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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00066
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: August 30, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00066

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PAGE 1

Page 16 Friday, August 30, 2002 Sgt. Luis Molina, 160th MP Battalion Q: How are you? A: If someone would ask me How are you? I would tell them, I am as good as God wants me to be. Q: When you were young, did you always know what you wanted to be when you grew up? A: I always tried to have a plan in life, but sometimes you have to make adjustments. I am half Italian and half Spanish. I was born in Nicaraqua, but used to come visit America every year because we had family there. I came to the United States in 1979 for good. Q: What are you talking about? A: I always wanted to join the military. I joined the Army for patriotism and the chal lenge. Q: Why are you always smiling? A: I dont know Im smiling; people tell me that Im smiling. I wake up very happy. I guess its because Im just happy to be alive. Q: What is your job here at GTMO? A: Im a military police guard. I do guard duty with the detainees. Q: Hows that job treating you? A: Its fine. Im proud to have had the priv ilege and opportunity to come here. Some times its a challenge, but I came here to work. Q: But you like challenges, dont you? A: Yeah, its good. After three months here I feel more comfortable with the job. You learn as time goes by. Q: You have any hobbies? A: I like to play ping-pong for fun. I am the two-time reigning champion here at GTMO. Q: Were you born with those skills? A: Well actually, my father was a world champion. He won the African, Asian and American ping-pong tournments in the mid70s. I guess its in the blood. Q: So if you had an unlimited amount of ping-pong balls, do you think youd be able to suppress an enemy charging at you with a bayonet? A: Thats impossible. I would not take ping-pong balls into battle. Q: Do you think you would be able to beat Forrest Gump in a match? A: Forrest Gump was really good. I dont know If I could beat him. Id make him sweat, or at least Id try. Q: What kind of experiences have you had with the Army? A: Well, I joined the Army as an infantry man in 1990. I was on active duty with the 24th Inf. Div., one of the first units into Saudi Arabia during the Gulf War. Q: What kept you going while you were out there? A: A song by the group Super tramp entitled Take the Long Way Home. I thought about it while I was at war because it seemed like I was taking the long way home. Q: Any moment from your time in active duty that really sticks out in your mind? A: Well, after I did my two years and got out, I recieved a letter from the Bridage Commander of the 24th Inf. Div. thanking me for my service. I felt real proud. Q: Do you think if you lowcrawled around at Windmill beach wearing your desert camoflage from the Gulf War, any one would see you? A: No one would see me. That camoflage works good. Q: Ive seen you wear glasses. Have you ever experienced wear ing those Army issued ones? A: Oh yeah, I actually have a pair with me. Q: Those things are pretty thick, can you see other planets with them on? A: Yeah, sure! Q: You do alot of exercising? A: Ill go for a run every now and then. Q: Do you run faster than the wind? A: It depends how fast the wind will blow. Q: Whats important to you? A: The church is very important to me. When I come out of there, I feel so good from praying. I thank God for everything in my life. Q: And how do you feel about serving your country? A: Well, I love being in the Army. Ive already risked my life for this country before, and Ill do it again if I have to. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Sgt. Luis Molina: WIth life, you must look at the big picture. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Still taking the long way home... The naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba has been host to a number of notable visitors during Operation Enduring Freedom, but on Tuesday a delegation arrived whose only desire was to show support for the men and women deployed here as part of the ongoing war on terrorism. And get some laughs. The USO, in partnership with cable station Comedy Central, brought 11 comedians to Cuba to entertain the troops Thursday night. The taped shows will air on cable in late Octo ber and will be repeated through December. The entertainers invited included such names as Colin Quinn, Lenny Clark and Tony Rock. The USO and Comedy Central just completed a successful three-show set at McGuire AFB in New Jersey in July. The USOs mission is to provide a touch of home to the troops, said Betty Naylor, the USO tour producer who handled the mam moth task of booking nearly a dozen comics and getting them here. She has booked acts for Cuba before, most recently Charlie Daniels. The comics GTMO experience started with a noon arrival Tuesday. The guests were checked into the CBQ and driven to the Wind jammer club in the early afternoon for some refreshments and a briefing given by Army Lt. Col. Joseph Hoey, the Public Affairs Officer of JTF-160. The overview gave the entertainers and production staff the lowdown on what kind of troops have been deployed to Guan tanamo, who runs the base, and what life is like for those deployed here. The entertainers were then treated to a windshield tour while the stagehands worked behind the scenes with Morale, Welfare and Recreations Craig Basil to adjust the lighting and sound system of the Windjammer for Thursdays performances. On Wednesday the USO group got off to an early (for comics) start and embarked on a tour that took nearly eight hours, but which gave them a taste of how the different branches of service represented here work together in a Joint Task Force environment. Bright and early at 8 a.m., the group paid a courtesy call to the naval base commander, Captain Robert A. Buehn. Buehn picked up where Hoey left off the previous day and showed the entertainers a slide presentation that touched on the history of the U.S. pres ence in Guantanamo Bay. A Comedy Central cameraman mentioned to Buehn that he had Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Whats so funny about GTMO? Friday, August 30, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 12 Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire USO teams with Comedy Central to bring comic relief to servicemembers Comics invade McCalla Hangar! From L to R: Jim Gaffigan, Modi, Greg Giraldo and Laurie Kilmartin. See USO, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 Page 8 Page 15

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Page 2 Friday, August 30, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office The world outside your churchs walls is desperate for the help only Christians can give. Needs surround you in your community families are falling apart, people are losing jobs and lacking education, citizens are suffer ing the violent blows of crime. Government agencies do what they can to help, but churches have the power to make the most sig nificant impact for change. Your neighbors need the hope that only Christ can bring, because only He can truly transform their lives. Its great to pray for people, but God also wants you to serve them. He wants you to go outside your churchs walls to bring your neighbors the hope that only He can offer. Here are some ways your church can become the answer to some of your commu nitys needs: Research what needs currently exist in your community. Study what government agencies, other secular organizations, and other faith-based organizations are doing to serve your commu nity. Build relationships with influential people in your community such as police officers and teachers. Practice what you preach. [Adapted from It Takes a Church to Raise a Village, by Dr. Marva L. Mitchell. Pub lished by Treasure House, an imprint of Des tiny Image Publishers, Inc., Shippensburg, Pa.] Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR Now that school is back in session we would like to emphasize safety issues with regard to road regulations. COM NAVBASEGTMO INST. 11200.1F contains traffic regulations for motor vehicles, motorcy cles, bicycles, and pedestrians. While walking or jogging always use paved, raised sidewalks where they are pro vided. If not use the left-side shoulder facing oncoming traffic. You are at less of a risk when you see traffic coming your way, and you have a fixed margin of safety. Most injuries sus tained by joggers and walkers occur when not using paved sidewalks. This is due to potholes, rocks, or poor visibility, etc. Paved sidewalks tend to have more lighting. Be sure to always wear reflective gear while out at night, and stay off of the trails. When jogging in company formation or administering an APFT test, coordinate with NAVBASE Security and provide them the fol lowing information: number of personnel, time of day, street routes and estimated time of completion. Arrange for a Fire Dept. vehicle to stand by. The same NAVBASE policy on reflective gear for joggers also applies to bicyclists. Per sons riding bicycles share the road with motor vehicles. In short, all bicyclists adhere to the same traffic regulations as motor vehicles. Wear a helmet and a reflective vest. Wearing of headphones or earphones is also prohibited. Remember that your helmet is the only thing that protects your head from the road surface. If you are a new arrival to Guantanamo Bay, I would recommend riding only during daylight hours until you familiarize yourself with the roads here. All personnel that operate motor vehicles, motorcycles, and bicycles: remember that school is back in session. Always give the right of way to school buses and children walking on roads and sidewalks. Submitted by Spc. Brian R. Treeful, PMO Your community is waiting for you JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. R. W. Funaro If you visit JTF-160 Headquar ters, you will find a wall dedicated to the values of the different branches of the military. As one looks at these values, one will find that they are similar. We all speak the same lan guage when it comes to Honor, Loy alty, Courage, Selfless Service, etc. but as I look among the service members here at GTMO, I find we all have something else in common. Take a look at what we have given up over the last several months. Some families have found it difficult to cope with our absence. We have missed births of children; the deaths of loved ones; some may have lost a business. We came from all walks of life with different accents and lifestyles, but we bonded because of that one thing we have in common. Lets go back to 9/12 and remember all the flag-waving patriots. Where are they now? I remember neighbors of mine saying, lets go get them, but those neighbors do not wear a uniform. We all took an oath. We all signed a contract. People do that every day of the week. What makes us so dif ferent? Just as people sign contracts every day, they also break them. We did not and we do not. We can identify with all the val ues of all the branches of service. That is us, plus one more thing. We gave our word and we are sticking to it when it is easier to wimp out. How noble is the person that has charac ter, and how lucky for those who know him/her. We in uniform have a bond that no civilian can understand. Stand tall and walk proud. Page 15 Friday, August 30, 2002 JTF-160 nets v-ball tournament win JTF-160 spiked the field in the mixed vol leyball tournament as they won in convincing fashion, beating both the 178th Military Police Company (15-5, 15-9) and 239th MP Co. (159, 1512). The mixed volleyball portion of the Com manders Cup was dominated by JTF-160. JTF-160 seemed to own the court Thursday, Aug. 22 in the Commanders Cup tournament semi-finals. They had good communication on the court, setting up their best players, Army Spc. Curtis L. Mathews and Army 1st Lt. Tom C. Kim, for spikes all night. It was like men playing against boys. We own the G. J. Denich gym. This is our house. The volleyball tournament is ours to win, no one can stop JTF-160, said Kim with a passion and conviction behind his words. The team soon proved him right, starting the opening set with eight straight points. 178th MP Co. finally scored their first point. The set was now 8-3 when Kim and Mathews got hot and put up six more points on the scoreboard. It seemed like it was taking candy from a baby. They won the first set 15-5 on a vicious spike by Kim. In the beginning of the second set JTF-160 lost their focus in the game. 178th MP Co. took advantage of that, and led the set 4-2. JTF-160 regrouped and came back to take the set and win the match 15-9. We played well in the first set, but in the second set we were letting them come back a little, said Matthews. But we managed to finish them off. The win was good for us. We play one game at a time. Even thought they lost their edge on the second set they were able to come together and muster a win. It is all about teamwork. That is what wins games. This tournament is dedicated to Kim because he is leaving Guantanamo Bay to go back to his duty station soon. He is carrying the team right now, said 1st Sgt. Teddy Hebert. The first match with the 178th MP Co. was an easy task for JTF-160. Their next opponent was the 239th MP Co. and their players didnt want to suffer the same fate as the 178th MP Co. had. JTF-160 hoped their momentum would carry them over to the next match and bring them one step closer to the championship. This match seemed different from the start. Both teams were sizing up one another. There was taunting and trash-talking in the game. But soon, JTF-160 was letting their game do the talking for them. They opened up with seven straight points. They took the 239th MP Co. out of the game. The score was 12-5 when Army Spc. Rauman M. Laurent of the 239th blocked a spike by Kim. This inspired the Black Sheep. They fought hard and tried to come back, closing the gap. But in the end JTF-160 was too strong, taking the first set 15-9. They were one set away from another victory, one step away from the finals. But 239th MP Co. didnt want to go down easily, so they fought and clawed to stay in the game. It was a seesaw battle. The teams were tied eight times in the second set. Laurent blocked five spikes in the set and the rest of the team fed off his energy. The set was knotted at twelve when Mathews started serving. After two quick points as Matthews served aces, the third serve was returned. JTF-160 then set up the play for Kim. Hebert set the ball towards the net and Kim leaped and killed the ball to score match point for JTF-160. This was the point they wanted to make to the 239th MPs: That JTF-160 was king. We stopped the trash-talking by winning the match in two straight sets. Until someone beats us this is our court. We are unbeatable here, said Kim. For the 239th MPs, there was nothing left but the post-game analysis. We played exceptional for the roster we had on the court, said Laurent. We are not volleyball stars, but we play well in the game. They won, but I dont think they had that much talent. It was a great run for the Black Sheep in the tournament, but its over now. The JTF-160 team gave some of the credit to their competiton. We played better because 239th MP Co. played well also, so we had to step it up in the match. It was a good game, said Kim. We played a lot better than we did in the first match, Matthews. We lost a couple of points, but we came together and no one got down on the team. We were able to come up with the victory. I am very proud of this team, because they showed they had heart. Whoever our next opponent is, we are going to play hard. This is our tournament. We are going to take it all. We will be celebrating in the end. And so they were. The JTF-160 volleyball team, again riding the talents of Matthews and Kim, swept the 346th MP Co. in three games of a best-of-five championship series at G.J. Denich gym Tuesday night. The volleyball portion of the Commanders Cup is theirs. And while they may not actually own the gym, this team looks to have a long lease. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Spc. Curtis L. Mathews from JTF-160 hits one of his many spikes throughout the game against the 239th MP Co. Black Sheep Army 1st LT. Tom C. Kim from JTF-160 hits the volleyball across the court in his teams win over the 178th MP Co. as Army Spc. Ryan E. Fitzpatrick looks on.

