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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00064
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: August 16, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00064

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PAGE 1

All that separates Naval Station Guan tanamo Bay from communist Cuba and the possibility of terrorist attacks is a fence. And along that 17.4-mile fence line, their profes sionalism and vigilance keep GTMO safe from harm. Guarding the border between GTMO and Cuba are the Marine reservists from Texas serving in Marine Corps Security Force Company, DET A, Bravo Company 123. And make no mistake; these reservists have a full-time job. Basically, we protect the fence line and do reconnaissance 24 hours a day, seven days a week, said Sgt. Jose Diaz, sergeant of the guard with MCSF Co. We accomplish our mission through the guards keeping watch in the many Marine Observation Points along the fence line and also through the foot and mounted patrols, which are conducted 24 hours a day. Between the guards in the MOPs and the Marines on constant patrol, there is very little that they miss, according to Diaz. But the MOPs, which are the guard towers you can see peppered across the northern GTMO hori zon, are what really allow the Marines to carry out their mission. In the MOPs, they observe just about any thing and everything the Cubans do, said Diaz. And the Cubans on the other side do the same to us. I dont blame them. We look at them, so why cant they look at us? But I dont think they do as good a job as we do. Were more disciplined. I have faith in those Marines in the MOPs and out on patrol. Theyre pretty observant and really detailed as to whats going on. Attention to detail is everything within the MOP, for the security of the entire base could be compromised if a vigilant eye is not kept on Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Guarding GTMO from attack Friday, August 16, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 10 Story and photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire A look inside... Marine Corps Security Force Company stays on line to ensure base is safe Lance Cpl. Clayton Harbich, machine gunner with MCSF Co., stands watch at a Marine Observation Point. Page 8 Page 6 Page 15 See GUARDING, page 5 Page 16 Friday, August 16, 2002 With Army Sgt. Stacey K. Lewis Q: How do you feel about being this weeks 15 minutes of fame? A: Embarrassed! I dont usually talk about myself. Q: Its easy. So, how would you describe yourself? A: Im outgoing and personable. Q: Come on. Everybody says that. Whats your philosophy of life? A: Work hard, play hard. Q: Everybody says that too. Do you have any unique hobbies or talents? A: Hmm... Not really. I am just me. Q: Lets try some basics. What unit are you with, and how long have you been here? A: Im with the 178th MP Company, and Ive been here for about two months. Q: Where do you work? A: I work at the Joint Aid Station. I like it I like working for people from different backgrounds, learning new things. I like tak ing care of the soldiers. Q: And for fun? A: Sports or the gym. I like playing volley ball; I played a little intramural during college. Q: And where do you live? A: I live over at Camp Bulkeley. Q: How do you like it over there? A: I dont mind it. Im settled in and nest ing, so to speak. Well, at least we have regular showers, not the push-button kind. Q: How do you and your roommates get along? A: Theyre a good group of girls. Q: How do you feel about the mission? A: I think it is a great mission. Everyone is working very hard and being professional. Q: Hmm. Whats something strange that has happened to you since youve been here? A: Unexpected guests in the shower. Iguanas, and various other types of wildlife. There are actually birds nesting in our shower-room. One day, one swooped down and scared the heck out of me. Q: What do you like about being here? A: Ive met a lot of interesting people here. Ive met people from all different backgrounds and walks of life. Q: What from home do you miss the most? A: Id have to say JoJo. My dog. Q: So, how would you normally spend a well-deserved day off on GTMO? A: At the pool relaxing and unwinding. Id like to get down to the Marina and give fishing or snorkeling a try, although, Id probably just sink. Q: If you could speak to someone who was about to deploy to GTMO, what would you tell him or her? A: This place is what you make of it. You can have fun with it or make it miserable. Patience and tolerance are virtues to practice here. Q: What do you do when GTMO gets you down? A: It sounds silly, but my roommate and I listen to Its a Great Day by Travis Tritt. It always seems to boost our mood. Q: If you could change one thing here, what would it be? A: I would just like to see the MPs receive more recognition and appreciation for all their outstanding hard work and professionalism. Q: Its a deal. Anything to say in closing? A: Since Ive been here, Ive met a lot of great people. Across the board Ive seen noth ing but hard working professionals. I am proud to have met and to work with everyone here. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Sgt. Stacey K. Lewis, on fame: I dont usually talk about myself. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire 15 minutes on the quiet side

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Page 2 Friday, August 16, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Are you walking in the FOG, the Favor Of God? If so, then you know the feeling of being overwhelmed and encompassed by His love, guidance and beneficence. But Gods blessings, whether material or spiritual, are not intended just to help you with your own life. They are designed to help you help others and extend the kingdom of God here on earth. How? Lets look at some benefits of walking in the FOG. Favor promotes you. It will take you to higher levels of success and service. It did for Esther. One day she was an orphaned Jewish refugee. One year later she was crowned Queen of Persia. Gods favor caused Esther to gain the goodwill of everyone she met. She didnt even have to work for it. One day of Gods favor is worth a thousand days of your labor. Favor pushes open doors that otherwise would be closed to you. It puts you into posi tion for blessings. When I had just started in ministry, I had a meeting with the pastor of a large, influential church. I had prayed for favor with him and before I left his church, I was booked to preach several revivals and attend an important conference for free. What seems impossible is very possible in God. [By Cheryl H. Little, www.crosswalk.com. Adapted from The Favor Of God: Discover the FOG, by Daniel E. Barrick.] Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the per sonnel within. ALERT! Last week a member of JTF-160 was hospitalized for Acute Alcohol Poisoning. As of this writing, the subject is recovering and doing well. If you are one of those people planning to party and drink yourself silly this weekend heres a few facts you should know. Most adults can drink moderate amounts of alcohol, up to two drinks per day for men and one per day for women. One drink: 12 oz. of beer, 5 oz. glass of wine, or 1.5 oz. of 80 proof liquor. Alcohol-related health problems are highest among young adults ages 18-29. Once ingested, alcohol is processed in the body through metabo lism and oxidation. Alcohol is detoxified and removed from the blood thorough oxidation, pre venting it from accumulating and destroying cells and organs in your body. The liver can metabolize only a certain amount of alcohol per hour, regard less of the amount that has been consumed. Alcohol Liver Disease (ALD) is a major cause of illness and death in the U.S. ALD includes hep atitis (persistent inflammation of the liver), and cirrhosis (progressive scarring of the liver tissue), eventually impairing the functions of other organs. Women can develop ALD after consum ing lower levels of alcohol over a shorter period of time compared to men and are more vulnerable to ALD. Many patients with ALD become infected with hepatitis-C virus (HCV), which causes a chronic and potentially fatal liver disease. A healthy and normal liver function is essential to life. Approx. 10,000-24,000 deaths from cirrhosis are attributable to alcohol abuse every year. Other side effects: In men, alcohol abuse contributes to testicular injury and impairs testosterone synthesis. Testos terone deficiency may contribute to feminization in males (i.e., breast enlargement). In women, alcohol abuse may contribute to increased production of a form of estrogen called estradiol, which contributes to increased bone density. If you are involved in an alcohol related inci dent at GTMO you may be charged with UCMJ violations! Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 Walking in a FOG NOTICE OF ARTICLE 15 ADJUDICATION A soldier was found guilty after a proceeding conducted under Article 15, UCMJ, for violations of Article 92, UCMJ, failure to obey a lawful order; to-wit: to conduct a police call of the company area; Article 92, UCMJ, dereliction of duty; and Arti cle 115, malingering. The nonjudicial punishment authority found beyond a reasonable doubt that on or about 11 June 2002 the soldier knowingly disobeyed an order from an NCO in his chain of command to conduct a police call of the company area to pick up all ciga rette butts and empty cigarette butt cans by not performing the police call and that the soldier negligently failed to have his name tag sewn on his LBV, as it was his known duty to do. The soldier also was found beyond a reasonable doubt to have feigned a muscle spasm in his back on or about 1 to 18 May 2002 while at home sta tion for purposes of avoiding training. The soldier was reduced to Private (E1), forfeited $257.10, suspended until 3 January 2003, received extra duty for 14 days, restriction for 14 days and an oral reprimand. KNOWING DISOBEDIENCE OF LAWFUL ORDERS, DERELICTION OF KNOWN DUTIES, AND MALINGERING WILL NOT BE TOLERATED Page 15 Friday, August 16, 2002 418th wins flag football opener Are you ready for some flag football, GTMO? The seasonlong gridiron battle for the GTMO Super Bowl crown began in hard-fought fashion as the 418th Transportation Company Hood Ratz defeated the 160th Military Police Battalion Chucks 14-7 in the GTMO Kick-off Clas sic on Cooper Field Monday night. The coin toss was the official start of the season. The Hood Ratz won the toss and elected to receive the ball. On the first drive of the season, the Hood Ratz charged down the field by running the ball and com pleting short passes. Soon they were on the 15-yard line and threatening to score. The Hood Ratz called a play to get Army Pfc. Jamaal Wilkins open in the end zone. The quar terback took the hike and the Chucks came with a furious blitz. The quarterback was flushed out of the pocket and he was forced into a bad throw to the end zone. The ball was intercepted by the Chucks, who came right back the other way. Army Sgt. Emil Ganim was the quarterback and the head of the running attack for the Chucks. Ganim broke free for a 36-yard run and was stopped on the 4yard line. It was third down and Ganim went for all the marbles. He threw a pass into the end zone where Wilkins was able to pick-off the pass. Both teams were playing tough defense and the game was deadlocked at 0-0. Finally, the Hood Ratz were able to strike first. Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan, the quarterback for Hood Ratz, threw a 43-yard pass to Wilkins for the first touch down of the GFL (GTMO Flag Football League) season. It was not a called play, but the whole side was open so we took advantage of the defense, said Ronan. The Hood Ratz were celebrat ing in the end zone as the score was now 7-0. It felt good scoring the first touchdown of the season. Ronan and me will connect for many more this season, said Wilkins. Ganim came out on the field determined to score and bring his team back on their second drive. They were moving the ball with sweeps and short passes. Hood Ratz made a mistake on defense and Ganim made them pay with a 38-yard pass to Army Pfc. Jerald D. Murphy. The Hood Ratz defense got tough in the red zone and was able to force another turnover. Both defenses were able to stop one another for the rest of the first half. They have a good team, said Ronan. They were better than I thought. At halftime we talked about defense, he said. That is what wins games. The players were missing too many flags. They were not making plays, said Ronan. In the second half, the Chucks seemed to be able to drive down the field at will, but when they would get near the end zone the Hood Ratz were somehow able to stop them. One drive seemed over when Ganim, under pressure from an all-out blitz, threw another inter ception. But wait there was a flag on the field. The referee called roughing the passer; the Chucks had new life. They capitalized by putting six on the scoreboard and the extra point was good. The game was now tied at seven. The clock was becoming a fac tor in the game. With about five minutes left, Ronan seemed to put the team on his shoulders. He was making plays, running the football and completing his passes. With about three minutes left, the Hood Ratz scored to go ahead in the game. They took a 14-7 lead. The Chucks Ganim went on the field with a vigorous energy. His mission was to bring his team back. The clock was running down. And on the first play of the drive, he completed a 40-yard pass to Murphy. But as the Chucks got close to the goal line, the Hood Ratz slowed them down with great defensive plays. First, the Chucks called a quar terback option that played right into the Hood Ratzs hands when Ganim handed off the ball. I was committed to the handoff; if the quarterback would have kept the ball, he would have been gone for the touchdown, said one of the Hood Ratz, Army Spc. Allen Lamar. The Chucks had less than two minutes on the game clock. It was fourth down. They had one more play left. Ganim screamed, Hike and he scrambled to his right. Look ing down the field, he spotted Murphy opened in the end zone. He threw the ball down field as Murphy was getting ready to catch the football. Army Spc. William Whittenburg leaped and deflected the football to save the game for the Hood Ratz. I was just doing my best. Playing the cornerback position is tough and I am small, so you have to do whatever it takes to be suc cessful. I am glad I stopped a potential touchdown, said Whit tenburg. That defensive play put the nail in the coffin for the Chucks on Monday, but the season has just begun. There are seventeen teams that will duel to the finish until there is a champion declared. There are two divisions in the league; we have the monstrous Midwest and the crushing Cen tral. Each team will play a total of twelve games in the season, said Donnell Daniel, the Athletic Director for Morale, Welfare and Recreation on base. When the season comes to an end, we will take the top four teams in each division and they will play a dou ble elimination tournament for the championship crown. The Hood Ratzs quest is just beginning. It was a good game, and I am looking forward to the next one. I am just glad we pulled out a win said Ronan. But we need to get better if we want to win the GTMO Super Bowl. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Staff Sgt.Joseph K. Ronan throws a 43 yard pass to Army Spc Jamaal Wilkins for the first touchdown of the GFL season. The Hood Ratz quarterback Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan scrambles from the pocket and runs for 15 yards on that play to put his team in scoring position.

