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The wire
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00065
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: August 23, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00065

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PAGE 1

Page 16 Friday, August 23, 2002 Spc. Bryan Jones, 2/142nd Inf. Co. Q: Why dont you tell the people where youre from? A: Im from a small town in Texas, where about 125 people live. Q: Whats that place like? A: Well, we have a Coke machine and a stop sign down by the cotton gin. Theres no law where I live. Q: You ever get into trouble back home when you were younger? A: A young man living in a town like that can always figure out some kind of trouble to get into. Q: Does everyone in a town like that gen erally get along with each other? A: Where Im from, if you get into a fight with someone, youll end up seeing that per son every day. So if you fight with one person for a week straight, youll end up with no friends in town. Q: So, what do you do in your unit? A: Well, I was an infantryman for six years, but now I work in supply. I inspect all the weapons after the guys finish their shifts. I make sure that they keep up on their mainte nance. Q: So, you like weapons? A: Yeah, Ive been shooting since I was small. Q: Got a lot of weapons back home? A: Yeah, I got a lot of guns. Q: If there was an intruder in your home, what weapon would you use and where would you aim? A: Where Im from, the door is always open. If someone who wasnt welcome entered, Id grab the shotgun and shoot at the head. Q: Would you be able to defend your entire town single handedly? A: Everybody defends their own stuff pretty well. Its not like theyre going to shoot and miss. Q: What if your town was attacked by giant spiders? A: Thats a pretty stupid question, but in the slim chance that they did come, youd have to kiss your life goodbye. Q: Why did you join the military? A: Everybody wants to be a soldier. My grandfather and father were also in the serv ice. Q: How long have you been in? A: I joined the day I turned 18. Ten years now in the National Guard. Q: Has the military changed you? A: I have been, and always will be, the same. Q: You must have learned some survival skills being in an infantry company. How long would you last on a deserted island? A: Id last until someone came and got me. I dont know how good Id be living, but dying isnt an option. Q: Have you been on many deployments? A: No, this is my first one. Its been all right, better than being poked in the eye with a sharp stick. Q: Any goals for when you get back home? A: Im saving money so I can buy some ranch land and put cattle on it. Q: Ever tip a cow over? A: Thats stupid, you cant tip a cow over unless youre doing 70 in a car and the thing walks out in front of you. Q: Ever hop on the back of a cow and ride it? A: Well, I used to ride bulls in rodeo shows. Q: What type of weapon would you make out of fruit? A: I would take plum seeds and shoot them from a slingshot. That would hurt pretty bad. Q: What was the most disgusting thing you have ever eaten? A: A Reuben sandwich. Those people should be beat up for making that thing. Q: Last question, can you explain why people are so proud to be from Texas? A: Texas is the greatest place in the world. We have everything there. There is no other place like it. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Bryan Jones: I have been, and always will be, the same. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Texas pride comes along for the ride Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we will pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and success of liberty. John F. Kennedy, 1961 The tragic attacks on the United States of America that took place on Sept. 11, 2001 united all Ameri cans and sent thousands of service members to Guantanamo Bay in their support of Operation Endur ing Freedom. Although all who are here were touched by that somber morning that is still fresh in the memories of the people of this nation, members of the Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Unit 204 here were especially so, having lost one of their own. Navy Gunners Mate 3rd Class Thomas Butler, a member of MIUWU 204 for five years, was one of the New York City firefight ers who courageously rushed into the World Trade Center after the terrorist attacks on that gruesome day that America is still mourning. This Aug. 15, five members of the MIUWU who were close friends of Butlers left GTMO and returned to the U.S. to attend a memorial service in his honor. The service was held in memory of But ler at St. Josephs Church Saturday in Smithtown, N.Y. There, they were able to bid farewell to their fallen comrade and sailor, whose body has yet to be found. With the one-year anniversary of 9/11 approaching and the search for bodies at the World Trade Cen ter site ended, the ceremony gave us closure and a chance to say goodbye, said Navy GM3 David J. Wentworth. The memorial service consisted of a full mass with eulogies, a final roll call by the FDNY and military ceremony. The five of us who attended the service were GMC Robert Christy, GM2 Patrick Donahue, GM3 Daniel Sheehan, EO1 Chris Thatcher, EO1 Yvonne Zirrith, and Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Remembering... Friday, August 23, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 11 Story by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire MIUWU 204 unit members say good-bye to a fallen friend, who is gone but not forgotten Go drill it on the mountain Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Two masked and goggled SEABEES raise the bit on a hill overlooking Camp America while drilling holes for explosives. The charges will be deto nated Friday and the dislodged rock crushed for future GTMO use. See MIUWU, page 5 A look inside... Page 8 Page 6 Page 15

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Page 2 Friday, August 23, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Draw upon Bible verses and characters to help you pray more powerfully. You know how important it is to pray for your children, and you try to do so regularly. But sometimes you dont seem very inspired when you pray. Perhaps your prayers have become just one more thing to check off your daily list of things to do. Drawing upon the Bibles help when you pray for your children can help you pray more powerfully and effectively. Here are some ways you can use Scripture to pray for your children: *Personalize Bible verses for your children by inserting their names into the verses and paraphrasing them aloud in the form of prayers. Ask God to reveal specific promises from His Word that you can focus on for your children. *Choose some biblical characters whose stories inspire you, and use them as a basis to pray for your children. Consider what strengths the characters demonstrate that you would like God to develop in your children, such as courage or compassion. Consider what your children can learn from the characters mistakes, and the ways in which God helped them overcome their weaknesses. [Adapted from Praying the Scriptures for Your Children by Jodie Berndt. Pub lished by Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Mich.] Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR Nowadays, many people own or have access to a computer that can surf the Internet. Online shopping is becoming our favorite pas time. Purchases are made at the touch of a but ton. All that is required is a credit card number. BEWARE! Credit card fraud is a problem affecting thousands weekly. Identity theft is a fast-grow ing crime. You could become a victim without even knowing it. Exercise caution when pur chasing items on the Internet. Here are a couple of tips. Purchase items from a company that is well established. Make sure you get the companys phone number and street address. Call to ver ify that the business exists. Ask friends, neigh bors, and co-workers if theyve purchased from the company. When purchasing or finalizing your trans actions or submitting any personal informa tion, be sure you are using a secure browser and website. A flashing message should appear indicating that you have entered a secure area. If you feel you are being scammed, file a complaint with your states Consumer Protec tion Division or National Fraud Center. These agencies can be located on the Internet. Purchasing even real online items with just a click of the mouse can lead to problems if you are not careful. Debts can add up quickly. Avoid costly purchases. Know what you are buying and how much you are spending. You will be responsible for paying those debts. It is very important to understand your pay ment plan when dealing with credit cards. Whether you pay the minimum on your bill or most of what is due, there is still a balance left. It is important to know how your credit card company applies the interest rate and charge fees, and the billing cycle and grace period. All of us who have credit card bills can ben efit by being here in GTMO. Just say NO and save money. Work toward paying off debts. Submitted by Army Sgt. Deborah Pacheco, PMO Draw upon Bible verses for children NOTICE OF ARTICLE 15 ADJUDICATION A soldier was found guilty after a summarized proceeding conducted under Article 15, UCMJ, for violations of Article 92, UCMJ, failure to obey a lawful general order or regulation. The nonjudicial punishment authority found beyond a reasonable doubt that on or about 16 June 2002 on the waters of Guantanamo Bay, the soldier navigated an MWR vessel beyond the northern boundary of U.S. Naval Base, GTMO, and into Cuban territorial waters. This violated both COMNAVBASEGT MOINSTR 1720.10G and General Order Number 1, dated 20 May 2002. The soldier and his five passengers were subject to arrest and detention by Cuban authorities had they not turned around in time. The soldier received 14 days extra duty and 14 days restriction. In addi tion, the Harbor Magistrate suspended the soldiers boating license for one year, effectively revoking it. CROSSING INTO CUBAN TERRITORIAL WATERS CREATES AN UNWARRANTED INTERNATIONAL INCIDENT AND IS INEXCUSABLE. SUCH CONDUCT ENDANGERS THE BOATING PRIVILEGES AFFORDED ALL SOLDIERS. JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the per sonnel within. Page 15 Friday, August 23, 2002 239th MPs advance by beating PSU The 239th Military Police Company came from behind to beat the 307th Port Security Unit in three games to advance in the mixed volleyball tournament at G. J. Denich Gym Tuesday. It was an exciting first-round match. The crowds energy seemed to pour onto the vol leyball court. This game had the feel of a championship fight. When the two teams stepped onto the court they were not only playing for their units pride but for points in the JTF-160s Com manders Cup. Both teams fought like two prizefighters, with the 239th MPs coming out swinging with a 5-0 lead in the first match. But PSU 307 climbed back into the game, little by little. Both sides were exchanging points in the first set. PSU 307 tied the game at ten, then took the lead on the next point. The lead was 14-11, but PSU 307 could not put the 239th away. The match became deadlocked at 14. In the rules of volleyball, you have to win by two points. PSU 307 turned it up and was able to score two straight points to win the first match 16-14. In the next game, PSU 307 continued play ing as they did at the finish of the first match. They opened up a 5-2 lead, potentially critical in a close game. But this lead would not last long. The 239th MP Co. rallied back and tied the match at five. The lead would go back and forth until the 239th MP Co. scored five unanswered points to win the second game 15-10. Tying the match gave new life to the 239th. The winner of the third game would be the team that advanced in the tournament bracket. It was no easy contest. There were six ties and four lead changes as both teams seemed to want victory equally. The pressure was mounting as each point became more and more crucial. The teams were tied at twelve when the 239th MP Co. scored two points. Then PSU 307 scored a point. The atmosphere was tense on the court as the score was 14-13. It was do or die time for both teams. Who would step up? Serving, PSU 307 couldnt tie it up, and the 239th MP Co. was able to score match point to advance, and after winning the first game, PSU 307 had let the opportunity to advance in the tournament slip through their hands. The game was pretty close. We had a good chance to put it away in the second match. It was our fault. They played hard and came back to win, said Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Bradlee T. Starks from PSU 307. It was a good and close game, said Army Spc. Rauman M. Laurent from the 239th MP Co. Both teams went at one another hard. We had minor mistakes in the game, but because we played as a team, we were able to come back and win. Hopefully we can continue winning and take care of business in the tour nament. We are going to try our best to win the Commanders Cup. Stories and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Spc. Rauman M. Laurent, 239th MP Co., spikes the ball aggressively to score a point for the Blacksheeps in their victory over PSU 307. The Hood Ratz flag football team overcame a late charge by Cactus Curtain in the second half to stay undefeated in the flag football season. The game was a defensive struggle from the start. Both teams had a hard time getting their offense in synch. Defense dictated the tempo in this game. It seemed that one mistake or a big play would change the out come of the game. The first half of the game was all about the Hood Ratz. They were winning the battle in the trenches. As the game progressed, Army Pfc. John P. Gines broke free from the line of scrimmage with a 43-yard touchdown run to put the Hood Ratz on top, 6-0. The extra point was good and the Hood Ratz lead was 7-0. They increased that lead by capitalizing on Cactus Curtains mistakes. The Hood Ratzs quar terback, Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan, saw a blown coverage in the end zone. He stepped back in the pocket and threw a bomb down the field. Ronan was able to thread the needle with a perfect pass. He threw the ball over the hands of the cornerback and into the grasp of Army Spc. William Whittenburg for a 38-yard touch down pass, and the Hood Ratz had a commanding 13-0 lead. It wasnt an easy play. I was able to put a move on the corner back and beat him down field. Ronans timing was perfect. It was a great pass, said Whitten burg. This was the perfect opportu nity for the Hood Ratz to let their defense loose on Cactus Curtain and put the game away. They started taking chances on defense by blitzing more often, and it worked. Cactus Curtain was able to score a touchdown on a sec ond-half running play, but it was too little, too late. There was too much defense and not enough time on the game clock for Cactus Curtain, now 1-2 on the season. Army Spc. Allen Lamar played big in this game, said Ronan. He had three quarter back sacks that helped stop Cac tus Curtains momentum in the game. He turned it up another level on defense. He gives every thing he has in the game. He is very important to the teams suc cess. We now have a record of 2-0 with this victory. It felt real good beating Cactus Curtain, because they were trash talking a lot in the game. They were lucky we did not play well today, he said Im look forward to next Fri day. Thats when we play against Naval Station theyre the team to beat. They have a good team, he said. Well see. Army Spc. William Whittenburg from the 418th Transportation Company makes an over the shoulder catch to seal the victory for the Hood Ratz 13-7. Hood Ratzs QB, defense hold off Cactus Curtain