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Page 14 Friday, August 30, 2002 Mens and Womens Division Soccer Season will run from Monday, Sept. 30 and run until Fri day, Nov. 8th. All rosters are due on Friday, September 20th. Contact Capt. Gormly at x5249 for more information. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. MWF, 5:30PM-6:30PM, Tues. & Thurs. 6:15PM-7:15PM. Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower, Paintball Range, Sat. & Weds., 1:00PM-7:00PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Flag Football Leagues, M-F, 6 PM, Cooper Field. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM4:00PM. Today, Friday, August 30th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Saturday, August 31st, 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Sunday, September 1st 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Monday, September 2nd 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 10:00AM, 7 On 7 Paintball Tournament, JTF 160 Commanders Cup Series, Paintball Range. Tuesday, September 3rd 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Wednesday, September 4th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1:00PM-7:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower 6:00PM, Mixed Bowling Tournament, JTF 160 Com manders Cup Series, MarbleHead Lanes. 7:00PM, Round One, Table Tennis Tournament, CBQ. Thursday, September 5th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Comics run amok at GTMO Where are all the soldiers? bellowed funnyman Lenny Clark after he entered the chapel at Camp America expecting to hear the chuckle of servicemembers. Instead, he and his fellow comedy stars on the USO comedy tour including Saturday Night Live performer Colin Quinn were greeted with silence and looks of embarrassment from the rest of the tour group. Eventually, the chapel began to swell with off-duty soldiers and the typical hand-shaking and autograph-signing took place, and of course jokes filled the air. Clarke accepted his defeat but remained humorously vigilant, stating that it was about time you guys showed up. However, the reason for the ill-timed event wasnt miscom munication on part of the groups military escorts, the MWR staff or the USO it was a question of how does one deal with eleven crazy comedi ans looking to wreak havoc and collect material on a tropical military base? The military is inherently funny, chided comedian Nick DiPaolo. We are not here to expose anything, but just to fig ure it all out and get a deeper understanding of what you guys do. The daylong tour became a whirlwind of chaotic events that began with the trek to get to Camp America, which itself became a comedy sketch in the making. Their military escorts were clearly more used to handling tough media types barking out questions and trying to take pictures where they are not supposed to. This crowd, not out for a story but a joke, was a bit different. I have a photographic memory will that be a prob lem? joked comedian Mike Birbiglia when he was told to put his camera away. However, the escorts had their hands full when the comedic caravan came to a halt due to a locked gate to Camp America, where service-mem bers were anxiously awaiting their arrival. As everyone waited for the key to arrive and the MWR reps scrambled on the radio for assistance, the comedians became restless and wandered out onto Windmill Beach. One daring prankster jumped into the ocean in his underwear, prompting an escort to call him back in. A standoff ensued and the comedian reluctantly put his shorts on, dried off and returned to the van. The cam eraman, who had opted to stay in the van, cursed himself for not capturing the amusing image on film for the Comedy Central special, to be aired in October. The key was still nowhere to be found, so the comedians took off on foot up the hill to America. We are here for the soldiers and we cant even get to them, Modi said, a come dian from Long Island. One hapless jokester with a BDU cap tried to walk to the gate without a badge and was escorted back down with an armed Humvee slowly trailing behind him. Finally, they made it to their destination the Seaside Gal ley, where they were to chow down and mingle with the troops only to find it closed, with no troops to be found. After twenty minutes of arguing with the chow hall employees, the food was served and the comedians went on to the chapel. The last stop was the Naval Hospital, where the comics perhaps hoped to find bays full of wounded soldiers needing a laugh. They found one with an ingrown toenail. In the end, the colorful cast of characters was herded back into the van to get some rest and prepare for the show at the Windjammer club, while their weary escort crew contem plated how a wily group of comedians managed to take over GTMO for a day. As Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro said when he met up with the group after lunch, I understand that you guys got a lot of new material today. Story by Army Sgt. Paul Morando Special to The Wire Photo by Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Colin Quinn makes a typically sour face during the comics tour. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa L to R: Lenny Clarke, Laurie Kilmartin, Nick DiPaolo and Louis Ramey pound the sand in search of laughs at Windmill Beach. Page 3 Friday, August 30, 2002 At GTMO, taking the ferry is pretty much the only way youre going to get from the Windward side to the Lee ward side or vice versa. The workers on this craft, a threeman team per shift, skillfully guide the massive vessel on its all-day rounds back and forth across Guantanamo Bay to get you where you need to go. Ferry Boat YFB-93 never fails, and its the one and only ferry in operation here. The 140-foot vessel, which weighs approximately 200,000 tons, can carry three tractor trail ers plus numerous humvees in one bold trek across the shark-infested bay. Whether bringing visitors to Windward or ferrying ser vicemembers across to the Leeward airfield so they can get off this rock, the ferry pleases many with its majestic sight and mighty mission. Ferry operators Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Efren Guillermo, the engineer on board, checks the readings on a manual board deep down in the thunderously loud engine room. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Captain Jack Tomlin skillfully chimes in with a routine radio check as the massive ferry slowly carries its hardy load across to the Leeward side of GTMO. Efren Guillermo, Engineer I keep happy with this job. Ive done similar work in the Phillipines for 23 years, so this work isnt so bad at all. Arnold Palogan, Loadmaster This is a real nice job. You get to meet some cool people. Ive been doing this for three years and its great. Jack Tomlin, Captain I love my job. I was in the Navy for over 26 years and did two tours at GTMO. I always loved it here, which is why I took this job. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The ferry: The only way to get your vehicle to and from the other side.

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Page 4 Friday, August 30, 2002 This weeks question: How should GTMO commemorate Sept. 11? Army Staff Sgt. James Vasquez, 2/142 Inf. Co. As a base, at the moment the towers were hit, everything should stop, and a moment of silence should be held. Sgt. Tony Bennings, 2/142 Inf. Co. For me to get some sleep would be a good idea, but it would be nice to take some moments of silence and then hear The Star Spangled Ban ner playing loud and proud. Navy HM1 Robert Chew, JTF-160 EPU Itd be nice if we could have all the services join together and collaborate on one big ceremony by the beach. 2nd Lt. Chuck Wingerd, 239th MP Co. A good idea would be to erect a flagpole in Camp Delta and we could fly flags and give them away like they did at the Pentagon. 1st Lt. Mike Dunn, 239th MP Co. There should be a coor dinated moment of silence and prayer basewide. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Stars dont come in any more than four Army Gen. James T. Hill, from U.S. Southern Command, came to GTMO Saturday to visit the troops supporting the detainee operation. Ellis took time out of his visit to promote Pvt. Paul Engebretson, from the 571st MP Co., to private first class. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Across 1 Daddy 4 Root beer brand (3 wds.) 9 Like cloth 14 Lode yield 15 Doldrums 16 Deft 17 Fasten 18 Used the oars 19 Rift 20 National capital 22 Alleviate 24 Healing plant 25 Post-traumatic stress disorder 27 Removes the water 31 Lacerated 32 Special menus 33 Conger 34 Woke up 36 Poorly 38 For each one 40 Small scoop 42 Unbroken 43 Governing group 44 Raven author 45 Mud brick 47 Tack 51 Fable 53 V.P.s boss 54 Bovine 55 Hairstyle 57 Warning bells 59 Car manufacturer 62 Musical production 65 Had been 66 Gunpowder need 67 Jewish holiday 68 Snacked 69 Leafy salad green 70 Tie down 71 Japanese money Down 1 Tall tree 2 American songbird 3 Flag 4 Air (prefix) 5 Soon 6 Compass point 7 Rightful 8 Broadest 9 Western Athletic Conference 10 Eyed 11 Compete 12 Sprite 13 Mesh 21 Embellishment 23 Spots 25 Expressway 26 Ball holder 28 Make over 29 Bark in pain 30 Slick 32 MD 35 Teensy 36 Deli order 37 Mainland State 38 Sailors hey 39 Bard 40 Names 41 Single 42 Typing rate 43 Quarterback Montana 45 Rainy mo. 46 Slumps 48 Air duct 49 Prisoner 50 Become weak 52 Mists 56 Stoles 57 Opera solo 58 Furniture 59 Business abbr. 60 Title of respect 61 Southwestern Indian 63 Position 64 Stray Page 13 Friday, August 30, 2002 Answers to the August 23 puzzle DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, August 30 8 p.m. Hey Arnold, PG 76min 10 p.m. XXX, PG-13 124min Saturday, August 31 8 p.m. Power Puff Girls Movie, PG 80min 10 p.m. Signs, PG-13 107min Sunday, September 1 8 p.m. Hey Arnold, PG 76min 10 p.m. Like Mike, PG 100min Monday, September 2 8 p.m. K-19 Widowmaker, PG-13 140min Tuesday, September 3 8 p.m. XXX, PG-13 124min Wednesday, September 4 8 p.m. Signs, PG-13 107min Thursday, September 5 8 p.m. Like Mike, PG 100min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, August 30 8 p.m. Changing Lanes, R 99min 10 p.m. Kiss of the Dragon, R 98min Saturday, August 31 8 p.m. American Pie 2, R 105min 10 p.m. The Ultimate Weapon, R 105min Sunday, September 1 8, 10 p.m. The Patriot, R -158min Monday, September 2 8 p.m. The Forsaken, R -91min Tuesday, September 3 8 p.m. Chill Factor, R -102min Wednesday, September 4 8 p.m. The Corruptor, R -111min Thursday, September 5 8, 10 p.m. Twin Dragons, R -109min Frustrated Recipe Corner with Capt. Sam Barbera, 239th MP Co. Louisiana Fish and Pecans, GTMO style Batter 1 cup of milk or buttermilk 1 egg 1 tbs. mustard 1 tbs. hot sauce 1 cup all-purpose flour Butter or vegetable oil Large heavy skillet 8 tbs. coarsly chopped, raw pecans 6, 4 ounce firm-fleshed fish fillets (in GTMO, jack or snook work best) Seasoning 1 tbs. salt 1 tbs. sweet paprika 1 tsp. onion powder 1 tsp. red pepper 1 tsp. black pepper 1/2 tsp. garlic powder Mix batter and put in a bowl. Mix seasoning and sprinkle/rub on both sides of fillets. Put flour in a large bowl or cake pan. Dip fillets in liquid batter, drain for a second, then dust with flour. (A good trick is to use a paper bag. Put flour in the bag, add fillets, seal the bag and shake hard.) Heat 1/4-inch of oil or butter to approximately 350 degrees in the skillet. Butter may require a lit tle lower temperature. Butter tastes better, but oil is a little more low fat. Note: real Louisisana cooking is rarely low fat...use the butter! Add pecans to skillet, then fillets. Fry fillets about 2 min. Turn fillets keeping pecans attached (pecans should be on top now). Fry fillet on second side for 2 to 3 minutes or until golden brown. Serve hot and wrap your mouth around that!

