli can Petes Marina. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. MWF, 5:30PM-6:30PM, Tues. & Thurs. 6:15PM-7:15PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM-6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Flag Football Leagues, M-F, 6 PM, Cooper Field. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM-4:00PM. Today, Friday, September 6th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Saturday, September 7th, 06:30AM, Commanders Cup Run, Denich Gym. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Sunday, September 8th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Monday, September 9th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, September 10th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Wednesday, September 11th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 7:00PM, Round Two, Darts Tournament, CBQ. 7:00PM-8:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower Thursday, September 12th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Find yourself at Bulkeley movies Deep within the bowels of Guantanamo Bay exists a gem in the rough that it seems few are willing to find. Ask about it, and most people will question its existence. It is a sanctuary, a place for calm and individual reflection, a space where one can be thankful to be deployed here. A place where one can some times come to view old action movies from the sthe Camp Bulke ley movie the ater. Wire edi tor Spc. Frank Pellegrini and myself dis covered this amazing forum of film two weeks ago, when we attended a showing of a wrongly forgotten classic: a lit tle Arnold Schwarzenegger action piece known as Com mando. Rolling in a Humvee, we set out in search of this fabled GTMO movie theater, not knowing if its existence was mere myth. But after searching through a maze of dirt roads out at Camp Bulkeley, we eventually realized that the leg end was indeed real. As we approached this lost but now found theater, it was as if we had discovered an oasis in the desert. Was it mere illusion? At first sight, the place seemed abandoned, but the appearance of a lonely MWR worker by the projectionist booth reas sured us that this was no mirage. Besides us, only two other enlightened individuals were in attendance. Only seconds after settling into our spacious seats, up front near the low-slung screen, our nearly private screening began. As Commando burst upon the screen, Pellegrini and I were taken back to a Golden Age of cinema, a time when great, cheesy action movies of a higher caliber roamed the planet. Having not seen this movie since I was a kid, the experi ence of seeing it again on a big screen was only enhanced by the magnificent beauty that was this sultry GTMO night. Every slick one-liner (Please dont disturb my friend. Hes dead tired.) was punctuated by an arc of light ning splintering the sky. The steel drums so prevalent in the James Horner soundtrack were enhanced by the foreboding sound of distant thunder. It was an hour-and-a-half of unadulterated entertainment, and when the credits started to roll, we shook hands heartily and told each other how glad we were to have come. How we had been here at GTMO for three months (and change) and never paid a visit to this fine theater, escaped us both. It goes to show, that on a base that is pretty much one long road, if you look hard enough you can still discover new treasure. The sometimes older selec tion of movies that play at the Bulkeley movie theater is a nice change of pace from the as current-as-they-get cinema fare offered at the Downtown Lyceum Theater. (Although The Sum of all Fears was hardly current by the end of its long run.) And the apparent lack of visitors to this out-ofthe-way spot makes it a nice getaway from the large crowds that can sometimes plague GTMOs better-known theater. But Camp Bulkeley, like the theater that hides within it, is a site that the tourists apparently have yet to find. A suburb of the more famous Camp Amer ica, it is located down the road from Camp Delta, and it is the home of only one unit the 178th Military Police Com pany, National Guard members out of Monroe, Ga. So if you ever happen to find yourself out there near Camp Bulkeley after the sun goes down, you know the spot to check out. Of course it helps if a vin tage action movie starring Arnold Schwarzenegger is playing, but even a flick of lesser quality can benefit from the atmosphere out at the serene and secluded Camp Bulkeley. Its definitely worth the effort to discover, if for the experience alone. Story and photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire The majestic Bulkeley movie theater. By day, it looks abandoned, nestled on grounds that have seen better-maintained days. But every night twice a night it comes alive.