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Page 14 Friday, August 16, 2002 No falling is allowed in this sport. Not on my watch, Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Melissa Steinman assured the seven students who attended her new rappelling class on Saturday. Five of the seven students had never rappelled before, but Steinmans class is geared toward making both beginners and experts feel at home. Steinman, a quartermaster with Port Security Unit 307, teaches the class every fourth day during her day off. She is one of only two people associ ated with the bases Morale Welfare and Recreation depart ment who is certified to give such a class. A reservist, Stein man teaches rock-climbing at a gym in Florida back in the civilian world. The 30-foot rappelling tower, which looms over the Paintball range, offers an impressive view of nearby Marine Hill and Guantanamo Bay. The facing of the sturdy wooden structure is plain now, but there are plans to add ele ments to the surface to simulate different natural materials. According to Steinman, a variety of new equipment has been ordered, including safety helmets, gloves, harnesses and ropes. The rock-climbing wall in the Marine Hill gym will be undergoing some improve ments as well. Steinman starts her class by giving an overview of what the climbers should expect. She stresses safety and she backs up everything she talks about with a demonstration given at a moderate pace. The lessons are taught in a four-class series, though the basics of rappelling can be learned in the first hour, Stein man said. The 9 mm-diameter ropes that stabilize the rappellers may look suspiciously thin, but the ropes are manufactured with a breaking force measured in kilonewtons meaning youd have to weigh thousands of pounds to snap them. Redundancy is built into the system. Three points of contact to the top of the tower are established with the ropes. Locking carabiners (clamps) are favored over spring-loaded models that could pop open if a rope became tangled. Even if a rappeller panics, the belayer, an assistant holding a safety rope at the base of the tower, can almost instantly stop a fall with a firm pull. Though rappellers decend the wall individually, teamwork is part of the training. When donning the safety harnesses while standing at the top of the tower, rappellers keep an eye on each other to prevent falls. Like wise, once youve decended the wall, you have to act as a beleyer for the next rappeller and ensure his or her safety. After Steinmans demon stration, it was time to take the plunge. The goal was to walk slowly down the wall back wards. The seven students descended the wall, one after another, with no mishaps. Steinman guided them the whole way and talked a few through the natural tendancy to put a death grip on the rope instead of letting the cord do its job and glide smoothly through the metal belaying hoops. First-time rappeller Sherrie Nabakowski, a civilian DOD worker, was excited about the experience. The first time you lean backward its weird, but it was fun, said Nabakowski. Call 8-5115 for the next available class. Classes run from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. The first hour is devoted to instruction, followed by open rappelling monitored by the instructor. Experienced rappellers may bring their own gear. Rappelling class has GTMO climbers reaching new heights Story by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire The Mens and Womens Division Soccer Season will be starting on Monday, September 30th and run until Friday, November 8th. All Division Soccer rosters are due on Friday, September 20th. Con tact Capt. Gormly at x5249 for more information. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sail ing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Nightly 8 PM Free movie, Lyceum & Camp Bulke ley. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. MWF, 5:30PM-6:30PM, Tues. & Thurs. 6:15PM-7:15PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM-6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM4:00PM. Today, Friday, August 16th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Saturday, August 17th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Sunday, August 18th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Monday, August 19th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, August 20th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Wednesday, August 21th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 6:00PM, Mixed Volleyball Tournament, JTF-160 Commanders Cup Series, G.J. Denich Gymna sium. Thursday, August 22th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Chris Downey rappels down the tower under the watchful eye of instructor Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Melissa Steinman. Navy JO1 Christopher G. Sherwood awaits his turn. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Steinman: Rappelling is about leg work, not upper body strength. Page 3 Friday, August 16, 2002 The Naval Post Office takes care of all the mail that is dis patched on and off the base. Whether its pictures or pack ages, letters from home or detainee mail, these sailors do their best to get all mail sent here to GTMO processed, sorted and handed over to your command. And when its time to write back, these sailors get your mail over to the Leeward side and out on the next plane leaving the island. Through rain, sleet or snow and that hot GTMO sun these postal workers in Navy blue are here for you. GTMOs Postal Services Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Antwan A. Vaughn, supervisor Different customers pose different challenges. We meet all requirements by following the regulations. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Henry Charry, mail handler I do like it. We have a good working environment. If theres good teamwork, we work well. We always keep busy. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Sophia L. Humphrey, postal clerk I have fun with it. You find so many people that you dont see on the base. You meet a lot of different people. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarah L. Ladue, postal clerk I like it all right. We have a really good postal team, so there are no problems. Mail comes and goes pretty quickly. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarah L. Ladue skillfully prepares a package for shipping after weighing it to determine proper postage. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Henry Charry happily exchanges some words with a service member after handing him a bag full of mail for his command.

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Page 4 Friday, August 16, 2002 This weeks question: Who would you choose to be stuck in a fox hole with if rounds started to fly? Army Sgt. Edward Villarreal, Bravo 2nd/142nd INF Co. My best friend Joshua who I met on active duty. We have a strong bond, and I can count on him for anything. Army Staff Sgt. Billy Corley, Bravo 2nd/142 INF Co. Cindy Crawford. It dont matter if shes a good shot or not. Army Sgt. Joshua Conwell, 178th MP Co. I would stuff my whole team in the foxhole. I cant com plain about any of those guys, so Id take them all. Army Spc. Johnny Best, 418th Trans portation Co. Id fight in a foxhole with just about any one. But throw Jada Pinkett-Smith in there, and Ill really hold that spot down. Army Sgt. 1st Class Earl Manning, 160th MP Bn. Staff Sgt. Kinsey, my assistant NCOIC. He is an outstanding sol dier, and I would will ingly go into combat with him any time. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Finest senior service member of JTF-160! Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, the com mander of JTF-160, recognizes Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Elizabeth French after she was selected by a board made up of top enlisted service members to represent the task force in the Navy Base Senior Servicemember of the Quarter competition. I was happy and honored to be chosen by JTF-160 to represent the taskforce in the Navy Senior Servicemember of the Quarter, said French. It meant everything to me that I was recognized as an NCO or petty officer. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Across 1 Medicine cabinet need 7 Cook 11 Distress call 14 Con (2 wds.) 15 Air (prefix) 16 Central processing unit 17 Transparent winged insect 18 Energy 19 Place 20 Airport abbr. 22 Radioactivity unit 23 Male sheep 24 Electronic systems 29 Give a contribution 31 Gourmet chocolate brand 32 Ball holder 34 Staid 35 Form 36 Mexican region 38 Shifty 39 Legume 40 Operate 41 Poor boy 44 New Mexico city 46 Flower jar 47 Crunchy 50 Building addition 51 Dubbed 52 Insinuator 54 State of ease 56 Spots 57 Fleece 59 School group 60 Body of water 61 Graven image 63 Entertained 68 Sea eagle 69 Salamander 70 Constellation 71 Compass point 72 Precious metal 73 Cheated Down 1 Business abbr. 2 Luau dish 3 And so forth 4 Accountant 5 Fervid 6 Racoon-like animal 7 Car 8 Successor 9 Goofed 10 Of Taiwan 11 Beetle 12 Narcotic 13 Season before Fall 21 To move to action 24 Charity 25 Bottle 26 Murky 27 Lyric poem 28 Part of a min. 30 Not (prefix) 33 Extremity cover 36 Japanese money 37 Second day of the wk. 39 To wrap 41 Akin 42 Usages 43 Berths 44 Concord e.g. 45 Brew 46 Wheeled vehicle 47 Pursues 48 Horseback travelers 49 Fruity 51 Capital of Niger 53 Cowboy show 55 Canned chili brand 58 Dish 62 Type of partnership 64 Referee 65 Drink slowly 66 Vane direction 67 Does Page 13 Friday, August 16, 2002 Concepts to creations Dwelling off past memories While building new relations Along the way ABSORB WHAT YOU ARE TAUGHT Its not who you fight, Its why you fought STAND FIRM With roots strong like a tree. You may be not rich, But success comes for free TAKE A BREATH, THEN BEGIN Youll figure out you can't lose When you stop trying to win Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Answers to the August 9 puzzle Friday, August 16 8 p.m. Divine Secrets of the Ya Ya Sisterhood, PG13 -116min 10 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG13 93min Saturday, August 17 8 p.m. Bad Company, PG-13 -117min 10 p.m. Road to Perdition, PG13 -118min Sunday, August 18 8 p.m. Minority Report, PG13 140min Monday, August 19 8 p.m. Windtalkers, R 133min Tuesday, August 20 8 p.m. Stuart Little 2, PG13 70min Wednesday, August 21 8 p.m. The Bourne Identity, PG13 -118min Thursday, August 22 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann, PG13 91min