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been stationed here in the Navy 30 years ago, and comedian Lenny Clarke got a quick laugh when he remarked that the bar racks probably look exactly the same. The role of the base in aiding Cuban refugees was mentioned in Buehns presentation, as well as the new function of the base as the holding place for Al-Quida detainees. The next stop for the comics was the docks, where they got to hear about military boating oper ations for the Coast Guard Port Security Unit 307. Lt. Tomas A. Kringel arranged for the comics to board some vessels and take a little trip out into the Bay. While waiting for his turn to board the next boat, Tony Rock took some time out to talk to some of the coastguardsmen. Its a double-edged sword, he said, in reference to questions about being the brother of the more famous comedian in the family, Chris Rock. There are benefits in name recognition, he admits, but he wants to be his own man. Coast Guard Lt. Dan J. Egan struck up a conversation with him and shared that he, too, has had to follow in someone elses footsteps. With regards to Rocks approach to Thursdays shows he explained. There will be no curs ing, no mentioning of female body parts. Since this is a military show, I cant do my Coast Guard joke, he added with a cryptic laugh. I have no military back ground, Ive probably been in two fights in my life, but I got involved with the USO because thats my way of contributing, he said, explaining his reasons for supporting the troops. Ive never met a more appre ciative audience, said Clarke as he walked around and introduced himself loudly to all within earshot. After an hour and a half at the PSU, the group moved from a waterside view of the base to one of the lofty hills that dot the bay the home of the Mobile Inshore Underwater Warfare Unit. Saturday Night Live come dian Colin Quinn broke off from the rest of the group to do a radio interview on The Blitz 103.1 while the others were greeted by Navy Cmdr. Sheldon D. Stuchell of the MIUWU. The comics shook hands with the handful of servicemembers on top of the hill and they were invited to peep through the large telescopes that few outside of the MIUWUs staff get to see, let alone touch. The tour deviated from the itinerary after the MIUWU visit. The visitors were met by a humvee and the comics piled into the back to experience the thrill of a ride down a winding hill in a tactical vehicle. The comics were all smiles when they hopped out of the vehicle at McCalla hangar, so the bumpy trip was worth it. In the hangar the USO group met with the servicemembers who work at the Pink Palace and JTF-160 Headquarters. The troops expressed surprise at see ing a group of strangers descend ing on their domain, but they quickly warmed up to them. They eagerly snatched up the glossy autograph sheets provided by Naylor and seized the opportunity to get autographs and pose for pictures with the celebrities. The comics were allowed to sit inside a stationary helicopter and pose for a few more photos. It was now past noon. There was a brief stop at the Windjam mer to pick up security badges, then it was off to Windmill Beach. The comics had a chance to wade in the Caribbean Sea before taking a walk up the road toward Camp America. Lunch was at Seaside Galley. Unfortu nately, the galley was closed when the group arrived. Strings were pulled and the galley was opened so that the grumbling stomachs could be appeased. JTF-160s Sgt. Maj. Funaro greeted the group at the din ing facility. I understand that you got a lot of new material today, he joked, in response to their disappoint ment at some delays and not getting to min gle with any troops at lunchtime. After lunch it was back to the grand tour. They exited Seaside Galley and met with troops at the new chapel. Word spread quickly through the camp and soon a size able crowd gathered under the domed roof to get autographs. I will definitely check out the show, said Army Sgt. Steve Andronis of the 342nd MPs. I watch them all the time. Nick DiPaolo is one of my favorites. I have to work midnights, but Im going to try to run out, catch the first show, and make it to work tomorrow, said Spc. Autmn Blewett of the 346th MPs. I had just gotten to sleep, but I saw everyone coming up here and I had to come right away. The comics left Camp A after signing autographs for 45 min utes. The day concluded with a stop at the Naval Station Hospital. A tour was conducted by Navy HMC Joseph Engel. The comics, eager to surprise someone, visited a bed-ridden patient, Sgt. Christo pher Renard, 346th MPs. It was looking like a boring day... Thank you! said a stunned Renard. As this paper goes to print, the comics were scheduled to per form in 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. shows Thursday at the Windjammer. Tickets were to be distributed through the chain of command to the different units. Approximately 400 servicemembers were expected to attend each show. Clarke summed up the Com edy Central tour neatly: What the troops are doing is tremen dous. Ive been involved with the USO for seven years now. Any time they want me to go, its my pleasure. Were here to make morale. Page 5 Friday, August 30, 2002 USO, from page 1 Entertainers Lenny Clarke and Nick DiPaolo savor a hilltop view of Guantanamo Bay, courtesy of the MIUWU. Tony Rock soaks his tired feet in the surf at Windmill Beach. Spc. Autumn Blewett and Spc. Kellen R. Morris of the 346th MP Co. eagerly col lected the autographs of comedians Nick DiPaolo and Lenny Clarke. Comic Louis Ramey signed every thing -even a Seabees hard hat. This past Sunday Camp Amer ica welcomed its long-awaited, new and roomier chapel, which is set up to seat more than 150 peo ple for one service. This new facility is a large Ten sion Fabric Structure tent that was abandoned for many years, used as a general storage area. But thanks to the dedication of some hard-working servicemembers at Camp America and to chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill, the tent has undergone a revival. Well, its truly a miracle, said Merrill. We have 100 chairs, four wooden altars, fans, a stage and a sound system all given to us. Not a single cent was spent. Pfc. Clayton Barth, from the 346th Military Police Company, saw the tent before its transforma tion. Afterward, he said, This is the best miracle so far. From what we had before to now, its just amazing. I dont have any kind of words for it. Its good to be in a new facil ity, said Pfc. BethAnn Martin, from the 571st MP Co. Its truly a blessing. Martin was one of the soldiers who contributed in the renovation of the tent. She works at Camp Delta, but she said she always asks her supervisor to give her Sunday off so that she can go to church. For Staff Sgt. John Sain, from the 342nd MP Co, a bigger facil ity shows we are progressing in our outreach. God really wants us to reach out to others. Sain has been going to the service since the chapel was at Freedom Heights. He said he has been encouraging all the soldiers from his company to come to the service. At the service on Sunday, all the worshippers gave thanks and praises to the Lord for their new accomodations. Musical entertainment was pro vided by New Life Christian Fel lowship and Voices of Inspiration Choir. I like the overall music of it. Everything just fits together, said Barth. I think its great to have people from different denomina tions worshipping together. Today is my first morning service here, he said. I usually come at night. I was actually really impressed. Chaplain Merrill couldnt help expressing his joy and satisfaction with the new facility. Today, everything came together the music, the special guest, the choir. I think now with the new facility we can have a high-quality service for all the ser vicemembers. This tent is a testi mony to all of us who are here. Now, walking in here is sym bolic of what God can do for any soldier, sailor, airman, Marine or Coast Guard member, said Mer rill. No matter how much of a mess their life may be in, they just have to give God a try. God will clean house. Moving to this place has long been a dream for Merrill. When I first got here, I men tioned the tent, people looked at me and thought that I was crazy, said Merrill. At that time, services were being held in a SEAhut. Few peo ple were coming to worship. But Merrill did not give up. He con tinued to pray with the regular attendees and asked for a miracle from God. And while he was waiting for Gods miracle, Merrill initiated an outreach campaign by using GTMO media and word-ofmouth. Week after week, more outreach was being done, and more people kept coming to the protestant service. We really outgrew the SEAhut, said Spc. Steven Burns, from the 346th MP Co., one of faithfuls who helped out with the outreach. Some Sundays we had people standing in the back. The place was crammed. Since the membership was increasing, Merrill set out for a bigger facililty. But as he said, The chaplain has no budget. So he turned back to the exist ing old tent, which hadnt been cleaned for years and was used as a storage for mattresses, wall lockers and piles of garbage. Once he obtained the okay, Merrill put together a crew of vol unteers to clean up the place, hop ing new doors would be opened. A lot of people worked hard to make this happen, said Burns. Even the people who dont go to church pitched in with the clean ing of the tent. For the past two weeks, off and on, I and a group of volunteers would get together after their shift at Camp to empty the trash out from the tent. After the cleanup, it all started to happen, as the saying goes, in mysterious ways. Merrill explained: The altar wood was being thrown away, the wooden stage was from the plat form of then Freedom Heights. The sound system was taken from the camp commandants office. The infantry donated the fence. It was truly a group effort. More than 40 men and women got together over the past few weeks to clean the facility. If we just pull ourselves together as a team we can accomplish anything, espe cially at the midpoint of our deployment, said Merrill. Everyone who is out there, no matter what happens, you can make it through this deployment, said Martin. If you have a hard time, you can always trust in God. He is always there. My vision here is to make this a worship service for all people, all different backgrounds and com mands so that they can feel com fortable to come and worship God, said Merrill. We had a good turn-out, but I think that even more people would have come today if the shifts at Camp Delta were not changed, said Merrill. Today was great, said Barth. I saw a lot of people from differ ent companies, different ranks, civilians. We are all coming together to worship the Lord. Hopefully, well continue to grow, said Burns. We are not going to stop. Our goal is to out grow this place. Chaplain Michael S. Merrill delivers his sermon Sunday in the new chapel. Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Page 12 Friday, August 30, 2002 Spc. Steven Burns and Pfc. Clayton Barth standing by the new chapel. Camp America to new chapel: Amen! Servicemembers and civilians sing with New Life Christian Fellowship.