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Page 15 Friday, September 6, 2002 NAVSTA still perfect on gridiron Naval Station came from behind with a strong second half to beat 178th Military Police Company 23-9 Wednesday night at Cooper Field. 178th MP Co. stunned Naval Station with intense defensive play in the first half, playing very aggressively and taking Naval Station out of their game plan. In the first series of the game for Naval Sta tion, the elusive Navy Seaman Antonio Robinson, who is the quarterback for Naval Station, was sacked for a safety. Robinson is hard to stop and he is very quick, said Army Staff Sgt Joseph K. Ronan. But 178th MP Co. sacked him three times in the first half. Naval Station seemed shocked. The 178th was the first team to give them real competi tion in this flag football season. They were being tested. Naval Station was on the brink of losing their perfect season. This was unfamil iar territory for them. But Naval Station regrouped from that first series and scored on a sweep to take a 7-2 lead. But the 178ths wishbone offense, with its fast-running quarterback option plays, had Naval Station on their heels. A quarterback pitch to Army Staff Sgt. Tony Williams set up the 178 MP Co.s first touchdown of the game, putting them ahead by a score of 9-7. Then their defense stopped Naval Station from coming down the field and scoring. Naval Station was forced to punt the football back to the 178th, which returned it for 37 yards. That put them in good field position and gave them a chance to score before the half. Williams ran to the left to break a 20-yard play. That gave the MPs a first down and goal to go. With the clock running down, 178th MP Co. was threatening to put points on the board. But Naval Stations defense picked up and prevented them from scoring on their next two plays, and soon the 178th was in danger of running out of time. They came out of the huddle with no timeouts left, and by the time they got to the line of scrimmage and began to call an audible the referee had blown the whistle. The first half came to an end. 178th MP Co. knew they had just let a golden opportunity slip through their hands. They hadnt used the game clock wisely. This mistake could haunt them later in the game. But they were still ahead 9-7, the first time Naval Station had found themselves on the losing side at halftime. Would it be enough? Naval Station is a tough team and you have to score as many points as you can to beat them, said Ronan. To maintain the lead against Naval Station we have to stay rock-steady, said the 178th coach, Army Spc. George Lallas, at halftime. We need to keep the pressure up and keep hitting them hard. I was pleased with our per formance in the first half. We were able to minimize our mistakes and we need to con tinue play like this the whole game. Naval Station was only down by two and they didnt look worried on the sidelines. We need to hold them on defense and stop them from scoring. I need to stop throwing interceptions, said Robinson. They are a good team. This is the first test of the season for Naval Station. We plan to air the ball out and hit them hard in the second half. Even though 178th MP Co. didnt score at the end of the first half, they would have the football at the start of the second half, and felt as though they were still in control of the game. Their offense was clicking on all cylin ders until Robinson intercepted the ball. This play shifted the momentum of the game and seemed to light a fire under Naval Station. Robinson took charge and took his team downfield. But as they were in the red zone, Robinson throw an ill-advised pass that was almost picked off by the 178th. Robinson maintained his composure and on the next play he threw a strike to Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Bill Goodwin for a touchdown. Catching that touchdown felt good, and it put us back on top. They were taking us out of our game plan, said Goodwin. Their quick option offense threw us off on defense but we were able to adjust. Now up 14-9, Naval Station was back in familiar territory. The 178th squad wasnt able to score on its next two drives, and Robinson was now on top of his game as he was picking apart the defense with precision passing. We had to use our two tight-end offense to open up the field, said Goodwin. Robinson was able to keep avoiding the constant pressure 178th MP Co. put on him and find the open man downfield. And when Robinson threw a 22-yard pass to Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jay S. Wojcik, it sealed the victory and kept Naval Stations undefeated season alive. Their record is now 7-0 and first place in their division. Flag Football Standings CRUNCHING CENTRAL Naval Station 7-0 239th MP Co. 6-0 178th MP Co. 4-2 NCTAMS 4-2 Hood Ratz 3-2 MIUW 204 2-3 Cactus Curtain 1-5 Wildcats 0-6 MONSTROUS MIDWEST Hospital 5-1 MCSF Co. 5-2 Buckeyes 4-2 Security 3-4 Chucks 2-4 War Eagles 2-4 Gun Runners 2-4 JTF-170 2-5 Angry Beavers 0-6 Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jay S. Wojcik blows by two defenders from 178th MP Co. for a 19-yard gain. Navy Seaman Antonio Robinson eludes the sack and runs for 15 yards in a win over 178th MP Co. Page 2 Friday, September 6, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Id read somewhere that at the Sept. 11 commemorations in New York City, former mayor Rudy Giuliani will be reading Abraham Lincolns Gettysburg Address. I found that very interesting. So I started researching it, and came across this letter a man named David Wills invitation to President Lincoln to come and deliver a few appropriate remarks to Gettysburg to dedicate the cemetery that had been built there. As we ask ourselves, why commemorate? I think Wills explains it very well. It will be a source of great gratification to the many widows and orphans that have been made almost friendless by the Great Battle here, to have you here personally; and it will kindle anew in the breasts of the Comrades of these brave dead, who are now in the tented field or nobly meeting the foe in the front, a confidence that they who sleep in death on the Battle Field are not forgotten by those highest in Authority; and they will feel that, should their fate be the same, their remains will not be uncared for. Lincoln, of course, accepted the invitation and delivered on November 19, 1863 one of the most famous speeches in history, all the more remarkable for its brevity and concise beauty. As Lincoln said: It is...for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead we take increased devo tion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Raymond A. Tetreault. Time is passing quickly for JTF-160 units deployed at GTMO, but a predictable pattern of daily routines has taken over. It can be easy at times to lose focus of our mission, which is to guard and detain those who would otherwise be free to plan and wage terrorist attacks against the U.S. Whether you realize it or not, everyone here mechanics, bus drivers, infantry, military police, and clerks has an important job in sup port of the war against terrorism. We are not in Afghanistan, but it doesn't make our jobs any less important or dangerous. A lucky few have the privilege from time to time of enjoying their weekends off by relaxing at one of the base clubs over a few drinks. But consuming alcoholic beverages at GTMO is a privilege not to be abused. It is disconcerting to find that Drunk and Dis orderly behavior still occurs among JTF-160 per sonnel, even those who have been here for a while. We have stated in this column many times in the past that this is in direct violation of Policy Letter #1: Alcohol Consumption, and NAVBASE regulations. Regardless of your branch of service, if you are a member of JTF-160 who is arrested for a Drunk & Disorderly incident and found to be in violation of the Alcohol Consumption policy, I can guarantee you that you will face UCMJ pro ceedings. The main reason we are here is to do our job. With all due consideration, our mission comes first and everything else is secondary. Remember that the reputation you make for yourself while you are here will follow you to your next assign ment. Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 Lessons from Gettysburg JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. A message from Chief of Staff of the Army, Gen. Eric K. Shinseki: On 11 September, 2001, without warn ing or reason, the forces of hatred and fear attacked America. We all remember the pain and anger we felt in the after math of those attacks as we honored fallen comrades, colleagues, dear friends, and loved ones who had been lost. Some who survived will live in agony for the rest of their lives. We embraced all of their families during the pain of their bereavement. In remembrance of the sac rifices made that day, we will pause on 11 September, 2002 for a moment of silence and quiet reflection at each installation and garrison throughout the Army. The times for this observance will be coordi nated by each major command. Our nation has provided and contin ues to provide the world leadership needed to bring to justice those responsi ble for these terrible attacks. In the year since, the Army, in concert with other services and our allies, has devoted itself to winning the global war on terrorism, providing stability in those regions of the world important to us, and training to defend the United States and its interests. These commitments have not been with out further sacrifice by soldiers who have gone into harms way on our behalf. The Army remains on point for the nation, as it has for over 227 years. By protecting and preserving our way of life, soldiers are keeping faith with all Ameri cans. The Army is strong; it is ready. Sec retary White and I, as well as the rest of the Army leadership, are privileged by your service and inspired by your exam ples of loyalty, duty, honor, and integrity. Your courage, selfless service, and respect for one another, and for others, make us the great Army that we are and enable us to fulfill our contract with the American people to fight and win our nations wars, decisively. So as we pause this 11 September to remember the sacrifices of so many dur ing those attacks in Washington, in New York City, and in Pennsylvania it is appropriate that we reflect on what it means to be an American. God bless each and every one of you, God bless this magnificent Army of ours, and God bless America.