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the border below. I observe everything, right down to a twitch of a finger. If I fail in my job, everyone on the base might die because there will be no warning, said Lance Cpl. Ramirez Gomez. In this work, you have to stay focused. If the Cubans try anything on my MOP, theyll have to answer to my M-16. Im here to protect the base and to serve the Marine Corps and my country. And given the current global threat of ter rorism since Sept. 11 and the fact that 598 detainees are being held right here in GTMO, watching out for troublesome Cubans is now only one potential threat to look out for. Since Sept. 11, the importance of our mis sion has increased ten-fold, said Cpl. Mark Palos. Not only do we have to watch the Cubans but also look out for possible terrorist attacks. Theres a real possibility that terrorists can come through that fence. People have to realize that there is a communist country on the other side, and we have no say on what goes on over there. If they want to let terrorists into their country, they can. Were the only thing between them and the base. With all the attention placed on the war on terror and the detainees, the long-standing mission of these Marines might be somewhat overshadowed, but it is a mission that needs no outside attention to get done. Most of the attention is going to Camp Delta now, but were not looking for attention or glory, said Palos. We have a job to do. They can keep all the thunder they want. When theyre not on line doing their job, the Marines here conduct extensive training, said Diaz, which includes martial arts, work ing with mines and polishing their basic infantry skills. Everyone in the unit really holds their own, he said, and takes the training to heart after all, they may need it someday. We try to do a lot. We know how to do our job, said Palos. Back at home during drill weekends, we also do a lot of infantry opera tions and tactics. And now that theyre deployed to Guan tanamo Bay, the unit as a whole is well pre pared to accomplish their task. I was active duty before, so Im used to being away from home, said Diaz. Its hard to just get up and be gone for a year, but I think that these Marines are handling it very well. They miss their families, but their minds are always on the job. Well, this is my job, said Cpl. Keith Harris. I know why Im here, so I have to go do it. You learn a lot of toler ance and patience, said Palos. Nothing is set in stone. You have to learn not to take it personally; its all just business. We all have a job to do. That business is part of the long and distinguished history of the Marines at Guantanamo Bay, and the legacy continues with the tireless efforts of these reservists. This base has been changed from Marine to Navy, but the security has always been Marine, since the Battle of Cuzco Wells in 1898. Only since Sept. 11 has the intensity increased, said Palos. For over a hundred years, Marines have been here doing this job, and we will continue to do so as long as we need to, said Diaz. I think that people really dont understand that there is a communist coun try on the other side of that fence. All of the Marines here take this job very seriously. Marines often have the reputation of being fanatical about being Marines. For these reservists, its simply a grave responsibility. We have a vital mission here, said Cpl. Kevin Martinez. If we werent guarding that fence line, theres no telling what could hap pen. Were keeping the people here safe, and were going home safely. Thats the Marine Corps way. Page 5 Friday, August 16, 2002 GUARDING, from page 1 Cpl. Mark Palos of MCSF Co. leads a foot patrol along the northeast gate entrance to Cuba. Lance Cpl. Ramirez Gomez, like his fellow Marines of the MCSF Co., keeps a vigil eye when in his MOP; the security of the base is in his hand. A shift gets ready to roll out on a mounted patrol with armored humvees. Patrols are done 24 hours a day. 571st MPs: Deltas full-timers Page 12 Friday, August 16, 2002 There isnt much that distinguishes the 571st Military Police Co. from the handful of other units guarding detainees at Camp Delta and living at Camp America. Same home. Same workplace. Same SEAhuts over their heads and gravel beneath their feet. Well, maybe the conversation. They all talk about their jobs and what theyre missing out on at home, said the 571st commander, Army Capt. Krista Watts. This is our job. Were in the Army. In a detention operation run largely by reservists, the 571st is the only active-duty MP company on the ground at Camp Amer ica. Which means theyre all from one home town Fort Lewis in Washington state and theyre maybe a little more accustomed than their neighbors to spending most of their waking hours in speckled green. They also bring a certain geographical bal ance to the Camp America nation. Most of our people are originally from the Western states Washington, Oregon, California, said Watts. Except for the 346th from Kansas, the reserve units here are all from east of the Mississippi. Being full-time MPs also means the 571st is filled with military pros prior-service Marines, prior-service Air Force, a good cross-section of military life, said 1st Sgt. Philip Chatigny. But unlike many of the Guard and Reserve MP units, the 571st didnt have a lot of members who did Camp Deltatype work in their full-time lives. This isnt a typical MP mission for us. MPs in the Army dont do corrections, said Chatigny. But we were able to get a lot of training at the Military Correctional Facility at Fort Lewis. And when our turn came to come here, we were ready. Now that theyre on the job, the 571st leads a professional existence at Guantanamo Bay that any National Guard or Reserve MP here knows all too well: Go to Camp Delta, guard the detainees, serve a meal (for these swing-shifters, thats dinner), guard the detainees some more and be relieved by the next shift. Before work, a formation at Camp America to check that everyones equipped to go to work, and one in Delta to put out some company business and relieve the guards on duty. After, do PT to unwind, and go to sleep. And this portion of the detention opera tion, the 571st serves together. Working the same shift together helps keep the company strong, and it gives the sol diers a sense of ownership of that part of the detainees day, said Watts. They feel like theyre responsible. And what a responsibility high pres sure, high-stakes, looking after some of Americas worst enemies with the whole world looking on. But it remains a job that, day-to-day, doesnt offer much in the way of adventure and thats if its done right. We dont expect a whole lot of excite ment, said guard Sgt. Eric M. Ralls. We hope theres not a whole lot of excitement. With a job like ours, the less the better. Its really not difficult, he continued. After all this time, the detainees are very institutionalized. They know exactly whats going to happen, when its going to happen. They put up very little resistance. But even in a job where monotony is the goal, variety is still the spice of life. Pfc. BethAnn M. Martin was looking forward to her shift Tuesday she was slated for escort duty, taking detainees from their cells to places like the Joint Interrogation Facility or the Detention Hospital and back again. Everyone loves that when its their turn, she said. Its a nice change of pace and you get to be inside in the air conditioning. Indeed, staying sane in this detention oper ations often Groundhog Day-like world often means taking pleasure in the little breaks in the routine. For an active-duty unit that spent all month together long before this and now bunks together too one way to spice up Camp Americas shift-by-shift existence is mixing a little outside the accustomed crowd. Its not easy, but it can be done. Ive made friends in all the other units, said Martin. You meet them on the bus, or in the chow hall, or after PT because theyll just be waking up. Or on a day off, youll meet people on the outside, and find out youre neighbors here and didnt even know it. In other words, were all active-duty now. I think we feel like a unit here the only active-duty unit and all on the same shift, Ralls said. We do stick together. In the end, though, I dont feel any differ ent than the reservists, he said. There may not be a whole lot of natural interaction we do our shift, they do theirs. But we all do the same job. Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Army Sgt. Ronald Farrow checks his list as 571st soldiers head for the bus to Camp Delta. Roll-call clipboard in hand, Army Sgt. Ronald Farrow looks on as members of his 571st Military Police Co. form up for a pre-shift inspection Tuesday under cover near Camp Americas Seaside Galley. Ready for work: Pvt. Jason Totaro of the 571st flashes his badge for Staff Sgt. Joseph McGuigan.