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small percentage of people con tract encephalitis, a potentially fatal infection of the brain. The virus is most dangerous for chil dren, the elderly, and people with weak immune systems. Which may leave GTMO with less to worry about. Forces here are not at a sig nificant risk, said Radike. Generally those affected by West Nile virus are over the age of 52. One out of four people bitten by an infected mosquito will come down with flu-like symptoms, the rest will never even know they've been bitten by an infected mosquito. So the best treatment for those individ uals would be supportive care, pain relievers such as Motrin and Tylenol. A little Chicken soup and rest wouldn't hurt either. Advanced age, Radike said, is by far the greatest risk factor of severe neurological disease, long-term morbidity, and death. In the American epidemic this year, there have been 425 people infected, of which 20 have died; all deaths have occurred in peo ple over the age of 52. The majority of these people have been older than 70 years of age, he said. Thus far, no case of the virus has been detected south of the U.S. border, although, Cuba has recently offered help to the U.S. to contain the outbreak because it says the disease could spread to the Caribbean and Central America when infected birds begin migrating south in autumn. It is inevitable that at some point this virus will migrate down to GTMO. In the last three years it has migrated from New York down to the Florida Keys and Louisiana, with all that being said it is bloody unlikely for it to affect our mission here, he said. And how will we know if the virus has arrived here? The presence of dead birds in the area may herald the arrival of the West Nile virus and can provide early epidemiological clues to its arrival. Over 110 species of birds can be infected with this virus, but the common crow is most likely to be infected, said Radike. He con tinued: Troops here are well protected from the West Nile virus. One, the infection isn't down here yet, and two, those at risk would be older than 52 years of age, probably much older, he said. Thats not a big problem for a military force. But GTMO is preparing for the virus arrival, as well as for other mosquito-spread diseases such as malaria and dengue. We have set up a program to deal specifically with the possi bility of infected mosquitoes. We do bird surveillance, testing any dead birds found for the virus, and mosquito surveil lance, monitoring where there are populations of mosquitoes and testing them for the virus as well, said Navy Lt. Cdr. Gre gory W. Thomas, GTMOs pub lic health officer. Additionally, we use Malathion-based chemi cal products to spray mosquitopopulated areas. The proactive tactics of the Public Health Office has already had success keeping the mos quito population here at bay, and the number of bites down. Since January we have been very aggressive with our mos quito program, said Navy Chief Richard W. Anderson, lead chief preventive medicine and public health. We go out every other day and do mosquito counts. We have established traps, and we see how many mosquitoes are found in each one to determine the amount of spraying that needs to be done. If there are a lot found we will spray more frequent, if less are found we will spray less. Additionally, the environ ment is a strong force working against mosquitoes in GTMO. The arid, hot environment here is not mosquito-friendly, unlike the other side of Cuba where is rains all the time, Radike said. So will the West Nile virus come here? Probably. Could you get sick? Maybe. Take all the reasonable precautions you can against getting bitten, and watch for flu-like symptoms; they could be something else. But the good news is, even if an virus-bearing mosquito makes its way out of some standing water, past the sprayers and onto your skin for an infec tious dip into your bloodstream, odds are the worst effects youll feel can be cleared up with a trip to the sick call, some Motrin and some rest. The M osquito Life Cycle (about ten times actual size ) Page 11 Friday, August 30, 2002 Graphic courtesy of Corel Graphics The crow is one of the most common species of bird infected by mosquitoes and made a carrier of West Nile virus. Graphic courtesy of Environmental Protection Agency website This graphic demonstrates the growth process and life cycle of a mosquito, from hatching to adulthood Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Navy Cmdr. James K. Radike doesnt see a big problem. PSUers train like infantrymen, Page 6 Friday, August 30, 2002 Hes wearing a Battle Dress Uniform, covered in camouflage, fully loaded M-16 in hand and armed with combat knowledge of how to go into battle and emerge victorious. You might think you were looking at an elite Army or even Marine commando. That is, until you see the badge that says U.S. Coast Guard. The Coast Guard Port Security Unit 307, a reserve unit from St. Petersburg, Fla., is in charge of water-borne and shore-side security here at GTMO. And in order for the shore-side forces to be able to per form their mission basic ground-type tactics like setting up security perimeters, check points defensive and fighting positions and performing mounted and un-mounted patrols they must train not only like sailors but infantry men. Case in point: a period of instruction given by the PSU this week, related to combat skills under the section of individual movements and tactics, training that the unit holds to keep their reservists combat skills as sharp as Rambos knife. This type of class is extremely important for the PSU, which is basically the infantry of the Coast Guard, said Petty Officer 1st Class Ed Messina, instructor of the class. These combat skills are taught and reinforced because PSUs, unlike any other Coast Guard units, are rapid deploy ment forces, and we can be anywhere in the world in a few days, and we must be able to fight and defend our selves in any geographical location. The course is a part of the PSUs Personnel Qualification Standards training, said Lt. Robert Courtenay of the PSU 307. All members of the PSU must complete a required amount of different skills training. After this training is completed and the member has been with the unit for at least two years and has attended some basic combat skills course, he may receive a PSU insignia badge. And since the Coast Guards basic training doesnt include infantry skills, such training needs to be taught to PSU members, said Courte nay. A standard for anyone in the PSU is the Phoenix Readiness Course provided by the Air Force out of McGuire Air Force Base, N.J., which is a two-week infantry skills course. But here at GTMO, Messina is teaching too. During the four-hour course, Messina reviewed a wide range of subjects: how to stay protected through cover and conceal ment, what it takes to survive in a firefight, how to react to direct and indirect fire, build ing proper fighting positions, land navigation, noise and light discipline, proper formations and combat movements. Through all of the training, Messina stressed the importance of self-reliance. A Story and photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire During the Port Security Unit 307s combat skills training, Petty Officer 1st Class Ed Messina, class instructor, critiques the standing fighting position of Petty Officer 1st Class Christopher E. Lipke as he takes aim with an M-16. Messina points out what Petty Officer 3rd Class Mike Shaw did right and wrong after he camouflaged himself and hid in the bushes for the class to try to spot him Messina illustrates the proper way to apply camou flage to the face to maximize effectiveness.

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Page 10 Friday, August 30, 2002 West Nile virus: next stop GTMO? Cases of West Nile virus have been diagnosed in 20 U.S. states and the District of Columbia, and tainted mosquitoes and dis eased birds continue to spread the disease throughout the West ern Hemisphere. With cases reported as far south as the Florida Keys, is Guantanamo Bay in danger of becoming the virus next stop? West Nile virus infection is a mosquito-borne infection with a rapidly expanding geographic distribution, Navy Cmdr. James K. Radike said. And its highly likely to make its way here. The virus was detected for the first time in the Western Hemi sphere in 1999 when an out break of human illness due to West Nile virus occurred in and around New York City. In the past three years, the virus has spread throughout the East and Midwest. So far this year, more than 370 cases of the West Nile virus have been confirmed in the country's worst outbreak of the disease since it first appeared in the U.S. in 1999. Nearly 80 per cent of the cases are in three states: Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. Louisiana is the hard est-hit state with over 171 cases and eight deaths this year. There are many theories about how the virus was intro duced into North America. Some include the arrival of the virus through an infected bird, either migratory or imported, the accidental importation of an infected mosquito, or of an infected individual who recently returned from a country where West Nile virus was circulating. And some hold to the theory that Saddam Hussein used Cuba as a surrogate country to develop West Nile virus and unleash it upon the U.S. as a biological weapon. But Cmdr. Radike, at least, doesnt see West Nile as much of a weapon. The thought of spreading the West Nile as a biological weapon is highly unlikely, he said. One in five infected indi viduals will develop a mild febrile illness, he said, and the remainder will remain asympto matic. One in 150 will develop either meningitis or encephalitis, or both. That to me seems to be a pretty ineffective weapon. Still, the West Nile virus can cause serious health effects and even death in humans because after an infected mosquito bites an individual, the virus multi plies in the person's blood sys tem, and if it crosses the blood-brain barrier to reach the brain, will cause serious inflam mation of the brain tissue and interfere with normal central nervous system functions. There is currently no avail able antibiotics or medication to treat this virus, although research is currently underway. Researchers are looking at inter feron-alpha, the drug used to treat viral infections. Radike said. However, most people bitten by an infected mosquito never get sick, and most of the rest see only flu-like symptoms. Only a Whether the disease is terror or Nature, its time to get prepared, just in case. What it is, whos at risk, and what you can do to stay healthy. Symptoms of West Nile Virus Symptoms of mild infection can include fever, headache, body aches, skin rash, and swollen lymph glands. Symptoms of severe infection may be marked by: high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, tremors, convultions, muscle weakness, paralysis, and coma. Contact your health care provider if you have concerns about your health. If severe symptoms develop see your doctor. Prevention Tips Wear long sleeves and pants in infested areas. Use repellant containing DEET. Limit outdoor activities at dawn and dusk, when mosquitos are most active. Repair holes in doors and window screens. Eliminate sources of standing water. Keep gutters clean and dry. Photo courtesy of Corel Graphics Portrait of the carrier of the West Nile Virus: A mosquito perching on a wet leaf. Story by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Graphic courtesy of Centers for Disease Control website Map of United States displaying states where West Nile virus has been found. true warrior, he said, must rely on himself if hes to survive the gauntlet of battle. Sometimes you have to work harder, not smarter, he said. We lose a tactical advan tage if we make things easier, like using cam ouflage that can wipe away faster. And with land navigation, you cant always rely on a GPS or satellite because they cant tell you everything. A map doesnt run out of batter ies. You could be the best shot in the world or the greatest in hand-to-hand combat, but if you dont know where you are with the enemy out there it doesnt matter. If you dont select the ultimate fighting position, youre gonna get spotted. Something as simple as not topping off your canteen, with all of that water swishing around, Messina continued, can sound off to the enemy and let them know where you are. A lot of guys in Vietnam died like that. Even shiny objects on your uniform must be considered. You could be the most elite com mando in NATO, but if I see your watch reflecting, I will kill you. With such acute attention to detail, as Messina pointed out to the class, can be everything in the war on terrors new kind of combat zone. In this day, we have a different enemy with a different mentality, said Messina. Joe Taliban will think nothing of surrender ing and then real quick reach for a grenade pin once in your camp. This enemy has little value for life. And if the stuff hits the fan, you must be able to kill and destroy the threat before they kill and destroy you. Thats the business that were in. The PSU 307 has been open for such business since immediately after the attacks on Sept. 11, when the unit was called up for port security in New York for two days before heading out to begin a two-month tour in Boston and eventually coming to secure the coasts of GTMO. When we were called up on Sept. 11, there was a lot of fear but a lot of patriotism. We didnt know what to really expect, but we were ready for it, said Courtenay. Everyone in this unit is a hard charger, and they really want to be here. We may be reservists, but we have to be ready to deploy within 96 hours if we get the call. And when that call comes, the reservists of the PSU 307 can rely on their amassed expe rience to aid them in accomplishing whatever mission needs to get done. The unique thing about our unit is that we have a conglomerate of federal and state law enforcement officers, firefighters and a lot of prior-service people from all the other branches, said Messina, himself a former member of the Marine Corps. They really bring their experience to the plate, and this training is a great refresher for them. And for the new guys its a whole new animal, and its important that we bring them up to speed. Our units a big melting pot of experi ence, said Courtenay, a former Military Police officer in the Army. We all come together, even with the other services, and put our training to the test. According to his students, Messinas aim was true during this weeks training. This combat training is really good, said Petty Officer 1st Class Christopher E. Lipke of the PSU 307. Ive had hands-on training before, but this was an excellent refresher course for me. I feel better having gone through this, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Greg Dunlap of the PSU 307. Ive had similar training, but this was more in-depth than usual. For Messina, in order to know the ropes, you have to climb them first. After youve been doing this training for a while, it becomes second nature, he said. These guys taking this course are merely enhancing the skills that everyone else in this unit has brought together. And by coming together through training and experience, the PSU 307 remains con stantly mission-ready. After Sept. 11, we didnt skip a beat with training, said Messina. With the PSU, if were in a real-world situation and see the opportunity to better ourselves, were going to seize that chance and train hard. We never stop. We give 110 percent all the time. Page 7 Friday, August 30, 2002 put their combat skills to test Lt. Robert Courtenay of the PSU 307 hits the ground to demonstrate the high-speed way to low-crawl Messina reviews the proper hand signal to use for stop and get down while out on a foot patrol.

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, August 30, 2002 Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The inaugural Fishing Rodeo held Saturday at Pelican Petes Marina brought out both experienced and beginning anglers for a day of friendly competition and fierce fishing. The event, organized by Navy Lt. Jim Bowman of J-4 and Army Capt. Sam Barbera of the 239th MP Co., attracted 40 entrants on only a weeks notice. The event was limited to JTF-160 servicemembers. Five types of fish were eligible shark, snapper, mackerel, jack and snook. All fish entered into competition for prizes must have been caught and landed by the participant on a conventional rod, hook and line or hand line exclusively. The fish had to meet minimum size requirements as well. The competition lasted from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. For many, the day was one of frustration as they reeled in ineligible barracudas or nothing at all. The initial eligible fish brought in were a few small mackerels and snappers. It was starting to look like the winning entries would weigh only about 3-lbs combined, when a boat pulled into the docks with a hefty 181/4-lb. king mackerel and a long gray hammerhead shark weighing 42 lbs. that were the envy of all those present. When the trophies were awarded, the winners were Senior Airman Jason Bradfords shark, Navy SK1 Paul K. Buies 10-lb. jack and 1-lb. snapper, and Virginia A. Inghams king-size king mackerel. No snooks were caught. Capt. Barbera and Lt. Bowman plan to turn the Fishing Rodeo into a monthly event and expand it to all servicemembers here. To find out more about future fishing events and to learn more about fishing in general, listen to Bar bera and Bowman on their Blitz 103.1 radio show, Fish Tales, Sundays from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. The one that didnt get away: This 42-lb. hammerhead shark was brought in by Senior Airman Jason Bradford of J-6 after a 35-minute struggle. Jason has caught sharks before, but he was particularly proud of this beauty. Lance Cpl. Virginia Inghams category-winning king mackerel is weighed in at 18-1/4 lbs. by Army Capt Sam Barbera. Navy SK1 Paul K. Buie with his jack. Army Sgt. Jason T. Rouse prudently handles a critter thats still kicking. The fiesty barracuda was ineligible for the fishing contest, but he was donated to the MWR workers at the Marina. Anglers saddle up for 1st Fishing Rodeo Senior Airman Jason Bradford and Lance Cpl. Virginia A. Ingham, both of J-6, compare trophies and get ready for a huge fish fry. Spc. Michael T. Scanlon Jr. of the 239th MPs responds to a tug on the line. He and his friends enjoy GTMO fishing whenever they get a day off. Unfortunately, on this trip they snagged only one legal fish, a mackerel.