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Page 14 Friday, August 23, 2002 Effective immediately, JTF160 servicemembers have a new way to contact friends and loved ones at home the Morale Videophone. Located in room 201 of the Pink Palace, the videophone is a free service offered to ser vicemembers of all branches. The videophone is in opera tion 24 hours a day, seven days a week, as long as an appointment is made in advance. The videophone, a ViaTV model VC105-II, was brought to Guantanamo by the 43rd MP Brigade. The Rhode Island National Guard purchased the video phone a few years ago, said Army Capt. Daniel C. Lutz, JTF-160 HQ Commandant. The phone is deployed with its mobilized units. It was recently used when one of the states MP companies deployed to Hungary. The JTF has plans to purchase a new videophone that will be permanently assigned to GTMO when we leave. According to Lutz, the videophone has been func tional since late July. Now that it has been tested, it is open for more widespread use. The set up of the video phone is fairly simple. It con sists of a small black box that houses a built-in digital video camera and a high-perform ance analog modem. The pic ture quality, size and frame speed can be adjusted on the fly. The unit also allows you to pan, tilt and zoom the camera. The ViaTV uses an ordinary phoneline, not a broadband connection like DSL or ISDN. The unit is about the size of a standard cable box, and it sits here on top of a normal 27 color TV in a sparse room, unfurnished save for a two tables and two chairs. The room is locked when not in use. The user turns on the unit and the TV and makes a call to a DSN number with a standard touchtone phone. On the other end of the line, the service members loved ones sit in front of a similar videophone setup in a private room. The 43rd MP BDE has a videocon ferencing unit set up in their armory back in Rhode Island, but other Reserve and National Guard units have comparable video conferencing equipment as well. According to the man ufacturer, the ViaTV is H.324 compatible, so it can receive data from other H.324 compat ible videophone manufac turers such as Aiptek, TeleEye or Vizufon. Each servicemember should contact their units chain of command to see if the videophone can be used to contact their loved ones at home, advised Lutz. Some other units have begun to test the videophone with videophones at their home stations. Others are still determining if any videophone resources are in their area back home. So far, it has only been used from one videophone to another videophone. However, if a servicemember has a spe cific need we are willing to test it out and see if it works, said Lutz. According to Lutz, the pol icy is that every JTF-160 ser vicemember is allotted 15 minutes per week on a first come, first served basis. Units can reserve blocks of time to ensure the videophones avail ability by contacting Lutzs office at x5253. On Wednesday alone 11 ser vicemembers, including JTF160 Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Funaro, signed up to see their loved one back home. Slots fill up fast, so plan ahead. Time must be coordi nated both on the GTMO side and back at the home station. Finally, for those at Camp America who may be feeling left out, Lutz passed on the fol lowing good news: Two new videophones are on order one to replace the current videophone and one for Camp America. Morale videophone lets troops reach out and view loved ones Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire The JTF-160 Fishing Rodeo takes place Saturday at Pelican Petes Marina From 6:00AM to 3:00PM. Con tact Capt. Barbera at #3538 or Lt. Bowman at #5256 for information. Mens and Womens Division Soccer Sea son will be starting on Monday, September 30th and run until Friday, November 8th. All Division Soccer rosters will be due on Friday, September 20th. Please contact Capt. Gormly at #5249 for more information. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Free movies: 8 PM Lyceum; 8,10 PM Camp Bulkeley. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, MWF, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, MF, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. MWF, 5:30PM-6:30PM, Tues. & Thurs. 6:15PM-7:15PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Flag Football Leagues, Cooper Field, M-F, 6:00PM. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM4:00PM. Today, Friday, August 23rd 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:30PM, Night Fishing Trip, M.W.R. Marina. Saturday, August 24th 6:00AM-3:00PM, JTF-160 Fishing Rodeo, Pelican Petes Marina. 7:00AM-2:00PM, Dawn Fishing Trip, CBQ. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Sunday, August 25th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 5:00PM, Spades Tournament, JTF-160 Commanders Cup Series, CBQ. Monday, August 26th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, August 27th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 6:00PM, Mixed Volleyball, JTF-160 Commanders Cup Series, Denich Gym. Wednesday, August 28th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 7:00PM, Round One, Table Tennis Tournament, CBQ. Thursday, August 29th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. The 43rds Sgt. 1st Class Vartan Masdanian tests the videophone. His son, Garo, and his brother, Kevork, are awaiting the call back in Rhode Island. Page 3 Friday, August 23, 2002 The active-duty soldiers of the Army Veterinary Detach ment have two missions while at Guantanamo Bay. One is to care for the military working dogs and other animals on base. The other is to inspect all of the food that comes to the com missary and galleys base-wide. On a day-to-day basis, they see clients on appointments and care for the 324 pets here. They provide full-service treat ment, including surgery and dental care. When inspecting food that comes off of the barge, they ensure that it is from an approved source and that is safe and sanitary to consume. The Army is the only branch of the service that does ani mal medicine, and these vets perform this unique job with utmost pride. Army veterinarians Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Pfc. Anna Grier and Spc. Amber Albrecht skillfully trim the overgrown hooves of Giorgio, the sole goat resident of GTMO. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Amber Albrecht inspects three kittens that are up for adoption. If no one adopts them, they will ultimately be put to sleep. Capt. Michelle Franklin I love it here. Its been a great experience. I never worked with much exotic animals until I came here. It has been a real eye-opener. Staff Sgt. Shelley Casinger I love the Army, and its good here. This is my sec ond tour in GTMO. The iguanas and Cuban boas are always interesting to work with. Spc. Amber Albrecht This is a really good job. Theres pretty much a new chain of command here, but its awesome. Being able to work with animals every day is great.

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Page 4 Friday, August 23, 2002 This weeks question: Where do you think Osama bin hiding? Spc. Reggie Gokey, 571st MP Co. He could be hiding in America somewhere, scoping out the scene. Maybe he even shaved off that crazy beard. Spc. Ron Coen 178th MP Co. Id say hes some where in Pakistan. It seems like a likely spot, given that guys beard would help him to fit in. Pfc. Jennifer Doebel, 571st MP Co. It doesnt matter where he is, eventually hes going to get caught. Even if hes working back in the States. Staff Sgt. Patrick Eggert, 342nd MP Co. With as much money and power as he has, he can be anywhere. But Id be willing to bet hes straddling along the Pakistani border. Spc. Kim Shavers, 114th MP Co. He might be on some tropical island somewhere drinking daquiris. Hes proba bly sporting some dreadlocks. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Hard work will make you tired Army Pfc. Ted Lachner, 602nd Maintenance Co., fixing a flat, skillfully extracts the rim from a 11 by 20 tire which belongs to a five ton truck. Due to the tremendous size of these types of tires, a lot of strength and sweatng must result from such hard work, making the soldiers who toil away on them just as worn out as some of the tires themselves. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Across 1 Baths 5 Island 9 Assistant 13 U.S. Department of Agriculture 14 Type of missile 15 Longitudinal 16 Vilify 17 Heroic tale 18 Tinkle 19 Happy 21 Particle 23 Flightless bird 24 Headed 25 Sound of leaves 29 Distress call 30 Roman garments 32 That man 33 A vacation (2 wds.) 36 Knobby 37 Arbiter 38 Point 39 Wodden projection 40 Clench your teeth 41 Downtown 42 In more pain 43 Piquant 44 Conger 45 Tails 46 Perch 47 Fancy 49 Blemish 50 Owns 53 Rinse 55 Snobbish 57 Cavity 60 Land measurement 62 Fairy tale opener 63 Prostrate 64 On top 65 Movie star 66 Made music 67 Crave 68 Stringed instrument Down 1 Lunge 2 Sacred poem 3 Adios 4 Sold at a discount 5 Releases 6 Burn with hot liquid 7 Drag 8 Cheese 9 Wheel holders 10 Caesars three 11 Newsman Rather 12 Moose relative 15 Veritable 20 Dud 22 Piano-like instrument 26 Before Fri. 27 Confine 28 Hollow 29 Sextet 30 Sounds 31 Aroma 33 Was sore 34 Not as false 35 Shekel 36 Smart person 39 Frozen pizza brand 40 Comprehend 42 Bun topping 43 Baked pasta dish 46 Mum 48 Swayed 49 Goose eggs 50 Eastern religion 51 Scarf 52 Inscribed pillar 54 Pull 56 Labor 57 Hertz 58 Epoch 59 Gyp 61 Computer part Page 13 Friday, August 23, 2002 Answers to the August 16 puzzle LIFE HERE IS STILL A CHALLENGE August 3, 2002: Today I cared for a patient who escaped from Cuba. He was found at sea and brought here by the U.S. Coast Guard. He left his wife and children in search of freedom. His hopes are all those that we have in the USA: Establish himself, bring his family here, and live the American Dream. Today was also Quarters. That is where all our sailors go out to the flag pole in front of the hospital and stand in formation at attention in their white uniforms. They pay respect to our flag while the National Anthem is played. I cant attend because I am caring for patients, but I can hear the Star Spangled Banner being played. I watch my Cuban patient rise to look out the window to watch Morning Colors. His eyes are filled with tears. No words are spoken. I can feel his pain, he wants what we were born with FREEDOM. The challenge is knowing that tomorrow I may work in a different area. This area has a patient that has been raised to hate our way of life. His eyes will glare at me when I enter the room. He will constantly wait for the oppor tunity to strike. With some trepidation, I will stand in harms way to meet his medical needs. We as Americans are a caring and compassionate people. It is beyond us why anyone would want to take away our bountiful lifestyle. We help so many countries in need and often dont understand why we have an enemy. I dont have an answer for this hatred. My mission is to care for all in need. I have just had to switch gears and find the right tempo to handle both those reaching for FREEDOM and those wishing to destroy it. HANGING TOUGH & STAYING STRONG, Navy Lt. Laura J. Ledyard, Nurse Corps DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, August 23 8 p.m. Stuart Little 2, PG-13 70min 10 p.m. Windtalkers, R 133min Saturday, August 24 8 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG-13 93min 10 p.m. Men in Black II, PG-13 91min Sunday, August 25 8 p.m. The Bourne Identity, PG-13 -118min Monday, August 26 8 p.m. Minority Report, PG-13 140min Tuesday, August 27 8 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG-13 93min Wednesday, August 28 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann, PG-13 91min Thursday, August 29 8 p.m. Men in Black II, PG-13 91min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, August 23 8 p.m. Changing Lanes, R 90min 10 p.m. An Officer and a Gentleman, R 133min Saturday, August 24 8 p.m. Monsters Ball, R 111min 10 p.m. Courage Under Fire, R 116min Sunday, August 25 8, 10 p.m. Brotherhood of the Wolf, R -143min Monday, August 26 8, 10 p.m. Tomb Raider, PG-13 101min Tuesday, August 27 8, 10 p.m. Commando, R 90min Wednesday, August 28 8, 10 p.m. Delta Force, R 129min Thursday, August 29 8, 10 p.m. All About The Benjamins, R 109min