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Non-lethal munitions training Page 6 Friday, August 16, 2002 With the war on terror blurring the lines of traditional warfare in hotspots across the globe, U.S. servicemembers must be ready to take and keep control of different situations, including some where deadly force is not the most desirable way. And that means training the newest and most advanced available in ways of keeping violent situations from spiraling out of control. That was the purpose of the Non-Lethal Munitions training that was demonstrated at Camp America August 8. Non-Lethal Munitions use is not meant to hurt anyone, said Army Staff Sgt. Thomas J. McCarthy, 43rd Military Police Brigade, who works in Anti-Terrorism Force Protection for JTF-160 and teaches the Non-Lethal Muni tions course. It is meant to turn down the escalation of force, which is the amount of force required to keep a situation from esca lating to a higher degree of violence. Its another step in the escalation of force process that a servicemember can use, he said. Now, instead of going right from handto-hand to firing the M-16, there is something in-between to resort to. The training started with a two-hour class room presentation where the history and usage of the munitions were explained by McCarthy and Army Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd MP Brigade and the Non commissioned Officer In Charge of the train ing. Then it was over to the range for a practice session, where the weapons system was demonstrated. Then the students engaged in live fire at the targets. During the classroom portion of the train ing, the different levels of force were explained to the servicemembers. Its known as the Force Continuum, which can range from a show of force to verbal persuasion to non-lethal tactics and, ultimately, deadly force. Tactical situations and the Rules of Engagement specific to them will also dictate the response. But these concepts of the Force Continuum must be understood with flexibil ity, since all dangerous situations can be per ceived differently. The intent of non-lethal munitions is to modify behavior without causing serious injury or death. It serves as another alterna tive for the commander to use in violent situ ations and is designed to create a distraction, but not replace lethal force. More or less, non-lethal weapons will knock an indi vidual down and temporarily incapaci tate them, McCarthy said. Army Maj. Javier A. Reina, J3 with the 43rd MP Brigade and the Officer in Charge of the training, said the JTF-160 com mand wanted all its soldiers to be equally ready for anything. The order for the training came down from the command ing general, who rec ognized the need for additional training for the soldiers, said Reina. There was a gap in the training that soldiers were receiving. Some soldiers didnt receive this training during their mobiliza tion. We are now working to cover that gap and make sure all soldiers are trained to this single standard. This Joint Task Force is made up of members from all the branches who take their jobs very seriously, said Reina. There might have been some apprehension in the beginning prior to coming here and getting the training, but now that we are providing the training and conducting the mission as required, we are doing it in a professional manner, and we are extremely proud to be doing what we are doing. Soldiers already have basic rifle marks manship and other weapons training, said Reina. This training was just an introduction Story by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Staff Sgt. Thomas J. McCarthy, 43rd MP Bde and class instructor, talks about the escalation of force. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Service members pound targets with 12-gauge rubber pellet rounds during the live-fire portion of the Non-Lethal Munitions training Aug. 8. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd MP Bde and NCOIC of training, grips a 12-gauge shotgun and demonstrates proper positioning while Maj. Javier A. Reina, 43rd MP Bde and OIC, acts as a shield guard. Page 11 Friday, August 16, 2002 452nd MP BLD: brain trust of JDOG ops When the 452nd Military Police Brigade Liaison Detach ment, out of Tallahassee, Fla., was deployed June 6, 2002, its com mander, Army Lt. Col. Donald Wedewer, told his troops, Gentle men, like D-Day on June 6, 1944, we are going to make history at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Here they are, having landed on the shores of GTMO at the begin ning of the 21st century. The members of the 452nd are pro ceeding with their mission to defend their country not with con ventional heavy weaponry, but by providing unremitting staff and administrative support to JTF160s Joint Detention Operations Group here. Newly created in 1998 to improve organizational structure after the Gulf War, the wartime MP BLD was established to aug ment and extend the Enemy Pris oners of War (EPW) Brigade commanders staff planning and coordination of operations for three U.S. MP battalions. Our mission is a little bit dif ferent at GTMO, said Wedewer, MP BLDs commander and the JDOGs executive officer. Our unit serves as a liaison between JTF-160s Headquarters, the MP battalion and the MP companies that are supporting the detainee operation at Camp Delta. We really make up the JDOG staff, he said. We are a brigadelevel staff. And since we are a small unit, less than a dozen peo ple, our soldiers have five times the tasks of a normal soldier. They came totally prepared for the mission, said Col. John J. Perrone Jr., JDOGs commander. I feel fortunate to have the 452nd working for JDOG. After a few meetings to lay the groundwork for what was needed to be done and how to interface with the other units, they were ready to proceed with their tasks. We have devel oped a good team relationship. Many of them bring a very good knowledge base of the area theyre working in, said Army Capt. Brett Robistow, the officer in charge of JDOG S-3 section. They are very dedicated to do what they can to support the oper ation at Camp Delta. Robistow is the only section chief who is not part the 452nd MP BLD. He came with the 43rd MP Brigade out of Rhode Island and works with the 452nd here. The 452nd MP BLD can be called the administrative braintrust of JDOG. Its officers are in charge of three of the JDOGs sections. One of them, Capt. Keith Bow ers, the officer in charge of JDOG S-1 section, puts it this way: Its pretty interesting to be part of this unit, said Bowers. Since we are a relatively small unit, everybody has their own field of expertise. We do a lot of crosstraining, and we support each other. The highly skilled unit is mostly made up of officers, but Bowers said not having enlisted labor around doesnt keep them from doing their job. Whether you are an officer or enlisted, you still have a job to do, said Bowers. Bowers, who oversees matters related to military personnel and the records of the detainees at Camp Delta, said that as soon as the 452nd came here, its members tried to embrace JDOGs priorities as their own. That flexible attitude worked well for Capt. Sharon McKnight, the OIC of JDOG S-2 and the medical liaison officer. My only challenge, she said, was to learn more about the med ical field. This the first time I am working as a medical liaison, and the working environment is differ ent and pretty new to me. As the medical liaison, McK night works with the Detainee Hospital and the representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross. Were always trying to look at ways to improve care at the hospi tal, she said. Were now work ing on a fixed facility, which will help the medical staff in providing better care for the patients. On a personal note, McKnight said she missed her three kids and would like to have them here, if it were possible. But, like a true solider, she said, I try my best to stay motivated because this is a very important mission. We have a tight-knit group here. We work well together, and we try to help each other. On the enlisted side, Master Sgt. Eugene Butler said, I like being part of the unit. But as soon as we got here, we forgot about it and tried to blend in with the peo ple of JDOG. Butler is now the JDOGs non commissioned officer in charge of operations. His job is to make sure that the operation runs smoothly. He has to do site visits and help enforce the standard operating procedures (SOP), and hes glad for the responsibility. Being at GTMO and partici pating in such an operation pro vides me with an experience that will help enhance my career, said Butler. The youngest member of the unit is Pfc. J.D. Murphy, who had to cancel the classes that he was taking at Florida State University. Now my friends and fellow classmates are going to graduate before I do, he said. But as I remember what happened on Sept. 11, I tend to forget about my personal hardship and focus on Operation Enduring Freedom. Thats why I am here. GTMO is much better than I expected, he said. In addition to the tropical climate, I like working for Capt. McKnight, who helps keep morale up, said Murphy. As far as work, Ive done a lit tle bit of everything, he said. Anything to get the mission going and to make my unit and JDOG proud. For their performance on the field, the members of the 452nd MP BLD have earned the admira tion and respect of the JDOGs commander. Up to this point, they are doing a marvelous job. Theyve met my expectations, said Perrone. Lt. Col. Wedewer was able to fill a void for me in the sense that I have to rely on his expertise and his staff for many issues. I trust theyll continue to be key advisors to the operation, said Perrone. This is a very challenging assignment that requires the staff to be focused and stay ahead of issues, said Perrone. They have maintained that type of discipline, which is contributing to the suc cess of the JDOG operation here. By doing so, they are supporting Gen. Rick Baccus and the deten tion operation as a whole. This is our units first deploy ment overseas, said Wedewer. We are breaking new ground. What we hope to do is pass on some of this knowledge and expe rience in this situation to MP schools and other MP BLDs. Photo courtesy of the 452nd MP BLD Lt. Col. Don Wedewer, the commander of 452nd MPBLD and the XO of JDOG, being interviewed by the media in Tallahassee, Fla., before the unit was deployed. Story by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Up to this point, theyre doing a marvelous job. Army Col. John J. Perrone Jr.

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OC is the best thing since sliced bread, said Army Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd Military Police Brigade and Non-Commis sioned Officer in Charge of training. Ive been utilizing it for over 13 years. Very few people can fight through the effects of OC. Ive actu ally seen people weep. OC, or Oleoresin Capsicum, is no joke. Classified as an inflamma tory pepper spray, it is just one of the non-lethal weapons that the MPs out at Camp America have been trained to use effectively. They have to fight through a 90-second drill which consists of five different sta tions to become certified to use OC spray. This class has been designed to give the MPs a better understand ing of how pepper spray is used, said Army Maj. Javier A. Reina, 43rd MP Bde., and Officer in Charge of training. They are taught how to fight through the effects if they should become contaminated. To keep fighting after being sprayed is a difficult and painful task to accomplish given OCs potential to stop you in your tracks. Its designed to cause a distraction, so the individual who is being sprayed can be taken down safely and effectively without injury, said Vinacco. Some lessons have to be learned the hard way. Just ask the MPs. Nothing like OC spray to spice up your day Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Page 10 Friday, August 16, 2002 Army Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd MP Bde., NCOIC of training and master of all weapons nonlethal, assumes his fierce spray ing stance and fires the peppery load. Army Sgt. Katty Casas, 239th MP Co., takes a healthy dose of OC spray right between the eyes from sharpshooting Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco. Sgt. Casas gets hosed off at the decontamination station after completing the course. Army Pvt. Rachel DiGiovanni, 571st MP Co., commands the enemy to get down on the ground at the last station. Army Sgt. Jamie Sheets, 342nd Mp Co., struggles in vain to open his burning eyes and desperately wash the OC spray out, while standing in front of a mirror. Army Pfc. Hal L. Robinson, 342 MP Co., uses all of his force to throw some elbow blocks while fighting his way through the different stations of the course with his eyes full of OC. to the actual non-lethal munitions, so users can observe what the effects of the different munitions are. For Army Sgt. Ronald Farrow of the 571st MP Co. from Fort Lewis, Wash., it was a wel come opportunity to get more comfortable with the weaponry. Some of the stuff that was introduced in the classroom, I have heard about, but didnt have any actual experience in using, he said. Todays training was a good learning expe rience. Of course, merely coming in contact with such weaponry means little if you dont come into contact with those who can teach you to use it correctly. The instructors at the training were there to pass on their extensive knowl edge of non-lethal weapons and tactics. All the instructors out here training sol diers are highly qualified graduates from the Interservice Non-Lethal Weapons Course out of Fort Leonard Wood, MO, said Reina. This is the single Department of Defense standard that is followed throughout all of the services, so all the branches can participate in this training. The instructors were great, said Army Spc. David S. Hamann of the 114th MP Co. from Mississippi. I was never trained with non-lethal weapons, so this training was of great benefit to me. Training doesnt only make soldiers better off and fit to fight in the physical aspect, but gives them the extra confidence that comes with another skill. You can see the motivation in their faces. Now that they know what to do with the munitions, they can do it now, said Reina. Theyre qualified and have the capability to fire off these munitions, and they feel secure that they have another tool in the bag, said Reina. Any kind of extra training is good train ing, said Hamann. This training raised my confidence level about being able to handle and control riot situations. Going into the class kind of opened my eyes, said Farrow. I learned a lot about the weapons and the munitions being used. It was good to be able to do that. For the guards who walk within the many gates of locked-down Camp Delta, the need to control a violent crowd might seem far-fetched. But there are other stops for U.S. forces in the war on terror than quiet GTMO. Everywhere, riot conditions are on the rise, said McCarthy. The use of nonlethal force is really growing these days. Of course, part of non-lethal munitions training is learning how to keep the munitions and the situation that calls for them non-lethal. Safety is paramount, said Vinacco. Non-lethal is less than lethal, but that can depend on how close you are. It is very important to know the minimum and maximum effective ranges of the differ ent types of munitions, said McCarthy. Anything fired below the minimum range can break through the skin and cause serious, even fatal damages. Non-lethal could definitely turn lethal within the minimum range, said Reina. Safety is a big concern during all training. Given such attention to proper handling and safety techniques of these non-lethal weapons, Vinacco a master of the weapons himself proclaimed that he was very impressed with those who had picked them up for the first time. Everyone out here displayed the safety aspect of the training very well, said Vinacco. I am very pleased with the out come of the training. Training to use non-lethal weaponry can give soldiers in a violent situation an extra option before having to end someones life with deadly force and risk turning a riot into a gunfight. And whether its learning to control a crowd with a 12-gauge sponge gun or to subdue an individual with OC pepper spray (see page 10), the non-lethal munitions training going on at Camp America offers one set of new skills that could someday save a servicemembers life. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Soldiers fire 12-gauge rubber pettlets from shotguns. Page 7 Friday, August 16, 2002 adds options to soldiers arsenal Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Staff Sgt. Thomas J. McCarthy, 43rd MP Bde and class instructor, demonstrates a combat load on an M-203. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The firing line is ready as soldiers practice their riot control advance manuevers.

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, August 16, 2002 Welcome to Guantanamo Bay! Every person and plane that touches down at Leeward Air Terminal is greeted by Naval Station GTMO Base Security. All bags are screened, all papers are checked, and all of GTMO can sleep tight at night knowing that this team of sailors is at the airport and on the job, keeping the rest of GTMO safe and secure. Nothing gets by this staff, said MA1 Glen W. Jernigan, NCOIC of the Navsta GTMO Base Security. We are responsible for all Leeward security. We secure the flight line, provide GTMO with anti-terrorist hijacking security, and work as the police force for both the Leeward and Windward sides, he said. While securing the flight line, the team acts as a gate between GTMO and the rest of the free world. The security team oversees all that travels onto and off of the island. They are equipped with weapons, X-ray machines, metal detection instruments, and trained contrabandsniffing dogs. These high-tech tools provide the means for these skilled professionals to accomplish their mis sion efficiently and effectively. I have complete faith in the staff here, said Jerrigan, and so should all of GTMO. OSSN Mary J. Dissler retrieves a bag off of the conveyor belt at Leeward Air Ter minal after it has been screened by the X-ray machine. MA3 Eric Jackson wands a passenger who set off the metal detectors alarm. STG3 Alan A. Percoski stands at the ready with his 12-gauge shotgun. MASN Tim D. Jonczak keeps an eye out as passengers deboard a plane. MA1 Glen W. Jernigan checks a passengers paperwork as he gets off a flight. MA3 James D. Potter screens luggage with the X-ray machine. Even security has security at Leeward Air Terminal. Air Terminal Security: Screening for safety Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, August 16, 2002 Welcome to Guantanamo Bay! Every person and plane that touches down at Leeward Air Terminal is greeted by Naval Station GTMO Base Security. All bags are screened, all papers are checked, and all of GTMO can sleep tight at night knowing that this team of sailors is at the airport and on the job, keeping the rest of GTMO safe and secure. Nothing gets by this staff, said MA1 Glen W. Jernigan, NCOIC of the Navsta GTMO Base Security. We are responsible for all Leeward security. We secure the flight line, provide GTMO with anti-terrorist hijacking security, and work as the police force for both the Leeward and Windward sides, he said. While securing the flight line, the team acts as a gate between GTMO and the rest of the free world. The security team oversees all that travels onto and off of the island. They are equipped with weapons, X-ray machines, metal detection instruments, and trained contrabandsniffing dogs. These high-tech tools provide the means for these skilled professionals to accomplish their mis sion efficiently and effectively. I have complete faith in the staff here, said Jerrigan, and so should all of GTMO. OSSN Mary J. Dissler retrieves a bag off of the conveyor belt at Leeward Air Ter minal after it has been screened by the X-ray machine. MA3 Eric Jackson wands a passenger who set off the metal detectors alarm. STG3 Alan A. Percoski stands at the ready with his 12-gauge shotgun. MASN Tim D. Jonczak keeps an eye out as passengers deboard a plane. MA1 Glen W. Jernigan checks a passengers paperwork as he gets off a flight. MA3 James D. Potter screens luggage with the X-ray machine. Even security has security at Leeward Air Terminal. Air Terminal Security: Screening for safety Story and photos by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire