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, August 30, 2002 Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The inaugural Fishing Rodeo held Saturday at Pelican Petes Marina brought out both experienced and beginning anglers for a day of friendly competition and fierce fishing. The event, organized by Navy Lt. Jim Bowman of J-4 and Army Capt. Sam Barbera of the 239th MP Co., attracted 40 entrants on only a weeks notice. The event was limited to JTF-160 servicemembers. Five types of fish were eligible shark, snapper, mackerel, jack and snook. All fish entered into competition for prizes must have been caught and landed by the participant on a conventional rod, hook and line or hand line exclusively. The fish had to meet minimum size requirements as well. The competition lasted from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. For many, the day was one of frustration as they reeled in ineligible barracudas or nothing at all. The initial eligible fish brought in were a few small mackerels and snappers. It was starting to look like the winning entries would weigh only about 3-lbs combined, when a boat pulled into the docks with a hefty 181/4-lb. king mackerel and a long gray hammerhead shark weighing 42 lbs. that were the envy of all those present. When the trophies were awarded, the winners were Senior Airman Jason Bradfords shark, Navy SK1 Paul K. Buies 10-lb. jack and 1-lb. snapper, and Virginia A. Inghams king-size king mackerel. No snooks were caught. Capt. Barbera and Lt. Bowman plan to turn the Fishing Rodeo into a monthly event and expand it to all servicemembers here. To find out more about future fishing events and to learn more about fishing in general, listen to Bar bera and Bowman on their Blitz 103.1 radio show, Fish Tales, Sundays from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. The one that didnt get away: This 42-lb. hammerhead shark was brought in by Senior Airman Jason Bradford of J-6 after a 35-minute struggle. Jason has caught sharks before, but he was particularly proud of this beauty. Lance Cpl. Virginia Inghams category-winning king mackerel is weighed in at 18-1/4 lbs. by Army Capt Sam Barbera. Navy SK1 Paul K. Buie with his jack. Army Sgt. Jason T. Rouse prudently handles a critter thats still kicking. The fiesty barracuda was ineligible for the fishing contest, but he was donated to the MWR workers at the Marina. Anglers saddle up for 1st Fishing Rodeo Senior Airman Jason Bradford and Lance Cpl. Virginia A. Ingham, both of J-6, compare trophies and get ready for a huge fish fry. Spc. Michael T. Scanlon Jr. of the 239th MPs responds to a tug on the line. He and his friends enjoy GTMO fishing whenever they get a day off. Unfortunately, on this trip they snagged only one legal fish, a mackerel.

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Page 10 Friday, August 30, 2002 West Nile virus: next stop GTMO? Cases of West Nile virus have been diagnosed in 20 U.S. states and the District of Columbia, and tainted mosquitoes and dis eased birds continue to spread the disease throughout the West ern Hemisphere. With cases reported as far south as the Florida Keys, is Guantanamo Bay in danger of becoming the virus next stop? West Nile virus infection is a mosquito-borne infection with a rapidly expanding geographic distribution, Navy Cmdr. James K. Radike said. And its highly likely to make its way here. The virus was detected for the first time in the Western Hemi sphere in 1999 when an out break of human illness due to West Nile virus occurred in and around New York City. In the past three years, the virus has spread throughout the East and Midwest. So far this year, more than 370 cases of the West Nile virus have been confirmed in the country's worst outbreak of the disease since it first appeared in the U.S. in 1999. Nearly 80 per cent of the cases are in three states: Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. Louisiana is the hard est-hit state with over 171 cases and eight deaths this year. There are many theories about how the virus was intro duced into North America. Some include the arrival of the virus through an infected bird, either migratory or imported, the accidental importation of an infected mosquito, or of an infected individual who recently returned from a country where West Nile virus was circulating. And some hold to the theory that Saddam Hussein used Cuba as a surrogate country to develop West Nile virus and unleash it upon the U.S. as a biological weapon. But Cmdr. Radike, at least, doesnt see West Nile as much of a weapon. The thought of spreading the West Nile as a biological weapon is highly unlikely, he said. One in five infected indi viduals will develop a mild febrile illness, he said, and the remainder will remain asympto matic. One in 150 will develop either meningitis or encephalitis, or both. That to me seems to be a pretty ineffective weapon. Still, the West Nile virus can cause serious health effects and even death in humans because after an infected mosquito bites an individual, the virus multi plies in the person's blood sys tem, and if it crosses the blood-brain barrier to reach the brain, will cause serious inflam mation of the brain tissue and interfere with normal central nervous system functions. There is currently no avail able antibiotics or medication to treat this virus, although research is currently underway. Researchers are looking at inter feron-alpha, the drug used to treat viral infections. Radike said. However, most people bitten by an infected mosquito never get sick, and most of the rest see only flu-like symptoms. Only a Whether the disease is terror or Nature, its time to get prepared, just in case. What it is, whos at risk, and what you can do to stay healthy. Symptoms of West Nile Virus Symptoms of mild infection can include fever, headache, body aches, skin rash, and swollen lymph glands. Symptoms of severe infection may be marked by: high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, tremors, convultions, muscle weakness, paralysis, and coma. Contact your health care provider if you have concerns about your health. If severe symptoms develop see your doctor. Prevention Tips Wear long sleeves and pants in infested areas. Use repellant containing DEET. Limit outdoor activities at dawn and dusk, when mosquitos are most active. Repair holes in doors and window screens. Eliminate sources of standing water. Keep gutters clean and dry. Photo courtesy of Corel Graphics Portrait of the carrier of the West Nile Virus: A mosquito perching on a wet leaf. Story by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Graphic courtesy of Centers for Disease Control website Map of United States displaying states where West Nile virus has been found. true warrior, he said, must rely on himself if hes to survive the gauntlet of battle. Sometimes you have to work harder, not smarter, he said. We lose a tactical advan tage if we make things easier, like using cam ouflage that can wipe away faster. And with land navigation, you cant always rely on a GPS or satellite because they cant tell you everything. A map doesnt run out of batter ies. You could be the best shot in the world or the greatest in hand-to-hand combat, but if you dont know where you are with the enemy out there it doesnt matter. If you dont select the ultimate fighting position, youre gonna get spotted. Something as simple as not topping off your canteen, with all of that water swishing around, Messina continued, can sound off to the enemy and let them know where you are. A lot of guys in Vietnam died like that. Even shiny objects on your uniform must be considered. You could be the most elite com mando in NATO, but if I see your watch reflecting, I will kill you. With such acute attention to detail, as Messina pointed out to the class, can be everything in the war on terrors new kind of combat zone. In this day, we have a different enemy with a different mentality, said Messina. Joe Taliban will think nothing of surrender ing and then real quick reach for a grenade pin once in your camp. This enemy has little value for life. And if the stuff hits the fan, you must be able to kill and destroy the threat before they kill and destroy you. Thats the business that were in. The PSU 307 has been open for such business since immediately after the attacks on Sept. 11, when the unit was called up for port security in New York for two days before heading out to begin a two-month tour in Boston and eventually coming to secure the coasts of GTMO. When we were called up on Sept. 11, there was a lot of fear but a lot of patriotism. We didnt know what to really expect, but we were ready for it, said Courtenay. Everyone in this unit is a hard charger, and they really want to be here. We may be reservists, but we have to be ready to deploy within 96 hours if we get the call. And when that call comes, the reservists of the PSU 307 can rely on their amassed expe rience to aid them in accomplishing whatever mission needs to get done. The unique thing about our unit is that we have a conglomerate of federal and state law enforcement officers, firefighters and a lot of prior-service people from all the other branches, said Messina, himself a former member of the Marine Corps. They really bring their experience to the plate, and this training is a great refresher for them. And for the new guys its a whole new animal, and its important that we bring them up to speed. Our units a big melting pot of experi ence, said Courtenay, a former Military Police officer in the Army. We all come together, even with the other services, and put our training to the test. According to his students, Messinas aim was true during this weeks training. This combat training is really good, said Petty Officer 1st Class Christopher E. Lipke of the PSU 307. Ive had hands-on training before, but this was an excellent refresher course for me. I feel better having gone through this, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Greg Dunlap of the PSU 307. Ive had similar training, but this was more in-depth than usual. For Messina, in order to know the ropes, you have to climb them first. After youve been doing this training for a while, it becomes second nature, he said. These guys taking this course are merely enhancing the skills that everyone else in this unit has brought together. And by coming together through training and experience, the PSU 307 remains con stantly mission-ready. After Sept. 11, we didnt skip a beat with training, said Messina. With the PSU, if were in a real-world situation and see the opportunity to better ourselves, were going to seize that chance and train hard. We never stop. We give 110 percent all the time. Page 7 Friday, August 30, 2002 put their combat skills to test Lt. Robert Courtenay of the PSU 307 hits the ground to demonstrate the high-speed way to low-crawl Messina reviews the proper hand signal to use for stop and get down while out on a foot patrol.

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small percentage of people con tract encephalitis, a potentially fatal infection of the brain. The virus is most dangerous for chil dren, the elderly, and people with weak immune systems. Which may leave GTMO with less to worry about. Forces here are not at a sig nificant risk, said Radike. Generally those affected by West Nile virus are over the age of 52. One out of four people bitten by an infected mosquito will come down with flu-like symptoms, the rest will never even know they've been bitten by an infected mosquito. So the best treatment for those individ uals would be supportive care, pain relievers such as Motrin and Tylenol. A little Chicken soup and rest wouldn't hurt either. Advanced age, Radike said, is by far the greatest risk factor of severe neurological disease, long-term morbidity, and death. In the American epidemic this year, there have been 425 people infected, of which 20 have died; all deaths have occurred in peo ple over the age of 52. The majority of these people have been older than 70 years of age, he said. Thus far, no case of the virus has been detected south of the U.S. border, although, Cuba has recently offered help to the U.S. to contain the outbreak because it says the disease could spread to the Caribbean and Central America when infected birds begin migrating south in autumn. It is inevitable that at some point this virus will migrate down to GTMO. In the last three years it has migrated from New York down to the Florida Keys and Louisiana, with all that being said it is bloody unlikely for it to affect our mission here, he said. And how will we know if the virus has arrived here? The presence of dead birds in the area may herald the arrival of the West Nile virus and can provide early epidemiological clues to its arrival. Over 110 species of birds can be infected with this virus, but the common crow is most likely to be infected, said Radike. He con tinued: Troops here are well protected from the West Nile virus. One, the infection isn't down here yet, and two, those at risk would be older than 52 years of age, probably much older, he said. Thats not a big problem for a military force. But GTMO is preparing for the virus arrival, as well as for other mosquito-spread diseases such as malaria and dengue. We have set up a program to deal specifically with the possi bility of infected mosquitoes. We do bird surveillance, testing any dead birds found for the virus, and mosquito surveil lance, monitoring where there are populations of mosquitoes and testing them for the virus as well, said Navy Lt. Cdr. Gre gory W. Thomas, GTMOs pub lic health officer. Additionally, we use Malathion-based chemi cal products to spray mosquitopopulated areas. The proactive tactics of the Public Health Office has already had success keeping the mos quito population here at bay, and the number of bites down. Since January we have been very aggressive with our mos quito program, said Navy Chief Richard W. Anderson, lead chief preventive medicine and public health. We go out every other day and do mosquito counts. We have established traps, and we see how many mosquitoes are found in each one to determine the amount of spraying that needs to be done. If there are a lot found we will spray more frequent, if less are found we will spray less. Additionally, the environ ment is a strong force working against mosquitoes in GTMO. The arid, hot environment here is not mosquito-friendly, unlike the other side of Cuba where is rains all the time, Radike said. So will the West Nile virus come here? Probably. Could you get sick? Maybe. Take all the reasonable precautions you can against getting bitten, and watch for flu-like symptoms; they could be something else. But the good news is, even if an virus-bearing mosquito makes its way out of some standing water, past the sprayers and onto your skin for an infec tious dip into your bloodstream, odds are the worst effects youll feel can be cleared up with a trip to the sick call, some Motrin and some rest. The M osquito Life Cycle (about ten times actual size ) Page 11 Friday, August 30, 2002 Graphic courtesy of Corel Graphics The crow is one of the most common species of bird infected by mosquitoes and made a carrier of West Nile virus. Graphic courtesy of Environmental Protection Agency website This graphic demonstrates the growth process and life cycle of a mosquito, from hatching to adulthood Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Navy Cmdr. James K. Radike doesnt see a big problem. PSUers train like infantrymen, Page 6 Friday, August 30, 2002 Hes wearing a Battle Dress Uniform, covered in camouflage, fully loaded M-16 in hand and armed with combat knowledge of how to go into battle and emerge victorious. You might think you were looking at an elite Army or even Marine commando. That is, until you see the badge that says U.S. Coast Guard. The Coast Guard Port Security Unit 307, a reserve unit from St. Petersburg, Fla., is in charge of water-borne and shore-side security here at GTMO. And in order for the shore-side forces to be able to per form their mission basic ground-type tactics like setting up security perimeters, check points defensive and fighting positions and performing mounted and un-mounted patrols they must train not only like sailors but infantry men. Case in point: a period of instruction given by the PSU this week, related to combat skills under the section of individual movements and tactics, training that the unit holds to keep their reservists combat skills as sharp as Rambos knife. This type of class is extremely important for the PSU, which is basically the infantry of the Coast Guard, said Petty Officer 1st Class Ed Messina, instructor of the class. These combat skills are taught and reinforced because PSUs, unlike any other Coast Guard units, are rapid deploy ment forces, and we can be anywhere in the world in a few days, and we must be able to fight and defend our selves in any geographical location. The course is a part of the PSUs Personnel Qualification Standards training, said Lt. Robert Courtenay of the PSU 307. All members of the PSU must complete a required amount of different skills training. After this training is completed and the member has been with the unit for at least two years and has attended some basic combat skills course, he may receive a PSU insignia badge. And since the Coast Guards basic training doesnt include infantry skills, such training needs to be taught to PSU members, said Courte nay. A standard for anyone in the PSU is the Phoenix Readiness Course provided by the Air Force out of McGuire Air Force Base, N.J., which is a two-week infantry skills course. But here at GTMO, Messina is teaching too. During the four-hour course, Messina reviewed a wide range of subjects: how to stay protected through cover and conceal ment, what it takes to survive in a firefight, how to react to direct and indirect fire, build ing proper fighting positions, land navigation, noise and light discipline, proper formations and combat movements. Through all of the training, Messina stressed the importance of self-reliance. A Story and photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire During the Port Security Unit 307s combat skills training, Petty Officer 1st Class Ed Messina, class instructor, critiques the standing fighting position of Petty Officer 1st Class Christopher E. Lipke as he takes aim with an M-16. Messina points out what Petty Officer 3rd Class Mike Shaw did right and wrong after he camouflaged himself and hid in the bushes for the class to try to spot him Messina illustrates the proper way to apply camou flage to the face to maximize effectiveness.