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Clean up, or the inspectors will get you Page 12 Friday, August 23, 2002 Go along on a housing inspection at Wind ward Loop with JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Funaro and you might have a better understanding on why your liv ing quarters must meet the standards. The problems we have are that people can be real pigs who like to live in pigpens, said Funaro. No one should have to be forced to live in someone elses filth. Ive gone into houses with a weeks worth of garbage lying around, he said. Ive had people come up to me and ask me to inspect their homes because their roommates are pigs. While Naval Station Housing performs their own inspections on the houses of Wind ward Loop, Funaro prefers to make random inspections himself every week to ensure that people are meeting the standards. Whenever one of the commands wants to do an inspection, we go do one, said Navy Chief Eugene Santorella of Naval Station Housing, who accompanies Funaro during the inspections. Funaro knows what hes looking for, and if he finds a pigpen, he said hell tell the owners to clean it up and he will come back in a week to re-inspect it. If its in a condition far below the standard, they must appear in his office and have their house ready for inspection within 24 hours. Such slovenly extremes are rare, said Funaro, but then again, it all depends on which house he sets foot in. Walking into one house, San torella ceremoni ally opens the door and lets loose the battle cry of Housing! to make his presence known. The resi dent of the house snaps to parade rest at the sight of Funaro. Was this floor mopped? Funaro inquires. The sol dier confirms that he just did it ten mikes ago, not even knowing that Funaro was com ing. Going upstairs, Funaro and Santorella find unmade racks and rooms that look like a tornado blew through. Those unmade beds really look bad, cites San torella. Funaro shakes his head at the sight of cloths piled everywhere. Upon entering another homestead, the place is found to be clean and in order. Hang ing on the wall is a cleaning duty roster. All of the beds are made, save one. Even with that one unmade bed, the house still looked good, said Santorella. How hard is it to make your rack? pon ders Funaro. Approaching another house, Santorella points out that both males and females can be equally jacked up when it comes to the cleanliness of a home. Funaro agrees, and wants to visit one of the cleaner houses on the loop, which as it hap pens is occupied by females. Santorella opens the door. The word Housing! cuts through the air like a hot knife through butter. Sensing something is amiss, he rushes in and heads right for the back door, which is wide open. A strong gust of wind enters and begins blowing the cur tains around. Santorella enters the back yard; the gate is swung open as well. He comes back and looks at Funaro. Someone was just here, and they bolted, he said. Think about it, the room is cold from the air conditioner. If that door was open the whole time, the room would be much warmer. Funaro doesnt discount the possibility. This sort of thing has happened before, he said. Yet despite the mystery surrounding this house, it is pretty squared away. People think they know when I come around, but Im a sneaky guy, said Funaro. In another house, an eclectic array of halfeaten food items and empty bottles are strewn about. Theres no need for that, said Funaro. Theres no reason why people have to leave food out or empty bottles. That stuff is going to start to smell and bring bugs. And let me tell you, roach infestation is a serious prob lem. People also have to take the garbage out first thing in the morning, said Santorella. The exterminators are here doing 15 houses a week because of ants and roaches. And once roaches get into one apartment, you can expect them to show up in others. But it is true that some homes were left in poor shape by the permanent party Navy per sonnel who used to live in the Loop, said San torella. Only since January have the servicemembers of JTF-160 been living in these homes, which can come in many flavors of cleanliness. While one might appear to be squared away save for an unmade rack, another might appear as if the Apocalypse took place in there. After finishing his inspec tions, Funaro was satisfied but not overly impressed with the houses that hed seen. Things looked good this week, but not enough of the houses are meeting the stan dards, he said. So folks, take care of what youve got. If this was a different type of situation or deployment, we wouldnt be living in aban doned housing, said Funaro. The first group that came here was living in GP Mediums. People take things for granted. Instead of these houses you could be in some barracks or tents. With that in mind, Funaro wants to make it clear to those who live in their own filth and never pick up a mop that they better Get it cleaned up, because Ill be back. Story and photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire What is that, dog food? asks JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Funaro as he inspects an unemptied trash can during his weekly random house inspections at Windward Loop. Ive seen that stuff before, said Navy Chief Eugene Santorella, Naval Station Housing. Its Hamburger Helper, extra chunky! myself. We were all good friends of Tom, and were deeply saddened by his loss, Wentworth said. Butlers life was filled with fire and water. A firefighter with Squad one in Brooklyn, N.Y., a part-time bay constable in Smithtown, N.Y., and a Navy GM3. His life was dedicated to serving and protecting others. Tom was a great guy. He was very quickwitted. As a sailor, he was completely squared away, Wentworth said. It is hard to explain just how much he is missed on this deploy ment. His death justifies our mission here. At least for me; it gives me a purpose for being here, he said. The mission of the MIUWU here is sur veillance and defense. We defend our assets, and during this operation, Guantanamo Bay and all that inhabit it are our assets, said Navy Cmdr. Sheldon D. Stuchell, commanding officer of MIUWU 204. Since Toms passing Ive spoken to his wife often. Shes hanging in there, though she misses him terribly, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Tra cie M. Smith-Yeoman. His wife, Martha Butler, described him as the epitome of the laid-back man in a New York Times article published in January. He was my rock. We would get bills and they would give me ulcers, and hed say dont worry about it, the bills will be there tomor row, she said. Butler, proud father of Sean, Kelly, and Patrick, was 37 years old on the day he fearlessly rushed into the Twin Towers. Those who served with him will miss his calm, light-hearted pres ence. He was very quiet, but all of a sudden he would come out with zingers that would make everyone laugh, Smith-Yeoman said. Members of MUIWU 204 feel the loss of their fellow servicemem ber and friend everyday due to the cowardly attacks that took place on September 11. Although, they have lost one of their own, they are aware that every Americans life was touched or changed by that day as well. We are going to commemorate Sept. 11 with everyone. It will be a sad, somber day, in which we can all seek comfort in one another, said Stuchell. Although the attacks of Sept. 11 were intended to tear the nation apart, it has only united and strength ened it. As John Adams said in 1776, Through all the gloom I can see the rays of ravishing light and glory. I can see the end is more than worth all the means. And that posterity will triumph. Thomas Butler did not die in vain on Sept. 11; he lost his life as a hero. Remembering him and all those like him reminds us why we are here and how important what we are doing is. It reminds us why we are here the same reason Thomas Butler would have been, but is not. But there are many ways to make the ulti mate sacrifice, and many for whom to make it. He died doing what he absolutely loved, said Wentworth. Being a fireman. Page 5 Friday, August 23, 2002 MIUWU, from page 1 Photo courtesy of MIUWU 204 The Twin Towers of the World Trade Center before the terror attacks that took place on September 11, 2001. Photo courtesy of MIUWU 204 GM3 Thomas Butler, MIUWU 204 and New York firefighter Squad 1. Photo Courtesy of MIUWU 204 GM3 Thomas Butler (far left) and MIUWU 204 unit members and friends in Puerto Rico February 2001. Courtesy of MIUWU 204 GM3 Thomas Butlers New York Fire Dept. unit patch,Squad One, Park Slope, Brooklyn N.Y.

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Bus stop home at last at Camp A Perhaps the ultimate compli ment to the new bus stop at Camp America was that the three SEABEES of Naval Mobile Con struction Battalion 7 still remem bered building it. This was July 25 no, July 21, said BU2 Andrew Sherman. It was supposed to be just a basic bus stop. But I cleared it with operations to get creative, to teach these guys something. So I designed it, and they built it. They SW3 Jason Cle venger and SW3 Ernest Whitney originally built the finest bus stop in the land (Damn right, says Clevenger) to grace the muddy flats near the juncture of Windward Loop and East Car avella, which back in June was the only bus stop in that area. An intricate weave of 2x4s, planks and sturdy posts with the battalions signature BEEP sticker (Battalion Equipment Evaluation Program) wood worked into the floor, the struc ture took the three a week, week and a half, said Whitney, and certainly would have classed up the vicinity. But arriving mem bers of the 418th Transportation Co. were just setting their minds to a complete upgrade of the one thing everybody at GTMO in June seemed eager to complain about the buses and they had different ideas. Originally, this was going to be the one bus stop that served the whole Loop/Caravella area, said Lt. David Hudak, 418th third pla toon leader. But then we added stops to the Loop and Caravella, so we werent using it any more. At the same time, we were increasing the number of stops at Camp America to six, to make it more convenient for the cus tomers that live out here, he said. And being that it gets so hot out here, we wanted to make sure that theres some kind of cover over them while people are waiting. Those twin considerations prompted the 418th to literally pick up the new covered bus stop and move it by forklift to one of the Camp America stops. The front of the camp already had a covered stop. But with the SEABEES whod built it booked solid on other projects through the end of their GTMO term, it was decided that this was a showpiece worth showing. Call it politics, said Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan. This was the best-looking bus stop, so they wanted it to be out front where everyone could see it. So we moved the old one to the back and replaced it. The bus stop project wont stop with appearances. As soon as the arriving SEABEE battalion, MCB 5 out of Port Hueneme, Ca., gets settled in at GTMO, Hudak said hell be working with them to get four more covered bus stops built, one for each of the remaining Camp A stops. In the meantime, Hudak, Ronan, diminutive forklift opera tor Spc. Johnny Best and the rest of the second platoon of the 418th Transportation Co. will satisfy themselves with an improved bus-route system thats become a lot more, well, satisfying. More stops and more buses and better coordination between those buses has meant that customers at Camp America and most anywhere else can expect a bus to come by every 15 minutes to the finest bus stop in the land. The departing SEABEES, meanwhile, are headed back stateside to Gulfport, Miss., this week. And seeing their bus stop become a parting gift to grace the entrance to Camp America proper was just the finishing touch on a satisfying deployment. Id say it was a success, said Sherman. Im happy with the quality of work that was done, and we got a lot of recognition, like being in the Wire a couple of different times, for the first time in a long time. That was nice. Im happy I got to do a lot of different stuff, said Clevenger. We did plumbing at X-Ray, guard towers at Delta, laid con crete. It was great experience. Indeed, the numbers speak for themselves. After 14 guard tow ers, 106 SEAhuts, 10 force-pro tection bunkers, 3 tension fabric structures, 3 water heaters, 3 bul letin boards and yes, 1 fine-look ing bus stop, the leaders of MCB 7 were proud of the six months work done in support of both Joint Task Forces here. It was definitely a successful deployment, summed up Offi cer-in-Charge Lt. Emily Allen. A lot of challenges faced and met. And it was definitely the crew that made it happen. These guys worked hard, agreed AOIC D.D. Fowler. Im proud of what they did here. They know they had a purpose, sup porting Operation Enduring Free dom by doing what they do well. Now all of Camp A knows: that includes building one heck of a bus stop. Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire R to L: SW3 Jason Clevenger, SW3 Ernest Whitney and BU2 Andrew Sherman stop a minute at their -signed masterpiece. Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan directs the bus-stop-moving forklift operated by Spc. Johnny Best. Another satisfied customer boards the Camp A bus from the new stop. Page 11 Friday, August 23, 2002 MORE CAMP A CONVENIENCE: MINI-NEX NOW OPEN 1100-2100 EVERY DAY! Everything you always wanted Page 6 Friday, August 23, 2002 The name is everywhere on buses, bull dozers and those white pickup trucks driving everywhere you turn. The crews are every where cutting your grass, fixing your air conditioning (and your GTMO specials), exterminating your pests and recycling your garbage. The name is Kvaerner, and theyre the builders, welders, electricians, mechanics and all-around mainte nance men that keep Guantanamo Bay and both Joint Task Forces up and running. Weve had the Base Maintenance Service Contract here since 1993, and thats our bread and butter, said Henri Fuentes, Kvaerners Senior Project Manager here and thus the com panys head man on the island. We main tain just about every thing from the buses to the barracks and everything in between, as well as some minor construction. Fuentes knows what a big job that is these days. Originally from Doylestown, Penn., he started out his builders life as a Navy SEABEE with Mobile Construction Battal ion 71 and was stationed here back in 1970, when Guantanamo Bay was an even sleepier town than it is today. I didnt like it much too boring. You could drive down Sherman Avenue in the middle of the day and literally not see another car, he said. And the atmosphere was very tense, not as friendly, mostly because this was when tensions with Cuba were very high. Fuentes made his mark, helping to build 54 Butler huts at Camp Bulkeley and put out side walls on the Windjammer. In 1996 he came back as a civilian to head up Kvaerners branch here (technically called Kvaerner Process Services Inc.), and since then has been in a prime position to witness the slow fall and fast rise of GTMOs world. Weve torn down 200 buildings in the last two or three years alone, he said. The servicemember hous ing and most of the other places that were built in the early s were put into care taker status by the government and essentially aban doned. The GTMO Gazette was down to one page, folded over. Everything was get ting downsized, and there was even talk about closing down the base. All that changed in January when the first detainees from Americas global war on ter ror got their tickets to GTMO. The JTF-160 headquarters used to be the dental office, he said. They had moved out, and by November and December of last year, they had pulled out all the fixtures and were ready to tear the place down. But since the JTFs arrived, theres been a real resurgence. Its refreshing to see this place bustling again. While that resurgence in demand has for the most part been good for the bottom line at the home office back in Oslo, Norway, its also kept Fuentes and his workers here very busy. The arrival of JTF-160 and JTF-170 and their supporting casts has meant that thousands of soldiers needed goods, services, roads and transportation and first and fore most, their offices, facilities and living quar ters brought up to speed. When you guys came, suddenly it was get them all back on line, he said. We worked two weeks around the clock to get all the parts and do all the work on these build ings, he said. Weve seen an influx of all different kinds of vehicles, that require differ ent kinds of parts to fix. And 90 percent of that stuff, we wait for on the barge just like everybody else. Its also meant more jobs for the thirdcountry nationals working for Fuentes and 40 other Americans here. The current workforce of about 400 represents a 20 percent increase since the JTFs arrived in January, and Fuentes plans to hire another 25 percent in the next few months as business continues to bustle. Fuentes said its his workers that deserve the credit for meeting the challenges of the JTF invasion. They make it happen, he said, And they give you their all. About 49 percent of the workers come from Jamaica, 49 percent are from the Philip pines and about 2 percent are from Cuba, Fuentes said. They are screened at home by temp-services companies there, and Fuentes had nothing but praise for his crews. They work hard, they work well, and theyre very loyal, not only to the company but to the U.S, Fuentes said. So many of them are still driving around with American Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Battle of the bulldozers? No, just heavy-duty teamwork as the Kvaerner dozer on the left helps the one on the right scoop up the remains of a demolished bridge near Cooper Field. Big dipper: Kvaerner bulldozer operator Jesse Man alanson levels off a hill near Cooper Field. Kvaerner Senior Project Manager Henri Fuentes explains a job to worker Jesse Manalansan.