PAGE 10

OC is the best thing since sliced bread, said Army Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd Military Police Brigade and Non-Commis sioned Officer in Charge of training. Ive been utilizing it for over 13 years. Very few people can fight through the effects of OC. Ive actu ally seen people weep. OC, or Oleoresin Capsicum, is no joke. Classified as an inflamma tory pepper spray, it is just one of the non-lethal weapons that the MPs out at Camp America have been trained to use effectively. They have to fight through a 90-second drill which consists of five different sta tions to become certified to use OC spray. This class has been designed to give the MPs a better understand ing of how pepper spray is used, said Army Maj. Javier A. Reina, 43rd MP Bde., and Officer in Charge of training. They are taught how to fight through the effects if they should become contaminated. To keep fighting after being sprayed is a difficult and painful task to accomplish given OCs potential to stop you in your tracks. Its designed to cause a distraction, so the individual who is being sprayed can be taken down safely and effectively without injury, said Vinacco. Some lessons have to be learned the hard way. Just ask the MPs. Nothing like OC spray to spice up your day Story and photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Page 10 Friday, August 16, 2002 Army Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd MP Bde., NCOIC of training and master of all weapons nonlethal, assumes his fierce spray ing stance and fires the peppery load. Army Sgt. Katty Casas, 239th MP Co., takes a healthy dose of OC spray right between the eyes from sharpshooting Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco. Sgt. Casas gets hosed off at the decontamination station after completing the course. Army Pvt. Rachel DiGiovanni, 571st MP Co., commands the enemy to get down on the ground at the last station. Army Sgt. Jamie Sheets, 342nd Mp Co., struggles in vain to open his burning eyes and desperately wash the OC spray out, while standing in front of a mirror. Army Pfc. Hal L. Robinson, 342 MP Co., uses all of his force to throw some elbow blocks while fighting his way through the different stations of the course with his eyes full of OC. to the actual non-lethal munitions, so users can observe what the effects of the different munitions are. For Army Sgt. Ronald Farrow of the 571st MP Co. from Fort Lewis, Wash., it was a wel come opportunity to get more comfortable with the weaponry. Some of the stuff that was introduced in the classroom, I have heard about, but didnt have any actual experience in using, he said. Todays training was a good learning expe rience. Of course, merely coming in contact with such weaponry means little if you dont come into contact with those who can teach you to use it correctly. The instructors at the training were there to pass on their extensive knowl edge of non-lethal weapons and tactics. All the instructors out here training sol diers are highly qualified graduates from the Interservice Non-Lethal Weapons Course out of Fort Leonard Wood, MO, said Reina. This is the single Department of Defense standard that is followed throughout all of the services, so all the branches can participate in this training. The instructors were great, said Army Spc. David S. Hamann of the 114th MP Co. from Mississippi. I was never trained with non-lethal weapons, so this training was of great benefit to me. Training doesnt only make soldiers better off and fit to fight in the physical aspect, but gives them the extra confidence that comes with another skill. You can see the motivation in their faces. Now that they know what to do with the munitions, they can do it now, said Reina. Theyre qualified and have the capability to fire off these munitions, and they feel secure that they have another tool in the bag, said Reina. Any kind of extra training is good train ing, said Hamann. This training raised my confidence level about being able to handle and control riot situations. Going into the class kind of opened my eyes, said Farrow. I learned a lot about the weapons and the munitions being used. It was good to be able to do that. For the guards who walk within the many gates of locked-down Camp Delta, the need to control a violent crowd might seem far-fetched. But there are other stops for U.S. forces in the war on terror than quiet GTMO. Everywhere, riot conditions are on the rise, said McCarthy. The use of nonlethal force is really growing these days. Of course, part of non-lethal munitions training is learning how to keep the munitions and the situation that calls for them non-lethal. Safety is paramount, said Vinacco. Non-lethal is less than lethal, but that can depend on how close you are. It is very important to know the minimum and maximum effective ranges of the differ ent types of munitions, said McCarthy. Anything fired below the minimum range can break through the skin and cause serious, even fatal damages. Non-lethal could definitely turn lethal within the minimum range, said Reina. Safety is a big concern during all training. Given such attention to proper handling and safety techniques of these non-lethal weapons, Vinacco a master of the weapons himself proclaimed that he was very impressed with those who had picked them up for the first time. Everyone out here displayed the safety aspect of the training very well, said Vinacco. I am very pleased with the out come of the training. Training to use non-lethal weaponry can give soldiers in a violent situation an extra option before having to end someones life with deadly force and risk turning a riot into a gunfight. And whether its learning to control a crowd with a 12-gauge sponge gun or to subdue an individual with OC pepper spray (see page 10), the non-lethal munitions training going on at Camp America offers one set of new skills that could someday save a servicemembers life. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Soldiers fire 12-gauge rubber pettlets from shotguns. Page 7 Friday, August 16, 2002 adds options to soldiers arsenal Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Staff Sgt. Thomas J. McCarthy, 43rd MP Bde and class instructor, demonstrates a combat load on an M-203. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The firing line is ready as soldiers practice their riot control advance manuevers.

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Non-lethal munitions training Page 6 Friday, August 16, 2002 With the war on terror blurring the lines of traditional warfare in hotspots across the globe, U.S. servicemembers must be ready to take and keep control of different situations, including some where deadly force is not the most desirable way. And that means training the newest and most advanced available in ways of keeping violent situations from spiraling out of control. That was the purpose of the Non-Lethal Munitions training that was demonstrated at Camp America August 8. Non-Lethal Munitions use is not meant to hurt anyone, said Army Staff Sgt. Thomas J. McCarthy, 43rd Military Police Brigade, who works in Anti-Terrorism Force Protection for JTF-160 and teaches the Non-Lethal Muni tions course. It is meant to turn down the escalation of force, which is the amount of force required to keep a situation from esca lating to a higher degree of violence. Its another step in the escalation of force process that a servicemember can use, he said. Now, instead of going right from handto-hand to firing the M-16, there is something in-between to resort to. The training started with a two-hour class room presentation where the history and usage of the munitions were explained by McCarthy and Army Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd MP Brigade and the Non commissioned Officer In Charge of the train ing. Then it was over to the range for a practice session, where the weapons system was demonstrated. Then the students engaged in live fire at the targets. During the classroom portion of the train ing, the different levels of force were explained to the servicemembers. Its known as the Force Continuum, which can range from a show of force to verbal persuasion to non-lethal tactics and, ultimately, deadly force. Tactical situations and the Rules of Engagement specific to them will also dictate the response. But these concepts of the Force Continuum must be understood with flexibil ity, since all dangerous situations can be per ceived differently. The intent of non-lethal munitions is to modify behavior without causing serious injury or death. It serves as another alterna tive for the commander to use in violent situ ations and is designed to create a distraction, but not replace lethal force. More or less, non-lethal weapons will knock an indi vidual down and temporarily incapaci tate them, McCarthy said. Army Maj. Javier A. Reina, J3 with the 43rd MP Brigade and the Officer in Charge of the training, said the JTF-160 com mand wanted all its soldiers to be equally ready for anything. The order for the training came down from the command ing general, who rec ognized the need for additional training for the soldiers, said Reina. There was a gap in the training that soldiers were receiving. Some soldiers didnt receive this training during their mobiliza tion. We are now working to cover that gap and make sure all soldiers are trained to this single standard. This Joint Task Force is made up of members from all the branches who take their jobs very seriously, said Reina. There might have been some apprehension in the beginning prior to coming here and getting the training, but now that we are providing the training and conducting the mission as required, we are doing it in a professional manner, and we are extremely proud to be doing what we are doing. Soldiers already have basic rifle marks manship and other weapons training, said Reina. This training was just an introduction Story by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Staff Sgt. Thomas J. McCarthy, 43rd MP Bde and class instructor, talks about the escalation of force. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Service members pound targets with 12-gauge rubber pellet rounds during the live-fire portion of the Non-Lethal Munitions training Aug. 8. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Vinacco, 43rd MP Bde and NCOIC of training, grips a 12-gauge shotgun and demonstrates proper positioning while Maj. Javier A. Reina, 43rd MP Bde and OIC, acts as a shield guard. Page 11 Friday, August 16, 2002 452nd MP BLD: brain trust of JDOG ops When the 452nd Military Police Brigade Liaison Detach ment, out of Tallahassee, Fla., was deployed June 6, 2002, its com mander, Army Lt. Col. Donald Wedewer, told his troops, Gentle men, like D-Day on June 6, 1944, we are going to make history at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Here they are, having landed on the shores of GTMO at the begin ning of the 21st century. The members of the 452nd are pro ceeding with their mission to defend their country not with con ventional heavy weaponry, but by providing unremitting staff and administrative support to JTF160s Joint Detention Operations Group here. Newly created in 1998 to improve organizational structure after the Gulf War, the wartime MP BLD was established to aug ment and extend the Enemy Pris oners of War (EPW) Brigade commanders staff planning and coordination of operations for three U.S. MP battalions. Our mission is a little bit dif ferent at GTMO, said Wedewer, MP BLDs commander and the JDOGs executive officer. Our unit serves as a liaison between JTF-160s Headquarters, the MP battalion and the MP companies that are supporting the detainee operation at Camp Delta. We really make up the JDOG staff, he said. We are a brigadelevel staff. And since we are a small unit, less than a dozen peo ple, our soldiers have five times the tasks of a normal soldier. They came totally prepared for the mission, said Col. John J. Perrone Jr., JDOGs commander. I feel fortunate to have the 452nd working for JDOG. After a few meetings to lay the groundwork for what was needed to be done and how to interface with the other units, they were ready to proceed with their tasks. We have devel oped a good team relationship. Many of them bring a very good knowledge base of the area theyre working in, said Army Capt. Brett Robistow, the officer in charge of JDOG S-3 section. They are very dedicated to do what they can to support the oper ation at Camp Delta. Robistow is the only section chief who is not part the 452nd MP BLD. He came with the 43rd MP Brigade out of Rhode Island and works with the 452nd here. The 452nd MP BLD can be called the administrative braintrust of JDOG. Its officers are in charge of three of the JDOGs sections. One of them, Capt. Keith Bow ers, the officer in charge of JDOG S-1 section, puts it this way: Its pretty interesting to be part of this unit, said Bowers. Since we are a relatively small unit, everybody has their own field of expertise. We do a lot of crosstraining, and we support each other. The highly skilled unit is mostly made up of officers, but Bowers said not having enlisted labor around doesnt keep them from doing their job. Whether you are an officer or enlisted, you still have a job to do, said Bowers. Bowers, who oversees matters related to military personnel and the records of the detainees at Camp Delta, said that as soon as the 452nd came here, its members tried to embrace JDOGs priorities as their own. That flexible attitude worked well for Capt. Sharon McKnight, the OIC of JDOG S-2 and the medical liaison officer. My only challenge, she said, was to learn more about the med ical field. This the first time I am working as a medical liaison, and the working environment is differ ent and pretty new to me. As the medical liaison, McK night works with the Detainee Hospital and the representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross. Were always trying to look at ways to improve care at the hospi tal, she said. Were now work ing on a fixed facility, which will help the medical staff in providing better care for the patients. On a personal note, McKnight said she missed her three kids and would like to have them here, if it were possible. But, like a true solider, she said, I try my best to stay motivated because this is a very important mission. We have a tight-knit group here. We work well together, and we try to help each other. On the enlisted side, Master Sgt. Eugene Butler said, I like being part of the unit. But as soon as we got here, we forgot about it and tried to blend in with the peo ple of JDOG. Butler is now the JDOGs non commissioned officer in charge of operations. His job is to make sure that the operation runs smoothly. He has to do site visits and help enforce the standard operating procedures (SOP), and hes glad for the responsibility. Being at GTMO and partici pating in such an operation pro vides me with an experience that will help enhance my career, said Butler. The youngest member of the unit is Pfc. J.D. Murphy, who had to cancel the classes that he was taking at Florida State University. Now my friends and fellow classmates are going to graduate before I do, he said. But as I remember what happened on Sept. 11, I tend to forget about my personal hardship and focus on Operation Enduring Freedom. Thats why I am here. GTMO is much better than I expected, he said. In addition to the tropical climate, I like working for Capt. McKnight, who helps keep morale up, said Murphy. As far as work, Ive done a lit tle bit of everything, he said. Anything to get the mission going and to make my unit and JDOG proud. For their performance on the field, the members of the 452nd MP BLD have earned the admira tion and respect of the JDOGs commander. Up to this point, they are doing a marvelous job. Theyve met my expectations, said Perrone. Lt. Col. Wedewer was able to fill a void for me in the sense that I have to rely on his expertise and his staff for many issues. I trust theyll continue to be key advisors to the operation, said Perrone. This is a very challenging assignment that requires the staff to be focused and stay ahead of issues, said Perrone. They have maintained that type of discipline, which is contributing to the suc cess of the JDOG operation here. By doing so, they are supporting Gen. Rick Baccus and the deten tion operation as a whole. This is our units first deploy ment overseas, said Wedewer. We are breaking new ground. What we hope to do is pass on some of this knowledge and expe rience in this situation to MP schools and other MP BLDs. Photo courtesy of the 452nd MP BLD Lt. Col. Don Wedewer, the commander of 452nd MPBLD and the XO of JDOG, being interviewed by the media in Tallahassee, Fla., before the unit was deployed. Story by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Up to this point, theyre doing a marvelous job. Army Col. John J. Perrone Jr.