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been stationed here in the Navy 30 years ago, and comedian Lenny Clarke got a quick laugh when he remarked that the bar racks probably look exactly the same. The role of the base in aiding Cuban refugees was mentioned in Buehns presentation, as well as the new function of the base as the holding place for Al-Quida detainees. The next stop for the comics was the docks, where they got to hear about military boating oper ations for the Coast Guard Port Security Unit 307. Lt. Tomas A. Kringel arranged for the comics to board some vessels and take a little trip out into the Bay. While waiting for his turn to board the next boat, Tony Rock took some time out to talk to some of the coastguardsmen. Its a double-edged sword, he said, in reference to questions about being the brother of the more famous comedian in the family, Chris Rock. There are benefits in name recognition, he admits, but he wants to be his own man. Coast Guard Lt. Dan J. Egan struck up a conversation with him and shared that he, too, has had to follow in someone elses footsteps. With regards to Rocks approach to Thursdays shows he explained. There will be no curs ing, no mentioning of female body parts. Since this is a military show, I cant do my Coast Guard joke, he added with a cryptic laugh. I have no military back ground, Ive probably been in two fights in my life, but I got involved with the USO because thats my way of contributing, he said, explaining his reasons for supporting the troops. Ive never met a more appre ciative audience, said Clarke as he walked around and introduced himself loudly to all within earshot. After an hour and a half at the PSU, the group moved from a waterside view of the base to one of the lofty hills that dot the bay the home of the Mobile Inshore Underwater Warfare Unit. Saturday Night Live come dian Colin Quinn broke off from the rest of the group to do a radio interview on The Blitz 103.1 while the others were greeted by Navy Cmdr. Sheldon D. Stuchell of the MIUWU. The comics shook hands with the handful of servicemembers on top of the hill and they were invited to peep through the large telescopes that few outside of the MIUWUs staff get to see, let alone touch. The tour deviated from the itinerary after the MIUWU visit. The visitors were met by a humvee and the comics piled into the back to experience the thrill of a ride down a winding hill in a tactical vehicle. The comics were all smiles when they hopped out of the vehicle at McCalla hangar, so the bumpy trip was worth it. In the hangar the USO group met with the servicemembers who work at the Pink Palace and JTF-160 Headquarters. The troops expressed surprise at see ing a group of strangers descend ing on their domain, but they quickly warmed up to them. They eagerly snatched up the glossy autograph sheets provided by Naylor and seized the opportunity to get autographs and pose for pictures with the celebrities. The comics were allowed to sit inside a stationary helicopter and pose for a few more photos. It was now past noon. There was a brief stop at the Windjam mer to pick up security badges, then it was off to Windmill Beach. The comics had a chance to wade in the Caribbean Sea before taking a walk up the road toward Camp America. Lunch was at Seaside Galley. Unfortu nately, the galley was closed when the group arrived. Strings were pulled and the galley was opened so that the grumbling stomachs could be appeased. JTF-160s Sgt. Maj. Funaro greeted the group at the din ing facility. I understand that you got a lot of new material today, he joked, in response to their disappoint ment at some delays and not getting to min gle with any troops at lunchtime. After lunch it was back to the grand tour. They exited Seaside Galley and met with troops at the new chapel. Word spread quickly through the camp and soon a size able crowd gathered under the domed roof to get autographs. I will definitely check out the show, said Army Sgt. Steve Andronis of the 342nd MPs. I watch them all the time. Nick DiPaolo is one of my favorites. I have to work midnights, but Im going to try to run out, catch the first show, and make it to work tomorrow, said Spc. Autmn Blewett of the 346th MPs. I had just gotten to sleep, but I saw everyone coming up here and I had to come right away. The comics left Camp A after signing autographs for 45 min utes. The day concluded with a stop at the Naval Station Hospital. A tour was conducted by Navy HMC Joseph Engel. The comics, eager to surprise someone, visited a bed-ridden patient, Sgt. Christo pher Renard, 346th MPs. It was looking like a boring day... Thank you! said a stunned Renard. As this paper goes to print, the comics were scheduled to per form in 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. shows Thursday at the Windjammer. Tickets were to be distributed through the chain of command to the different units. Approximately 400 servicemembers were expected to attend each show. Clarke summed up the Com edy Central tour neatly: What the troops are doing is tremen dous. Ive been involved with the USO for seven years now. Any time they want me to go, its my pleasure. Were here to make morale. Page 5 Friday, August 30, 2002 USO, from page 1 Entertainers Lenny Clarke and Nick DiPaolo savor a hilltop view of Guantanamo Bay, courtesy of the MIUWU. Tony Rock soaks his tired feet in the surf at Windmill Beach. Spc. Autumn Blewett and Spc. Kellen R. Morris of the 346th MP Co. eagerly col lected the autographs of comedians Nick DiPaolo and Lenny Clarke. Comic Louis Ramey signed every thing -even a Seabees hard hat. This past Sunday Camp Amer ica welcomed its long-awaited, new and roomier chapel, which is set up to seat more than 150 peo ple for one service. This new facility is a large Ten sion Fabric Structure tent that was abandoned for many years, used as a general storage area. But thanks to the dedication of some hard-working servicemembers at Camp America and to chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill, the tent has undergone a revival. Well, its truly a miracle, said Merrill. We have 100 chairs, four wooden altars, fans, a stage and a sound system all given to us. Not a single cent was spent. Pfc. Clayton Barth, from the 346th Military Police Company, saw the tent before its transforma tion. Afterward, he said, This is the best miracle so far. From what we had before to now, its just amazing. I dont have any kind of words for it. Its good to be in a new facil ity, said Pfc. BethAnn Martin, from the 571st MP Co. Its truly a blessing. Martin was one of the soldiers who contributed in the renovation of the tent. She works at Camp Delta, but she said she always asks her supervisor to give her Sunday off so that she can go to church. For Staff Sgt. John Sain, from the 342nd MP Co, a bigger facil ity shows we are progressing in our outreach. God really wants us to reach out to others. Sain has been going to the service since the chapel was at Freedom Heights. He said he has been encouraging all the soldiers from his company to come to the service. At the service on Sunday, all the worshippers gave thanks and praises to the Lord for their new accomodations. Musical entertainment was pro vided by New Life Christian Fel lowship and Voices of Inspiration Choir. I like the overall music of it. Everything just fits together, said Barth. I think its great to have people from different denomina tions worshipping together. Today is my first morning service here, he said. I usually come at night. I was actually really impressed. Chaplain Merrill couldnt help expressing his joy and satisfaction with the new facility. Today, everything came together the music, the special guest, the choir. I think now with the new facility we can have a high-quality service for all the ser vicemembers. This tent is a testi mony to all of us who are here. Now, walking in here is sym bolic of what God can do for any soldier, sailor, airman, Marine or Coast Guard member, said Mer rill. No matter how much of a mess their life may be in, they just have to give God a try. God will clean house. Moving to this place has long been a dream for Merrill. When I first got here, I men tioned the tent, people looked at me and thought that I was crazy, said Merrill. At that time, services were being held in a SEAhut. Few peo ple were coming to worship. But Merrill did not give up. He con tinued to pray with the regular attendees and asked for a miracle from God. And while he was waiting for Gods miracle, Merrill initiated an outreach campaign by using GTMO media and word-ofmouth. Week after week, more outreach was being done, and more people kept coming to the protestant service. We really outgrew the SEAhut, said Spc. Steven Burns, from the 346th MP Co., one of faithfuls who helped out with the outreach. Some Sundays we had people standing in the back. The place was crammed. Since the membership was increasing, Merrill set out for a bigger facililty. But as he said, The chaplain has no budget. So he turned back to the exist ing old tent, which hadnt been cleaned for years and was used as a storage for mattresses, wall lockers and piles of garbage. Once he obtained the okay, Merrill put together a crew of vol unteers to clean up the place, hop ing new doors would be opened. A lot of people worked hard to make this happen, said Burns. Even the people who dont go to church pitched in with the clean ing of the tent. For the past two weeks, off and on, I and a group of volunteers would get together after their shift at Camp to empty the trash out from the tent. After the cleanup, it all started to happen, as the saying goes, in mysterious ways. Merrill explained: The altar wood was being thrown away, the wooden stage was from the plat form of then Freedom Heights. The sound system was taken from the camp commandants office. The infantry donated the fence. It was truly a group effort. More than 40 men and women got together over the past few weeks to clean the facility. If we just pull ourselves together as a team we can accomplish anything, espe cially at the midpoint of our deployment, said Merrill. Everyone who is out there, no matter what happens, you can make it through this deployment, said Martin. If you have a hard time, you can always trust in God. He is always there. My vision here is to make this a worship service for all people, all different backgrounds and com mands so that they can feel com fortable to come and worship God, said Merrill. We had a good turn-out, but I think that even more people would have come today if the shifts at Camp Delta were not changed, said Merrill. Today was great, said Barth. I saw a lot of people from differ ent companies, different ranks, civilians. We are all coming together to worship the Lord. Hopefully, well continue to grow, said Burns. We are not going to stop. Our goal is to out grow this place. Chaplain Michael S. Merrill delivers his sermon Sunday in the new chapel. Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Page 12 Friday, August 30, 2002 Spc. Steven Burns and Pfc. Clayton Barth standing by the new chapel. Camp America to new chapel: Amen! Servicemembers and civilians sing with New Life Christian Fellowship.