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The 239th Military Police Company, known as the Black Sheepof Baton Rouge, was the first Louisiana Army National Guard unit to be placed on active duty since the war on terror began in October. Now its the only guard unit from Louisiana deployed to Guan tanamo Bay, Cuba. Like the other MP companies at Camp America, its role is to provide security at Camp Delta and support the mis sion of JTF-160 through the Joint Detention Operations Group. At the companys headquarters, there is a stuffed black sheeps head hanging by the entrance door and a Louisiana flag flying from the roof of the main office. Proud of his companys mas cot, Capt. Sam Barbera, the units commander, pointed to the black sheep and tried to explain what it represents. Weve adopted this mascot, he said, because for many years, we were what we called a tradi tional unit, not attached to any bat talion. We didnt have all the good equipment back then, he said. But after the events of Sept. 11 and after a successful deployment under Operation Noble Eagle to Fort Polk, La., to provide security for the Army post, the 239th MP Co. was elevated to the top level of readiness. After Operation Noble Eagle, we were the first Louisiana MP unit to be activated for Enduring Freedom as well, said Barbera. With that, the unit gained popu larity and received a lot more attention from the media. We were on all the TV channels and local newspapers, said Barbera. The MP company consists of personnel who have worked in various law enforce ment agencies, rescue units and correctional facilities in Louisiana. Weve got a great deal of law enforce ment, firefighters, EMS, correctional officers, who really came in handy in the preparation to come to GTMO, said Barbera. Once here, motivation took over. Because of what happened on 9/11, a lot of soldiers and civil ians have become more patriotic, said 1st Sgt. Darian Williams, who has worked for the fire department back home as a fire inspector and arson investigator. So being deployed here right now is more a morale thing for us, being able to give back to our country. Overall, our soldiers are han dling the deployment pretty well, he said. Well, theres always the incon venience of being farther away from home. When we were deployed to Fort Polk, we were not that far from home. Whenever we were off duty, we would drop by our house to see our families, said Spc. Jonathon Henson, a security guard at Camp Delta. Although GTMO doesnt offer the comforting location of Fort Polk, the soldiers of the 239th have demonstrated dedication to their work, said Barbera. Barbera, who has been in charge of the company for three years, said that he is very proud of the way his soldiers have been maintaining security on Camp Deltas day shift. The 239th replaced the 401st MP Co., one of the first MP units that were deployed to GTMO. Fortunately, their transition was not as tough as their predecessors, who came to GTMO before the construction of Camp America and Camp Delta. They had a chance to commu nicate with the commanders of the 160th MP Battalion and the 401st as they were getting ready for GTMO. Yet even with all that, it was a fast-paced introduction. When we first got here, it was baptism by fire, said Barbera. The ability of my soldiers to learn fast allowed us to get in the groove of things quickly. I like to say, you give them purpose, motivation and direction, and the rest just falls into place. It helps that most of them have had some kind of prior active duty experience in one of the four branches of service. According to Barbera, one of the units biggest assets was the opportunity to train at Fort Polk with the soldiers of the 519th MP Battalion, which ran the detention facility at Kandahar, Afghanistan. That helped a lot, he said. And we havent lost our momen tum since. To keep morale up and main tain unit integrity, many of the 239ths platoons have had their own barbecues. But Barbera said hes waiting for the visit of the Louisiana National Guards adju tant general to do something big. When he gets here, we gonna have a Louisiana Night at Ricks, said Barbera. We gonna share some of our unique Louisiana cul ture with the people of GTMO. We will have jambalaya, fried fish, shrimp creole, cajun music, Louisiana beer, and we might even have some Po boy sandwiches. That night will get them in the Louisiana mood of Laissez le bon temps rouler! said Barbera in French. In other words, Let the good times roll. There is a lot of unit cohe sion, said Staff Sgt. Roger Christopher, assistant NCOIC for operations. What I like the most is the units common-sense approach to the mission. This is one of the best deployments Ive been on so far. What holds this unit together is not necessarily the excellence of the higher command, but the will ingness, hard work and dedication of all the soldiers to the mission, said Sgt. William Rose, who over sees the daily procedures at Camp Delta regarding the feeding of the detainees and making sure they get enough time for showers and recreation. Henson, who also works at the camp, is a prime example. Ive learned how to use more patience in understanding the detainees when they look at me, he said. You learn with experience. But experience, day after day, can be numbing, and the 239th knows that staying sharp is as important as sharpening skills. I know what I am doing here is extremely patriotic, Rose said. However, it wears on you. I have to keep my eyes focused on my task. The worst enemy in this camp is complacency. The soldiers of the 239th MP Co. gather for a picture after finishing their shift. Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Page 10 Friday, August 23, 2002 Sgt. William Rose and Spc. Jonathon Henson of the 239th MP Co. 239th MPs: Louisianas black sheep Capt. Sam Barbera, 239th commander flags flying from their trucks. While the Kvaerner crews might not make as much as someone doing similar work in the U.S., the relativity of global economics means theyre also often the breadwinners for their families back home. You ask them, dont you want a day off? said Kvaerner Production Control Man ager Reggi Drake, and they tell you, Im here for one reason to work. Many of them have not only wives and children theyre supporting but aunts and uncles and cousins and parents. And what they make here is great compared to what they could make back home, if they find work at all. As the detention operation continues to hum along and GTMO continues to mature into a well-populated (relatively speaking) military-civilian community, the service members deployed or stationed here will be seeing more and more of those white-hard hat-clad construction crews, more landscap ing and grass-cutting crews with t-shirts shielding them from the GTMO sun. And yes, more traffic stoppage along Sher man Ave. as the general upgrading of GTMO continues apace. Ask Fuentes what major projects his men are working on these days and in the months to come, and he shakes his head wearily. The work along Sherman right now is a joint project between us and our main sub contractor, Radcliffe Construction Inc., Fuentes said. Its a base-wide thing to replace all the pipes and upgrade the water lines. Some of those pipes are 50, 60, 80 years old in some spots, theyre so rotted out the pipe is just the hole in the ground where the pipe used to be. One thing we just finished up is the base-wide siren system, for threat warnings and hurri canes that hasnt been operational for years. Were clear ing out the drainage ditches, like around Cooper Field, so that if the hurri canes hit hard the floodwater will get pulled off into the bay. And Tierra Cay that empty hous ing out by Migrant Ops were bringing that back to life. One other upcoming project, slated for September and October, that should make a certain group of troops very happy a total renovation of the shower and toilet facilities at Camp America. Well be taking it one building at a time, painting, putting in new lighting, building individual shower stalls, putting in new toilets with seats, Fuentes said. Weve already gotten rid of the pushbuttons on the showers out there and put tra ditional handles so that the waters not on a timer the next step will be putting in new mixing valves and fixtures so that the show ers look and work just like the ones at Wind ward Loop or anywhere else. So the boom that began in January shows no signs of slowing. But working for the JTFs also has its downs most of them having to do with tightened security, high-tech gadgetry and all the headaches that go with them. No matter how much we stock, JTF 160 and 170 can always figure out some part that we dont have on the shelf and then demand it right away, Fuentes joked. Weve got $2 million in stock and its never enough. And then theres the security atmosphere that accompanies all things detainee. It can be frustrating. Theres so much work, all you want to do is get in and get the job done. And youve got to wait to get past the security. And then theres the maintenance of places like Camp Delta. We wanted the blueprints to the electricity and so forth so we could maintain it more efficiently, he recalled. But of course they couldnt release them. Finally they told us theyd just black out the high-security details. So they gave us a copy, Fuentes said, and all that was left was the two outer fences. Everything else was black. But those are little frustrations, Fuentes said. All in all, hes happy with his workforce, happy to be back at GTMO with Kvaerner, and happy to be working for the Joint Task Forces. And not just because of the increased business. It makes you feel like theres a purpose of being here, he said. You can feel the patri otism. You feel like youre part of what theyre doing. Even though Im not in the military any more, I feel like Im a part of the war on ter ror, helping the troops here whether its in their job or in their quality of life. Even if youre just fixing somebodys air conditioner, youre helping them do their mission. Kvaerner welder Angelo Esquerra fixes a garage door on the HAZMAT building while fellow crew member Ramil Magtoto assists. Page 7 Friday, August 23, 2002 to know about Kvaerner but... Kevin Reed, a worker with Kvaerners main subcon tractor, Radcliffe Construction Inc., temporarily halts westbound traffic on Sherman Ave. Workers with Radclife Construction Inc., Kvaerners main subcontractor, trim a new water pipe for instal lation in a joint project along Sherman Avenue.

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, August 23, 2002 Troops cant complete the mission without fuel, and its up to the galleys of Guantanamo Bay to see that they are well fed. Take Naval Hospital Galley, Camp Americas Seaside Galley and the Quick Hall Naval Galley at Marine Hill, the Windward sides finest. Each offers a different eating experience with a common goal in mind: well-balanced meals, which lead to well-balanced servicemembers, who in turn lead to missions well done. With offerings ranging from fully loaded omelettes for breakfast at the Naval Hospital Galley to the exquisite lunchtime salad bar at Marine Hills Quick Hall, to perfectly prepared Reuben sandwiches at the Seaside Galley for dinner, servicemembers all over the base can fulfill a variety of appetites at a variety of convivial eating-places. But being able to provide an array of tastebud-tantalizing entrees for servicemembers to devour is no simple task. Given that everyone has different tastes, the contract work ers and servicemembers who operate these galleys must be ready to provide a beefy variety of dishes to suit the tastes of the masses. Their work is hard and exacting, but it pays off to them when they see you bite into a well-garnished cheese burger and a smile explodes across your face. So the next time youre off to chow, it doesnt matter where, because all three of the Windward galleys are here to make sure your stomach is well filled. That way youre missionready until the next mealtime comes around. You work hard; you deserve to eat hard. The galleys of GTMO are here to see that your meal goes down easy. Denville G. Mann slices into his freshly baked bread (made from his own secret recipe) at the Naval Hos pital Galley. Mann claims that people come from all around the world to have a taste of his sweet loaf. Three chow halls, one single mission James Govan, the supervisor of the Quick Hall Naval Station Galley at Marine Hill, maintains the salad bar to the highest standard. Govan states his salad bar is by far the best here on Guantanamo Bay. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Nickolaus B. Lewis from the Naval Hospital Galley, having not made an omlette in three years, comes out of his retirement. The highly trained workers from Atlantic Coast Contractors proudly serve all of the mouth-watering, well-balanced, nutritional and above all else delicious meals at the Seaside Galley at Camp America. Servicemembers from all around the base eagerly await with bated breath for the Quick Hall Naval Station Galley at Marine Hill to open its doors for lunch. Behold! The majestic interior scenery of the Seaside Galley at Camp America helps to make the food taste that much better. Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, August 23, 2002 Troops cant complete the mission without fuel, and its up to the galleys of Guantanamo Bay to see that they are well fed. Take Naval Hospital Galley, Camp Americas Seaside Galley and the Quick Hall Naval Galley at Marine Hill, the Windward sides finest. Each offers a different eating experience with a common goal in mind: well-balanced meals, which lead to well-balanced servicemembers, who in turn lead to missions well done. With offerings ranging from fully loaded omelettes for breakfast at the Naval Hospital Galley to the exquisite lunchtime salad bar at Marine Hills Quick Hall, to perfectly prepared Reuben sandwiches at the Seaside Galley for dinner, servicemembers all over the base can fulfill a variety of appetites at a variety of convivial eating-places. But being able to provide an array of tastebud-tantalizing entrees for servicemembers to devour is no simple task. Given that everyone has different tastes, the contract work ers and servicemembers who operate these galleys must be ready to provide a beefy variety of dishes to suit the tastes of the masses. Their work is hard and exacting, but it pays off to them when they see you bite into a well-garnished cheese burger and a smile explodes across your face. So the next time youre off to chow, it doesnt matter where, because all three of the Windward galleys are here to make sure your stomach is well filled. That way youre missionready until the next mealtime comes around. You work hard; you deserve to eat hard. The galleys of GTMO are here to see that your meal goes down easy. Denville G. Mann slices into his freshly baked bread (made from his own secret recipe) at the Naval Hos pital Galley. Mann claims that people come from all around the world to have a taste of his sweet loaf. Three chow halls, one single mission James Govan, the supervisor of the Quick Hall Naval Station Galley at Marine Hill, maintains the salad bar to the highest standard. Govan states his salad bar is by far the best here on Guantanamo Bay. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Nickolaus B. Lewis from the Naval Hospital Galley, having not made an omlette in three years, comes out of his retirement. The highly trained workers from Atlantic Coast Contractors proudly serve all of the mouth-watering, well-balanced, nutritional and above all else delicious meals at the Seaside Galley at Camp America. Servicemembers from all around the base eagerly await with bated breath for the Quick Hall Naval Station Galley at Marine Hill to open its doors for lunch. Behold! The majestic interior scenery of the Seaside Galley at Camp America helps to make the food taste that much better. Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire