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the border below. I observe everything, right down to a twitch of a finger. If I fail in my job, everyone on the base might die because there will be no warning, said Lance Cpl. Ramirez Gomez. In this work, you have to stay focused. If the Cubans try anything on my MOP, theyll have to answer to my M-16. Im here to protect the base and to serve the Marine Corps and my country. And given the current global threat of ter rorism since Sept. 11 and the fact that 598 detainees are being held right here in GTMO, watching out for troublesome Cubans is now only one potential threat to look out for. Since Sept. 11, the importance of our mis sion has increased ten-fold, said Cpl. Mark Palos. Not only do we have to watch the Cubans but also look out for possible terrorist attacks. Theres a real possibility that terrorists can come through that fence. People have to realize that there is a communist country on the other side, and we have no say on what goes on over there. If they want to let terrorists into their country, they can. Were the only thing between them and the base. With all the attention placed on the war on terror and the detainees, the long-standing mission of these Marines might be somewhat overshadowed, but it is a mission that needs no outside attention to get done. Most of the attention is going to Camp Delta now, but were not looking for attention or glory, said Palos. We have a job to do. They can keep all the thunder they want. When theyre not on line doing their job, the Marines here conduct extensive training, said Diaz, which includes martial arts, work ing with mines and polishing their basic infantry skills. Everyone in the unit really holds their own, he said, and takes the training to heart after all, they may need it someday. We try to do a lot. We know how to do our job, said Palos. Back at home during drill weekends, we also do a lot of infantry opera tions and tactics. And now that theyre deployed to Guan tanamo Bay, the unit as a whole is well pre pared to accomplish their task. I was active duty before, so Im used to being away from home, said Diaz. Its hard to just get up and be gone for a year, but I think that these Marines are handling it very well. They miss their families, but their minds are always on the job. Well, this is my job, said Cpl. Keith Harris. I know why Im here, so I have to go do it. You learn a lot of toler ance and patience, said Palos. Nothing is set in stone. You have to learn not to take it personally; its all just business. We all have a job to do. That business is part of the long and distinguished history of the Marines at Guantanamo Bay, and the legacy continues with the tireless efforts of these reservists. This base has been changed from Marine to Navy, but the security has always been Marine, since the Battle of Cuzco Wells in 1898. Only since Sept. 11 has the intensity increased, said Palos. For over a hundred years, Marines have been here doing this job, and we will continue to do so as long as we need to, said Diaz. I think that people really dont understand that there is a communist coun try on the other side of that fence. All of the Marines here take this job very seriously. Marines often have the reputation of being fanatical about being Marines. For these reservists, its simply a grave responsibility. We have a vital mission here, said Cpl. Kevin Martinez. If we werent guarding that fence line, theres no telling what could hap pen. Were keeping the people here safe, and were going home safely. Thats the Marine Corps way. Page 5 Friday, August 16, 2002 GUARDING, from page 1 Cpl. Mark Palos of MCSF Co. leads a foot patrol along the northeast gate entrance to Cuba. Lance Cpl. Ramirez Gomez, like his fellow Marines of the MCSF Co., keeps a vigil eye when in his MOP; the security of the base is in his hand. A shift gets ready to roll out on a mounted patrol with armored humvees. Patrols are done 24 hours a day. 571st MPs: Deltas full-timers Page 12 Friday, August 16, 2002 There isnt much that distinguishes the 571st Military Police Co. from the handful of other units guarding detainees at Camp Delta and living at Camp America. Same home. Same workplace. Same SEAhuts over their heads and gravel beneath their feet. Well, maybe the conversation. They all talk about their jobs and what theyre missing out on at home, said the 571st commander, Army Capt. Krista Watts. This is our job. Were in the Army. In a detention operation run largely by reservists, the 571st is the only active-duty MP company on the ground at Camp Amer ica. Which means theyre all from one home town Fort Lewis in Washington state and theyre maybe a little more accustomed than their neighbors to spending most of their waking hours in speckled green. They also bring a certain geographical bal ance to the Camp America nation. Most of our people are originally from the Western states Washington, Oregon, California, said Watts. Except for the 346th from Kansas, the reserve units here are all from east of the Mississippi. Being full-time MPs also means the 571st is filled with military pros prior-service Marines, prior-service Air Force, a good cross-section of military life, said 1st Sgt. Philip Chatigny. But unlike many of the Guard and Reserve MP units, the 571st didnt have a lot of members who did Camp Deltatype work in their full-time lives. This isnt a typical MP mission for us. MPs in the Army dont do corrections, said Chatigny. But we were able to get a lot of training at the Military Correctional Facility at Fort Lewis. And when our turn came to come here, we were ready. Now that theyre on the job, the 571st leads a professional existence at Guantanamo Bay that any National Guard or Reserve MP here knows all too well: Go to Camp Delta, guard the detainees, serve a meal (for these swing-shifters, thats dinner), guard the detainees some more and be relieved by the next shift. Before work, a formation at Camp America to check that everyones equipped to go to work, and one in Delta to put out some company business and relieve the guards on duty. After, do PT to unwind, and go to sleep. And this portion of the detention opera tion, the 571st serves together. Working the same shift together helps keep the company strong, and it gives the sol diers a sense of ownership of that part of the detainees day, said Watts. They feel like theyre responsible. And what a responsibility high pres sure, high-stakes, looking after some of Americas worst enemies with the whole world looking on. But it remains a job that, day-to-day, doesnt offer much in the way of adventure and thats if its done right. We dont expect a whole lot of excite ment, said guard Sgt. Eric M. Ralls. We hope theres not a whole lot of excitement. With a job like ours, the less the better. Its really not difficult, he continued. After all this time, the detainees are very institutionalized. They know exactly whats going to happen, when its going to happen. They put up very little resistance. But even in a job where monotony is the goal, variety is still the spice of life. Pfc. BethAnn M. Martin was looking forward to her shift Tuesday she was slated for escort duty, taking detainees from their cells to places like the Joint Interrogation Facility or the Detention Hospital and back again. Everyone loves that when its their turn, she said. Its a nice change of pace and you get to be inside in the air conditioning. Indeed, staying sane in this detention oper ations often Groundhog Day-like world often means taking pleasure in the little breaks in the routine. For an active-duty unit that spent all month together long before this and now bunks together too one way to spice up Camp Americas shift-by-shift existence is mixing a little outside the accustomed crowd. Its not easy, but it can be done. Ive made friends in all the other units, said Martin. You meet them on the bus, or in the chow hall, or after PT because theyll just be waking up. Or on a day off, youll meet people on the outside, and find out youre neighbors here and didnt even know it. In other words, were all active-duty now. I think we feel like a unit here the only active-duty unit and all on the same shift, Ralls said. We do stick together. In the end, though, I dont feel any differ ent than the reservists, he said. There may not be a whole lot of natural interaction we do our shift, they do theirs. But we all do the same job. Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Army Sgt. Ronald Farrow checks his list as 571st soldiers head for the bus to Camp Delta. Roll-call clipboard in hand, Army Sgt. Ronald Farrow looks on as members of his 571st Military Police Co. form up for a pre-shift inspection Tuesday under cover near Camp Americas Seaside Galley. Ready for work: Pvt. Jason Totaro of the 571st flashes his badge for Staff Sgt. Joseph McGuigan.