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Page 4 Friday, August 30, 2002 This weeks question: How should GTMO commemorate Sept. 11? Army Staff Sgt. James Vasquez, 2/142 Inf. Co. As a base, at the moment the towers were hit, everything should stop, and a moment of silence should be held. Sgt. Tony Bennings, 2/142 Inf. Co. For me to get some sleep would be a good idea, but it would be nice to take some moments of silence and then hear The Star Spangled Ban ner playing loud and proud. Navy HM1 Robert Chew, JTF-160 EPU Itd be nice if we could have all the services join together and collaborate on one big ceremony by the beach. 2nd Lt. Chuck Wingerd, 239th MP Co. A good idea would be to erect a flagpole in Camp Delta and we could fly flags and give them away like they did at the Pentagon. 1st Lt. Mike Dunn, 239th MP Co. There should be a coor dinated moment of silence and prayer basewide. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Stars dont come in any more than four Army Gen. James T. Hill, from U.S. Southern Command, came to GTMO Saturday to visit the troops supporting the detainee operation. Ellis took time out of his visit to promote Pvt. Paul Engebretson, from the 571st MP Co., to private first class. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Across 1 Daddy 4 Root beer brand (3 wds.) 9 Like cloth 14 Lode yield 15 Doldrums 16 Deft 17 Fasten 18 Used the oars 19 Rift 20 National capital 22 Alleviate 24 Healing plant 25 Post-traumatic stress disorder 27 Removes the water 31 Lacerated 32 Special menus 33 Conger 34 Woke up 36 Poorly 38 For each one 40 Small scoop 42 Unbroken 43 Governing group 44 Raven author 45 Mud brick 47 Tack 51 Fable 53 V.P.s boss 54 Bovine 55 Hairstyle 57 Warning bells 59 Car manufacturer 62 Musical production 65 Had been 66 Gunpowder need 67 Jewish holiday 68 Snacked 69 Leafy salad green 70 Tie down 71 Japanese money Down 1 Tall tree 2 American songbird 3 Flag 4 Air (prefix) 5 Soon 6 Compass point 7 Rightful 8 Broadest 9 Western Athletic Conference 10 Eyed 11 Compete 12 Sprite 13 Mesh 21 Embellishment 23 Spots 25 Expressway 26 Ball holder 28 Make over 29 Bark in pain 30 Slick 32 MD 35 Teensy 36 Deli order 37 Mainland State 38 Sailors hey 39 Bard 40 Names 41 Single 42 Typing rate 43 Quarterback Montana 45 Rainy mo. 46 Slumps 48 Air duct 49 Prisoner 50 Become weak 52 Mists 56 Stoles 57 Opera solo 58 Furniture 59 Business abbr. 60 Title of respect 61 Southwestern Indian 63 Position 64 Stray Page 13 Friday, August 30, 2002 Answers to the August 23 puzzle DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, August 30 8 p.m. Hey Arnold, PG 76min 10 p.m. XXX, PG-13 124min Saturday, August 31 8 p.m. Power Puff Girls Movie, PG 80min 10 p.m. Signs, PG-13 107min Sunday, September 1 8 p.m. Hey Arnold, PG 76min 10 p.m. Like Mike, PG 100min Monday, September 2 8 p.m. K-19 Widowmaker, PG-13 140min Tuesday, September 3 8 p.m. XXX, PG-13 124min Wednesday, September 4 8 p.m. Signs, PG-13 107min Thursday, September 5 8 p.m. Like Mike, PG 100min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, August 30 8 p.m. Changing Lanes, R 99min 10 p.m. Kiss of the Dragon, R 98min Saturday, August 31 8 p.m. American Pie 2, R 105min 10 p.m. The Ultimate Weapon, R 105min Sunday, September 1 8, 10 p.m. The Patriot, R -158min Monday, September 2 8 p.m. The Forsaken, R -91min Tuesday, September 3 8 p.m. Chill Factor, R -102min Wednesday, September 4 8 p.m. The Corruptor, R -111min Thursday, September 5 8, 10 p.m. Twin Dragons, R -109min Frustrated Recipe Corner with Capt. Sam Barbera, 239th MP Co. Louisiana Fish and Pecans, GTMO style Batter 1 cup of milk or buttermilk 1 egg 1 tbs. mustard 1 tbs. hot sauce 1 cup all-purpose flour Butter or vegetable oil Large heavy skillet 8 tbs. coarsly chopped, raw pecans 6, 4 ounce firm-fleshed fish fillets (in GTMO, jack or snook work best) Seasoning 1 tbs. salt 1 tbs. sweet paprika 1 tsp. onion powder 1 tsp. red pepper 1 tsp. black pepper 1/2 tsp. garlic powder Mix batter and put in a bowl. Mix seasoning and sprinkle/rub on both sides of fillets. Put flour in a large bowl or cake pan. Dip fillets in liquid batter, drain for a second, then dust with flour. (A good trick is to use a paper bag. Put flour in the bag, add fillets, seal the bag and shake hard.) Heat 1/4-inch of oil or butter to approximately 350 degrees in the skillet. Butter may require a lit tle lower temperature. Butter tastes better, but oil is a little more low fat. Note: real Louisisana cooking is rarely low fat...use the butter! Add pecans to skillet, then fillets. Fry fillets about 2 min. Turn fillets keeping pecans attached (pecans should be on top now). Fry fillet on second side for 2 to 3 minutes or until golden brown. Serve hot and wrap your mouth around that!

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Page 14 Friday, August 30, 2002 Mens and Womens Division Soccer Season will run from Monday, Sept. 30 and run until Fri day, Nov. 8th. All rosters are due on Friday, September 20th. Contact Capt. Gormly at x5249 for more information. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. MWF, 5:30PM-6:30PM, Tues. & Thurs. 6:15PM-7:15PM. Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower, Paintball Range, Sat. & Weds., 1:00PM-7:00PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Flag Football Leagues, M-F, 6 PM, Cooper Field. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM4:00PM. Today, Friday, August 30th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Saturday, August 31st, 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Sunday, September 1st 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Monday, September 2nd 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 10:00AM, 7 On 7 Paintball Tournament, JTF 160 Commanders Cup Series, Paintball Range. Tuesday, September 3rd 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Wednesday, September 4th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 1:00PM-7:00PM, Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower 6:00PM, Mixed Bowling Tournament, JTF 160 Com manders Cup Series, MarbleHead Lanes. 7:00PM, Round One, Table Tennis Tournament, CBQ. Thursday, September 5th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Comics run amok at GTMO Where are all the soldiers? bellowed funnyman Lenny Clark after he entered the chapel at Camp America expecting to hear the chuckle of servicemembers. Instead, he and his fellow comedy stars on the USO comedy tour including Saturday Night Live performer Colin Quinn were greeted with silence and looks of embarrassment from the rest of the tour group. Eventually, the chapel began to swell with off-duty soldiers and the typical hand-shaking and autograph-signing took place, and of course jokes filled the air. Clarke accepted his defeat but remained humorously vigilant, stating that it was about time you guys showed up. However, the reason for the ill-timed event wasnt miscom munication on part of the groups military escorts, the MWR staff or the USO it was a question of how does one deal with eleven crazy comedi ans looking to wreak havoc and collect material on a tropical military base? The military is inherently funny, chided comedian Nick DiPaolo. We are not here to expose anything, but just to fig ure it all out and get a deeper understanding of what you guys do. The daylong tour became a whirlwind of chaotic events that began with the trek to get to Camp America, which itself became a comedy sketch in the making. Their military escorts were clearly more used to handling tough media types barking out questions and trying to take pictures where they are not supposed to. This crowd, not out for a story but a joke, was a bit different. I have a photographic memory will that be a prob lem? joked comedian Mike Birbiglia when he was told to put his camera away. However, the escorts had their hands full when the comedic caravan came to a halt due to a locked gate to Camp America, where service-mem bers were anxiously awaiting their arrival. As everyone waited for the key to arrive and the MWR reps scrambled on the radio for assistance, the comedians became restless and wandered out onto Windmill Beach. One daring prankster jumped into the ocean in his underwear, prompting an escort to call him back in. A standoff ensued and the comedian reluctantly put his shorts on, dried off and returned to the van. The cam eraman, who had opted to stay in the van, cursed himself for not capturing the amusing image on film for the Comedy Central special, to be aired in October. The key was still nowhere to be found, so the comedians took off on foot up the hill to America. We are here for the soldiers and we cant even get to them, Modi said, a come dian from Long Island. One hapless jokester with a BDU cap tried to walk to the gate without a badge and was escorted back down with an armed Humvee slowly trailing behind him. Finally, they made it to their destination the Seaside Gal ley, where they were to chow down and mingle with the troops only to find it closed, with no troops to be found. After twenty minutes of arguing with the chow hall employees, the food was served and the comedians went on to the chapel. The last stop was the Naval Hospital, where the comics perhaps hoped to find bays full of wounded soldiers needing a laugh. They found one with an ingrown toenail. In the end, the colorful cast of characters was herded back into the van to get some rest and prepare for the show at the Windjammer club, while their weary escort crew contem plated how a wily group of comedians managed to take over GTMO for a day. As Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro said when he met up with the group after lunch, I understand that you guys got a lot of new material today. Story by Army Sgt. Paul Morando Special to The Wire Photo by Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Colin Quinn makes a typically sour face during the comics tour. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa L to R: Lenny Clarke, Laurie Kilmartin, Nick DiPaolo and Louis Ramey pound the sand in search of laughs at Windmill Beach. Page 3 Friday, August 30, 2002 At GTMO, taking the ferry is pretty much the only way youre going to get from the Windward side to the Lee ward side or vice versa. The workers on this craft, a threeman team per shift, skillfully guide the massive vessel on its all-day rounds back and forth across Guantanamo Bay to get you where you need to go. Ferry Boat YFB-93 never fails, and its the one and only ferry in operation here. The 140-foot vessel, which weighs approximately 200,000 tons, can carry three tractor trail ers plus numerous humvees in one bold trek across the shark-infested bay. Whether bringing visitors to Windward or ferrying ser vicemembers across to the Leeward airfield so they can get off this rock, the ferry pleases many with its majestic sight and mighty mission. Ferry operators Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Efren Guillermo, the engineer on board, checks the readings on a manual board deep down in the thunderously loud engine room. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Captain Jack Tomlin skillfully chimes in with a routine radio check as the massive ferry slowly carries its hardy load across to the Leeward side of GTMO. Efren Guillermo, Engineer I keep happy with this job. Ive done similar work in the Phillipines for 23 years, so this work isnt so bad at all. Arnold Palogan, Loadmaster This is a real nice job. You get to meet some cool people. Ive been doing this for three years and its great. Jack Tomlin, Captain I love my job. I was in the Navy for over 26 years and did two tours at GTMO. I always loved it here, which is why I took this job. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The ferry: The only way to get your vehicle to and from the other side.