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The 239th Military Police Company, known as the Black Sheepof Baton Rouge, was the first Louisiana Army National Guard unit to be placed on active duty since the war on terror began in October. Now its the only guard unit from Louisiana deployed to Guan tanamo Bay, Cuba. Like the other MP companies at Camp America, its role is to provide security at Camp Delta and support the mis sion of JTF-160 through the Joint Detention Operations Group. At the companys headquarters, there is a stuffed black sheeps head hanging by the entrance door and a Louisiana flag flying from the roof of the main office. Proud of his companys mas cot, Capt. Sam Barbera, the units commander, pointed to the black sheep and tried to explain what it represents. Weve adopted this mascot, he said, because for many years, we were what we called a tradi tional unit, not attached to any bat talion. We didnt have all the good equipment back then, he said. But after the events of Sept. 11 and after a successful deployment under Operation Noble Eagle to Fort Polk, La., to provide security for the Army post, the 239th MP Co. was elevated to the top level of readiness. After Operation Noble Eagle, we were the first Louisiana MP unit to be activated for Enduring Freedom as well, said Barbera. With that, the unit gained popu larity and received a lot more attention from the media. We were on all the TV channels and local newspapers, said Barbera. The MP company consists of personnel who have worked in various law enforce ment agencies, rescue units and correctional facilities in Louisiana. Weve got a great deal of law enforce ment, firefighters, EMS, correctional officers, who really came in handy in the preparation to come to GTMO, said Barbera. Once here, motivation took over. Because of what happened on 9/11, a lot of soldiers and civil ians have become more patriotic, said 1st Sgt. Darian Williams, who has worked for the fire department back home as a fire inspector and arson investigator. So being deployed here right now is more a morale thing for us, being able to give back to our country. Overall, our soldiers are han dling the deployment pretty well, he said. Well, theres always the incon venience of being farther away from home. When we were deployed to Fort Polk, we were not that far from home. Whenever we were off duty, we would drop by our house to see our families, said Spc. Jonathon Henson, a security guard at Camp Delta. Although GTMO doesnt offer the comforting location of Fort Polk, the soldiers of the 239th have demonstrated dedication to their work, said Barbera. Barbera, who has been in charge of the company for three years, said that he is very proud of the way his soldiers have been maintaining security on Camp Deltas day shift. The 239th replaced the 401st MP Co., one of the first MP units that were deployed to GTMO. Fortunately, their transition was not as tough as their predecessors, who came to GTMO before the construction of Camp America and Camp Delta. They had a chance to commu nicate with the commanders of the 160th MP Battalion and the 401st as they were getting ready for GTMO. Yet even with all that, it was a fast-paced introduction. When we first got here, it was baptism by fire, said Barbera. The ability of my soldiers to learn fast allowed us to get in the groove of things quickly. I like to say, you give them purpose, motivation and direction, and the rest just falls into place. It helps that most of them have had some kind of prior active duty experience in one of the four branches of service. According to Barbera, one of the units biggest assets was the opportunity to train at Fort Polk with the soldiers of the 519th MP Battalion, which ran the detention facility at Kandahar, Afghanistan. That helped a lot, he said. And we havent lost our momen tum since. To keep morale up and main tain unit integrity, many of the 239ths platoons have had their own barbecues. But Barbera said hes waiting for the visit of the Louisiana National Guards adju tant general to do something big. When he gets here, we gonna have a Louisiana Night at Ricks, said Barbera. We gonna share some of our unique Louisiana cul ture with the people of GTMO. We will have jambalaya, fried fish, shrimp creole, cajun music, Louisiana beer, and we might even have some Po boy sandwiches. That night will get them in the Louisiana mood of Laissez le bon temps rouler! said Barbera in French. In other words, Let the good times roll. There is a lot of unit cohe sion, said Staff Sgt. Roger Christopher, assistant NCOIC for operations. What I like the most is the units common-sense approach to the mission. This is one of the best deployments Ive been on so far. What holds this unit together is not necessarily the excellence of the higher command, but the will ingness, hard work and dedication of all the soldiers to the mission, said Sgt. William Rose, who over sees the daily procedures at Camp Delta regarding the feeding of the detainees and making sure they get enough time for showers and recreation. Henson, who also works at the camp, is a prime example. Ive learned how to use more patience in understanding the detainees when they look at me, he said. You learn with experience. But experience, day after day, can be numbing, and the 239th knows that staying sharp is as important as sharpening skills. I know what I am doing here is extremely patriotic, Rose said. However, it wears on you. I have to keep my eyes focused on my task. The worst enemy in this camp is complacency. The soldiers of the 239th MP Co. gather for a picture after finishing their shift. Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Page 10 Friday, August 23, 2002 Sgt. William Rose and Spc. Jonathon Henson of the 239th MP Co. 239th MPs: Louisianas black sheep Capt. Sam Barbera, 239th commander flags flying from their trucks. While the Kvaerner crews might not make as much as someone doing similar work in the U.S., the relativity of global economics means theyre also often the breadwinners for their families back home. You ask them, dont you want a day off? said Kvaerner Production Control Man ager Reggi Drake, and they tell you, Im here for one reason to work. Many of them have not only wives and children theyre supporting but aunts and uncles and cousins and parents. And what they make here is great compared to what they could make back home, if they find work at all. As the detention operation continues to hum along and GTMO continues to mature into a well-populated (relatively speaking) military-civilian community, the service members deployed or stationed here will be seeing more and more of those white-hard hat-clad construction crews, more landscap ing and grass-cutting crews with t-shirts shielding them from the GTMO sun. And yes, more traffic stoppage along Sher man Ave. as the general upgrading of GTMO continues apace. Ask Fuentes what major projects his men are working on these days and in the months to come, and he shakes his head wearily. The work along Sherman right now is a joint project between us and our main sub contractor, Radcliffe Construction Inc., Fuentes said. Its a base-wide thing to replace all the pipes and upgrade the water lines. Some of those pipes are 50, 60, 80 years old in some spots, theyre so rotted out the pipe is just the hole in the ground where the pipe used to be. One thing we just finished up is the base-wide siren system, for threat warnings and hurri canes that hasnt been operational for years. Were clear ing out the drainage ditches, like around Cooper Field, so that if the hurri canes hit hard the floodwater will get pulled off into the bay. And Tierra Cay that empty hous ing out by Migrant Ops were bringing that back to life. One other upcoming project, slated for September and October, that should make a certain group of troops very happy a total renovation of the shower and toilet facilities at Camp America. Well be taking it one building at a time, painting, putting in new lighting, building individual shower stalls, putting in new toilets with seats, Fuentes said. Weve already gotten rid of the pushbuttons on the showers out there and put tra ditional handles so that the waters not on a timer the next step will be putting in new mixing valves and fixtures so that the show ers look and work just like the ones at Wind ward Loop or anywhere else. So the boom that began in January shows no signs of slowing. But working for the JTFs also has its downs most of them having to do with tightened security, high-tech gadgetry and all the headaches that go with them. No matter how much we stock, JTF 160 and 170 can always figure out some part that we dont have on the shelf and then demand it right away, Fuentes joked. Weve got $2 million in stock and its never enough. And then theres the security atmosphere that accompanies all things detainee. It can be frustrating. Theres so much work, all you want to do is get in and get the job done. And youve got to wait to get past the security. And then theres the maintenance of places like Camp Delta. We wanted the blueprints to the electricity and so forth so we could maintain it more efficiently, he recalled. But of course they couldnt release them. Finally they told us theyd just black out the high-security details. So they gave us a copy, Fuentes said, and all that was left was the two outer fences. Everything else was black. But those are little frustrations, Fuentes said. All in all, hes happy with his workforce, happy to be back at GTMO with Kvaerner, and happy to be working for the Joint Task Forces. And not just because of the increased business. It makes you feel like theres a purpose of being here, he said. You can feel the patri otism. You feel like youre part of what theyre doing. Even though Im not in the military any more, I feel like Im a part of the war on ter ror, helping the troops here whether its in their job or in their quality of life. Even if youre just fixing somebodys air conditioner, youre helping them do their mission. Kvaerner welder Angelo Esquerra fixes a garage door on the HAZMAT building while fellow crew member Ramil Magtoto assists. Page 7 Friday, August 23, 2002 to know about Kvaerner but... Kevin Reed, a worker with Kvaerners main subcon tractor, Radcliffe Construction Inc., temporarily halts westbound traffic on Sherman Ave. Workers with Radclife Construction Inc., Kvaerners main subcontractor, trim a new water pipe for instal lation in a joint project along Sherman Avenue.