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Page 4 Friday, August 16, 2002 This weeks question: Who would you choose to be stuck in a fox hole with if rounds started to fly? Army Sgt. Edward Villarreal, Bravo 2nd/142nd INF Co. My best friend Joshua who I met on active duty. We have a strong bond, and I can count on him for anything. Army Staff Sgt. Billy Corley, Bravo 2nd/142 INF Co. Cindy Crawford. It dont matter if shes a good shot or not. Army Sgt. Joshua Conwell, 178th MP Co. I would stuff my whole team in the foxhole. I cant com plain about any of those guys, so Id take them all. Army Spc. Johnny Best, 418th Trans portation Co. Id fight in a foxhole with just about any one. But throw Jada Pinkett-Smith in there, and Ill really hold that spot down. Army Sgt. 1st Class Earl Manning, 160th MP Bn. Staff Sgt. Kinsey, my assistant NCOIC. He is an outstanding sol dier, and I would will ingly go into combat with him any time. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Finest senior service member of JTF-160! Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, the com mander of JTF-160, recognizes Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Elizabeth French after she was selected by a board made up of top enlisted service members to represent the task force in the Navy Base Senior Servicemember of the Quarter competition. I was happy and honored to be chosen by JTF-160 to represent the taskforce in the Navy Senior Servicemember of the Quarter, said French. It meant everything to me that I was recognized as an NCO or petty officer. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Across 1 Medicine cabinet need 7 Cook 11 Distress call 14 Con (2 wds.) 15 Air (prefix) 16 Central processing unit 17 Transparent winged insect 18 Energy 19 Place 20 Airport abbr. 22 Radioactivity unit 23 Male sheep 24 Electronic systems 29 Give a contribution 31 Gourmet chocolate brand 32 Ball holder 34 Staid 35 Form 36 Mexican region 38 Shifty 39 Legume 40 Operate 41 Poor boy 44 New Mexico city 46 Flower jar 47 Crunchy 50 Building addition 51 Dubbed 52 Insinuator 54 State of ease 56 Spots 57 Fleece 59 School group 60 Body of water 61 Graven image 63 Entertained 68 Sea eagle 69 Salamander 70 Constellation 71 Compass point 72 Precious metal 73 Cheated Down 1 Business abbr. 2 Luau dish 3 And so forth 4 Accountant 5 Fervid 6 Racoon-like animal 7 Car 8 Successor 9 Goofed 10 Of Taiwan 11 Beetle 12 Narcotic 13 Season before Fall 21 To move to action 24 Charity 25 Bottle 26 Murky 27 Lyric poem 28 Part of a min. 30 Not (prefix) 33 Extremity cover 36 Japanese money 37 Second day of the wk. 39 To wrap 41 Akin 42 Usages 43 Berths 44 Concord e.g. 45 Brew 46 Wheeled vehicle 47 Pursues 48 Horseback travelers 49 Fruity 51 Capital of Niger 53 Cowboy show 55 Canned chili brand 58 Dish 62 Type of partnership 64 Referee 65 Drink slowly 66 Vane direction 67 Does Page 13 Friday, August 16, 2002 Concepts to creations Dwelling off past memories While building new relations Along the way ABSORB WHAT YOU ARE TAUGHT Its not who you fight, Its why you fought STAND FIRM With roots strong like a tree. You may be not rich, But success comes for free TAKE A BREATH, THEN BEGIN Youll figure out you can't lose When you stop trying to win Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Answers to the August 9 puzzle Friday, August 16 8 p.m. Divine Secrets of the Ya Ya Sisterhood, PG13 -116min 10 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG13 93min Saturday, August 17 8 p.m. Bad Company, PG-13 -117min 10 p.m. Road to Perdition, PG13 -118min Sunday, August 18 8 p.m. Minority Report, PG13 140min Monday, August 19 8 p.m. Windtalkers, R 133min Tuesday, August 20 8 p.m. Stuart Little 2, PG13 70min Wednesday, August 21 8 p.m. The Bourne Identity, PG13 -118min Thursday, August 22 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann, PG13 91min

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Page 14 Friday, August 16, 2002 No falling is allowed in this sport. Not on my watch, Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Melissa Steinman assured the seven students who attended her new rappelling class on Saturday. Five of the seven students had never rappelled before, but Steinmans class is geared toward making both beginners and experts feel at home. Steinman, a quartermaster with Port Security Unit 307, teaches the class every fourth day during her day off. She is one of only two people associ ated with the bases Morale Welfare and Recreation depart ment who is certified to give such a class. A reservist, Stein man teaches rock-climbing at a gym in Florida back in the civilian world. The 30-foot rappelling tower, which looms over the Paintball range, offers an impressive view of nearby Marine Hill and Guantanamo Bay. The facing of the sturdy wooden structure is plain now, but there are plans to add ele ments to the surface to simulate different natural materials. According to Steinman, a variety of new equipment has been ordered, including safety helmets, gloves, harnesses and ropes. The rock-climbing wall in the Marine Hill gym will be undergoing some improve ments as well. Steinman starts her class by giving an overview of what the climbers should expect. She stresses safety and she backs up everything she talks about with a demonstration given at a moderate pace. The lessons are taught in a four-class series, though the basics of rappelling can be learned in the first hour, Stein man said. The 9 mm-diameter ropes that stabilize the rappellers may look suspiciously thin, but the ropes are manufactured with a breaking force measured in kilonewtons meaning youd have to weigh thousands of pounds to snap them. Redundancy is built into the system. Three points of contact to the top of the tower are established with the ropes. Locking carabiners (clamps) are favored over spring-loaded models that could pop open if a rope became tangled. Even if a rappeller panics, the belayer, an assistant holding a safety rope at the base of the tower, can almost instantly stop a fall with a firm pull. Though rappellers decend the wall individually, teamwork is part of the training. When donning the safety harnesses while standing at the top of the tower, rappellers keep an eye on each other to prevent falls. Like wise, once youve decended the wall, you have to act as a beleyer for the next rappeller and ensure his or her safety. After Steinmans demon stration, it was time to take the plunge. The goal was to walk slowly down the wall back wards. The seven students descended the wall, one after another, with no mishaps. Steinman guided them the whole way and talked a few through the natural tendancy to put a death grip on the rope instead of letting the cord do its job and glide smoothly through the metal belaying hoops. First-time rappeller Sherrie Nabakowski, a civilian DOD worker, was excited about the experience. The first time you lean backward its weird, but it was fun, said Nabakowski. Call 8-5115 for the next available class. Classes run from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. The first hour is devoted to instruction, followed by open rappelling monitored by the instructor. Experienced rappellers may bring their own gear. Rappelling class has GTMO climbers reaching new heights Story by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Wire The Mens and Womens Division Soccer Season will be starting on Monday, September 30th and run until Friday, November 8th. All Division Soccer rosters are due on Friday, September 20th. Con tact Capt. Gormly at x5249 for more information. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sail ing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Nightly 8 PM Free movie, Lyceum & Camp Bulke ley. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. MWF, 5:30PM-6:30PM, Tues. & Thurs. 6:15PM-7:15PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM-6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. 75 Bowling, Marblehead Lanes, M-F, 1:00PM4:00PM. Today, Friday, August 16th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Saturday, August 17th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Sunday, August 18th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. Monday, August 19th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, August 20th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Wednesday, August 21th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 6:00PM, Mixed Volleyball Tournament, JTF-160 Commanders Cup Series, G.J. Denich Gymna sium. Thursday, August 22th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Chris Downey rappels down the tower under the watchful eye of instructor Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Melissa Steinman. Navy JO1 Christopher G. Sherwood awaits his turn. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Steinman: Rappelling is about leg work, not upper body strength. Page 3 Friday, August 16, 2002 The Naval Post Office takes care of all the mail that is dis patched on and off the base. Whether its pictures or pack ages, letters from home or detainee mail, these sailors do their best to get all mail sent here to GTMO processed, sorted and handed over to your command. And when its time to write back, these sailors get your mail over to the Leeward side and out on the next plane leaving the island. Through rain, sleet or snow and that hot GTMO sun these postal workers in Navy blue are here for you. GTMOs Postal Services Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Antwan A. Vaughn, supervisor Different customers pose different challenges. We meet all requirements by following the regulations. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Henry Charry, mail handler I do like it. We have a good working environment. If theres good teamwork, we work well. We always keep busy. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Sophia L. Humphrey, postal clerk I have fun with it. You find so many people that you dont see on the base. You meet a lot of different people. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarah L. Ladue, postal clerk I like it all right. We have a really good postal team, so there are no problems. Mail comes and goes pretty quickly. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarah L. Ladue skillfully prepares a package for shipping after weighing it to determine proper postage. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Henry Charry happily exchanges some words with a service member after handing him a bag full of mail for his command.