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Page 2 Friday, August 30, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office The world outside your churchs walls is desperate for the help only Christians can give. Needs surround you in your community families are falling apart, people are losing jobs and lacking education, citizens are suffer ing the violent blows of crime. Government agencies do what they can to help, but churches have the power to make the most sig nificant impact for change. Your neighbors need the hope that only Christ can bring, because only He can truly transform their lives. Its great to pray for people, but God also wants you to serve them. He wants you to go outside your churchs walls to bring your neighbors the hope that only He can offer. Here are some ways your church can become the answer to some of your commu nitys needs: Research what needs currently exist in your community. Study what government agencies, other secular organizations, and other faith-based organizations are doing to serve your commu nity. Build relationships with influential people in your community such as police officers and teachers. Practice what you preach. [Adapted from It Takes a Church to Raise a Village, by Dr. Marva L. Mitchell. Pub lished by Treasure House, an imprint of Des tiny Image Publishers, Inc., Shippensburg, Pa.] Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR Now that school is back in session we would like to emphasize safety issues with regard to road regulations. COM NAVBASEGTMO INST. 11200.1F contains traffic regulations for motor vehicles, motorcy cles, bicycles, and pedestrians. While walking or jogging always use paved, raised sidewalks where they are pro vided. If not use the left-side shoulder facing oncoming traffic. You are at less of a risk when you see traffic coming your way, and you have a fixed margin of safety. Most injuries sus tained by joggers and walkers occur when not using paved sidewalks. This is due to potholes, rocks, or poor visibility, etc. Paved sidewalks tend to have more lighting. Be sure to always wear reflective gear while out at night, and stay off of the trails. When jogging in company formation or administering an APFT test, coordinate with NAVBASE Security and provide them the fol lowing information: number of personnel, time of day, street routes and estimated time of completion. Arrange for a Fire Dept. vehicle to stand by. The same NAVBASE policy on reflective gear for joggers also applies to bicyclists. Per sons riding bicycles share the road with motor vehicles. In short, all bicyclists adhere to the same traffic regulations as motor vehicles. Wear a helmet and a reflective vest. Wearing of headphones or earphones is also prohibited. Remember that your helmet is the only thing that protects your head from the road surface. If you are a new arrival to Guantanamo Bay, I would recommend riding only during daylight hours until you familiarize yourself with the roads here. All personnel that operate motor vehicles, motorcycles, and bicycles: remember that school is back in session. Always give the right of way to school buses and children walking on roads and sidewalks. Submitted by Spc. Brian R. Treeful, PMO Your community is waiting for you JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local phone) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. R. W. Funaro If you visit JTF-160 Headquar ters, you will find a wall dedicated to the values of the different branches of the military. As one looks at these values, one will find that they are similar. We all speak the same lan guage when it comes to Honor, Loy alty, Courage, Selfless Service, etc. but as I look among the service members here at GTMO, I find we all have something else in common. Take a look at what we have given up over the last several months. Some families have found it difficult to cope with our absence. We have missed births of children; the deaths of loved ones; some may have lost a business. We came from all walks of life with different accents and lifestyles, but we bonded because of that one thing we have in common. Lets go back to 9/12 and remember all the flag-waving patriots. Where are they now? I remember neighbors of mine saying, lets go get them, but those neighbors do not wear a uniform. We all took an oath. We all signed a contract. People do that every day of the week. What makes us so dif ferent? Just as people sign contracts every day, they also break them. We did not and we do not. We can identify with all the val ues of all the branches of service. That is us, plus one more thing. We gave our word and we are sticking to it when it is easier to wimp out. How noble is the person that has charac ter, and how lucky for those who know him/her. We in uniform have a bond that no civilian can understand. Stand tall and walk proud. Page 15 Friday, August 30, 2002 JTF-160 nets v-ball tournament win JTF-160 spiked the field in the mixed vol leyball tournament as they won in convincing fashion, beating both the 178th Military Police Company (15-5, 15-9) and 239th MP Co. (159, 1512). The mixed volleyball portion of the Com manders Cup was dominated by JTF-160. JTF-160 seemed to own the court Thursday, Aug. 22 in the Commanders Cup tournament semi-finals. They had good communication on the court, setting up their best players, Army Spc. Curtis L. Mathews and Army 1st Lt. Tom C. Kim, for spikes all night. It was like men playing against boys. We own the G. J. Denich gym. This is our house. The volleyball tournament is ours to win, no one can stop JTF-160, said Kim with a passion and conviction behind his words. The team soon proved him right, starting the opening set with eight straight points. 178th MP Co. finally scored their first point. The set was now 8-3 when Kim and Mathews got hot and put up six more points on the scoreboard. It seemed like it was taking candy from a baby. They won the first set 15-5 on a vicious spike by Kim. In the beginning of the second set JTF-160 lost their focus in the game. 178th MP Co. took advantage of that, and led the set 4-2. JTF-160 regrouped and came back to take the set and win the match 15-9. We played well in the first set, but in the second set we were letting them come back a little, said Matthews. But we managed to finish them off. The win was good for us. We play one game at a time. Even thought they lost their edge on the second set they were able to come together and muster a win. It is all about teamwork. That is what wins games. This tournament is dedicated to Kim because he is leaving Guantanamo Bay to go back to his duty station soon. He is carrying the team right now, said 1st Sgt. Teddy Hebert. The first match with the 178th MP Co. was an easy task for JTF-160. Their next opponent was the 239th MP Co. and their players didnt want to suffer the same fate as the 178th MP Co. had. JTF-160 hoped their momentum would carry them over to the next match and bring them one step closer to the championship. This match seemed different from the start. Both teams were sizing up one another. There was taunting and trash-talking in the game. But soon, JTF-160 was letting their game do the talking for them. They opened up with seven straight points. They took the 239th MP Co. out of the game. The score was 12-5 when Army Spc. Rauman M. Laurent of the 239th blocked a spike by Kim. This inspired the Black Sheep. They fought hard and tried to come back, closing the gap. But in the end JTF-160 was too strong, taking the first set 15-9. They were one set away from another victory, one step away from the finals. But 239th MP Co. didnt want to go down easily, so they fought and clawed to stay in the game. It was a seesaw battle. The teams were tied eight times in the second set. Laurent blocked five spikes in the set and the rest of the team fed off his energy. The set was knotted at twelve when Mathews started serving. After two quick points as Matthews served aces, the third serve was returned. JTF-160 then set up the play for Kim. Hebert set the ball towards the net and Kim leaped and killed the ball to score match point for JTF-160. This was the point they wanted to make to the 239th MPs: That JTF-160 was king. We stopped the trash-talking by winning the match in two straight sets. Until someone beats us this is our court. We are unbeatable here, said Kim. For the 239th MPs, there was nothing left but the post-game analysis. We played exceptional for the roster we had on the court, said Laurent. We are not volleyball stars, but we play well in the game. They won, but I dont think they had that much talent. It was a great run for the Black Sheep in the tournament, but its over now. The JTF-160 team gave some of the credit to their competiton. We played better because 239th MP Co. played well also, so we had to step it up in the match. It was a good game, said Kim. We played a lot better than we did in the first match, Matthews. We lost a couple of points, but we came together and no one got down on the team. We were able to come up with the victory. I am very proud of this team, because they showed they had heart. Whoever our next opponent is, we are going to play hard. This is our tournament. We are going to take it all. We will be celebrating in the end. And so they were. The JTF-160 volleyball team, again riding the talents of Matthews and Kim, swept the 346th MP Co. in three games of a best-of-five championship series at G.J. Denich gym Tuesday night. The volleyball portion of the Commanders Cup is theirs. And while they may not actually own the gym, this team looks to have a long lease. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Spc. Curtis L. Mathews from JTF-160 hits one of his many spikes throughout the game against the 239th MP Co. Black Sheep Army 1st LT. Tom C. Kim from JTF-160 hits the volleyball across the court in his teams win over the 178th MP Co. as Army Spc. Ryan E. Fitzpatrick looks on.

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Page 16 Friday, August 30, 2002 Sgt. Luis Molina, 160th MP Battalion Q: How are you? A: If someone would ask me How are you? I would tell them, I am as good as God wants me to be. Q: When you were young, did you always know what you wanted to be when you grew up? A: I always tried to have a plan in life, but sometimes you have to make adjustments. I am half Italian and half Spanish. I was born in Nicaraqua, but used to come visit America every year because we had family there. I came to the United States in 1979 for good. Q: What are you talking about? A: I always wanted to join the military. I joined the Army for patriotism and the chal lenge. Q: Why are you always smiling? A: I dont know Im smiling; people tell me that Im smiling. I wake up very happy. I guess its because Im just happy to be alive. Q: What is your job here at GTMO? A: Im a military police guard. I do guard duty with the detainees. Q: Hows that job treating you? A: Its fine. Im proud to have had the priv ilege and opportunity to come here. Some times its a challenge, but I came here to work. Q: But you like challenges, dont you? A: Yeah, its good. After three months here I feel more comfortable with the job. You learn as time goes by. Q: You have any hobbies? A: I like to play ping-pong for fun. I am the two-time reigning champion here at GTMO. Q: Were you born with those skills? A: Well actually, my father was a world champion. He won the African, Asian and American ping-pong tournments in the mid70s. I guess its in the blood. Q: So if you had an unlimited amount of ping-pong balls, do you think youd be able to suppress an enemy charging at you with a bayonet? A: Thats impossible. I would not take ping-pong balls into battle. Q: Do you think you would be able to beat Forrest Gump in a match? A: Forrest Gump was really good. I dont know If I could beat him. Id make him sweat, or at least Id try. Q: What kind of experiences have you had with the Army? A: Well, I joined the Army as an infantry man in 1990. I was on active duty with the 24th Inf. Div., one of the first units into Saudi Arabia during the Gulf War. Q: What kept you going while you were out there? A: A song by the group Super tramp entitled Take the Long Way Home. I thought about it while I was at war because it seemed like I was taking the long way home. Q: Any moment from your time in active duty that really sticks out in your mind? A: Well, after I did my two years and got out, I recieved a letter from the Bridage Commander of the 24th Inf. Div. thanking me for my service. I felt real proud. Q: Do you think if you lowcrawled around at Windmill beach wearing your desert camoflage from the Gulf War, any one would see you? A: No one would see me. That camoflage works good. Q: Ive seen you wear glasses. Have you ever experienced wear ing those Army issued ones? A: Oh yeah, I actually have a pair with me. Q: Those things are pretty thick, can you see other planets with them on? A: Yeah, sure! Q: You do alot of exercising? A: Ill go for a run every now and then. Q: Do you run faster than the wind? A: It depends how fast the wind will blow. Q: Whats important to you? A: The church is very important to me. When I come out of there, I feel so good from praying. I thank God for everything in my life. Q: And how do you feel about serving your country? A: Well, I love being in the Army. Ive already risked my life for this country before, and Ill do it again if I have to. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Sgt. Luis Molina: WIth life, you must look at the big picture. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Still taking the long way home... The naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba has been host to a number of notable visitors during Operation Enduring Freedom, but on Tuesday a delegation arrived whose only desire was to show support for the men and women deployed here as part of the ongoing war on terrorism. And get some laughs. The USO, in partnership with cable station Comedy Central, brought 11 comedians to Cuba to entertain the troops Thursday night. The taped shows will air on cable in late Octo ber and will be repeated through December. The entertainers invited included such names as Colin Quinn, Lenny Clark and Tony Rock. The USO and Comedy Central just completed a successful three-show set at McGuire AFB in New Jersey in July. The USOs mission is to provide a touch of home to the troops, said Betty Naylor, the USO tour producer who handled the mam moth task of booking nearly a dozen comics and getting them here. She has booked acts for Cuba before, most recently Charlie Daniels. The comics GTMO experience started with a noon arrival Tuesday. The guests were checked into the CBQ and driven to the Wind jammer club in the early afternoon for some refreshments and a briefing given by Army Lt. Col. Joseph Hoey, the Public Affairs Officer of JTF-160. The overview gave the entertainers and production staff the lowdown on what kind of troops have been deployed to Guan tanamo, who runs the base, and what life is like for those deployed here. The entertainers were then treated to a windshield tour while the stagehands worked behind the scenes with Morale, Welfare and Recreations Craig Basil to adjust the lighting and sound system of the Windjammer for Thursdays performances. On Wednesday the USO group got off to an early (for comics) start and embarked on a tour that took nearly eight hours, but which gave them a taste of how the different branches of service represented here work together in a Joint Task Force environment. Bright and early at 8 a.m., the group paid a courtesy call to the naval base commander, Captain Robert A. Buehn. Buehn picked up where Hoey left off the previous day and showed the entertainers a slide presentation that touched on the history of the U.S. pres ence in Guantanamo Bay. A Comedy Central cameraman mentioned to Buehn that he had Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Whats so funny about GTMO? Friday, August 30, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 12 Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire USO teams with Comedy Central to bring comic relief to servicemembers Comics invade McCalla Hangar! From L to R: Jim Gaffigan, Modi, Greg Giraldo and Laurie Kilmartin. See USO, page 5 A look inside... Page 6 Page 8 Page 15