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Bus stop home at last at Camp A Perhaps the ultimate compli ment to the new bus stop at Camp America was that the three SEABEES of Naval Mobile Con struction Battalion 7 still remem bered building it. This was July 25 no, July 21, said BU2 Andrew Sherman. It was supposed to be just a basic bus stop. But I cleared it with operations to get creative, to teach these guys something. So I designed it, and they built it. They SW3 Jason Cle venger and SW3 Ernest Whitney originally built the finest bus stop in the land (Damn right, says Clevenger) to grace the muddy flats near the juncture of Windward Loop and East Car avella, which back in June was the only bus stop in that area. An intricate weave of 2x4s, planks and sturdy posts with the battalions signature BEEP sticker (Battalion Equipment Evaluation Program) wood worked into the floor, the struc ture took the three a week, week and a half, said Whitney, and certainly would have classed up the vicinity. But arriving mem bers of the 418th Transportation Co. were just setting their minds to a complete upgrade of the one thing everybody at GTMO in June seemed eager to complain about the buses and they had different ideas. Originally, this was going to be the one bus stop that served the whole Loop/Caravella area, said Lt. David Hudak, 418th third pla toon leader. But then we added stops to the Loop and Caravella, so we werent using it any more. At the same time, we were increasing the number of stops at Camp America to six, to make it more convenient for the cus tomers that live out here, he said. And being that it gets so hot out here, we wanted to make sure that theres some kind of cover over them while people are waiting. Those twin considerations prompted the 418th to literally pick up the new covered bus stop and move it by forklift to one of the Camp America stops. The front of the camp already had a covered stop. But with the SEABEES whod built it booked solid on other projects through the end of their GTMO term, it was decided that this was a showpiece worth showing. Call it politics, said Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan. This was the best-looking bus stop, so they wanted it to be out front where everyone could see it. So we moved the old one to the back and replaced it. The bus stop project wont stop with appearances. As soon as the arriving SEABEE battalion, MCB 5 out of Port Hueneme, Ca., gets settled in at GTMO, Hudak said hell be working with them to get four more covered bus stops built, one for each of the remaining Camp A stops. In the meantime, Hudak, Ronan, diminutive forklift opera tor Spc. Johnny Best and the rest of the second platoon of the 418th Transportation Co. will satisfy themselves with an improved bus-route system thats become a lot more, well, satisfying. More stops and more buses and better coordination between those buses has meant that customers at Camp America and most anywhere else can expect a bus to come by every 15 minutes to the finest bus stop in the land. The departing SEABEES, meanwhile, are headed back stateside to Gulfport, Miss., this week. And seeing their bus stop become a parting gift to grace the entrance to Camp America proper was just the finishing touch on a satisfying deployment. Id say it was a success, said Sherman. Im happy with the quality of work that was done, and we got a lot of recognition, like being in the Wire a couple of different times, for the first time in a long time. That was nice. Im happy I got to do a lot of different stuff, said Clevenger. We did plumbing at X-Ray, guard towers at Delta, laid con crete. It was great experience. Indeed, the numbers speak for themselves. After 14 guard tow ers, 106 SEAhuts, 10 force-pro tection bunkers, 3 tension fabric structures, 3 water heaters, 3 bul letin boards and yes, 1 fine-look ing bus stop, the leaders of MCB 7 were proud of the six months work done in support of both Joint Task Forces here. It was definitely a successful deployment, summed up Offi cer-in-Charge Lt. Emily Allen. A lot of challenges faced and met. And it was definitely the crew that made it happen. These guys worked hard, agreed AOIC D.D. Fowler. Im proud of what they did here. They know they had a purpose, sup porting Operation Enduring Free dom by doing what they do well. Now all of Camp A knows: that includes building one heck of a bus stop. Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire R to L: SW3 Jason Clevenger, SW3 Ernest Whitney and BU2 Andrew Sherman stop a minute at their -signed masterpiece. Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan directs the bus-stop-moving forklift operated by Spc. Johnny Best. Another satisfied customer boards the Camp A bus from the new stop. Page 11 Friday, August 23, 2002 MORE CAMP A CONVENIENCE: MINI-NEX NOW OPEN 1100-2100 EVERY DAY! Everything you always wanted Page 6 Friday, August 23, 2002 The name is everywhere on buses, bull dozers and those white pickup trucks driving everywhere you turn. The crews are every where cutting your grass, fixing your air conditioning (and your GTMO specials), exterminating your pests and recycling your garbage. The name is Kvaerner, and theyre the builders, welders, electricians, mechanics and all-around mainte nance men that keep Guantanamo Bay and both Joint Task Forces up and running. Weve had the Base Maintenance Service Contract here since 1993, and thats our bread and butter, said Henri Fuentes, Kvaerners Senior Project Manager here and thus the com panys head man on the island. We main tain just about every thing from the buses to the barracks and everything in between, as well as some minor construction. Fuentes knows what a big job that is these days. Originally from Doylestown, Penn., he started out his builders life as a Navy SEABEE with Mobile Construction Battal ion 71 and was stationed here back in 1970, when Guantanamo Bay was an even sleepier town than it is today. I didnt like it much too boring. You could drive down Sherman Avenue in the middle of the day and literally not see another car, he said. And the atmosphere was very tense, not as friendly, mostly because this was when tensions with Cuba were very high. Fuentes made his mark, helping to build 54 Butler huts at Camp Bulkeley and put out side walls on the Windjammer. In 1996 he came back as a civilian to head up Kvaerners branch here (technically called Kvaerner Process Services Inc.), and since then has been in a prime position to witness the slow fall and fast rise of GTMOs world. Weve torn down 200 buildings in the last two or three years alone, he said. The servicemember hous ing and most of the other places that were built in the early s were put into care taker status by the government and essentially aban doned. The GTMO Gazette was down to one page, folded over. Everything was get ting downsized, and there was even talk about closing down the base. All that changed in January when the first detainees from Americas global war on ter ror got their tickets to GTMO. The JTF-160 headquarters used to be the dental office, he said. They had moved out, and by November and December of last year, they had pulled out all the fixtures and were ready to tear the place down. But since the JTFs arrived, theres been a real resurgence. Its refreshing to see this place bustling again. While that resurgence in demand has for the most part been good for the bottom line at the home office back in Oslo, Norway, its also kept Fuentes and his workers here very busy. The arrival of JTF-160 and JTF-170 and their supporting casts has meant that thousands of soldiers needed goods, services, roads and transportation and first and fore most, their offices, facilities and living quar ters brought up to speed. When you guys came, suddenly it was get them all back on line, he said. We worked two weeks around the clock to get all the parts and do all the work on these build ings, he said. Weve seen an influx of all different kinds of vehicles, that require differ ent kinds of parts to fix. And 90 percent of that stuff, we wait for on the barge just like everybody else. Its also meant more jobs for the thirdcountry nationals working for Fuentes and 40 other Americans here. The current workforce of about 400 represents a 20 percent increase since the JTFs arrived in January, and Fuentes plans to hire another 25 percent in the next few months as business continues to bustle. Fuentes said its his workers that deserve the credit for meeting the challenges of the JTF invasion. They make it happen, he said, And they give you their all. About 49 percent of the workers come from Jamaica, 49 percent are from the Philip pines and about 2 percent are from Cuba, Fuentes said. They are screened at home by temp-services companies there, and Fuentes had nothing but praise for his crews. They work hard, they work well, and theyre very loyal, not only to the company but to the U.S, Fuentes said. So many of them are still driving around with American Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Battle of the bulldozers? No, just heavy-duty teamwork as the Kvaerner dozer on the left helps the one on the right scoop up the remains of a demolished bridge near Cooper Field. Big dipper: Kvaerner bulldozer operator Jesse Man alanson levels off a hill near Cooper Field. Kvaerner Senior Project Manager Henri Fuentes explains a job to worker Jesse Manalansan.

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Clean up, or the inspectors will get you Page 12 Friday, August 23, 2002 Go along on a housing inspection at Wind ward Loop with JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Funaro and you might have a better understanding on why your liv ing quarters must meet the standards. The problems we have are that people can be real pigs who like to live in pigpens, said Funaro. No one should have to be forced to live in someone elses filth. Ive gone into houses with a weeks worth of garbage lying around, he said. Ive had people come up to me and ask me to inspect their homes because their roommates are pigs. While Naval Station Housing performs their own inspections on the houses of Wind ward Loop, Funaro prefers to make random inspections himself every week to ensure that people are meeting the standards. Whenever one of the commands wants to do an inspection, we go do one, said Navy Chief Eugene Santorella of Naval Station Housing, who accompanies Funaro during the inspections. Funaro knows what hes looking for, and if he finds a pigpen, he said hell tell the owners to clean it up and he will come back in a week to re-inspect it. If its in a condition far below the standard, they must appear in his office and have their house ready for inspection within 24 hours. Such slovenly extremes are rare, said Funaro, but then again, it all depends on which house he sets foot in. Walking into one house, San torella ceremoni ally opens the door and lets loose the battle cry of Housing! to make his presence known. The resi dent of the house snaps to parade rest at the sight of Funaro. Was this floor mopped? Funaro inquires. The sol dier confirms that he just did it ten mikes ago, not even knowing that Funaro was com ing. Going upstairs, Funaro and Santorella find unmade racks and rooms that look like a tornado blew through. Those unmade beds really look bad, cites San torella. Funaro shakes his head at the sight of cloths piled everywhere. Upon entering another homestead, the place is found to be clean and in order. Hang ing on the wall is a cleaning duty roster. All of the beds are made, save one. Even with that one unmade bed, the house still looked good, said Santorella. How hard is it to make your rack? pon ders Funaro. Approaching another house, Santorella points out that both males and females can be equally jacked up when it comes to the cleanliness of a home. Funaro agrees, and wants to visit one of the cleaner houses on the loop, which as it hap pens is occupied by females. Santorella opens the door. The word Housing! cuts through the air like a hot knife through butter. Sensing something is amiss, he rushes in and heads right for the back door, which is wide open. A strong gust of wind enters and begins blowing the cur tains around. Santorella enters the back yard; the gate is swung open as well. He comes back and looks at Funaro. Someone was just here, and they bolted, he said. Think about it, the room is cold from the air conditioner. If that door was open the whole time, the room would be much warmer. Funaro doesnt discount the possibility. This sort of thing has happened before, he said. Yet despite the mystery surrounding this house, it is pretty squared away. People think they know when I come around, but Im a sneaky guy, said Funaro. In another house, an eclectic array of halfeaten food items and empty bottles are strewn about. Theres no need for that, said Funaro. Theres no reason why people have to leave food out or empty bottles. That stuff is going to start to smell and bring bugs. And let me tell you, roach infestation is a serious prob lem. People also have to take the garbage out first thing in the morning, said Santorella. The exterminators are here doing 15 houses a week because of ants and roaches. And once roaches get into one apartment, you can expect them to show up in others. But it is true that some homes were left in poor shape by the permanent party Navy per sonnel who used to live in the Loop, said San torella. Only since January have the servicemembers of JTF-160 been living in these homes, which can come in many flavors of cleanliness. While one might appear to be squared away save for an unmade rack, another might appear as if the Apocalypse took place in there. After finishing his inspec tions, Funaro was satisfied but not overly impressed with the houses that hed seen. Things looked good this week, but not enough of the houses are meeting the stan dards, he said. So folks, take care of what youve got. If this was a different type of situation or deployment, we wouldnt be living in aban doned housing, said Funaro. The first group that came here was living in GP Mediums. People take things for granted. Instead of these houses you could be in some barracks or tents. With that in mind, Funaro wants to make it clear to those who live in their own filth and never pick up a mop that they better Get it cleaned up, because Ill be back. Story and photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire What is that, dog food? asks JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Funaro as he inspects an unemptied trash can during his weekly random house inspections at Windward Loop. Ive seen that stuff before, said Navy Chief Eugene Santorella, Naval Station Housing. Its Hamburger Helper, extra chunky! myself. We were all good friends of Tom, and were deeply saddened by his loss, Wentworth said. Butlers life was filled with fire and water. A firefighter with Squad one in Brooklyn, N.Y., a part-time bay constable in Smithtown, N.Y., and a Navy GM3. His life was dedicated to serving and protecting others. Tom was a great guy. He was very quickwitted. As a sailor, he was completely squared away, Wentworth said. It is hard to explain just how much he is missed on this deploy ment. His death justifies our mission here. At least for me; it gives me a purpose for being here, he said. The mission of the MIUWU here is sur veillance and defense. We defend our assets, and during this operation, Guantanamo Bay and all that inhabit it are our assets, said Navy Cmdr. Sheldon D. Stuchell, commanding officer of MIUWU 204. Since Toms passing Ive spoken to his wife often. Shes hanging in there, though she misses him terribly, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Tra cie M. Smith-Yeoman. His wife, Martha Butler, described him as the epitome of the laid-back man in a New York Times article published in January. He was my rock. We would get bills and they would give me ulcers, and hed say dont worry about it, the bills will be there tomor row, she said. Butler, proud father of Sean, Kelly, and Patrick, was 37 years old on the day he fearlessly rushed into the Twin Towers. Those who served with him will miss his calm, light-hearted pres ence. He was very quiet, but all of a sudden he would come out with zingers that would make everyone laugh, Smith-Yeoman said. Members of MUIWU 204 feel the loss of their fellow servicemem ber and friend everyday due to the cowardly attacks that took place on September 11. Although, they have lost one of their own, they are aware that every Americans life was touched or changed by that day as well. We are going to commemorate Sept. 11 with everyone. It will be a sad, somber day, in which we can all seek comfort in one another, said Stuchell. Although the attacks of Sept. 11 were intended to tear the nation apart, it has only united and strength ened it. As John Adams said in 1776, Through all the gloom I can see the rays of ravishing light and glory. I can see the end is more than worth all the means. And that posterity will triumph. Thomas Butler did not die in vain on Sept. 11; he lost his life as a hero. Remembering him and all those like him reminds us why we are here and how important what we are doing is. It reminds us why we are here the same reason Thomas Butler would have been, but is not. But there are many ways to make the ulti mate sacrifice, and many for whom to make it. He died doing what he absolutely loved, said Wentworth. Being a fireman. Page 5 Friday, August 23, 2002 MIUWU, from page 1 Photo courtesy of MIUWU 204 The Twin Towers of the World Trade Center before the terror attacks that took place on September 11, 2001. Photo courtesy of MIUWU 204 GM3 Thomas Butler, MIUWU 204 and New York firefighter Squad 1. Photo Courtesy of MIUWU 204 GM3 Thomas Butler (far left) and MIUWU 204 unit members and friends in Puerto Rico February 2001. Courtesy of MIUWU 204 GM3 Thomas Butlers New York Fire Dept. unit patch,Squad One, Park Slope, Brooklyn N.Y.