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Page 2 Friday, August 16, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Are you walking in the FOG, the Favor Of God? If so, then you know the feeling of being overwhelmed and encompassed by His love, guidance and beneficence. But Gods blessings, whether material or spiritual, are not intended just to help you with your own life. They are designed to help you help others and extend the kingdom of God here on earth. How? Lets look at some benefits of walking in the FOG. Favor promotes you. It will take you to higher levels of success and service. It did for Esther. One day she was an orphaned Jewish refugee. One year later she was crowned Queen of Persia. Gods favor caused Esther to gain the goodwill of everyone she met. She didnt even have to work for it. One day of Gods favor is worth a thousand days of your labor. Favor pushes open doors that otherwise would be closed to you. It puts you into posi tion for blessings. When I had just started in ministry, I had a meeting with the pastor of a large, influential church. I had prayed for favor with him and before I left his church, I was booked to preach several revivals and attend an important conference for free. What seems impossible is very possible in God. [By Cheryl H. Little, www.crosswalk.com. Adapted from The Favor Of God: Discover the FOG, by Daniel E. Barrick.] Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott OIC, Command Information: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the per sonnel within. ALERT! Last week a member of JTF-160 was hospitalized for Acute Alcohol Poisoning. As of this writing, the subject is recovering and doing well. If you are one of those people planning to party and drink yourself silly this weekend heres a few facts you should know. Most adults can drink moderate amounts of alcohol, up to two drinks per day for men and one per day for women. One drink: 12 oz. of beer, 5 oz. glass of wine, or 1.5 oz. of 80 proof liquor. Alcohol-related health problems are highest among young adults ages 18-29. Once ingested, alcohol is processed in the body through metabo lism and oxidation. Alcohol is detoxified and removed from the blood thorough oxidation, pre venting it from accumulating and destroying cells and organs in your body. The liver can metabolize only a certain amount of alcohol per hour, regard less of the amount that has been consumed. Alcohol Liver Disease (ALD) is a major cause of illness and death in the U.S. ALD includes hep atitis (persistent inflammation of the liver), and cirrhosis (progressive scarring of the liver tissue), eventually impairing the functions of other organs. Women can develop ALD after consum ing lower levels of alcohol over a shorter period of time compared to men and are more vulnerable to ALD. Many patients with ALD become infected with hepatitis-C virus (HCV), which causes a chronic and potentially fatal liver disease. A healthy and normal liver function is essential to life. Approx. 10,000-24,000 deaths from cirrhosis are attributable to alcohol abuse every year. Other side effects: In men, alcohol abuse contributes to testicular injury and impairs testosterone synthesis. Testos terone deficiency may contribute to feminization in males (i.e., breast enlargement). In women, alcohol abuse may contribute to increased production of a form of estrogen called estradiol, which contributes to increased bone density. If you are involved in an alcohol related inci dent at GTMO you may be charged with UCMJ violations! Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 Walking in a FOG NOTICE OF ARTICLE 15 ADJUDICATION A soldier was found guilty after a proceeding conducted under Article 15, UCMJ, for violations of Article 92, UCMJ, failure to obey a lawful order; to-wit: to conduct a police call of the company area; Article 92, UCMJ, dereliction of duty; and Arti cle 115, malingering. The nonjudicial punishment authority found beyond a reasonable doubt that on or about 11 June 2002 the soldier knowingly disobeyed an order from an NCO in his chain of command to conduct a police call of the company area to pick up all ciga rette butts and empty cigarette butt cans by not performing the police call and that the soldier negligently failed to have his name tag sewn on his LBV, as it was his known duty to do. The soldier also was found beyond a reasonable doubt to have feigned a muscle spasm in his back on or about 1 to 18 May 2002 while at home sta tion for purposes of avoiding training. The soldier was reduced to Private (E1), forfeited $257.10, suspended until 3 January 2003, received extra duty for 14 days, restriction for 14 days and an oral reprimand. KNOWING DISOBEDIENCE OF LAWFUL ORDERS, DERELICTION OF KNOWN DUTIES, AND MALINGERING WILL NOT BE TOLERATED Page 15 Friday, August 16, 2002 418th wins flag football opener Are you ready for some flag football, GTMO? The seasonlong gridiron battle for the GTMO Super Bowl crown began in hard-fought fashion as the 418th Transportation Company Hood Ratz defeated the 160th Military Police Battalion Chucks 14-7 in the GTMO Kick-off Clas sic on Cooper Field Monday night. The coin toss was the official start of the season. The Hood Ratz won the toss and elected to receive the ball. On the first drive of the season, the Hood Ratz charged down the field by running the ball and com pleting short passes. Soon they were on the 15-yard line and threatening to score. The Hood Ratz called a play to get Army Pfc. Jamaal Wilkins open in the end zone. The quar terback took the hike and the Chucks came with a furious blitz. The quarterback was flushed out of the pocket and he was forced into a bad throw to the end zone. The ball was intercepted by the Chucks, who came right back the other way. Army Sgt. Emil Ganim was the quarterback and the head of the running attack for the Chucks. Ganim broke free for a 36-yard run and was stopped on the 4yard line. It was third down and Ganim went for all the marbles. He threw a pass into the end zone where Wilkins was able to pick-off the pass. Both teams were playing tough defense and the game was deadlocked at 0-0. Finally, the Hood Ratz were able to strike first. Army Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan, the quarterback for Hood Ratz, threw a 43-yard pass to Wilkins for the first touch down of the GFL (GTMO Flag Football League) season. It was not a called play, but the whole side was open so we took advantage of the defense, said Ronan. The Hood Ratz were celebrat ing in the end zone as the score was now 7-0. It felt good scoring the first touchdown of the season. Ronan and me will connect for many more this season, said Wilkins. Ganim came out on the field determined to score and bring his team back on their second drive. They were moving the ball with sweeps and short passes. Hood Ratz made a mistake on defense and Ganim made them pay with a 38-yard pass to Army Pfc. Jerald D. Murphy. The Hood Ratz defense got tough in the red zone and was able to force another turnover. Both defenses were able to stop one another for the rest of the first half. They have a good team, said Ronan. They were better than I thought. At halftime we talked about defense, he said. That is what wins games. The players were missing too many flags. They were not making plays, said Ronan. In the second half, the Chucks seemed to be able to drive down the field at will, but when they would get near the end zone the Hood Ratz were somehow able to stop them. One drive seemed over when Ganim, under pressure from an all-out blitz, threw another inter ception. But wait there was a flag on the field. The referee called roughing the passer; the Chucks had new life. They capitalized by putting six on the scoreboard and the extra point was good. The game was now tied at seven. The clock was becoming a fac tor in the game. With about five minutes left, Ronan seemed to put the team on his shoulders. He was making plays, running the football and completing his passes. With about three minutes left, the Hood Ratz scored to go ahead in the game. They took a 14-7 lead. The Chucks Ganim went on the field with a vigorous energy. His mission was to bring his team back. The clock was running down. And on the first play of the drive, he completed a 40-yard pass to Murphy. But as the Chucks got close to the goal line, the Hood Ratz slowed them down with great defensive plays. First, the Chucks called a quar terback option that played right into the Hood Ratzs hands when Ganim handed off the ball. I was committed to the handoff; if the quarterback would have kept the ball, he would have been gone for the touchdown, said one of the Hood Ratz, Army Spc. Allen Lamar. The Chucks had less than two minutes on the game clock. It was fourth down. They had one more play left. Ganim screamed, Hike and he scrambled to his right. Look ing down the field, he spotted Murphy opened in the end zone. He threw the ball down field as Murphy was getting ready to catch the football. Army Spc. William Whittenburg leaped and deflected the football to save the game for the Hood Ratz. I was just doing my best. Playing the cornerback position is tough and I am small, so you have to do whatever it takes to be suc cessful. I am glad I stopped a potential touchdown, said Whit tenburg. That defensive play put the nail in the coffin for the Chucks on Monday, but the season has just begun. There are seventeen teams that will duel to the finish until there is a champion declared. There are two divisions in the league; we have the monstrous Midwest and the crushing Cen tral. Each team will play a total of twelve games in the season, said Donnell Daniel, the Athletic Director for Morale, Welfare and Recreation on base. When the season comes to an end, we will take the top four teams in each division and they will play a dou ble elimination tournament for the championship crown. The Hood Ratzs quest is just beginning. It was a good game, and I am looking forward to the next one. I am just glad we pulled out a win said Ronan. But we need to get better if we want to win the GTMO Super Bowl. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Staff Sgt.Joseph K. Ronan throws a 43 yard pass to Army Spc Jamaal Wilkins for the first touchdown of the GFL season. The Hood Ratz quarterback Staff Sgt. Joseph K. Ronan scrambles from the pocket and runs for 15 yards on that play to put his team in scoring position.

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All that separates Naval Station Guan tanamo Bay from communist Cuba and the possibility of terrorist attacks is a fence. And along that 17.4-mile fence line, their profes sionalism and vigilance keep GTMO safe from harm. Guarding the border between GTMO and Cuba are the Marine reservists from Texas serving in Marine Corps Security Force Company, DET A, Bravo Company 123. And make no mistake; these reservists have a full-time job. Basically, we protect the fence line and do reconnaissance 24 hours a day, seven days a week, said Sgt. Jose Diaz, sergeant of the guard with MCSF Co. We accomplish our mission through the guards keeping watch in the many Marine Observation Points along the fence line and also through the foot and mounted patrols, which are conducted 24 hours a day. Between the guards in the MOPs and the Marines on constant patrol, there is very little that they miss, according to Diaz. But the MOPs, which are the guard towers you can see peppered across the northern GTMO hori zon, are what really allow the Marines to carry out their mission. In the MOPs, they observe just about any thing and everything the Cubans do, said Diaz. And the Cubans on the other side do the same to us. I dont blame them. We look at them, so why cant they look at us? But I dont think they do as good a job as we do. Were more disciplined. I have faith in those Marines in the MOPs and out on patrol. Theyre pretty observant and really detailed as to whats going on. Attention to detail is everything within the MOP, for the security of the entire base could be compromised if a vigilant eye is not kept on Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Guarding GTMO from attack Friday, August 16, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 10 Story and photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire A look inside... Marine Corps Security Force Company stays on line to ensure base is safe Lance Cpl. Clayton Harbich, machine gunner with MCSF Co., stands watch at a Marine Observation Point. Page 8 Page 6 Page 15 See GUARDING, page 5 Page 16 Friday, August 16, 2002 With Army Sgt. Stacey K. Lewis Q: How do you feel about being this weeks 15 minutes of fame? A: Embarrassed! I dont usually talk about myself. Q: Its easy. So, how would you describe yourself? A: Im outgoing and personable. Q: Come on. Everybody says that. Whats your philosophy of life? A: Work hard, play hard. Q: Everybody says that too. Do you have any unique hobbies or talents? A: Hmm... Not really. I am just me. Q: Lets try some basics. What unit are you with, and how long have you been here? A: Im with the 178th MP Company, and Ive been here for about two months. Q: Where do you work? A: I work at the Joint Aid Station. I like it I like working for people from different backgrounds, learning new things. I like tak ing care of the soldiers. Q: And for fun? A: Sports or the gym. I like playing volley ball; I played a little intramural during college. Q: And where do you live? A: I live over at Camp Bulkeley. Q: How do you like it over there? A: I dont mind it. Im settled in and nest ing, so to speak. Well, at least we have regular showers, not the push-button kind. Q: How do you and your roommates get along? A: Theyre a good group of girls. Q: How do you feel about the mission? A: I think it is a great mission. Everyone is working very hard and being professional. Q: Hmm. Whats something strange that has happened to you since youve been here? A: Unexpected guests in the shower. Iguanas, and various other types of wildlife. There are actually birds nesting in our shower-room. One day, one swooped down and scared the heck out of me. Q: What do you like about being here? A: Ive met a lot of interesting people here. Ive met people from all different backgrounds and walks of life. Q: What from home do you miss the most? A: Id have to say JoJo. My dog. Q: So, how would you normally spend a well-deserved day off on GTMO? A: At the pool relaxing and unwinding. Id like to get down to the Marina and give fishing or snorkeling a try, although, Id probably just sink. Q: If you could speak to someone who was about to deploy to GTMO, what would you tell him or her? A: This place is what you make of it. You can have fun with it or make it miserable. Patience and tolerance are virtues to practice here. Q: What do you do when GTMO gets you down? A: It sounds silly, but my roommate and I listen to Its a Great Day by Travis Tritt. It always seems to boost our mood. Q: If you could change one thing here, what would it be? A: I would just like to see the MPs receive more recognition and appreciation for all their outstanding hard work and professionalism. Q: Its a deal. Anything to say in closing? A: Since Ive been here, Ive met a lot of great people. Across the board Ive seen noth ing but hard working professionals. I am proud to have met and to work with everyone here. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Sgt. Stacey K. Lewis, on fame: I dont usually talk about myself. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire 15 minutes on the quiet side