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Page 16 Friday, September 6, 2002 Sgt. 1st Class Arthur T. Martin Jr., 239th MP Co. Q: What is your mission here at GTMO? A: I work in food service. My soldiers and I are responsible for the feeding of detainees. Q: Hows the Army been treating you? A: My experiences in the Army have been excellent. Being able to adapt, and paying attention to detail are the keys to success. Q: You joined right out of high school? A: Yes I did. It was either the Army for col lege or bust. Q: So youre in this Army thing for the long haul? A: Yes, an extra pension is a must, thanks to Enron. Q: Tell us about that drill sergeant patch on your uniform. A: Well, I graduated from a reserve-com ponent drill sergeant school, but unfortunately I never went on the trail to train troops. But my skills were applied every day when I worked at the #2 boot camp program in the nation, I.M.P.A.C.T., straightening out kids. Q: What was the best thing about that? A: To see that you have made a positive change in someones life. Also having gradu ates moms coming up to you thanking you with a big hug and a kiss on the lips. Q: You still think about training troops? A: Yes, I have a strong passion to. Hope fully I will get a chance. Q: What sort of a drill sergeant would you make? A: Im like Major Payne. They might not like me, but they will respect me. Q: So your soldiers would have night mares about you. A: Yes, of course. Q: So, back in your basic training days, you must have been pretty squared away. A: I was platoon sergeant until I got caught eating a Jolly Rancher. They fired me and made me a road guard. Q: You must of been in top-notch shape back then, are you still a PT stud? A: Yes, of course. Q: How long can you do flutter kicks for? A: Until my abs develop a 12 pack. Q: Can you catch bullets with your teeth? A: No. I wouldnt even attempt to. Q: Can you dodge bullets like in The Matrix? A: Negative. If someone starts shooting at me, Im ducking and moving. Q: Thats the idea. So lets say you start running back home; where would that be? A: Baton Rouge, La. Q: Bad things are going on back there right now, with all of these serial killers running around. A: Theyd be no serial killers if I was back on the block. Me and the other 239th horse men, Leachman, Taylor and Horton, would round them up quick, fast and in a hurry. Q: So you must go to Mardi Gras? A: Yes, of course. I saw my first nice Manuckaduck there. Q: Right...is that one New Balance sneaker youre wearing and those two crutches you have within Army regulations? A: At ease. I got banged up playing flag football. But Im proud to say that the Black Sheep are 5-0 and counting. Ya heard me? Q: Well now, what do you do in your spare time? A: Watch TV, go out to Camp America to conversate with the horsemen and perform surgery. Q: Sure...so whats to come for you once you start collecting that Army pension? A: Law enforcement, on a drug task force. Q: Do think youll be the next Shaft? A: Yes, of course. Our bald heads have that same irresistible shine to them. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Sgt. 1st Class Arthur T. Martin Jr.: checking Pink Palace badges and keeping an eye out for those serial killers. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Ducking and moving with Drill Sgt. skill On the one hand, were all working that day, just like every other day, said Camp Americas assistant camp commandant, Staff Sgt. Janet Harnack of the 346th MP Co. On the other, it should never be an ordinary day. Such is the balance JTF-160 and JTF-170 are striking as the one-year anniversary of last years Sept. 11 terrorist attacks approaches. One year after hijacked planes full of jet fuel slammed into both World Trade Center tow ers and the Pentagon; one year after a fourth plane thought to be headed for the White House was heroically brought down in a Pennsylvania field by its self-sacrificing pas sengers; one year after thousands died and millions cried and the worlds most powerful nation was plunged into war with a shadowy network of terrorists, it is time to remember what we can never forget. Certainly the U.S. military has been honor ing Sept. 11 since the terrible morning itself. Reservists in New York City and Washington, D.C. reported for duty at city armories while dust and debris were still falling. National Guard members went to work establishing perimeters and guarding airports. The Penta gon dusted itself off, mourned its dead and began prosecuting a war on terror in Afghanistan, liberating a nation from a repressive government and hunting terrorists to the darkest corners of the deepest caves. And as 2001 turned to 2002, that war grew a rear guard here on Guantanamo Bay. A remote Caribbean naval base, once near to withering away, is teeming anew with ser vicemembers again, all working to operate and protect a detention operation that not only keeps our enemies off the battlefield but mines intelligence that saves American lives both military and civilian. Nearly 80 percent of the servicemembers here are reservists, with lives uprooted from jobs and homes and hometowns they honor Sept. 11 merely by calling GTMO home. So too do active-duty servicemembers, far from Fort Lewis in Washington state, Kirt land Air Force Base in New Mexico or any of the towns across America that active-duty units here call home. Operation Enduring Freedom is the U.S. militarys tribute to Sept. 11. In Guantanamo Bay, JTF-160 and JTF-170 are its missionar Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. GTMO gets ready to remember Friday, September 6, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 13 Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire How the detention opera tion will memorialize the awful day that spawned it. Members of the 239th Military Police Co. get ready to go on shift at Camp Delta last week. Like all members of JTF-160 and JTF-170 here, they will honor Sept. 11, 2002 simply by going to work. See 9/11/02, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 Page 10 Page 15