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Page 4 Friday, August 23, 2002 This weeks question: Where do you think Osama bin hiding? Spc. Reggie Gokey, 571st MP Co. He could be hiding in America somewhere, scoping out the scene. Maybe he even shaved off that crazy beard. Spc. Ron Coen 178th MP Co. Id say hes some where in Pakistan. It seems like a likely spot, given that guys beard would help him to fit in. Pfc. Jennifer Doebel, 571st MP Co. It doesnt matter where he is, eventually hes going to get caught. Even if hes working back in the States. Staff Sgt. Patrick Eggert, 342nd MP Co. With as much money and power as he has, he can be anywhere. But Id be willing to bet hes straddling along the Pakistani border. Spc. Kim Shavers, 114th MP Co. He might be on some tropical island somewhere drinking daquiris. Hes proba bly sporting some dreadlocks. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Hard work will make you tired Army Pfc. Ted Lachner, 602nd Maintenance Co., fixing a flat, skillfully extracts the rim from a 11 by 20 tire which belongs to a five ton truck. Due to the tremendous size of these types of tires, a lot of strength and sweatng must result from such hard work, making the soldiers who toil away on them just as worn out as some of the tires themselves. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Across 1 Baths 5 Island 9 Assistant 13 U.S. Department of Agriculture 14 Type of missile 15 Longitudinal 16 Vilify 17 Heroic tale 18 Tinkle 19 Happy 21 Particle 23 Flightless bird 24 Headed 25 Sound of leaves 29 Distress call 30 Roman garments 32 That man 33 A vacation (2 wds.) 36 Knobby 37 Arbiter 38 Point 39 Wodden projection 40 Clench your teeth 41 Downtown 42 In more pain 43 Piquant 44 Conger 45 Tails 46 Perch 47 Fancy 49 Blemish 50 Owns 53 Rinse 55 Snobbish 57 Cavity 60 Land measurement 62 Fairy tale opener 63 Prostrate 64 On top 65 Movie star 66 Made music 67 Crave 68 Stringed instrument Down 1 Lunge 2 Sacred poem 3 Adios 4 Sold at a discount 5 Releases 6 Burn with hot liquid 7 Drag 8 Cheese 9 Wheel holders 10 Caesars three 11 Newsman Rather 12 Moose relative 15 Veritable 20 Dud 22 Piano-like instrument 26 Before Fri. 27 Confine 28 Hollow 29 Sextet 30 Sounds 31 Aroma 33 Was sore 34 Not as false 35 Shekel 36 Smart person 39 Frozen pizza brand 40 Comprehend 42 Bun topping 43 Baked pasta dish 46 Mum 48 Swayed 49 Goose eggs 50 Eastern religion 51 Scarf 52 Inscribed pillar 54 Pull 56 Labor 57 Hertz 58 Epoch 59 Gyp 61 Computer part Page 13 Friday, August 23, 2002 Answers to the August 16 puzzle LIFE HERE IS STILL A CHALLENGE August 3, 2002: Today I cared for a patient who escaped from Cuba. He was found at sea and brought here by the U.S. Coast Guard. He left his wife and children in search of freedom. His hopes are all those that we have in the USA: Establish himself, bring his family here, and live the American Dream. Today was also Quarters. That is where all our sailors go out to the flag pole in front of the hospital and stand in formation at attention in their white uniforms. They pay respect to our flag while the National Anthem is played. I cant attend because I am caring for patients, but I can hear the Star Spangled Banner being played. I watch my Cuban patient rise to look out the window to watch Morning Colors. His eyes are filled with tears. No words are spoken. I can feel his pain, he wants what we were born with FREEDOM. The challenge is knowing that tomorrow I may work in a different area. This area has a patient that has been raised to hate our way of life. His eyes will glare at me when I enter the room. He will constantly wait for the oppor tunity to strike. With some trepidation, I will stand in harms way to meet his medical needs. We as Americans are a caring and compassionate people. It is beyond us why anyone would want to take away our bountiful lifestyle. We help so many countries in need and often dont understand why we have an enemy. I dont have an answer for this hatred. My mission is to care for all in need. I have just had to switch gears and find the right tempo to handle both those reaching for FREEDOM and those wishing to destroy it. HANGING TOUGH & STAYING STRONG, Navy Lt. Laura J. Ledyard, Nurse Corps DOWNTOWN LYCEUM Friday, August 23 8 p.m. Stuart Little 2, PG-13 70min 10 p.m. Windtalkers, R 133min Saturday, August 24 8 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG-13 93min 10 p.m. Men in Black II, PG-13 91min Sunday, August 25 8 p.m. The Bourne Identity, PG-13 -118min Monday, August 26 8 p.m. Minority Report, PG-13 140min Tuesday, August 27 8 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG-13 93min Wednesday, August 28 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann, PG-13 91min Thursday, August 29 8 p.m. Men in Black II, PG-13 91min CAMP BULKELEY Friday, August 23 8 p.m. Changing Lanes, R 90min 10 p.m. An Officer and a Gentleman, R 133min Saturday, August 24 8 p.m. Monsters Ball, R 111min 10 p.m. Courage Under Fire, R 116min Sunday, August 25 8, 10 p.m. Brotherhood of the Wolf, R -143min Monday, August 26 8, 10 p.m. Tomb Raider, PG-13 101min Tuesday, August 27 8, 10 p.m. Commando, R 90min Wednesday, August 28 8, 10 p.m. Delta Force, R 129min Thursday, August 29 8, 10 p.m. All About The Benjamins, R 109min

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Page 14 Friday, August 23, 2002 Effective immediately, JTF160 servicemembers have a new way to contact friends and loved ones at home the Morale Videophone. Located in room 201 of the Pink Palace, the videophone is a free service offered to ser vicemembers of all branches. The videophone is in opera tion 24 hours a day, seven days a week, as long as an appointment is made in advance. The videophone, a ViaTV model VC105-II, was brought to Guantanamo by the 43rd MP Brigade. The Rhode Island National Guard purchased the video phone a few years ago, said Army Capt. Daniel C. Lutz, JTF-160 HQ Commandant. The phone is deployed with its mobilized units. It was recently used when one of the states MP companies deployed to Hungary. The JTF has plans to purchase a new videophone that will be permanently assigned to GTMO when we leave. According to Lutz, the videophone has been func tional since late July. Now that it has been tested, it is open for more widespread use. The set up of the video phone is fairly simple. It con sists of a small black box that houses a built-in digital video camera and a high-perform ance analog modem. The pic ture quality, size and frame speed can be adjusted on the fly. The unit also allows you to pan, tilt and zoom the camera. The ViaTV uses an ordinary phoneline, not a broadband connection like DSL or ISDN. The unit is about the size of a standard cable box, and it sits here on top of a normal 27 color TV in a sparse room, unfurnished save for a two tables and two chairs. The room is locked when not in use. The user turns on the unit and the TV and makes a call to a DSN number with a standard touchtone phone. On the other end of the line, the service members loved ones sit in front of a similar videophone setup in a private room. The 43rd MP BDE has a videocon ferencing unit set up in their armory back in Rhode Island, but other Reserve and National Guard units have comparable video conferencing equipment as well. According to the man ufacturer, the ViaTV is H.324 compatible, so it can receive data from other H.324 compat ible videophone manufac turers such as Aiptek, TeleEye or Vizufon. Each servicemember should contact their units chain of command to see if the videophone can be used to contact their loved ones at home, advised Lutz. Some other units have begun to test the videophone with videophones at their home stations. Others are still determining if any videophone resources are in their area back home. So far, it has only been used from one videophone to another videophone. However, if a servicemember has a spe cific need we are willing to test it out and see if it works, said Lutz. According to Lutz, the pol icy is that every JTF-160 ser vicemember is allotted 15 minutes per week on a first come, first served basis. Units can reserve blocks of time to ensure the videophones avail ability by contacting Lutzs office at x5253. On Wednesday alone 11 ser vicemembers, including JTF160 Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Funaro, signed up to see their loved one back home. Slots fill up fast, so plan ahead. Time must be coordi nated both on the GTMO side and back at the home station. Finally, for those at Camp America who may be feeling left out, Lutz passed on the fol lowing good news: Two new videophones are on order one to replace the current videophone and one for Camp America. Morale videophone lets troops reach out and view loved ones Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire The JTF-160 Fishing Rodeo takes place Saturday at Pelican Petes Marina From 6:00AM to 3:00PM. Con tact Capt. Barbera at #3538 or Lt. Bowman at #5256 for information. Mens and Womens Division Soccer Sea son will be starting on Monday, September 30th and run until Friday, November 8th. All Division Soccer rosters will be due on Friday, September 20th. Please contact Capt. Gormly at #5249 for more information. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Free movies: 8 PM Lyceum; 8,10 PM Camp Bulkeley. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, MWF, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, MF, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. MWF, 5:30PM-6:30PM, Tues. & Thurs. 6:15PM-7:15PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Flag Football Leagues, Cooper Field, M-F, 6:00PM. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM4:00PM. Today, Friday, August 23rd 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:30PM, Night Fishing Trip, M.W.R. Marina. Saturday, August 24th 6:00AM-3:00PM, JTF-160 Fishing Rodeo, Pelican Petes Marina. 7:00AM-2:00PM, Dawn Fishing Trip, CBQ. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Sunday, August 25th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 5:00PM, Spades Tournament, JTF-160 Commanders Cup Series, CBQ. Monday, August 26th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, August 27th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 6:00PM, Mixed Volleyball, JTF-160 Commanders Cup Series, Denich Gym. Wednesday, August 28th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 7:00PM, Round One, Table Tennis Tournament, CBQ. Thursday, August 29th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. The 43rds Sgt. 1st Class Vartan Masdanian tests the videophone. His son, Garo, and his brother, Kevork, are awaiting the call back in Rhode Island. Page 3 Friday, August 23, 2002 The active-duty soldiers of the Army Veterinary Detach ment have two missions while at Guantanamo Bay. One is to care for the military working dogs and other animals on base. The other is to inspect all of the food that comes to the com missary and galleys base-wide. On a day-to-day basis, they see clients on appointments and care for the 324 pets here. They provide full-service treat ment, including surgery and dental care. When inspecting food that comes off of the barge, they ensure that it is from an approved source and that is safe and sanitary to consume. The Army is the only branch of the service that does ani mal medicine, and these vets perform this unique job with utmost pride. Army veterinarians Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Pfc. Anna Grier and Spc. Amber Albrecht skillfully trim the overgrown hooves of Giorgio, the sole goat resident of GTMO. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Amber Albrecht inspects three kittens that are up for adoption. If no one adopts them, they will ultimately be put to sleep. Capt. Michelle Franklin I love it here. Its been a great experience. I never worked with much exotic animals until I came here. It has been a real eye-opener. Staff Sgt. Shelley Casinger I love the Army, and its good here. This is my sec ond tour in GTMO. The iguanas and Cuban boas are always interesting to work with. Spc. Amber Albrecht This is a really good job. Theres pretty much a new chain of command here, but its awesome. Being able to work with animals every day is great.

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Page 2 Friday, August 23, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Draw upon Bible verses and characters to help you pray more powerfully. You know how important it is to pray for your children, and you try to do so regularly. But sometimes you dont seem very inspired when you pray. Perhaps your prayers have become just one more thing to check off your daily list of things to do. Drawing upon the Bibles help when you pray for your children can help you pray more powerfully and effectively. Here are some ways you can use Scripture to pray for your children: *Personalize Bible verses for your children by inserting their names into the verses and paraphrasing them aloud in the form of prayers. Ask God to reveal specific promises from His Word that you can focus on for your children. *Choose some biblical characters whose stories inspire you, and use them as a basis to pray for your children. Consider what strengths the characters demonstrate that you would like God to develop in your children, such as courage or compassion. Consider what your children can learn from the characters mistakes, and the ways in which God helped them overcome their weaknesses. [Adapted from Praying the Scriptures for Your Children by Jodie Berndt. Pub lished by Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Mich.] Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR Nowadays, many people own or have access to a computer that can surf the Internet. Online shopping is becoming our favorite pas time. Purchases are made at the touch of a but ton. All that is required is a credit card number. BEWARE! Credit card fraud is a problem affecting thousands weekly. Identity theft is a fast-grow ing crime. You could become a victim without even knowing it. Exercise caution when pur chasing items on the Internet. Here are a couple of tips. Purchase items from a company that is well established. Make sure you get the companys phone number and street address. Call to ver ify that the business exists. Ask friends, neigh bors, and co-workers if theyve purchased from the company. When purchasing or finalizing your trans actions or submitting any personal informa tion, be sure you are using a secure browser and website. A flashing message should appear indicating that you have entered a secure area. If you feel you are being scammed, file a complaint with your states Consumer Protec tion Division or National Fraud Center. These agencies can be located on the Internet. Purchasing even real online items with just a click of the mouse can lead to problems if you are not careful. Debts can add up quickly. Avoid costly purchases. Know what you are buying and how much you are spending. You will be responsible for paying those debts. It is very important to understand your pay ment plan when dealing with credit cards. Whether you pay the minimum on your bill or most of what is due, there is still a balance left. It is important to know how your credit card company applies the interest rate and charge fees, and the billing cycle and grace period. All of us who have credit card bills can ben efit by being here in GTMO. Just say NO and save money. Work toward paying off debts. Submitted by Army Sgt. Deborah Pacheco, PMO Draw upon Bible verses for children NOTICE OF ARTICLE 15 ADJUDICATION A soldier was found guilty after a summarized proceeding conducted under Article 15, UCMJ, for violations of Article 92, UCMJ, failure to obey a lawful general order or regulation. The nonjudicial punishment authority found beyond a reasonable doubt that on or about 16 June 2002 on the waters of Guantanamo Bay, the soldier navigated an MWR vessel beyond the northern boundary of U.S. Naval Base, GTMO, and into Cuban territorial waters. This violated both COMNAVBASEGT MOINSTR 1720.10G and General Order Number 1, dated 20 May 2002. The soldier and his five passengers were subject to arrest and detention by Cuban authorities had they not turned around in time. The soldier received 14 days extra duty and 14 days restriction. In addi tion, the Harbor Magistrate suspended the soldiers boating license for one year, effectively revoking it. CROSSING INTO CUBAN TERRITORIAL WATERS CREATES AN UNWARRANTED INTERNATIONAL INCIDENT AND IS INEXCUSABLE. SUCH CONDUCT ENDANGERS THE BOATING PRIVILEGES AFFORDED ALL SOLDIERS. JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239/5241 (Local) 5246 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the per sonnel within. Page 15 Friday, August 23, 2002 239th MPs advance by beating PSU The 239th Military Police Company came from behind to beat the 307th Port Security Unit in three games to advance in the mixed volleyball tournament at G. J. Denich Gym Tuesday. It was an exciting first-round match. The crowds energy seemed to pour onto the vol leyball court. This game had the feel of a championship fight. When the two teams stepped onto the court they were not only playing for their units pride but for points in the JTF-160s Com manders Cup. Both teams fought like two prizefighters, with the 239th MPs coming out swinging with a 5-0 lead in the first match. But PSU 307 climbed back into the game, little by little. Both sides were exchanging points in the first set. PSU 307 tied the game at ten, then took the lead on the next point. The lead was 14-11, but PSU 307 could not put the 239th away. The match became deadlocked at 14. In the rules of volleyball, you have to win by two points. PSU 307 turned it up and was able to score two straight points to win the first match 16-14. In the next game, PSU 307 continued play ing as they did at the finish of the first match. They opened up a 5-2 lead, potentially critical in a close game. But this lead would not last long. The 239th MP Co. rallied back and tied the match at five. The lead would go back and forth until the 239th MP Co. scored five unanswered points to win the second game 15-10. Tying the match gave new life to the 239th. The winner of the third game would be the team that advanced in the tournament bracket. It was no easy contest. There were six ties and four lead changes as both teams seemed to want victory equally. The pressure was mounting as each point became more and more crucial. The teams were tied at twelve when the 239th MP Co. scored two points. Then PSU 307 scored a point. The atmosphere was tense on the court as the score was 14-13. It was do or die time for both teams. Who would step up? Serving, PSU 307 couldnt tie it up, and the 239th MP Co. was able to score match point to advance, and after winning the first game, PSU 307 had let the opportunity to advance in the tournament slip through their hands. The game was pretty close. We had a good chance to put it away in the second match. It was our fault. They played hard and came back to win, said Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Bradlee T. Starks from PSU 307. It was a good and close game, said Army Spc. Rauman M. Laurent from the 239th MP Co. Both teams went at one another hard. We had minor mistakes in the game, but because we played as a team, we were able to come back and win. Hopefully we can continue winning and take care of business in the tour nament. We are going to try our best to win the Commanders Cup. Stories and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Spc. Rauman M. Laurent, 239th MP Co., spikes the ball aggressively to score a point for the Blacksheeps in their victory over PSU 307. The Hood Ratz flag football team overcame a late charge by Cactus Curtain in the second half to stay undefeated in the flag football season. The game was a defensive struggle from the start. Both teams had a hard time getting their offense in synch. Defense dictated the tempo in this game. It seemed that one mistake or a big play would change the out come of the game. The first half of the game was all about the Hood Ratz. They were winning the battle in the trenches. As the game progressed, Army Pfc. John P. Gines broke free from the line of scrimmage with a 43-yard touchdown run to put the Hood Ratz on top, 6-0. The extra point was good and the Hood Ratz lead was 7-0. They increased that lead by capitalizing on Cactus Curtains mistakes. The Hood Ratzs quar terback, Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan, saw a blown coverage in the end zone. He stepped back in the pocket and threw a bomb down the field. Ronan was able to thread the needle with a perfect pass. He threw the ball over the hands of the cornerback and into the grasp of Army Spc. William Whittenburg for a 38-yard touch down pass, and the Hood Ratz had a commanding 13-0 lead. It wasnt an easy play. I was able to put a move on the corner back and beat him down field. Ronans timing was perfect. It was a great pass, said Whitten burg. This was the perfect opportu nity for the Hood Ratz to let their defense loose on Cactus Curtain and put the game away. They started taking chances on defense by blitzing more often, and it worked. Cactus Curtain was able to score a touchdown on a sec ond-half running play, but it was too little, too late. There was too much defense and not enough time on the game clock for Cactus Curtain, now 1-2 on the season. Army Spc. Allen Lamar played big in this game, said Ronan. He had three quarter back sacks that helped stop Cac tus Curtains momentum in the game. He turned it up another level on defense. He gives every thing he has in the game. He is very important to the teams suc cess. We now have a record of 2-0 with this victory. It felt real good beating Cactus Curtain, because they were trash talking a lot in the game. They were lucky we did not play well today, he said Im look forward to next Fri day. Thats when we play against Naval Station theyre the team to beat. They have a good team, he said. Well see. Army Spc. William Whittenburg from the 418th Transportation Company makes an over the shoulder catch to seal the victory for the Hood Ratz 13-7. Hood Ratzs QB, defense hold off Cactus Curtain

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Page 16 Friday, August 23, 2002 Spc. Bryan Jones, 2/142nd Inf. Co. Q: Why dont you tell the people where youre from? A: Im from a small town in Texas, where about 125 people live. Q: Whats that place like? A: Well, we have a Coke machine and a stop sign down by the cotton gin. Theres no law where I live. Q: You ever get into trouble back home when you were younger? A: A young man living in a town like that can always figure out some kind of trouble to get into. Q: Does everyone in a town like that gen erally get along with each other? A: Where Im from, if you get into a fight with someone, youll end up seeing that per son every day. So if you fight with one person for a week straight, youll end up with no friends in town. Q: So, what do you do in your unit? A: Well, I was an infantryman for six years, but now I work in supply. I inspect all the weapons after the guys finish their shifts. I make sure that they keep up on their mainte nance. Q: So, you like weapons? A: Yeah, Ive been shooting since I was small. Q: Got a lot of weapons back home? A: Yeah, I got a lot of guns. Q: If there was an intruder in your home, what weapon would you use and where would you aim? A: Where Im from, the door is always open. If someone who wasnt welcome entered, Id grab the shotgun and shoot at the head. Q: Would you be able to defend your entire town single handedly? A: Everybody defends their own stuff pretty well. Its not like theyre going to shoot and miss. Q: What if your town was attacked by giant spiders? A: Thats a pretty stupid question, but in the slim chance that they did come, youd have to kiss your life goodbye. Q: Why did you join the military? A: Everybody wants to be a soldier. My grandfather and father were also in the serv ice. Q: How long have you been in? A: I joined the day I turned 18. Ten years now in the National Guard. Q: Has the military changed you? A: I have been, and always will be, the same. Q: You must have learned some survival skills being in an infantry company. How long would you last on a deserted island? A: Id last until someone came and got me. I dont know how good Id be living, but dying isnt an option. Q: Have you been on many deployments? A: No, this is my first one. Its been all right, better than being poked in the eye with a sharp stick. Q: Any goals for when you get back home? A: Im saving money so I can buy some ranch land and put cattle on it. Q: Ever tip a cow over? A: Thats stupid, you cant tip a cow over unless youre doing 70 in a car and the thing walks out in front of you. Q: Ever hop on the back of a cow and ride it? A: Well, I used to ride bulls in rodeo shows. Q: What type of weapon would you make out of fruit? A: I would take plum seeds and shoot them from a slingshot. That would hurt pretty bad. Q: What was the most disgusting thing you have ever eaten? A: A Reuben sandwich. Those people should be beat up for making that thing. Q: Last question, can you explain why people are so proud to be from Texas? A: Texas is the greatest place in the world. We have everything there. There is no other place like it. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Bryan Jones: I have been, and always will be, the same. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Texas pride comes along for the ride Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we will pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and success of liberty. John F. Kennedy, 1961 The tragic attacks on the United States of America that took place on Sept. 11, 2001 united all Ameri cans and sent thousands of service members to Guantanamo Bay in their support of Operation Endur ing Freedom. Although all who are here were touched by that somber morning that is still fresh in the memories of the people of this nation, members of the Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Unit 204 here were especially so, having lost one of their own. Navy Gunners Mate 3rd Class Thomas Butler, a member of MIUWU 204 for five years, was one of the New York City firefight ers who courageously rushed into the World Trade Center after the terrorist attacks on that gruesome day that America is still mourning. This Aug. 15, five members of the MIUWU who were close friends of Butlers left GTMO and returned to the U.S. to attend a memorial service in his honor. The service was held in memory of But ler at St. Josephs Church Saturday in Smithtown, N.Y. There, they were able to bid farewell to their fallen comrade and sailor, whose body has yet to be found. With the one-year anniversary of 9/11 approaching and the search for bodies at the World Trade Cen ter site ended, the ceremony gave us closure and a chance to say goodbye, said Navy GM3 David J. Wentworth. The memorial service consisted of a full mass with eulogies, a final roll call by the FDNY and military ceremony. The five of us who attended the service were GMC Robert Christy, GM2 Patrick Donahue, GM3 Daniel Sheehan, EO1 Chris Thatcher, EO1 Yvonne Zirrith, and Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Remembering... Friday, August 23, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 11 Story by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire MIUWU 204 unit members say good-bye to a fallen friend, who is gone but not forgotten Go drill it on the mountain Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Two masked and goggled SEABEES raise the bit on a hill overlooking Camp America while drilling holes for explosives. The charges will be deto nated Friday and the dislodged rock crushed for future GTMO use. See MIUWU, page 5 A look inside... Page 8 Page 6 Page 15